Title:
Fix Holder, Steel Wire, Bricks, and Bricks Walls Reinforcement Method Thereby
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Disclosed is a method for reinforcing a block masonry wall of blocks by use of a fixture, fixture holder, and deformed steel wire. The fixture holder has a hollow pipe shape and includes six blade receptacles protruding outward from a periphery thereof by a predetermined distance. The blade receptacles are spirally formed in a longitudinal direction of the fixture holder by a predetermined pitch. The deformed steel wire has an approximately regular-polygonal longitudinal direction thereof by a constant pitch. The deformed steel wire includes an intersectional connecting portion and/or beam connection loop. A block used in the reinforcing method includes a center hole and a side surface groove, and further includes first and second side holes at opposite sides of the center hole. The side surface groove is formed only at one side surface or either side surface of the block. All the holes have a rounded rectangular shape. The masonry wall reinforcing method includes the steps of: connecting a horizontally extending basic deformed steel wire to a vertically extending intersectional connection type deformed steel wire and covering them with mortar; and connecting a fixture holder, which is oriented toward an inner wall, to the vertically extending intersectional connection type deformed steel wire and covering them with mortar. A beam block reinforcing method includes the steps of: laying a row of beam blocks such that holes of the beam blocks horizontally communicate with one another, and penetrating a first deformed steel wire through the holes of the beam blocks; and horizontally disposing a second deformed steel wire on upper surfaces of the beam blocks.



Inventors:
Lee, Yan Sup (Seoul, KR)
Application Number:
12/227588
Publication Date:
10/22/2009
Filing Date:
05/23/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/568, 52/607, 52/747.12
International Classes:
E04B1/02; E04B1/08; E04C1/39
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
A, PHI DIEU TRAN
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
NATH, GOLDBERG & MEYER (Alexandria, VA, US)
Claims:
1. A method for reinforcing a masonry wall comprising: connecting a horizontally extending basic deformed steel wire to a vertically extending intersectional connection type deformed steel wire and covering them with mortar; connecting a fixture holder, which is oriented toward an inner wall, to the vertically extending intersectional connection type deformed steel wire and covering them with mortar; laying blocks; and connecting a fixture to the fixture holder by press-fitting the fixture into the inner wall through the fixture holder oriented toward the inner wall.

2. The method according to claim 1, wherein an end of the vertically extending intersectional connection type deformed steel wire or the horizontally extending basic deformed steel wire, which is located near the ground, ceiling, or lateral wall surface of a building, is longitudinally connected and fixed, by use of the fixture holder, to the fixture that is press-fitted into the ground, ceiling, or lateral wall surface.

3. The method according to claim 1, wherein the intersectional connection type deformed steel wire includes one or two intersectional connecting portions, and each intersectional connecting portion is formed by circularly bending a portion of the deformed steel wire in a lateral direction such that the fixture holder or deformed steel wire is inserted into the intersectional connecting portion.

4. The method according to claim 3, wherein, when the intersectional connection type deformed steel wire includes first and second intersectional connecting portions, the first and second intersectional connecting portions being disposed in different planes perpendicular to each other and spaced apart from each other by a distance equal to the height of a single block.

5. The method according to claim 1, wherein: each deformed steel wire has an approximately regular-polygonal cross section, and is spirally twisted in a longitudinal direction thereof by a constant pitch; the fixture holder has an elongated hollow pipe shape, and includes six blade receptacles protruding outward from a periphery of the fixture holder, the blade receptacles being spirally formed in a longitudinal direction of the fixture holder by a predetermined pitch; and the fixture holder connects two deformed steel wires to each other in a longitudinal direction of the deformed steel wires via both ends of the fixture holder.

6. The method according to claim 1, wherein: each block includes a center hole and a side surface groove, and the center hole has substantially the same shape as a shape defined by two facing side surface grooves spaced apart from each other by a distance equal to the width of a masonry joint; and upon the laying of blocks, the vertically extending deformed steel wire is penetrated through the center hole of a block and the space defined by the two facing side surface grooves of an underlying block in sequence.

7. The method according to claim 6, wherein the center hole and the space defined by the two facing side surface grooves have a rounded rectangular shape.

8. The method according to claim 6, wherein each block includes a single side surface groove formed only at one side surface thereof or a pair of side surface grooves formed, respectively, at both side surfaces thereof.

9. The method according to claim 6, wherein each block further includes a first side hole and a second side hole formed, respectively, at opposite sides of the center hole, and the first and second side holes have a rounded rectangular shape.

10. The method according to claim 3, wherein, to connect the fixture holder to the intersectional connecting portion of the intersectional connection type deformed steel wire, after inserting the fixture holder into the intersectional connecting portion, an anchoring fixture holder is fitted around an either end of the fixture holder, the anchoring fixture holder having the same pitch as the fixture holder, but having a larger diameter and a shorter length than those of the fixture holder.

11. The method according to claim 3, wherein the intersectional connecting portion has an entrance having a width larger than a thickness of the deformed steel wire and smaller than a thickness of the fixture holder.

12. A method for the reinforcement of a masonry wall, for reinforcing beam blocks arranged on an upper end of a window, comprising: laying a row of beam blocks such that holes of the beam blocks are horizontally lined up with one another, and penetrating a first deformed steel wire through the holes of the beam blocks; horizontally disposing a second deformed steel wire on upper surfaces of the beam blocks; connecting the first and second deformed steel wires to each other and covering them with mortar; and laying blocks on the row of beam blocks.

13. The method according to claim 12, further comprising: prior to laying the row of beam blocks, removing a row of beam blocks arranged on the upper end of the window and a plurality of rows of blocks laid on the row of beam blocks, and supporting the remaining blocks by use of a temporary support.

14. The method according to claim 12, wherein the first and second deformed steel wires are connected to each other by use of a beam connection loop type deformed steel wire, which includes a beam connection loop formed at a lower end thereof and an intersectional connecting portion spaced apart from the beam connection loop by a predetermined distance, or by use of a beam supporting type deformed steel wire which includes a beam connection loop formed at a lower end thereof and an intersectional connecting portion formed at an upper end thereof and spaced apart from the beam connection loop by a predetermined distance.

15. The method according to claim 14, wherein: the beam connection loop is formed by circularly bending the lower end of the deformed steel wire such that the deformed steel wire is inserted into the beam connection loop, an entrance of the beam connection loop being opened in an approximately upper lateral region; and the intersectional connecting portion is formed by circularly bending a portion of the deformed steel wire in a lateral direction such that a fixture holder or deformed steel wire is inserted into the intersectional connecting portion.

16. The method according to claim 12, further comprising: connecting the second deformed steel wire horizontally disposed on the upper surfaces of the beam blocks to a vertically extending intersectional connection type deformed steel wire.

17. The method according to claim 14, further comprising: connecting a horizontally extending basic deformed steel wire or a fixture holder oriented toward an inner wall to the beam connection loop type deformed steel wire or an intersectional connection type deformed steel wire connected to an upper end of the beam connection loop type deformed steel wire as well as to the second deformed steel wire horizontally disposed on the upper surfaces of the beam blocks.

