Title:
Tail Free Transfer Winder
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Transferring a moving web from a winding roll to a new core is effected by cutting the web to form a downstream web end portion and an adjacent upstream web end portion; splicing the cut web with a tape; moving the spliced web to a position adjacent to the new core; and adhering the downstream web end portion to the new core with the tape.



Inventors:
Pasquale, Robert A. (Hawthorne, NJ, US)
Application Number:
12/133412
Publication Date:
10/08/2009
Filing Date:
06/05/2008
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
242/522
International Classes:
B65H35/06; B65H35/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20130140389SEAT BELT RETRACTOR COMPRISING A TENSIONING DRIVEJune, 2013Pechhold et al.
20120224905DETECTING DEVICE AND PRINTER THAT DETECTS A REMAINING AMOUNT OF PAPER IN A PAPER ROLLSeptember, 2012Nihashi
20070181739Flexible material storage deviceAugust, 2007Derendal
20130248635YARN-FEEDING/RECOVERING METHOD FOR TEXTILE MACHINES, AND APPARATUS FOR CARRYING OUT SUCH METHODSeptember, 2013Gotti et al.
20090134260Magnetic recording tape backside having both low friction and low surface roughnessMay, 2009Jensen et al.
20130193391METHOD FOR WINDING AND UNWINDING A SYNTHETIC ROPE ON A WINCH DRUMAugust, 2013Fok et al.
20060102771Spining reelMay, 2006Kimura
20170065842Fire Hose Pack RollerMarch, 2017Harrold
20050098678Overhead spool mount and methodMay, 2005Adams et al.
20100025520WINDING SUPPORT AND USE OF A WINDING CARRIERFebruary, 2010Hahm et al.
20120211582MATERIAL WINDERAugust, 2012Cid



Primary Examiner:
CAMPOS, JR, JUAN J
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Kane Kessler P.C. (New York, NY, US)
Claims:
1. A method of transferring a moving web from a winding roll to a rotating new core, the method comprising the steps of: cutting the moving web to form a downstream web end portion and an adjacent upstream web end portion; splicing the moving cut web with a tape; moving the spliced web to a position adjacent to the rotating new core; and adhering the downstream web end portion while moving to the rotating new core with an adhesive.

2. A method as set forth in claim 1 wherein the tape is a double faced tape, the cut web is spliced with an adhesive that is on a first face of the double faced tape, and the downstream web end portion is adhered to the new core with an adhesive that is on a second face of the double faced tape.

3. A method as set forth in claim 2 wherein the splicing step includes applying the double faced tape to the cut web so that a first portion of the double faced tape overlies the downstream end portion of the web and a second portion of the double faced tape overlies the upstream end portion of the web, each one of the first and second tape portions having an exposed adhesive surface.

4. A method as set forth in claim 1 wherein the tape is a single faced tape, the cut web is spliced with an adhesive that is on the single faced tape, and the downstream web end portion is adhered to the new core with an adhesive that is on the new core.

5. A method as set forth in claim 1 wherein the cutting step includes the step of wrapping the moving web about a pull roll having a surface portion that is configured as a cutting surface for receiving a knife to cut the web.

6. A method as set forth in claim 1 wherein the step of adhering the downstream web end portion to the new core includes the step of positioning a bump/pack/gap roll to position the splice on the moving web against the new core to cause the downstream end portion of the web to adhere to the new core.

7. A method as set forth in claim 6 wherein the bump/pack/gap roll is positioned in a nip position with the new core.

8. A method as set forth in claim 6 wherein the bump/pack/gap roll is not positioned in a nip position with the new core.

9. A method as set forth in claim 1 wherein: the tape is a double faced tape, the cut web is spliced with an adhesive that is on a first face of the double faced tape, and the downstream web end portion is adhered to the new core with an adhesive that is on a second face of the double faced tape; and the splicing step includes applying the double faced tape to the cut web so that a first portion of the double faced tape overlies the downstream end portion of the web and a second portion of the double faced tape overlies the upstream end portion of the web, each one of the first and second tape portions having an exposed adhesive surface; and the cutting step includes the step of wrapping the moving web about a pull roll having a surface portion that is configured as a cutting surface for receiving a knife to cut the web; and the step of adhering the downstream web end portion to the new core includes the step of positioning a bump/pack/gap roll to position the splice on the moving web against the new core to cause the downstream end portion of the web to adhere to the new core.

