Title:
Shoe and Sandal Footwear Combination
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Shoes are described herein for receiving the foot of a wearer, the foot having a sole portion and an upper portion, including: a sole segment; and an upper conforming segment, wherein the upper segment is coupled to the sole segment and conforms to the surface of the upper portion of the foot of the wearer and comprises at least one opening wherein at least a portion of the foot is exposed and allowed to breathe.



Inventors:
Goldberg, Franne (Beverly Hills, CA, US)
Application Number:
12/359013
Publication Date:
10/29/2009
Filing Date:
01/23/2009
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
36/45, 36/25R
International Classes:
A43B3/12; A43B13/00; A43B23/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
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20090260260Flip-Flop Type Shoes and Method of Fastening Straps on the Soles of Flip-Flop Type ShoesOctober, 2009Whitaker et al.
20100050472STABILIZING INSOLE AND METHOD FOR USING THE STABILIZING INSOLEMarch, 2010Tzeng et al.
20080295360Footwear Structure with Improved ComfortablenessDecember, 2008Gazzola
20060174517Shoe having a waterproof underliningAugust, 2006Chang
20020189131Cancealed air breathing structure of shoe soleDecember, 2002Chang
20070039211Orthotic insert having recess for therapeutic patchFebruary, 2007Pichler
20070094891Ventilated shoeMay, 2007Myslinski
20050235524Structure of wound-healing insoleOctober, 2005Huang



Primary Examiner:
MOHANDESI, JILA M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
BUCHALTER (IRVINE, CA, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A shoe for receiving the foot of a wearer, the foot having a sole portion and an upper portion, comprising: a sole segment; and an upper conforming segment, wherein the upper segment is coupled to the sole segment and conforms to the surface of the upper portion of the foot of the wearer and comprises at least one opening wherein at least a portion of the foot is exposed and allowed to breathe.

2. The shoe of claim 1, wherein the upper conforming segment comprises a plurality of openings.

3. The shoe of claim 1, wherein the upper conforming segment comprises fabric or material.

4. The shoe of claim 3, wherein the upper conforming segment comprises natural fabric, synthetic fabric or a combination thereof.

5. The shoe of claim 3, wherein the upper conforming segment comprises denim, silk, cotton, polyester, rayon., neoprene, linen, velvet, leather, spandex, lycra, suede or any combination thereof.

6. The shoe of claim 1, wherein the sole segment comprises natural material, synthetic material or a combination thereof.

7. The shoe of claim 6, wherein the sole segment comprises rubber, polymer, wood or wood materials, recycled materials, layered cardboard or paper, cork and any other suitable material or combination thereof.

8. The shoe of claim 1, wherein the upper conforming segment comprises a length.

9. The shoe of claim 8, wherein the length is designed to stretch from the foot of the wearer upward toward the knee.

10. The shoe of claim 9, wherein the length comprises ankle length or low-top, mid-calf length, knee length or thigh length.

11. The shoe of claim 1, wherein the upper segment, the sole segment or a combination thereof comprise a design.

12. The shoe of claim 1, wherein the at least one of the at least one opening is located at the back of the shoe wherein the heel of the foot is exposed.

13. The shoe of claim 1, wherein the sole segment comprises a heel of at least one inch in height.

14. The shoe of claim 1, wherein the sole segment comprises a heel of at least two inches in height.

15. The shoe of claim 1, wherein the sole segment comprises a wedge heel.

16. The shoe of claim 1, wherein the sole segment comprises a plurality of layers.

17. The shoe of claim 16, wherein the plurality of layers comprises a t least two different types of materials.

Description:

This application is a United States Utility Application claiming priority to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 61/047220 filed on Apr. 23, 2008, which is commonly-owned and incorporated herein in its entirety.

FIELD OF THE SUBJECT MATTER

The field of the subject matter is a shoe and sandal footwear combination, methods of production and uses thereof. Specifically, contemplated footwear can be used by children—both boys and girls, and adults—both men and women.