18. A fixture holder having an elongated hollow pipe shape, wherein: the fixture holder includes six blade receptacles protruding outward from a periphery of the fixture holder; and the blade receptacles are spirally formed in a longitudinal direction of the fixture holder by a predetermined pitch.

19. The fixture holder according to claim 18, wherein the fixture holder is longitudinally coupled with a fixture, and the fixture includes a central core and a plurality of blades protruding outward from a periphery of the core to be inserted into the blade receptacles of the fixture holder, the blades being spirally formed about the core in a longitudinal direction of the fixture by a predetermined pitch.

20. The fixture holder according to claim 18 or 19, wherein the fixture holder is longitudinally coupled to a deformed steel wire, which has a regular-polygonal cross section having vertex portions to be inserted into the blade receptacles, the deformed steel wire being spirally twisted in a longitudinal direction thereof by a predetermined pitch.

21. The fixture holder according to claim 19, wherein, when the fixture holder and the fixture are coupled to each other, a gap for absorbing a vibration generated between the fixture holder and the fixture is provided between each blade of the fixture and the associated blade receptacle of the fixture holder, and a spacing is provided between the core of the fixture and an inwardly protruding portion formed between the neighboring blade receptacles of the fixture holder.

22. A deformed steel wire for use in the reinforcement of a masonry wall, wherein the deformed steel wire has an approximately regular-polygonal cross section, and the deformed steel wire is spirally twisted in a longitudinal direction thereof by a constant pitch.

23. The deformed steel wire according to claim 22, wherein the deformed steel wire has a regular-triangular, regular-tetragonal, regular-pentagonal, or regular-hexagonal cross section.

24. The deformed steel wire according to claim 22, wherein the pitch of the deformed steel wire coincides with a pitch of a fixture holder, which includes a plurality of blade receptacles and is spirally twisted, such that vertex portions of the regular-polygonal deformed steel wire are inserted into the blade receptacles of the fixture holder while the deformed steel wire is longitudinally coupled to the fixture holder via their relative rotations.

25. The deformed steel wire according to claim 24, wherein the fixture holder is longitudinally coupled with a fixture, and the fixture includes a central core and a plurality of blades protruding outward from a periphery of the core to be inserted into the blade receptacles of the fixture holder, the blades being spirally formed about the core in a longitudinal direction of the fixture by a predetermined pitch.

26. The deformed steel wire according to claim 24, wherein the deformed steel wire includes at least one intersectional connecting portion such that the fixture holder or another deformed steel wire is connected to the deformed steel wire in a direction perpendicular to a longitudinal direction of the deformed steel wire.

27. The deformed steel wire according to claim 26, wherein the intersectional connecting portion is formed by circularly bending a portion of the deformed steel wire in a lateral direction such that the fixture holder or another steel wire is inserted into the intersectional connecting portion.

28. The deformed steel wire according to claim 27, wherein the intersectional connecting portion has an entrance having a width larger than a width of the deformed steel wire and smaller than a width of the fixture holder.

29. The deformed steel wire according to claim 26, wherein the deformed steel wire includes first and second intersectional connecting portions, and the first and second intersectional connecting portions are disposed in different planes perpendicular to each other and are spaced apart from each other by a distance equal to approximately one or more integer times the height of a block.

30. The deformed steel wire according to claim 26, wherein the deformed steel wire includes a beam connection loop formed at one end thereof and an intersectional connecting portion spaced apart from the beam connection loop by a predetermined distance.

31. The deformed steel wire according to claim 30, wherein the intersectional connecting portion is formed only at the other end of the deformed steel wire.

32. The deformed steel wire according to claim 30, wherein the beam connection loop is formed by circularly bending the end of the deformed steel wire such that another deformed steel wire is inserted into the beam connection loop.

33. The deformed steel wire according to claim 32, wherein an entrance of the beam connection loop has an acute angle with a longitudinal direction of the deformed steel wire and is opened inward.

34. A deformed steel wire having a beam connection loop formed at one end thereof and an intersectional connecting portion formed at the other end thereof, wherein: the beam connection loop is formed by circularly bending the end of the deformed steel wire such that another deformed steel wire is inserted into the beam connection loop; and the intersectional connecting portion is formed by circularly bending a portion of the deformed steel wire in a lateral direction such that a fixture holder or another deformed steel wire is inserted into the intersectional connecting portion.

35. The deformed steel wire according to claim 34, wherein an entrance of the beam connection loop has an acute angle with a longitudinal direction of the deformed steel wire and is opened inward.

36. The deformed steel wire according to claim 34, wherein the deformed steel wire has a substantially regular-polygonal cross section and is spirally twisted in a longitudinal direction thereof.

37. A deformed steel wire to be longitudinally coupled to a fixture holder, which has an elongated hollow pipe shape and includes a plurality of blade receptacles protruding outward from a periphery of the fixture holder, the blade receptacles being spirally formed in a longitudinal direction of the fixture holder by a predetermined pitch, wherein the deformed steel wire has a substantially regular-polygonal cross section and is spirally twisted in a longitudinal direction thereof by the same pitch as the predetermined pitch of the blade receptacles of the fixture holder, the deformed steel wire including a beam connection loop formed at one end thereof.

38. A block for use in a masonry wall reinforcing method using fixtures, fixture holders and deformed steel wires, wherein: the block includes a center hole and at least one side surface groove, and the center hole has substantially the same shape as a shape defined by two facing side surface grooves spaced apart from each other by a distance equal to the width of a masonry joint; and the center hole and the space defined by the two facing side surface grooves have a rounded rectangular shape.

39. The block according to claim 38, wherein the block further includes a first side hole and a second side hole formed, respectively, at opposite sides of the center hole, and the first and second side holes have a rounded rectangular shape.

40. The block according to claim 38, wherein the at least one side surface groove of the block is formed only at one side surface of the block.

41. The block according to claim 39, wherein the center hole has a width smaller than a width of the first side hole and the second side hole.

42. The block according to claim 40, wherein: the block further includes a first side hole and a second side hole formed, respectively, at opposite sides of the center hole; the first and second side holes have a rounded rectangular shape; and the first side hole is located between the center hole and the side surface groove, and has a length smaller than a length of the opposite second side hole.

43. The block according to claim 38, wherein the at least one side surface groove includes two side surface grooves formed at both side surfaces of the block.

44. The block according to claim 43, wherein the center hole has a width smaller than a width of the first and second side holes.

Description:

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates to a fixture holder, deformed steel wire, and block for use in a method for reinforcing a masonry wall, and more particularly, to a masonry wall reinforcing method wherein fixture holders, each being coupled with a fixture press-fitted into an inner wall, are connected to one another by use of vertically and horizontally extending deformed steel wires.

BACKGROUND ART

A masonry wall is constructed by a constructional work for building a wall by piling up stones, bricks, concrete blocks, etc. Generally, a purely masonry structure is referred to a brick structure, stone structure, and concrete block structure, which use no reinforcement. Such a masonry structure generally has a good durability and in particular, the stone structure has been used for a long time. In the Western Europe, etc. having a rare occurrence of earthquake, a variety of masonry works have been employed without a drawback in structural strength. In relation with the masonry works, moreover, a long time ago there were developed various decorative designs including arches and domes. Even in these days, for example, the block structure is widely used.

