Title:
Sliced and cut diamond national jewelry
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Jewelry containing at least one stone being specifically cut for replicating a shape of a country of origin of a wearer. The jewelry includes a setting and a stone. The stone is set in the setting, and is specifically cut for replicating the shape of the country of origin of the wearer of the article of jewelry.



Inventors:
Sacheti, Kushal (New York, NY, US)
Application Number:
12/386475
Publication Date:
10/29/2009
Filing Date:
04/16/2009
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
63/32
International Classes:
A44C17/02; A44C17/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
REESE, DAVID C
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
CHARLES E. BAXLEY, ESQUIRE (NEW YORK, NY, US)
Claims:
The invention claimed is:

1. Jewelry containing at least one stone being specifically cut for replicating a shape of a country of origin of a wearer, comprising: a) a setting; and b) a stone; wherein said stone is set in said setting; and wherein said stone is specifically cut for replicating the shape of the country of origin of the wearer of said article of jewelry.

2. The jewelry of claim 1, wherein said stone is a precious gem.

3. The jewelry of claim 2, wherein said precious gem is a diamond.

4. The jewelry of claim 1, wherein said jewelry is selected from the group consisting of a pendant, a necklace, earrings, a bracelet, a watch casing, a badge, a belt buckle, a pin, and a ring.

Description:

1. THE CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

The instant nonprovisional patent application claims priority from provisional patent application No. 61/125,616, filed on Apr. 25, 2008, entitled SLICED AND CUT DIAMOND NATIONAL JEWELRY, and incorporated herein by reference thereto.

2. THE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

A. The Field of the Invention

The embodiments of the present invention relate to jewelry, and more particularly, the embodiments of the present invention relate to jewelry containing at least one stone being specifically cut for replicating a shape of a country of origin of a wearer.

B. The Description of the Prior Art

The population of the United States includes many immigrants. Immigrants from a country of origin could be extremely proud of their heritage. The immigrants may desire to display their country of origin with at least one diamond stone defining the map perimeter shape that is representative of their country of origin.

Numerous innovations for diamond processing have been provided in the prior art, which will be described below in chronological order to show advancement of the art, and which is incorporated herein by reference thereto. Even though these innovations may be suitable for the individual purposes which they address, nevertheless, they differ from the embodiments of the present invention in that they do not teach jewelry containing at least one stone being specifically cut for replicating a shape of a country of origin of a wearer.

(1) The U.S. Pat. No. 4,417,564 to Lawrence et al.

The U.S. Pat. No. 4,417,564 issued to Lawrence et al. on Nov. 29, 1983 in U.S. class 125 and subclass 30.01 teaches a rough gem stone centered by mounting the stone on a dop, providing an image of the stone, as seen normal to the axis, providing a reference shape that corresponds to the shape of a cut stone, superimposing the stone image and the reference shape, altering the size of one relative to the other until the reference shape corresponds to the stone that can be cut from the rough stone, and altering the position of the rough stone until the stone image registers correctly with the reference shape. In a method of working the stone, the final radial dimension to which the stone is to be worked is estimated and is used for terminating working when the actual radial dimension reaches the corresponding value.

(2) The U.S. Pat. No. 5,462,474 to Hansen.

The U.S. Pat. No. 5,462,474 issued to Hansen on Oct. 31, 1995 in U.S. class 451 and subclass 41 teaches a method, and product from the method, of faceting a gemstone in which the facets, when combined with the polishing/non-polishing of the facet form an image, such as the Star-of-David. The image is visible when viewed through the table of the gem. On one end of a clear or substantially clear gemstone, a series of facets are made, which combine to create lines and boundaries. Through selective polishing of the facets, usually as they are made, some of the facets so created are darker and more visible than the others. These darker facets assist in forming the Star-of-David, or other image, visible through the table of the finished gemstone.

(3) The U.S. Pat. No. 6,591,827 to Fuchs.