BACKGROUND

Shoes and sandals have been in the marketplace for years and there's no shortage of modifications to each design. Shoes are generally designed to have a sole and an upper—where the upper is attached to the sole with the only opening being where the foot is inserted. Sandals have a sole, but then combine the sole with a combination of straps. The sole of a sandal is usually thin, not cushioned and sometimes has heels.

One recent design is the athletic sandal that has the sole of an athletic shoe, but the straps of a sandal. While this design might be comfortable to the bottom of the foot, the straps rub against the skin, cause blisters and are usually made out of a polymer-based material, such as nylon.

Another construction design with both shoes and sandals is that they generally require a mechanism to tighten the shoe or sandal onto the foot—such as shoe strings, buckles, VELCRO® straps or elastic straps. In these designs, the user is required to spend a portion of time putting the shoe/sandal on the foot and then tightening the shoe/sandal.

Another fashion item that is considered footwear is a sock. Socks are made out of a number of fabrics and materials, are easily slipped onto feet and are held onto the foot by a woven or knit fabric that conforms itself to the foot and leg. Many socks also have an elastic band around the top of the sock, which helps to hold the sock into place during walking, running or otherwise moving. Socks are not designed to be worn in a variety of locations, such as outdoors or in public areas, without shoes or sandals, primarily because the bottom of the sock isn't reinforced with a sole. In addition, most socks are not designed to be worn during hot weather, because while some sock fabrics breathe, they do not significantly allow the foot to breathe and cool.

Therefore, it would be ideal to produce a piece of footwear that combines the utility of a shoe, with the ease and flexibility of a sock, while at the same time the openness of a sandal. Surprisingly, a novel piece of footwear has, in fact, been created that does merge the benefits of the three previously-mentioned pieces of footwear into one complete and flexible piece of footwear.

SUMMARY OF THE SUBJECT MATTER

Shoes are described herein for receiving the foot of a wearer, the foot having a sole portion and an upper portion, including: a sole segment; and an upper conforming segment, wherein the upper segment is coupled to the sole segment and conforms to the surface of the upper portion of the foot of the wearer and comprises at least one opening wherein at least a portion of the foot is exposed and allowed to breathe.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

FIG. 1 shows a contemplated embodiment design.

FIG. 2 shows a contemplated embodiment design.

FIGS. 3A and 3B show two contemplated embodiment designs.

FIGS. 4A and 4B shows two views of a contemplated embodiment design.

FIG. 5 shows a contemplated embodiment design.

FIGS. 6A and 6B show two contemplated embodiment designs.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

As discussed earlier, it would be ideal to produce a piece of footwear that combines the utility of a shoe, with the ease and flexibility of a sock, while at the same time the openness of a sandal. Surprisingly, a novel piece of footwear has, in fact, been created that does merge the benefits of the three previously-mentioned pieces of footwear into one complete and flexible piece of footwear.

Shoes are described herein for receiving the foot of a wearer, the foot having a sole portion and an upper portion, including: a sole segment; and an upper conforming segment, wherein the upper segment is coupled to the sole segment and conforms to the surface of the upper portion of the foot of the wearer and comprises at least one opening wherein at least a portion of the foot is exposed and allowed to breathe. In many contemplated embodiments, there are a plurality of openings in the upper segment, wherein the front portion of the foot that comprises the toes is exposed, along with at least a portion of the heel of the foot.

The sole portion of the foot is generally considered to be the bottom of the foot or the portion that makes contact with the floor surface or ground. The upper portion of the foot is generally considered to be that portion of the foot that is not the sole portion. The surface of the upper portion of the foot is considered to be that portion of the foot that is exposed to the environment, which would generally exclude the surface area between the toes.

The sole segment and the upper segment are coupled to one another via any suitable material or method, including binding, stitching, inserting a portion of the upper segment into the sole segment, affixing or adhering the upper segment to the sole segment or a combination thereof.