The block structure is built not by simply piling up blocks, but by laying blocks at the outer surface of an inner wall that is made of concrete, etc. Therefore, it is very important to achieve a sufficient coupling force between the inner wall and the blocks. If there occurs a deterioration in the coupling force between the inner wall and the blocks, it may cause a collapse of the laid blocks by an earthquake, wind pressure, or other external shocks.

Accordingly, to prevent various unexpected accidents caused by, for example, the collapse of blocks, there exists a serious need for a strong coupling between the laid blocks and the inner wall. As a solution to reinforce the coupling of blocks, conventionally, it has been proposed that a fixture, which consists of a core and spiral blades, is fitted into an inner wall, for achieving an increase in the coupling force between the blocks and the inner wall.

However, the above described solution has a problem in that a great number of separate elements should be used for fixing the fixture, which was fitted into the inner wall, to the blocks. This results in an inconvenience in the use of the fixture.

DISCLOSURE

[Technical Problem]

Therefore, the present invention has been made in view of the above problems, and it is an object of the present invention to provide a method for reinforcing a masonry wall wherein fixture holders, each being coupled with a fixture press-fitted into an inner wall, are connected to one another by use of vertically and horizontally extending deformed steel wires, and a fixture holder, deformed steel wire, and block for use in the masonry wall reinforcing method.

[Technical Solution]

In accordance with an aspect of the present invention, the above and other objects can be accomplished by the provision of a method for reinforcing a masonry wall comprising: connecting a horizontally extending basic steel wire to a vertically extending intersectional connection type deformed steel wire and covering them with mortar; connecting a fixture holder, which is oriented toward an inner wall, to the vertically extending intersectional connection type deformed steel wire and covering them with mortar; laying blocks; and connecting a fixture to the fixture holder by press-fitting the fixture into the inner wall through the fixture holder oriented toward the inner wall. With this method, the fixture holder can be connected to another deformed steel wire by use of the intersectional connection type deformed steel wire without requiring separate elements, thereby enabling the masonry wall to be firmly supported in vertical and horizontal directions thereof.

An end of the vertically extending intersectional connection type deformed steel wire or the horizontally extending deformed steel wire, which is located near the ground, ceiling, or lateral wall surface of a building, may be longitudinally connected and fixed, by use of the fixture holder, to the fixture that is press-fitted into the ground, ceiling or lateral wall surface. This has the effect of allowing the deformed steel wire, which extends in a horizontal or vertical direction of a building, to be more firmly fixed to the ground, ceiling, or lateral wall surface.

The intersectional connection type deformed steel wire may include one or two intersectional connecting portions. With the use of the intersectional connecting portion, the fixture holder or another deformed steel wire can be simply connected perpendicular to the deformed steel wire, resulting in a convenience in connecting operation.

Here, each intersectional connecting portion may be formed by circularly bending a portion of the deformed steel wire in a lateral direction such that the fixture holder or deformed steel wire is inserted into the intersectional connecting portion. This simplifies the fabrication of the intersectional connection type deformed steel wire, and achieves a convenience in the implementation of the reinforcing method.

When the intersectional connection type deformed steel wire includes first and second intersectional connecting portions, the first and second intersectional connecting portions are disposed in different planes perpendicular to each other and are spaced apart from each other by a distance equal to the height of a single block. Accordingly, the fixture holder and another deformed steel wire can be connected perpendicular to the single deformed steel wire while being connected perpendicular to each other. Also, as a result of separating both connecting portions for the fixture holder and the deformed steel wire from each other, the overall construction can be simplified.

Preferably, an entrance of the intersectional connecting portion has a width larger than a thickness of the deformed steel wire and smaller than a thickness of the fixture holder.

To connect the fixture holder to the intersectional connecting portion of the intersectional connection type deformed steel wire, after inserting the fixture holder into the intersectional connecting portion, an anchoring fixture holder is fitted around an either end of the fixture holder, the anchoring fixture holder having the same pitch as the fixture holder, but having a larger diameter and a shorter length than the fixture holder. Thereby, the anchoring fixture holder interferes with the intersectional connecting portion, thereby preventing the fixture holder from being separated from the intersectional connecting portion.

Each deformed steel wire has an approximately regular-polygonal cross section, and is spirally twisted in a longitudinal direction thereof by a constant pitch. The fixture holder has an elongated hollow pipe shape, and includes six blade receptacles protruding outward from a periphery of the fixture holder by a predetermined distance, the blade receptacles being spirally formed in a longitudinal direction of the fixture holder by a predetermined pitch. The fixture holder connects two deformed steel wires to each other in a longitudinal direction of the steel wires via both ends thereof.

Each of the blocks may include a center hole and a side surface groove, and the center hole has substantially the same shape as a shape defined by two facing side surface grooves spaced apart from each other by a distance equal to the width of a masonry joint. Upon the laying of blocks, the vertically extending deformed steel wire may be penetrated through the center hole of a block and the space defined by the two facing side surface grooves of an underlying block in turn. Preferably, the center hole and the space defined by the two facing side surface grooves have a rounded rectangular shape, in the view of the provision of a sufficient work space and a high adherence force of mortar.

Each of the blocks may include a single side surface groove formed only at one side surface thereof or a pair of side surface grooves formed at both side surfaces thereof. The block may further include a first side hole and a second side hole formed, respectively, at opposite sides of the center hole, and the first and second side holes have a rounded rectangular shape suitable to increase the adherence of mortar.

In accordance with another aspect of the present invention, there is provided a method for reinforcing beam blocks arranged on an upper end of a window, for the reinforcement of a masonry wall, comprising: laying a row of beam blocks such that holes of the beam blocks horizontally communicate with one another, and penetrating a first deformed steel wire through the holes of the beam blocks; horizontally disposing a second deformed steel wire on upper surfaces of the beam blocks; connecting the first and second steel wires to each other and covering them with mortar; and laying blocks on the row of beam blocks. With this method, the reinforcement of beam blocks can be accomplished by use of elements used in the reinforcement of a masonry wall.

In the case of reinforcing beam blocks of an existing building, the above method may further comprising: prior to laying the row of beam blocks, removing a row of beam blocks arranged on the upper end of the window and a plurality of rows of blocks laid on the row of beam blocks, and supporting the remaining blocks by use of a temporary support.

The first and second deformed steel wires may be connected to each other by use of a beam connection loop type deformed steel wire, which includes a beam connection loop formed at a lower end thereof and an intersectional connecting portion spaced apart from the beam connection loop by a predetermined distance, or by use of a beam supporting type deformed steel wire which includes a beam connection loop formed at a lower end thereof and an intersectional connecting portion formed at an upper end thereof and spaced apart from the beam connection loop by a predetermined distance. With this connection, the load of beam blocks can be sufficiently supported.

The beam connection loop may be formed by circularly bending the lower end of the deformed steel wire such that the deformed steel wire is inserted into the beam connection loop, an entrance of the beam connection loop being opened in an approximately upper lateral region, and the intersectional connecting portion may be formed by circularly bending a portion of the deformed steel wire in a lateral direction such that a fixture holder or deformed steel wire is inserted into the intersectional connecting portion, for the sake of simplifying the reinforcement of beam blocks.