10. A method of transferring a moving web from a winding roll to a rotating new core, the method comprising the steps of: cutting the moving web on a first roll to form a downstream web end portion and an adjacent upstream web end portion; transporting the web end portions from the first roll to a position that is spaced apart from the first roll and adjacent to a rotating new core; maintaining the downstream web end portion adjacent to the upstream web end portion during the transporting step; and adhering the moving downstream web end portion to the rotating new core without forming a tail.

11. A method as set forth in claim 10 wherein the maintaining step includes applying a tape to the web end portions after cutting the web to maintain the web end portions adjacent to each other during the transporting step.

12. A method as set forth in claim 11 wherein the tape is a double sided tape having a first layer of adhesive that maintains the web end portions adjacent to each other during the transporting step and a second layer of adhesive that adheres the downstream web end portion to the new core.

13. A method as set forth in claim 10 wherein the transporting step includes moving the web end portions through space between the first roll and the new core.

14. Apparatus for transferring a moving web from a winding roll to a rotating new core, the apparatus comprising: a pull roll on which the moving web is wrapped; a knife roll that is movable and cuts the web while the moving web is wrapped on the pull roll; a tape roll on which a tape is adhered and which is movable relative to the pull roll to apply the tape to the moving cut web while the moving cut web is wrapped on the pull roll to splice the cut web; and a bump/pack/gap roll that causes the moving spliced web to engage the rotating new core so that the cut web adheres to the new core.

15. Apparatus for transferring a moving web from a winding roll to a rotating new core, the apparatus comprising: means for cutting the moving web to form an upstream web end portion and a downstream web end portion; means for applying an adhesive layer to the moving cut web to hold the web end portions in a spatial relationship; and means for moving the downstream web end portion into contact with the rotating new core to adhere the downstream web end portion to the new core.

16. Apparatus as set forth in claim 12 wherein the means for applying includes a tape roll on which is disposed a double faced tape, the tape roll being movable into a nip position with the moving web to apply the double faced tape to the cut web.

17. Apparatus for transferring a moving web from a winding roll to a rotating new core, the apparatus comprising: a first mechanism that cuts the moving web; a second mechanism that splices the moving cut web with a tape; and a third mechanism that transports the spliced web to the rotating new core to adhere the tape to the rotating new core.

18. Apparatus as set forth in claim 17 wherein the first mechanism includes a pull roll on which the moving web is wrapped prior to being cut.

19. Apparatus as set forth in claim 18 wherein the pull roll is a vacuum pull/anvil roll.

20. Apparatus as set forth in claim 17 wherein the second mechanism includes a tape roll on which the tape is adhered before being applied to the cut web, the tape roll forming a nip with the pull roll to cause the tape to adhere to the cut web on both sides of the cut.

21. Apparatus as set forth in claim 17 wherein the first mechanism cuts the web to form a downstream end portion of the web and an adjacent upstream end portion of the web, the tape adhering the downstream web end portion to the new core while the upstream web end portion peels away from the tape.

22. Apparatus as set forth in claim 17 wherein the second mechanism is operative to apply the tape to the cut web so that a first portion of the tape overlies a downstream end portion of the web and a second portion of the tape overlies an upstream end portion of the web, each one of the first and second tape portions having an exposed adhesive surface presented away from the web.

23. Apparatus as set forth in claim 17 wherein the third mechanism includes a bump/pack/gap bump roll.

Description:

RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of the filing date of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/123,361, filed Apr. 8, 2008, titled Tail Free Transfer Winder, the entire disclosure of which is incorporated by reference.