The U.S. Pat. No. 6,591,827 issued to Fuchs on Jul. 15, 2003 in U.S. class 125 and subclass 30.01 teaches a method for preparing a diamond having a six-pointed-star shaped girdle, including providing a round diamond, and grooving six equally spaced, equally-sized triangularly-shaped 120° angled grooves in the girdle of the round diamond. A grooving machine includes a dop. The dop may be rotated between six equally-spaced stops.

(4) The U.S. Pat. No. 6,913,009 to Shuto.

The U.S. Pat. No. 6,913,009 issued to Shuto on Jul. 5, 2005 in U.S. class 125 and subclass 30.01 teaches a diamond cutting method including the steps of forming a square or rectangular table in a piece of gemstone, forming a pavilion continuous to the table by cutting vertically from each side of the square or rectangular table to define the four lower-girdle facets, and by cutting obliquely from each corner of the square or rectangular table to the culet of the pavilion to form four lower-main facets, whereby the upper opposite sides of each lower-main facet adjoining the adjacent lower-girdle facets whereas the lower opposite sides of each lower-main facet adjoining the confronting lower opposite sides of the adjacent lower-main facets. An enneahedral-cut diamond thus produced is a table-and-pavilion structure permitting plural diamonds to be arranged side-by-side as a whole with their square or rectangular tables directed inward or outward.

(5) The U.S. Pat. No. 6,915,663 to Shuto.

The U.S. Pat. No. 6,915,663 issued to Shuto on Jul. 12, 2005 in U.S. class 63 and subclass 32 teaches a diamond cutting method including the steps of forming a square or rectangular table in a piece of gemstone, forming a pavilion continuous to the table by cutting vertically from each side of the square or rectangular table to define the four lower-girdle facets, and by cutting obliquely from each corner of the square or rectangular table to the culet of the pavilion to form four lower-main facets, whereby the upper opposite sides of each lower-main facet adjoining the adjacent lower-girdle facets whereas the lower opposite sides of each lower-main facet adjoining the confronting lower opposite sides of the adjacent lower-main facets. An enneahedral-cut diamond thus produced is a table-and-pavilion structure, permitting plural diamonds to be arranged side-by-side as a whole with their square or rectangular tables directed inward or outward.

(6) The U.S. Pat. No. 7,000,607 to Davidi.

The U.S. Pat. No. 7,000,607 issued to Davidi on Feb. 21, 2006 in U.S. class 125 and subclass 30.01 teaches a gemstone having a crown, a girdle, and a pavilion, and a method for cutting the gemstone. The girdle is shaped so that when viewed in plan view, it is primarily bounded by four pairs of parallel straight edges. Three of the four pairs of edges are spaced by roughly equal spacing D1, while the remaining pair of edges is spaced by a spacing D2. D2 is greater than D1 by between 10% and 40%.

(7) The U.S. Pat. No. 7,228,856 to Aoyagi.

The U.S. Pat. No. 7,228,856 issued to Aoyagi on Jun. 12, 2007 in U.S. class 125 and subclass 30.01 teaches ten of the pavilion main facets are formed with reference to the previously formed five of the first pavilion main facets in which an initial first main facet is formed in a position centered on a line shifted approximately fifteen degrees from the ridge of the raw diamond on the pavilion side. Ten of the pavilion main facets radiate from the curette, and twenty of lower girdle facets are formed between the adjacent pavilion main facets on the pavilion side of the diamond.

It is apparent that numerous innovations for diamond processing have been provided in the prior art, which are adapted to be used. Furthermore, even though these innovations may be suitable for the specific individual purposes to which they address, however, they would not be suitable for the purposes of the embodiments of the present invention as heretofore described, namely, jewelry containing at least one stone being specifically cut for replicating a shape of a country of origin of a wearer.

3. THE SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Thus, an object of the embodiments of the present invention is to provide jewelry containing at least one stone being specifically cut for replicating a shape of a country of origin of a wearer, which avoids the disadvantages of the prior art.