After completing the reinforcement of beam blocks, the above method may further comprising: connecting the second deformed steel wire horizontally disposed on the upper surfaces of the beam blocks to a vertically extending intersectional connection type deformed steel wire, and covering them with mortar, or connecting a horizontally extending basic deformed steel wire or a fixture holder oriented toward an inner wall, except for the second deformed steel wire horizontally disposed on the upper surfaces of the beam blocks, to the beam connection loop type deformed steel wire or an intersectional connection type deformed steel wire connected to an upper end of the beam connection loop type deformed steel wire. In this way, the reinforcement of beam blocks can be accomplished simultaneously with the reinforcement of the overall masonry wall.

DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

The above and other objects, features and other advantages of the present invention will be more clearly understood from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGS. 1A and 1B are a configuration view and a sectional view, respectively, illustrating an embodiment of a fixture for use in a method for reinforcing a masonry wall;

FIGS. 2A to 2E are configuration views and sectional views illustrating a fixture holder for use with the fixture of FIGS. 1A and 1B;

FIGS. 3A to 3C are a configuration view and sectional views illustrating a deformed steel wire for use with the fixture holder of FIGS. 2A to 2E;

FIGS. 4A to 4D are perspective views illustrating different configurations of the deformed steel wire of FIGS. 3A to 3C;

FIGS. 5A and 5B are views illustrating the longitudinal connection of the fixture of FIGS. 1A and 1B by use of the fixture holder of FIGS. 2A to 2E;

FIGS. 6A to 6C are views illustrating the longitudinal connection of the deformed steel wire of FIGS. 3A to 3C by use of the fixture holder of FIGS. 2A to 2E;

FIG. 7 is a view illustrating the longitudinal connection of the fixture of FIGS. 1A and 1B and the deformed steel wire of FIGS. 3A to 3C by use of the fixture holder of FIGS. 2A to 2E;

FIG. 8 is a view illustrating the fixture press-fitted into an inner wall and the fixture holder connected to a rear end of the fixture, which are connected perpendicular to the vertically extending deformed steel wire;

FIGS. 9A and 9B are views illustrating the horizontal parallel connection of two basic deformed steel wires by use of a vertically extending deformed steel wire;

FIG. 10 is a front view illustrating a masonry wall obtained by a reinforcing method of the present invention, and fixtures, fixture holders, and deformed steel wires installed in the masonry wall;

FIGS. 11A to 11C are sectional views of FIG. 10;

FIGS. 12A to 12C are a perspective view and plan views illustrating an embodiment of a block for use in a reinforcing method of FIG. 10;

FIG. 13 is a perspective view illustrating the configuration of a masonry wall, which is reinforced by use of blocks of FIG. 12;

FIGS. 14A to 14E are views illustrating the sequence of a masonry wall reinforcing method in accordance with the present invention;

FIGS. 15A to 15D are views illustrating the sequence of a beam block reinforcing method included in the masonry wall reinforcing method in accordance with the present invention; and

FIG. 16 is a view illustrating an operation for reinforcing beam blocks after removing some blocks of an existing masonry wall in accordance with the masonry wall reinforcing method of the present invention.

BEST MODE

Now, an embodiment of a method for reinforcing a masonry wall in accordance with the present invention will be described in detail with reference to the accompanying drawings.

FIG. 1A is a configuration view illustrating an embodiment of a fixture 1 for use in the masonry wall reinforcing method in accordance with the present invention, and FIG. 1B is a sectional view of the fixture 1.

The fixture 1 is made of a metal material having a high strength and a corrosion resistance against moisture, etc. The fixture 1 includes a core 11, and a plurality of blades 12 protruding outward from a periphery of the core 11 by a constant distance. The blades 12 are spirally formed around the core 11 by a predetermined pitch P in a longitudinal direction of the fixture 1. Although there is no limit in the number of the blades 12, in an advantageous embodiment as shown in FIG. 1B, the fixture 1 includes three blades, to satisfy both requirements of high strength and simple configuration.

FIG. 2A is a configuration view illustrating a fixture holder 2 for use with the fixture 1 of FIGS. 1A and 1B, and FIG. 2B is a sectional view of the fixture holder 2.

The fixture holder 2 is made of a moisture-resistance metal material, such as stainless steel, aluminum, brass, etc., a plastic material, or the like. The fixture holder 2 has a hollow cylindrical shape, and is formed with a plurality of blade receptacles 22 protruding outwardly from a periphery thereof by a constant distance. The blade receptacles 22 are spirally formed by a predetermined pitch P in a longitudinal direction of the fixture holder 2. Here, the pitch P between the blades 12 of the fixture 1 coincides with the pitch P between the blade receptacles 22 of the fixture holder 2. If the fixture holder 2 includes six blade receptacles 22 as shown in FIG. 2B, the fixture holder 2 can be coupled with a fixture having two or three blades, or a deformed steel wire having a regular-triangular cross section or regular-hexagonal cross section which will be described hereinafter.

FIG. 2C is a perspective view illustrating an anchoring fixture holder 2′, which is configured so as to be fitted around an outer periphery of the fixture holder 2. FIG. 2D is a perspective view illustrating two anchoring fixture holders 2′ fitted around the outer periphery of the fixture holder 2. FIG. 2E is a sectional view of the anchoring fixing holder 2′ fitted around the outer periphery of the fixture holder 2.

The anchoring fixture holder 2′ has the same pitch as that of the fixture holder 2, but has a smaller length and a larger diameter than those of the fixture holder 2, so as to be fitted around the outer periphery of the fixture holder 2. In the course that the fixture holder 2 is coupled into an intersectional connecting portion of a deformed steel wire that will be described hereinafter, the anchoring fixture holder 2′ serves to anchor the fixture holder 2 to the intersectional connecting portion, to thereby prevent separation of the fixture holder 2.

FIG. 3A is a configuration view illustrating a deformed steel wire 5 for use with the fixture holder 2 of FIGS. 2A to 2E, and FIGS. 3B and 3C are sectional views of the deformed steel wire 5. FIGS. 4A to 4D are views illustrating different deformed configurations of the deformed steel wire 5 of FIGS. 3A to 3C.

The deformed steel wire 5, used in the reinforcing method of the present invention, is formed by spirally twisting a deformed steel wire, having an approximately regular-triangular, regular-tetragonal (not shown), regular-pentagonal (not shown), or regular-hexagonal cross section, by a predetermined pitch P. The pitch P of the deformed steel wire 5 coincides with the pitch P of the fixture 1 and the pitch P of the fixture holder 2 (See FIGS. 1A and 2A).

Specifically, FIG. 3A illustrates the configuration of the basic deformed steel wire 5, and FIGS. 4A to 4D illustrate different configurations of the deformed steel wire 5. More specifically, FIG. 4A illustrates an intersectional connection type deformed steel wire 5′, FIG. 4B illustrates a beam connection loop type deformed steel wire 5″, FIG. 4C illustrates a beam supporting type deformed steel wire 5″′, and FIG. 4D illustrates a beam connection loop and intersectional connection mixed type deformed steel wire 5″″.