BACKGROUND

Many of today's products are made by processing a web of material. This processing, typically referred to as Web Converting, allows enhancements, such as printing, coating, laminating and texturing, to be made to a base material such as paper, polymer films, foils and fabrics. The processing of these materials usually occurs when a roll (or rolls) of material is unwound, moved through a machine and rewound when the processing is completed.

To increase productivity and throughput of an operation, as well as to allow for the processing to occur under constant conditions, many techniques have been developed to allow rolls of material to be fed to and removed from the converting machine on a continuous basis, without interrupting the process. These techniques allow for splicing of rolls together while unwinding, and for transferring of webs from full to new rolls while winding.

At the winder, when a roll of material is completed (having reached its desired size), the web needs to be cut and a new roll started. Typically the new roll is started by attaching the web to a hollow tube, commonly referred to as a “core” and usually made of cardboard, steel or aluminum. The core is held in the winder and interconnected with a motor which spins it, allowing the web to be wound around it. Tape or adhesive is commonly applied to the core prior to the web being introduced, allowing the web to adhere to it.

The cutting and transferring of the web to the new core can be done either manually, through direct operator intervention, or automatically. When done automatically, it is common practice for a “bump and cut” system to be used. In this system a running web is brought in contact with a core (which is running at the same surface speed and already has tape or adhesive applied to it) by a roll (referred to as a “bump roll”) and a knife is fired into the web (after, or downstream of, the core contact point), severing it. As a result, the web sticks to the core and begins to wind around it. Typically a turret type winder is used, having two or more positions for holding rolls and cores and designed to rotate about a center axis to allow for the proper orientation of the rolls with respect to the running web.

A drawback of the “bump and cut” system is the length of web between the location of the “bump”, where the web is taped to the core, and the location of the cut. This length, commonly referred to as the “tail”, is free to fall in any orientation and typically folds over on the core. Not only is this section of web wasted, but on certain products the upset that is caused by the fold can ruin successive wraps of the material.

Several devices have been invented to address the tail issue. These units are designed to apply the web to the new core without any tail or fold.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In the attached drawings:

FIG. 1 is a schematic view of a turret winder and a transfer mechanism in accordance with one embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged schematic view of one portion of the transfer mechanism of FIG. 1;

FIGS. 3-7 are views similar to FIG. 2 showing steps in the process of cutting and splicing the web before adhering it to a new core;

FIGS. 8-11 are enlarged schematic views of another portion of the transfer mechanism of FIG. 1, showing steps in the process of adhering the web to a new core; and

FIGS. 12 and 13 illustrate alternative embodiments of the invention.

DESCRIPTION

The present invention relates to a transfer mechanism for transferring a moving web to a new core. The invention is applicable to transfer mechanisms of differing constructions. As representative of the invention, FIGS. 1-11 show a transfer mechanism 10 that is a first embodiment of the invention, associated with a turret winder 12. The transfer mechanism 10 is adapted to first cut a moving web 14 that is being wound on a winding roll 15 that is supported on the turret winder 12, and then to transfer the moving web to a new core 16 on the turret winder.

A transfer mechanism of the invention may take different forms. In the one embodiment that is illustrated, the transfer mechanism 10 (FIG. 1) includes, among other parts, a vacuum pull roll/anvil roll 20 (FIG. 2), a cut-off roll 22, two tape roll assemblies 24 (FIG. 1), one or more tension sensing/control rolls 26, a combination bump/pack/gap roll 28, and appropriate web contouring idlers 30, all mounted from a frame assembly 32. The mechanism 10 is configured to provide two different web paths so that the web can be wound on the new core 16 in either a clockwise or counter clockwise direction (top side in or top side out). Other arrangements, such as with two cut-off rolls 22 and one tape roll assembly 24, could be used.

The vacuum pull roll/anvil roll 20 (FIG. 2) is operative to pin the web 14 to its surface through suction. A drive motor (not shown) drives the roll 20 at a surface speed that equals the web speed. The roll 20 also assists in the cutting of the web, by serving as a backing (anvil) for a cut-off roll knife. To that end, the roll 20 can include a separate surface portion 36 (FIG. 4), which may be in the form of a replaceable insert. A position feedback device (not shown) monitors the angular position of the pull roll 20. Other means may be provided for effecting radially inward pulling of the web.