Briefly stated, another object of the embodiments of the present invention is to provide jewelry containing at least one stone being specifically cut for replicating a shape of a country of origin of a wearer. The jewelry includes a setting and a stone. The stone is set in the setting, and is specifically cut for replicating the shape of the country of origin of the wearer of the article of jewelry.

The novel features considered characteristic of the embodiments of the present invention are set forth in the appended claims. The embodiments of the present invention themselves, however, both as to their construction and their method of operation together with additional objects and advantages thereof will be best understood from the following description of the specific embodiments when read and understood in connection with the accompanying drawing.

4. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING

The sole FIGURE of the drawing is a diagrammatic elevational view of a pin of the jewelry of the embodiments of the present invention containing at least one stone being specifically cut for replicating a shape of a country of origin of a wearer.

5. LIST OF REFERENCE NUMERALS UTILIZED IN THE DRAWING

A. General.

  • 10 jewelry of embodiments of present invention 10 containing at least one stone 12 being specifically cut for replicating shape 14 of country 16 of origin 18 of wearer 20
  • 12 at least one stone being specifically cut for replicating shape 14 of country 16 of origin 18 of wearer 20
  • 14 shape of country 16 of origin 18 of wearer 20
  • 16 country of origin 18 of wearer 20
  • 18 origin 18 of wearer 20
  • 20 wearer

B. Configuration of jewelry 10.

  • 22 setting

6. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

A. General.

It is feasible to slice rough stones. It is also feasible to cut slices of the stones into prescribed shapes with varying parameters. The parameters and size of the slice can be both customized or standardized. The embodiments of the present invention involve slicing and cutting stones in manufacturing or marketing of unique pieces of jewelry.

By way of example, consider that the population of the United States includes many immigrants. An immigrant from a country of origin could be extremely proud of his or her heritage. The immigrant may desire to display his or her country of origin with one or more slices of a stone defining a map perimeter shape or other shape that is signatory of his or her country of origin.

By slicing and cutting a stone into the shape of the immigrant's country of origin, a very marketable article of jewelry can be produced. The product produced can be a pendant, a necklace, earrings, a bracelet, a watch casing, a badge, a belt buckle, a pin, a ring, etc.

Referring now to the sole FIGURE, which is a diagrammatic elevational view of a pin of the jewelry of the embodiments of the present invention containing at least one stone being specifically cut for replicating a shape of a country of origin of a wearer, the jewelry of the embodiments of the present invention is shown generally at 10 containing at least one stone 12 being specifically cut for replicating a shape 14 of a country 16 of origin 18 of a wearer 20.

B. The Configuration of the Jewelry 10.

The jewelry 10 includes a setting 22 and the stone 12. The stone 12 is set in the setting 22, and is specifically cut for replicating the shape 14 of the country 16 of origin 18 of the wearer 20 of the jewelry 10.

The stone 12 is a precious gem, such as a diamond.

The jewelry 10 is selected from group consisting of a pendant, a necklace, earrings, a bracelet, a watch casing, a badge, a belt buckle, a pin, a ring, etc.

C. The Impressions.

It will be understood that each of the elements described above or two or more together may also find a useful application in other types of constructions differing from the types described above.

While the embodiments of the present invention have been illustrated and described as embodied in sliced and cut diamond national jewelry, however, they are not limited to the details shown, since it will be understood that various omissions, modifications, substitutions, and changes in the forms and details of the embodiments of the present invention illustrated and their operation can be made by those skilled in the art without departing in any way from the spirit of the embodiments of the present invention.

Without further analysis the foregoing will so fully reveal the gist of the embodiments of the present invention that others can by applying current knowledge readily adapt them for various applications without omitting features that from the standpoint of prior art fairly constitute characteristics of the generic or specific aspects of the embodiments of the present invention.