Although the shown intersectional connection type deformed steel wire 5′ has two intersectional connecting portions 51a and 51b, the intersectional connection type deformed steel wire 5′ may have only one intersectional connecting portion. In this case, by connecting the two deformed steel wires, each having only one intersectional connecting portion, to each other by use of the fixture holder 2, it is possible to achieve the same effect as the deformed steel wire 5′ of FIG. 4A. Such an intersectional connecting portion 51 is obtained by circularly bending a portion of the deformed steel wire in a lateral direction such that the fixture holder 2 or another basic deformed steel wire 5 can be inserted into the intersectional connecting portion 51. Advantageously, in the view of a convenience in assembling and a rigidness in structure, an entrance of the intersectional connecting portion 51 has a width smaller than a width of the fixture holder 2, but larger than a width of the basic deformed steel wire 5.

The intersectional connecting portions 51a and 51b are arranged perpendicular to each other, and are spaced apart from each other by a distance equal to the height of a single block. With this arrangement, the intersectional connecting portions 51a and 51b can be positioned on different successive rows of blocks, resulting in a simplified configuration and assembling operation of the deformed steel wire 5′ and blocks. It will be appreciated that the distance between the intersectional connecting portions 51a and 51b is not essentially limited to the height of the single block. Furthermore, as described above, even when the intersectional connection type deformed steel wire has only one intersectional connecting portion, it is possible to achieve the same effect as the deformed steel wire 5′ of FIG. 4A by longitudinally connecting the two deformed steel wires each having only one intersectional connecting portion by means of the fixture holder 2.

The beam connection loop type deformed steel wire 5″ shown in FIG. 4B has a beam connection loop 52 formed at a lower end thereof and an intersectional connecting portion 51 spaced apart from the beam connection loop 52 by a predetermined distance. The beam connection loop 52 is obtained by circularly bending the lower end of the deformed steel wire 5″ such that another steel wire can be inserted into the beam connection loop 52. An entrance of the beam connection loop 52 is opened in an approximately upper lateral region. Although the deformed steel wire 5″ shown in FIG. 4B has only one intersectional connecting portion 51, the present invention is not limited thereto. In an alternative embodiment, similar to FIG. 4A, the deformed steel wire 5″ may have two intersectional connecting portions, so as to be directly used in the reinforcement of a masonry wall. In a further alternative embodiment, the deformed steel wire 5″ may have only the beam connection loop without the intersectional connecting portion. In the latter embodiment, by connecting an upper end of the deformed steel wire 5″ to the intersectional connection type deformed steel wire 5′ by means of the fixture holder 2, it is possible to achieve the same effect as that of the beam connection loop type deformed steel wire 5″ shown in FIG. 4B. Moreover, although the intersectional connecting portion 51 and the beam connection loop 52 of the deformed steel wire 5″ shown in FIG. 4B are arranged in the same vertical plane as each other such that different two parallel steel wires can be connected to the deformed steel wire 5″, the intersectional connecting portion 51 and the beam connection loop 52 may be arranged in different planes perpendicular to each other such that the fixture holder 2 oriented toward an inner wall can be coupled into the intersectional connecting portion 51. Referring to FIG. 4D, the deformed steel wire 5″″ may have the beam connection loop 52, and three intersectional connecting portions 51a, 51b and 51c, which are arranged above the beam connection loop 52 and spaced apart from one another by a distance equal to the height of a single block. The deformed steel wire 5″″ can be connected directly to the fixture holder 2 or another deformed steel wire, in addition to being used for the reinforcement of beam blocks.

FIG. 4C illustrates the beam supporting type deformed steel wire 5′″, which the intersectional connecting portion 51 formed at an upper end thereof and the beam connection loop 52 formed at a lower end thereof. As compared to the beam connection loop type deformed steel wire 5″ shown in FIG. 4B, the deformed steel wire 5′″ has no portion extending upward from the intersectional connecting portion 51. Here, a distance between the intersectional connecting portion 51 and the beam connection loop 52 is equal to that of the beam connection loop type deformed steel wire 5″ shown in FIG. 4B. In consideration of the fact that deformed steel wires for supporting beam blocks have to be more densely arranged than those used for supporting the remaining portion of a masonry wall, the deformed steel wire 5′″ has a simplified configuration suitable only for supporting beam blocks, regardless of the reinforcement purpose of a masonry wall.

FIG. 5A is an exemplary view illustrating the longitudinal coupling of the fixture 1 of FIGS. 1A and 1B by use of the fixture holder 2 of FIGS. 2A to 2E, and FIG. 5B is a sectional view illustrating the coupling relationship of the fixture 1 and the fixture holder 2.

As shown in FIG. 5A, the fixture holder 2 and the fixture 1 have the same pitch as each other. Thus, the fixture holder 2 and the fixture 1 can be longitudinally coupled to each other via their relative spiral rotations. In this case, the fixture 1 can be fitted into the fixture holder 2 through either end of the fixture holder 2. Consequently, the fixture holder 2 can be used to connect the two fixtures 1 to each other.

Referring to FIG. 5B, the fixture holder 2, which is formed with six blade receptacles 22, may be coupled with the fixture 1 having three blades 12 (FIG. 6B), or may be coupled with a fixture having two blades. Each blade 12 of the fixture 1 is configured such that it can be inserted into an associated one of the blade receptacles 22 of the fixture holder 2 while keeping a slight gap G therebetween. Considering the geometrical shape of the blade 12 in more detail, a distance from the center of the fixture 1 to an edge of the blade 12 is longer than a distance from the center of the fixture holder 2 to an inwardly protruded portion 21 of the fixture holder 2. With this geometrical shape, the inwardly protruded portion 21 of the fixture holder 2 interferes with the blade 12 of the fixture 1, thereby allowing the fixture 1 to be caught fixedly inside the fixture holder 2. Once the fixture holder 2 is installed into a masonry wall, the outer periphery of the fixture holder 2 is surrounded by mortar. Therefore, the fixture holder 2 has no risk of deformation even if it is compressed by movements of the fixture 1, and consequently, can more strongly support the fixture 1.

In the present invention, the fixture 1 and the fixture holder 2 are configured such that the blades 12 and the blade receptacles 22 are spirally formed in their longitudinal direction. Therefore, by simply rotating the fixture 1 and the fixture holder 2 relative to each other similar to a screw fastening manner, the coupling of the fixture 1 and the fixture holder 2 can be accomplished in a very simplified manner. Moreover, to impart a great flexural rigidity to the fixture 1 and the fixture holder 2, it is advantageous that the cross sectional shapes of the blades 12 and the blade receptacles 22 are determined to achieve a great modulus of section.