The cut-off roll 22 (FIG. 2) is mounted in pneumatically or motor positioned arms located about the periphery of the vacuum pull roll/anvil 20 roll. The cut-off roll 22 includes a drive motor complete with a speed/position controller. The cut-off roll 22 incorporates a razor type blade, or knife 40, that may be mounted in a helix on the roll's surface. A position feedback device (not shown) monitors the angular position of the cut-off roll 22.

The two tape rolls 24 are independently mounted in pneumatically or motor positioned arms located about the periphery of the vacuum pull roll/anvil roll 20. The tape rolls 24 are motor driven complete with speed/position controls. The drive can be accomplished either by independent motors/controls or a common arrangement. The tape rolls 24 are designed to be easily accessed by an operator. Each tape roll 24 (FIG. 2) preferably includes a special surface portion 42 that allows a splice tape 50 to be mounted on it with minimal or no sticking, as described below. This surface portion 42 can be plasma coated, silicone coated, etc., for release purposes. A position feedback device (not shown) monitors the tape roll's angular position. The tape roll 24 has a mark 44 against which the leading edge of the splice tape 50 is positioned.

The transfer mechanism 10 utilizes the splice tape 50, which is positioned on the selected tape roll 24 at the beginning of the transfer process as described below. The splice tape 50 is preferably a double sided tape, or double faced tape, having an adhesive first side surface 52 (FIG. 6) and an opposite adhesive second side surface 54. The tape 50 has a leading half or leading end portion 56, and a trailing half or trailing end portion 58. (The thickness of the tape 50 is exaggerated for clarity, in the drawings).

The tension sensing/control roll(s) 26 (FIG. 2) are provided to monitor the web tension and to control the winder spindle that is supporting the building roll. The combination bump/pack/gap roll 28 (FIG. 8) is mounted on linear slides 60 and is interconnected to a pneumatic cylinder 62 designed to allow the roll to interface with the building roll of material as it is wound, as well as with the new core 16 at the time of transfer to the new core. The bump/pack/gap roll pneumatic cylinders 62 are also mounted on linear slides 64 and is interconnected with a positioning system, such as a motor driven screw 66, which allows the roll 28 to be located with respect to the roll of material as it is being wound.

While the web 14 is being processed (FIG. 2), and the building roll 15 is being wound on the winder 12, the web wraps most of the periphery of the vacuum pull roll/anvil roll 20, a segment of a tension sensing/control roll 26, and a portion of the bump/pack/gap roll 28. The vacuum roll 20 is driven so that its surface speed equals the web speed. The vacuum system is on, pinning the web 14 to the portion of the roll 20 that is wrapped. The bump/pack/gap roll 28 (FIG. 8) may be running in pack mode (in contact with the roll of material that is being wound), in gap mode (staying in close proximity to the roll of material that is being wound), or in retracted mode.

When a transfer is to be performed (FIGS. 2-6) from a building roll 15 to the new core 16, a splice tape 50 is applied to the tape roll 24 that is associated with the particular web path/mode of operation that is selected (top side in or top side out). The leading edge 70 of the splice tape 50 is positioned against the tape roll mark 44. The tape 50 (FIG. 6) is positioned on the surface portion 42 of the tape roll 24, so that the first side surface 52 of the tape overlies the roll 24 and the second side surface 54 of the tape is exposed and faces outward. Once the tape 50 is positioned on the tape roll 24, it may be held in place either by lightly sticking to the roll, or with tear tabs (small pieces of tape, not shown, which stick both to the splice tape and to the tape roll 24), or by other methods such as a vacuum.

The new core 16 (FIG. 1) is loaded into one of the spindle positions of the winder 12. No tape or adhesive is applied to the surface of the core 16. Instead, adhesive, for example in the form of the tape 50 as discussed above, is applied to the tape roll 24.