In some embodiments, contemplated footwear comprises a sole segment and an upper segment, wherein the upper segment allows the footwear to be pulled onto to foot like a sock. In contemplated embodiments, the upper section may have any length stretching up the leg—including ankle length or low-top, mid-calf length, knee length, thigh length or can be structured in a manner similar to panty hose.

Contemplated upper segments comprise at least one, and in many cases a plurality, of openings where the foot is allowed to breathe. Contemplated upper segments may be made out of any suitable fabric or material, including recycled materials. Contemplated fabric choices may include natural or synthetic fabric, including denim, silk, cotton, polyester, rayon, neoprene, linen, velvet, leather, spandex, lycra, suede or any combination thereof.

In some embodiments, a contemplated upper segment comprises portions that are bound and/or stitched/top stitched in order to prevent wear and/or fraying on the upper segment. In addition, this binding and/or stitching may also be considered decorative for the upper segment by introducing a new color, texture or pattern to the upper segment. In some embodiments, the binding and/or stitching is both functional and decorative. In other embodiments, the binding and/or stitching is either functional or decorative.

The at least one opening or a plurality of openings in the upper segment may comprise any suitable shape or form, such: as allowing for the heel, the top of the foot or at least some of the toes to be exposed. The shape and location of the opening may be purely functional, as previously described, or may be shaped and/or located to be decorative and functional at the same time. The openings may be reinforced by stitching or other methods, such as an elastic cord or thread.

Contemplated sole segments may comprise any suitable design, including athletic soles, hard soles, flat soles, high-heel soles, wedge and clog-type soles and other suitable soles. In some embodiments, the heel portion of the sole segment may be at least one inch high. In other embodiments, the heel portion of the sole segment may be higher than two inches. In other embodiments, the sole segment may comprise a plurality of layers, wherein at least one of the layers is designed to be a “comfort layer” or a porous layer that is used to promote antibacterial environments. In embodiments where the sole segment comprises layered materials, it is contemplated that the layers may comprise the same or different materials.

It should be understood that contemplated sole segments may comprise any soles that are found on women's, men's or children's shoes. In addition, contemplated sole segments may comprise any suitable materials. Contemplated sole segments may be made out of any suitable sole material, natural or synthetic, including rubber, polymer, recycled materials, wood or wood materials, such as layered cardboard or paper, cork and any other suitable material or combination thereof.

The upper segment and/or sole segment may comprise any suitable design. These designs may comprise nonsensical or random designs, may comprise logos, trademarks or expressions, or a combination thereof. For example, a company may produce jeans and then produce a line of coordinated footwear, some of which contain the logo of the company, some of which contain a random design and some of which contain a tag line with a random design. It should be clear that the designs and combinations of these designs are only limited by the creativity of the designer or company producing the footwear.

The designs contemplated may be a part of the design of the fabric, may be applied to a blank piece of fabric or may be a combination of both. The upper segment and/or sole segment may also comprise any suitable decorative material, such as stitching, beads, jewels, metallic pieces and chains, buttons, zippers or combinations thereof.

FIGS. 1-6 show several contemplated embodiments of this footwear, but it should be understood that there are many designs of sole segments and upper segments that fit within the concept of the contemplated footwear.

FIG. 1 shows a contemplated embodiment of a shoe 100 as described herein. In this figure, the sole segment 110 and upper segment 120 is shown, wherein the upper segment 120 is coupled to the sole segment 110. A plurality of openings 130 is shown, which differentiates this contemplated shoe from other prior art shoes. Also, in this figure, the upper segment 120 comprises a length portion 140 that allows the upper segment to reach to and possibly over the ankle of the wearer and up toward the knee (not shown). Stitching 150 of the upper segment 120 is also shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 2 shows a back view of a contemplated embodiment of a shoe 200, as described herein. In this figure, the sole segment 210 and upper segment 220 is shown, wherein the upper segment 220 is coupled to the sole segment 210. One opening 230 is shown, wherein this opening 230 is designed to expose the heel of the foot (not shown). Also, in this figure, the upper segment 220 comprises a length portion 240 that allows the upper segment to reach to and possibly over the ankle of the wearer and up toward the knee (not shown). Binding 250 of the upper segment 220 is also shown in FIG. 2. A finish band 260 is also shown, wherein the finish band 260 acts to bind the top of the upper segment 220. In this embodiment, the upper segment is made of stretch fabric, cotton spandex, spandex, seamless stretch fabric or a combination thereof.