As described above, there exists the predetermined gap G between each blade 12 and the associated blade receptacle 22 in a state wherein the fixture 1 and the fixture holder 2 are coupled to each other. Therefore, when the fixture 1 and the fixture holder 2 are used for the reinforcement of a building, the gap G can absorb a vibration generated in the building to some extent and also, can deal with an unwanted thermal expansion of materials caused by, for example, a temperature variation. Moreover, a spacing S between the core 11 of the fixture 1 and the inwardly protruded portion 21 of the fixture holder 2 serves as a moisture or air vent, thereby eliminating the problem of corrosion by standing water, etc. In addition to the spacing C, the inner volume of each blade receptacle 22 remained after receiving the blade 12 can act to increase the cross sectional area of the moisture or air vent. In particular, the increased number of curves can allow the blades 12 of the fixture 1 to be smoothly guided and inserted into the blade receptacles 22 of the fixture holder 2 even if the orientation of the fixture 1 is not accurately set to that of the fixture holder 2, resulting in a convenience in use.

FIG. 6A illustrates the longitudinal direction of the deformed steel wire 5 of FIGS. 3A to 3C by use of the fixture holder 2 of FIGS. 2A to 2E, and FIGS. 6B and 6C are sectional views illustrating the coupling relationship of the deformed steel wire 5 and the fixture holder 2. FIG. 7 illustrates the longitudinal coupling of the fixture 1 of FIGS. 1A and 1B and the deformed steel wire 5 of FIGS. 3A to 3C by use of the fixture holder 2 of FIGS. 2A to 2E.

Since the pitch of the deformed steel wire 5 coincides with the pitch of the fixture holder 2, similar to the longitudinal coupling of the fixture 1 and the fixture holder 2, the deformed steel wire 5 and the fixture holder 2 can be longitudinally connected to each other as shown in FIG. 6A.

In the case where the fixture holder 2 has six blade receptacles 2, as shown in FIGS. 6B and 6C, the fixture holder 2 can be coupled with the deformed steel wire 5 having a regular-hexagonal cross section as well as the deformed steel wire 5 having a regular-triangular cross section.

Considering the geometrical shape of the deformed steel wire 5, a distance from the center of the deformed steel wire 5 to a vertex point of the cross section of the deformed steel wire 5 is longer than a distance from the center of the fixture holder 2 to the inwardly protruded portion 21. Therefore, the inwardly protruded portion 21 of the fixture holder 2 interferes with the vertex point of the cross section of the deformed steel wire 5, thereby allowing the deformed steel wire 5 to be secured inside the fixture holder 2. Once the fixture holder 2 is installed into a masonry wall, the outer periphery of the fixture holder 2 is surrounded by mortar. Therefore, the fixture holder 2 has no risk of deformation even if it is compressed by movements of the deformed steel wire 5, and consequently, can more strongly support the steel deformed wire 5.

In the present invention, both the deformed steel wire 5 and the fixture holder 2 are spirally twisted in a longitudinal direction thereof. Therefore, by simply rotating the deformed steel wire 5 and the fixture holder 2 relative to each other similar to a screw fastening manner, the coupling of the deformed steel wire 5 and the fixture holder 2 can be accomplished in a very simplified manner.

Also, there exists a predetermined gap between the deformed steel wire 5 and the fixture holder 2 in a state wherein the deformed steel wire 5 and the fixture holder 2 are coupled to each other. Therefore, when the deformed steel wire 5 and the fixture holder 2 are used for the reinforcement of a building, the gap can absorb a vibration generated in the building to some extent, and also can deal with an unwanted thermal expansion of materials, etc. caused by a temperature variation, etc.

Meanwhile, in the case where the pitches of the above mentioned three elements, i.e. the fixture, fixture holder, and deformed steel wire, coincide with one another, as shown in FIG. 7, the fixture 1 and the deformed steel wire 5 can be longitudinally coupled to each other by use of the fixture holder 2. Accordingly, the vertically or horizontally extending deformed steel wire 5 can be fixed to the wall or ground of a building. For example, if the deformed steel wire 5 is connected to the fixture 1, which was vertically press fitted into the ground, by use of the fixture holder 2, the deformed steel wire 5, which extends in a vertical direction of the building, can be firmly connected to and supported by the ground. More specifically, an end of the deformed steel wire, which extends in a vertical direction of the building, is located near the ground or ceiling of the building, and thus, can be connected and fixed to the fixture that was press-fitted into the ground or ceiling by use of the fixture holder. Similarly, an end of the deformed steel wire, which extends in a horizontal direction of the building, is located near the lateral wall of the building, and thus, can be connected and fixed to the fixture that was press-fitted into the lateral wall by use of the fixture holder.

However, if it is actually unnecessary to longitudinally connect the fixture 1 and the deformed steel wire 5 to each other, there is no need for coinciding the pitches of the above three elements with one another. In this case, on the basis of the fact that whether the fixture holder 2 will be coupled to the fixture 1 or the deformed steel wire 5, there exists only a requirement that the pitch of the fixture holder 2 has to coincide with the pitch of the fixture 1 or the pitch of the deformed steel wire 5.

FIG. 8 is a view illustrating the fixture press-fitted into an inner wall and the fixture holder connected to a rear end of the fixture, which are connected perpendicular to the deformed steel wire.

The fixture holder 2, which is coupled to the fixture 1 press-fitted into an inner wall C such as a concrete wall, is connected perpendicular to the intersectional connection type deformed steel wire 5′ via the first intersectional connecting portion 51a. In turn, the basic deformed steel wire 5 is connected perpendicular to the deformed steel wire 5′ via the second intersectional connecting portion 51b that is located below the first intersectional connecting portion 51a by a distance equal to the height of a single block. Consequently, the additional steel wire 5 can be also connected perpendicular to the fixture holder 2. Here, an outer diameter of the fixture holder 2 substantially coincides with an inner diameter of the intersectional connecting portion 51 including the first intersectional connecting portion 51a, and a width of the entrance of the first intersectional connecting portion 51a is smaller than the outer diameter of the fixture holder 2. Accordingly, the fixture holder 2 cannot be fitted through the entrance of the intersectional connecting portion 51, but is allowed to be fitted only through an inner periphery of the intersectional connecting portion 51. Although not shown in FIG. 8, if the anchoring fixture holder 2′ is fitted around the fixture holder 2 from either side of the fixture holder 2 as shown in FIG. 2D in a state wherein the fixture holder 2 is connected with the first intersectional connecting portion 51a, the anchoring fixture holder 2′ interferes with the first intersectional connecting portion 51a, thereby serving to prevent the fixture holder 2 from being longitudinally separated from the first intersection connecting portion 51a. Also, since the width of the entrance of the intersectional connecting portion 51 including the second intersectional connecting portion 51b is larger than a diameter of the deformed steel wire 5, the deformed steel wire 5 can be fitted into the intersectional connecting portion 51 through the entrance formed in a lateral direction of the intersectional connecting portion 51.

In the above described intersectional connection type deformed steel wire 5′, the two intersectional connecting portions thereof have no change in arrangement direction and plane even though the deformed steel wire 5′ is inverted. In other words, the two intersectional connecting portions of the intersectional connection type deformed steel wire 5′ have no special distinction of upper and lower positions. Therefore, the terms “first” and “second” distinguishing the two intersectional connecting portions have no special meaning.