At some time before transfer, the winder turret 12 is indexed, bringing the new core 16 into its transfer position as shown in FIGS. 8-11. The web 14 is still running, continuing to wind on the same spindle as before indexing, to complete the building roll 15. The motor of the new core 16 is activated so that the core's surface speed matches that of the web 14. The tape roll 24 and the cut-off roll 22 are also brought to a surface speed that matches the speed of the web 14.

Immediately before transfer, the tape roll 24 and the cut-off roll 22 move into close proximity (FIG. 3) to the vacuum pull roll/anvil roll 20, pneumatically positioned against a device such as a cam (not shown) that ensures they contact the vacuum pull roll/anvil roll at the precise time/location. The rotational position of the tape roll 24 and the cut-off roll 22 is set so that the cut-off knife 40 and the tape roll 24 are in phase with the cutting surface 36 on the vacuum pull roll/anvil roll 20. Additionally, the bump/pack/gap roll 28 is moved to a position in close proximity (FIG. 8) to the core 16. Other means, such as a motor driven system, can be used to replace the pneumatics and cams to position the tape roll 24 and cut-off roll 22.

The cut-off roll 22 is fired (FIG. 4) against the vacuum pull roll/anvil roll 20 at the correct time such that the knife 40 makes contact with the cutting surface 36. The knife 40 severs the web 14 at a cut line 80 (FIGS. 5 and 6), forming a downstream web end portion 82 (closer along the web path to the supply of web, to the right as viewed in the Figures) and an upstream web end portion 84 (farther along the web path, to the left as viewed in the Figures) on opposite sides of the web cut line 80. The downstream web end portion 82 is the “leading edge” of the web being supplied from the unwind. The two web end portions 82 and 84 are adjacent to each other on opposite sides of the web cut line 80. Both web end portions 82 and 84 (FIG. 5) continue to lie flat against the surface of the pull roll 20 as the roll rotates, because of the vacuum pull exerted by the roll 20.

As the vacuum roll/anvil roll 20 continues to rotate, the tape roll 24 (FIG. 5) is fired at the proper time so that the second side surface 54 of the tape 50 is applied (FIG. 6) to the moving web 14. Specifically, the leading half 56 of the splice tape 50 lands on the upstream web end portion 84, and the trailing half 58 of the splice tape lands on the downstream web end portion 82. The adhesive properties of the tape 50 result in the tape being transferred from the tape roll 24 to the web 14, bridging the cut 80 and holding the moving web together in a butt splice 90 (FIG. 7) as the moving web exits the vacuum roll 20. The web end portions 82 and 84 are maintained adjacent to each other by the tape 50 as the web 14 moves. The cut-off roll 22 and the tape roll 24 are then retracted from the vacuum pull roll/anvil roll 20.

The web 14 continues to move, with the splice 90 leaving the vacuum roll 20, traveling around the tension sensing/control roll 26 (which may be coated with a special release surface such as plasma so that the tape will not stick to it) and heading toward the bump/pack/gap roll 28. Some time during the transfer sequence, prior to the splice 90 reaching the bump/pack/gap roll 28, the bump/pack/gap roll is pneumatically positioned (FIG. 9) against the new core 16, with the web 14 running between them.

The splice 90 is transported through space (i.e., not along a surface) to a position spaced apart from the vacuum pull roll/anvil roll 20 and adjacent to the new core 16. As the splice 90 reaches the core 16 (FIGS. 10 and 11), the splice tape 50 on the web 14 comes into contact with the surface of the core. Specifically, the first side surface 52 of the tape 50 engages the outer surface of the core 16, causing the splice tape to stick to the core as the core rotates and the web 14 moves.

When this happens, the upstream web end portion 84, which is the end of the length of web 14 that is on the building roll 15, pulls away from the leading half 56 of the splice tape 50, and does not stick to the core 16. This result occurs for several reasons, including the relative strength of adhesion of the splice tape 50 to the core 16 as compared to the strength of adhesion of the splice tape to the web 14, and the magnitude of the pulling force being applied to the web from the building roll 15. Thus, the upstream web end portion 84 peels off the splice tape 50, rather than sticking to it and being wound on the new core 16. The upstream web end portion 84 travels to the building roll 15 to complete it.