FIGS. 3A and 36 show two contemplated embodiments of a shoe 300, as described herein. In this figure, the sole segment 310 and upper segment 320 is shown, wherein the upper segment 320 is coupled to the sole segment 310. A plurality of openings 330 are shown, wherein these openings 330 are designed-to expose portions of the foot 335 Also, in this figure, the upper segment 320 comprises a length portion 340 that allows the upper segment to reach to and possibly over the ankle of the wearer and up toward the knee (not shown). Binding 350 of the upper segment 320 is also shown in FIG. 3A. Stitching 355 of the upper segment 320 is shown in FIG. 36. A finish band 360 is also shown, wherein the finish band 360 acts to bind the top of the upper segment 320. In this embodiment, the upper segment is made of stretch fabric, cotton spandex, spandex, seamless stretch fabric or a combination thereof.

FIGS. 4A and 4B show a contemplated embodiment of a shoe 400 from the front/side perspective (4A) and the back perspective (4B), as described herein. In this figure, the sole segment 410 and upper segment 420 is shown, wherein the upper segment 420 is coupled to the sole segment 410. A plurality of openings 430 are shown, wherein these openings 430 are designed to expose portions of the foot (not shown). Also, in this figure, the upper segment 420 comprises a length portion 440 that allows the upper segment to reach to and possibly over the ankle of the wearer and up toward the knee (not shown). Binding 450 and stitching 455 of the upper segment 420is also shown in FIG. 4A. FIG. 5 shows the contemplated shoe 500 of FIG. 4A whereby the foot 535 of a wearer is shown. In this figure, the sole segment 510 and upper segment 520 is shown, wherein the upper segment 520 is coupled to the sole segment 510. A plurality of openings 530 are shown, wherein these openings 530 are designed to expose portions of the foot 535. Binding 550 of the upper segment 520 is also shown.

FIGS. 6A and 6B show two contemplated embodiments of a shoe 600, as described herein. In this figure, the sole segment 610 and upper segment 620 is shown, wherein the upper segment 620 is coupled to the sole segment 610. A plurality of openings 630 is shown, wherein these openings 630 are designed to expose portions of the foot 635. Also, in this figure, the upper segment 620 comprises a length portion 640 that allows the upper segment to reach to and possibly over the ankle of the wearer and up toward the knee (not shown). Binding 650 of the upper segment 620 is also shown. A finish band 660 is also shown, wherein the finish band 660 acts to bind the top of the upper segment 620. FIG. 6A shows that the sole segment 610 comprises a heel portion 615. FIG. 6B shows that the sole segment 610 comprises a wedge-heel portion 618. In this embodiment, the upper segment is made of stretch fabric, cotton spandex, spandex, seamless stretch fabric or a combination thereof. The heels in these embodiments may comprise any suitable material, combination of materials, layers of materials or combinations thereof.

Thus, specific embodiments and applications of shoe and sandal footwear combinations and their methods of production have been disclosed. It should be apparent, however, to those skilled in the art that many more modifications besides those already described are possible without departing from the inventive concepts herein. The inventive subject matter, therefore, is not to be restricted except in the spirit of the disclosure herein. Moreover, in interpreting the disclosure, all terms should be interpreted in the broadest possible manner consistent with the context. In particular, the terms “comprises” and “comprising” should be interpreted as referring to elements, components, or steps in a non-exclusive manner, indicating that the referenced elements, components, or steps may be present, or utilized, or combined with other elements, components, or steps that are not expressly referenced.