Referring to FIG. 9A, the beam connection loop type deformed steel wire 5″ may be connected with two basic steel wires 5 such that the two steel wires 5 are horizontally arranged parallel to each other. To achieve the horizontal parallel arrangement of the two deformed steel wires 5, a lower one of the two deformed steel wires 5 may be penetrated through the beam connection loop 52 and the remaining upper deformed steel wire 5 may be penetrated through the intersectional connecting portion 51. Similarly, as shown in FIG. 9B, the horizontal parallel arrangement of the two deformed steel wires 5 can be accomplished even by use of the beam supporting type deformed steel wire 5′″. The beam connection loop type deformed steel wire 5″ may be modified such that an additional intersectional connecting portion is formed at the upper side of the intersectional connecting portion 51, or may be longitudinally connected, at an upper end thereof, to the deformed steel wire 5′ by use of the fixture holder 2, for enabling the elements, used for the reinforcement of beam blocks, to be also used for the reinforcement of a masonry wall.

FIG. 10 is a front view illustrating a masonry wall, which is reinforced by the fixtures 1, fixture holders 2, and deformed steel wires 5, 5′, 5″ and 5′″ as described in FIGS. 8 and FIGS. 9A and 9B. FIG. 11A is a sectional view taken along the line X-X of FIG. 10, FIG. 11B is a sectional view taken along the line Y-Y of FIG. 10, and FIG. 11C is a sectional view taken along the line Z-Z of FIG. 10.

FIG. 8 is related to a region designated by the line X-X of FIG. 10 and FIG. 11A. It can be confirmed from FIG. 8 that the fixture holder 2, which is coupled to the rear end of the fixture 1 embedded in the inner wall C, is connected perpendicular to the deformed steel wire 5′, which extends in a vertical direction of the wall, via the first intersectional connecting portion 51a, and in turn, the deformed steel wire 5, which extends in a horizontal direction of the wall, is also connected perpendicular to the vertically extending deformed steel wire 5′ via the second intersectional connecting portion 51b at the height lower than the fixture holder 2 by the height of a single block. Each of the horizontally or vertically extending steel wires 5 and 5′ may be longitudinally connected to additional steel wire(s) by use of the fixture holder 2 as shown in FIG. 6A, for the sake of the reinforcement of the overall masonry wall.

FIG. 9A is related to a region designated by the line Y-Y of FIG. 10 and FIG. 11B. It can be appreciated from FIG. 9A that a first deformed steel wire 5, which extends horizontally by penetrating through a beam block 9, and a second deformed steel wire 5, which is horizontally disposed on the beam block 9 in the same direction as the first deformed steel wire 5, are fitted into and fixed by the beam connection loop 52 and the intersectional connecting portion 51 of the beam connection loop type deformed steel wire 5″, respectively, for the sake of supporting the beam block 9. Also, it can be appreciated that the deformed steel wire 5″ can be longitudinally connected to an additional deformed steel wire 5″ by use of the fixture holder 2 as shown in FIG. 6A. In FIG. 11B, the intersectional connection type deformed steel wire 5′ is extended to an upper end of the beam connection loop type deformed steel wire 5″. The intersectional connection type deformed steel wire 5′ is also used for the reinforcement of a masonry wall.

FIG. 9B is related to a region designated by the line Z-Z of FIG. 10 and FIG. 1C. It can be appreciated from FIG. 9B that a first deformed steel wire 5, which extends horizontally by penetrating through the beam block 9, and a second steel wire 5, which is horizontally disposed on the beam block 9 in the same direction as the first deformed steel wire 5, are fitted into and fixed by the beam connection loop 52 and the intersectional connecting portion 51 of the beam supporting type deformed steel wire 5′″, for the sake of supporting the beam block 9. As shown in FIG. 10, the deformed steel wire 5′″ is effective to densely connect the deformed steel wire 5, which is horizontally penetrated through the beam block 9, and the deformed steel wire 5, which is horizontally disposed on the beam block 9, to each other, thereby guaranteeing a more effective reinforcement of the beam block. In particular, by allowing the deformed steel wires 5 to be more densely arranged in opposite end regions of the beam block 9, the deformed steel wire 5′″ having the above described configuration can surely and easily eliminate the drooping of the ends of the beam block 9. Since the reinforcement of beam blocks requires an increased number of deformed steel wires as compared to the number of deformed steel wires required for the reinforcement of a masonry wall, the use of the beam connection loop type deformed steel wires 5″ may cause an excessive consumption of materials and an inconvenience in block laying. However, these problems can be solved by the adoption of the beam supporting type deformed steel wire 5′″.

FIGS. 12A to 12C illustrate a block for use in the masonry wall reinforcing method of the present invention. The block 8 has a center hole 81, a side surface groove 82, a first side hole 83, and a second side hole 84. The side surface groove 82 is formed only at one outer side surface of the block 8, and all the above holes have a rounded rectangular shape. The reason why the groove is formed only at one side surface of the block is to prevent the groove of the block, which is located at the corner of the wall (See the region L of FIG. 13), from being exposed to the outside. As compared to a circular hole, the above described rectangular hole has the effect of increasing the contact area of upper and lower rows of blocks, thereby enabling a more strong connection of the rows of blocks. In particular, the rectangular hole has the effect of not only providing an increased space required for the penetration of the deformed steel wire, thus enabling an easy wire penetrating operation, but also allowing the block to have a constant thickness around the hole, thus enabling a uniform firing of the block without leaving a weak portion in the block and resulting in an improvement in both a rigidity and structural strength of the block. Moreover, since corners of the rectangular hole are rounded, it is possible to prevent a stress from being concentrated at the corners, and consequently, to reduce the potentiality of a breakage of the block to the maximum extent.

With the masonry wall reinforcing method of the present invention, the laying of blocks can be performed without a special restriction so long as neighboring blocks are arranged such that their side surface grooves face each other only at a location through which the vertically extending deformed steel wire 5′ is penetrated (See the circle N of FIG. 13). Therefore, there is no need for forming the side surface groove 82 at both side surfaces of each block.

As shown in FIG. 12C, the center hole 81 of the block 8 has a rounded rectangular shape, which is substantially the same as a shape defined by two facing side surface grooves 82 spaced apart from each other by a distance M equal to the width of a masonry joint.

Comparing the sizes of the above mentioned holes with reference to FIG. 12B, the center hole 81, which is perforated in the center of the block, has a width e smaller than a width h of the first and second side holes 83 and 84. When blocks are alternately laid one above another, a mortar portion M between neighboring blocks is located above or below the center hole 81 of the underlying or overlying block. However, since the mortar portion M has a lower strength than that of the block, in order to reinforce the strength of the mortar portion M, it is necessary that the width e of the center hole 81 of the underlying or overlying block must be smaller than the width h of the first or second side hole 83 or 84, such that a thickness g of the remained center portion of the block around the center hole 81 is larger than a width f of the remained side portion of the block.