The downstream web end portion 82 (the portion immediately after the cut 80) continues to stick to the trailing half 58 of the tape 50, resulting in the downstream web end portion being transferred to the core 16. Since the downstream web end portion 82 is the “leading edge” of the web 14 that is being supplied from the unwind, and since this web portion 82 adheres to the tape 50, it also adheres to the core 16. As a result, the moving web 14 coming from the unwind commences to be wound on the new core 16. There is no tail formed, and the transfer to the new core 16 is completed with no fold-over and no tail.

At this point, the drive controlling the motor attached to the core 16 can be switched from speed control to tension control, taking an input signal from the tension sensing/control roll 26. The bump/pack/gap roll 28 may be positioned either in pack mode (in contact with the new roll of material that is being wound), gap mode (staying in close proximity to the new roll of material that is being wound) or retracted mode.

In the illustrated embodiment, a single layer of splice tape 50 is used. Conditions may be present that would call for varying or different tape configurations or characteristics. These conditions might include the adhesion characteristics of the web material itself, and/or the adhesion characteristics of the new core, for example. In such varying circumstances, the splice tape may be provided with different adhesive characteristics or configurations. Specifically, the splice tape may have different adhesive strengths on its two faces. Or, a splice tape may be provided as a film with two separate layers of adhesive on its opposite faces. Still further, an auxiliary (additional) piece of tape may be provided for engagement with one or the other of the two web end portions, having adhesive characteristics different from those of the main tape. All these factors and variations can be implemented in keeping with the invention.

As one alternative, a transfer to the new core 16 can be made without contact between it and the bump/pack/gap roll 28. FIG. 12 illustrates this alternative. Splice preparation would be the same as before. The bump/pack/gap roll 28 is pneumatically positioned (FIG. 12) in close proximity to (but not against) the new core 16, with the web 14 running between them. The new core 16 is positioned so that the web 14 contacts it. As the splice 90 reaches the core 16, the splice tape 50 on the web 14 comes into contact with the surface of the core. Specifically, the first side surface 52 of the tape 50 engages the outer surface of the core 16, causing the splice tape to stick to the core as the core rotates and the web 14 moves. The downstream web end portion 82 (the portion immediately after the cut 80) continues to stick to the trailing half 58 of the tape 50, resulting in the downstream web end portion being transferred to the core 16. Since the downstream web end portion 82 is the “leading edge” of the web 14 that is being supplied from the unwind, and since this web portion 82 adheres to the tape 50, it also adheres to the core 16. As a result, the moving web 14 coming from the unwind commences to be wound on the new core 16. There is no tail formed, and the transfer to the new core 16 is completed with no fold-over and no tail.

As another alternative (FIG. 13), a transfer to the new core 16 can be made in either of the above described methods without the use of double face tape 50 to splice the web. In this mode a single sided tape 50a can be used to splice the web 14. The single sided tape 50a is positioned on the tape roll 24 with the adhesive side exposed. The new core 16 is prepared with an exposed sticky surface, such as a double face tape or other adhesive 100. The web 14 is cut and is spliced with the single sided tape 50a. When the splice 90 reaches the core 16, the splice tape 50a on the web 14 comes into contact with the exposed tape/adhesive 100 on the surface of the core. Specifically, the first side surface 52a of the tape 50a engages the adhesive outer surface 100 of the core 16, causing the splice tape to stick to the core as the core rotates and the web 14 moves. The downstream web end portion 82 (the portion immediately after the cut 80) continues to stick to the trailing half 58a of the tape 50a, resulting in the downstream web end portion being transferred to the core 16. Since the downstream web end portion 82 is the “leading edge” of the web 14 that is being supplied from the unwind, and since this web portion 82 adheres to the tape 50a, it also adheres to the core 16. As a result, the moving web 14 coming from the unwind commences to be wound on the new core 16. There is no tail formed, and the transfer to the new core 16 is completed with no fold-over and no tail.