Also, the first side hole 83, located between the center hole 81 and the side surface groove 82, has a length c smaller than a length d of the opposite second side hole 84. This is to reduce a deviation between the thicknesses a and a′ of the block around the first side hole 83 and the thicknesses b and b′ of the block around the second side hole 84, thereby enabling a uniform firing of the block. If the length c of the first side hole 83 is equal to the length d of the opposite second side hole 84, the deviation between the thicknesses a and a′ around the first side hole 83 and the thicknesses b and b′ around the second side hole 84 increases excessively, thus causing an irregularity in the firing of the block and consequently, having a bad effect on the strength of the block.

FIG. 13 illustrates the use of the above described block. It can be appreciated from FIG. 13 that the vertically extending deformed steel wire 5′ is penetrated alternately through the center hole 81 of the block and the space defined by both the facing side surface grooves 82 of the underlying neighboring blocks.

Although the beam block 9 shown in the lower part of FIGS. 11A to 11C or the beam blocks shown in FIG. 13 are illustrated as though they have circular holes, the block shown in FIG. 12 is also usable as the beam block, and in particular, is more preferable in view of assisting a block sorting operation of a mason.

Meanwhile, although FIGS. 12A to 12C and FIG. 13 illustrate the block 8 having the side surface groove 82 formed only at one side surface thereof, it will be appreciated that a block, having a pair of side surface grooves formed at both side surfaces thereof, can be used in the construction of a building except for the corners of the building. Providing the side surface grooves 82 at both side surfaces of the block has the effect of achieving a convenience in the laying of blocks.

Hereinafter, an embodiment of the masonry wall reinforcing method in accordance with the present invention will be described with reference to FIGS. 14A to 14E.

First, in a state wherein a first row of blocks 8 is laid around a periphery of the inner wall C at a predetermined height as shown in FIG. 14A, the deformed steel wire 5 is disposed in a peripheral direction of a building (i.e. in a longitudinal direction of the blocks) as shown in FIG. 14B, and the deformed steel wire 5′ is penetrated through the center hole 81 of the block 8 in a height direction (i.e. vertical direction) of the building. The deformed steel wire 5 is connected to the deformed steel wire 5′ via the second intersectional connecting portion 51b.

Next, as shown in FIG. 14C, after filling mortar in a masonry joint, a second row of blocks is laid on the first row of blocks 8 such that side surface grooves 82 of two neighboring blocks face each other to define a space for the penetration of the deformed steel wire 5′. Since the first intersectional connecting portion 51a of the deformed steel wire 5′ is spaced apart from the second intersectional connecting portion 51b by a distance equal to the height of a single block, the first intersectional connecting portion 51a is located at the height of an upper end surface of the second row of blocks. Also, since the first and second intersectional connecting portions 51a and 51b are arranged perpendicular to each other, the first intersectional connecting portion 51a is used for the connection of the fixture holder 2 that is oriented toward the inner wall of the building. If the anchoring fixture holders 2′ are fitted around the fixture holder 2 from opposite sides of the fixture holder 2 in a state wherein the fixture holder 2 is fitted into the first intersectional connecting portion 51a, the fixture holder 2 longitudinally interferes with the inner periphery of the first intersectional connecting portion 51a, thereby being fixedly caught by the first intersectional connecting portion 51a.

Thereafter, a third row of blocks is laid on the second row of blocks as shown in FIG. 14D. By repeatedly performing the above described procedure as shown in FIGS. 14A to 14C, a plurality of deformed steel wires 5′ and 5 can be connected to one another in both the peripheral direction and the vertical direction of the building, and furthermore, a plurality of fixture holders 2 can be connected thereto, for reinforcing the strength of the resulting masonry wall.

Finally, if the fixture 1 is introduced into a rear end of each fixture holder 2 until the fixture 1 is press-fitted into the inner wall while being connected to the fixture holder 2, the overall masonry wall can be strongly fixed to the inner wall.

Now, a beam block reinforcing method included in the above described masonry wall reinforcing method will be described with reference to FIGS. 15A to 15D.

First, a first deformed steel wire 5 is penetrated through a hole perforated in the beam block 9 as shown in FIG. 15A, and a second deformed steel wire 5 is disposed on an upper surface of the beam block 9 as shown in FIG. 15B. Then, after inserting the lower first deformed steel wire 5 into the beam connection loop 52 of the beam connection loop type deformed steel wire 5″ as shown in FIG. 15C and inserting the upper second deformed steel wire 5 into the intersectional connecting portion 51 of the deformed steel wire 5″ spaced apart from the beam connection loop 52 by a predetermined distance (equal to a distance between the two steel wires 5), mortar is filled in a masonry joint, and additional rows of blocks are laid thereon. With this method, in addition to surely supporting the beam block, the reinforcement of the masonry wall can be accomplished by repeatedly connecting additional deformed steel wires to an upper end of the beam connection loop type deformed steel wire 5″ by use of the fixture holders 2 and also, by connecting different kinds of deformed steel wires 5′ in a lateral direction of the deformed steel wire 5 disposed on the upper surface of the beam block 9.

In particular, since the deformed steel wire 5, which is disposed on an upper surface of the last beam block (See the circle O of FIG. 13), protrudes toward the wall, the deformed steel wire 5 can support the beam block with a strong force so long as the deformed steel wire 5 is not cut.

FIG. 16 is an explanatory view illustrating a beam block reinforcing method applicable to an existing building. The sequence of the beam block reinforcing method will now be described.

First, a row of beam blocks 9 and a plurality of rows of blocks (for example, four rows of blocks) above the row of beam blocks 9 are removed together. Then, after supporting the remaining blocks, overlaid above the removed blocks, by use of temporary supports (not shown) so as to prevent the collapse of the blocks, as shown in FIGS. 15A to 15D, beam blocks 9 are disposed in a row such that their holes horizontally communicate with one another, such that a first deformed steel wire 5 is penetrated through the communicating holes of the beam blocks 9. Then, blocks 8 are laid at the lateral side of the beam blocks 9, and a second deformed steel wire 5 is disposed on the upper surfaces of the blocks 8. Thereafter, the two deformed steel wires 5 are connected to the beam connection loop 52 and the intersectional connecting portion 51a of the deformed steel wire 5″″.

Subsequently, after laying another row of blocks 8, the fixture holder 2 is connected to the intersectional connecting portion 51b of the deformed steel wire 5″″.

After laying a further row of blocks 8, an additional deformed steel wire 5 is disposed in a horizontal direction of the building, so as to be connected to the intersectional connecting portion 51c of the deformed steel wire 5″″.

After completing the laying of blocks 8 by filling mortar in a masonry joint, the fixture 1 is press-fitted into the inner wall through the fixture holder 2 that is embedded in the masonry joint.

With the above described procedure, the reinforcement of beam blocks in the existing building can be accomplished.

INDUSTRIAL APPLICABILITY

As apparent from the above description, the present invention provides a masonry wall reinforcing method, which can achieve the reinforcement of a masonry wall with a minimum number of elements. With the masonry wall reinforcing method of the present invention, furthermore, the reinforcement of beam blocks can be achieved only by use of the elements used in the reinforcement of the masonry wall without requiring additional elements, resulting in a convenience in masonry work.

Although the preferred embodiments of the present invention have been disclosed for illustrative purposes, those skilled in the art will appreciate that various modifications, additions and substitutions are possible, without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention as disclosed in the accompanying claims.