Title:
ROOFING SHINGLE SUPPORT SYSTEM
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A support system for conveniently staging and accessing roofing materials above and across each side of a roof, said system comprising a pair of longitudinally-extending base members, the base members each having a generally triangular-shaped radial cross section; and means for joining the base members to each other.



Inventors:
Crookston, Lawrence A. (Barberton, OH, US)
Application Number:
12/062121
Publication Date:
10/08/2009
Filing Date:
04/03/2008
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/741.1
International Classes:
E04D15/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
EPPS, TODD MICHAEL
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
HAHN LOESER & PARKS, LLP (Cleveland, OH, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A support system for conveniently staging and accessing roofing materials above and across each side of a gabled roof, said system comprising: a pair of longitudinally-extending base members, the base members each having a generally triangular-shaped radial cross section; and means for joining the base members to each other.

2. The support system of claim 1, wherein the means for joining the base members comprises a plurality of straps, each strap surrounding both of the base members.

3. The support system of claim 1, wherein the means for joining the base members comprises a sheathing.

4. The support system of claim 2, wherein the sheathing surrounds the base members on three sides.

5. The support system of claim 2, wherein the sheating is an elastomeric netting having a plurality of holes therethrough.

6. The support system of claim 2, wherein the base members are spaced apart.

7. The support system of claim 1, wherein the base members comprise a lightweight material.

8. The support system of claim 1, wherein said base members have a hinged or flexible centerline.

9. The support system of claim 1, wherein said means for joining the base members is skid- and tear-resistant.

10. The support system of claim 1, wherein said means for joining the base members is a resilient, rollable material.

11. The support system of claim 1, wherein said means for joining the base members is removably attached to the base members.

12. The support system of claim 1, wherein an upper surface of the base members is attached to said lower surface of said means for joining the base members.

13. The support system of claim 11, wherein said system has cushioning, shock absorptive and sound insulative capabilities.

14. A method of stacking roofing shingle bundles on a roof having a peak, comprising: placing a first shingle support system about the peak of the roof, the first shingle support system comprising two longitudinally-extending base members that, when placed on opposite sides of the peak of the roof, form a substantially horizontal shingle support surface; stacking at least one bundle of shingles on the first shingle support system.

15. The method of claim 14, wherein the base members are of a generally triangular radial cross-section.

16. The method of claim 14, wherein the shingle support system further comprises a sheathing surrounding at least the top and bottom of each base member and connecting the two base members together.

17. The method of claim 16, wherein the sheathing is an elastomeric netting.

18. The method of claim 16, further comprising the steps of: placing a second shingle support system about the peak of the roof adjacent to the first shingle support system, the second shingle support system comprising two longitudinally-extending base members that, when placed on opposite sides of the peak of the roof, form a substantially horizontal shingle support surface; and stacking at least one bundle of shingles on the second shingle support system.

19. The method of claim 16, wherein the base members are spaced apart, and the method further comprises attaching the shingle support system to the roof with at least one fastener extending through sheathing located in the space between the base members.

20. The method of claim 14, wherein the method further comprises: stacking a plurality of shingle bundle layers on the first shingle support system.

Description:

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates to the field of roofing equipment for aiding roofers or construction workers while working on an inclined roof surface. More particularly, the present invention relates to a platform for supporting a roofing construction materials. Specifically, the present invention relates to a roofing shingle support system designed to structurally support one or more stacks of shingle bundles at or near the apex of a sloping roof.

BACKGROUND

Tradesmen often need a convenient storage and retrieval location for placing and accessing their materials while working. For roofing tradesmen, it would be appropriate to acquire a semi-flat to flat place to stack bundles of roofing shingles before their installation.

Of course, this is of little concern in mildly sloping or flat roofs. However, without an additional support system the typical gabled or sloped roof surface will not support a stack of shingles for a sustained period. Indeed, since shingles will readily slide off, attempting to store stacks of shingles upon a sharply sloping roof will be unwise and unsafe.

In terms of structural support, an ideal place for placing tradesman materials is the ridge or apex of a roof. The apex of a roof's framing system offers the greatest structural support and thus has the capacity to readily endure the most weight, as may come in the form of stacks of roofing shingle bundles. Unfortunately, the apex is very narrow and generally provides insufficient surface area for placing shingles.

Conceivably, one could still place and balance the shingles upon the roof's narrow apex without further support. However, this is clearly unsafe and infeasible. Moreover, due to the shingles' inherent flexibility, they would quickly bend under their own weight and the forces of gravity. While some variation from a flat shingle surface is acceptable, too much variation, as may occur under the aforementioned scenario, may adversely affect the shingles function. The shingle's tolerance to bending will depend on weather conditions, or more specifically, the external temperature and moisture content. Some shingles, such as laminated fiberglass/asphalt shingles, may delaminate, or split if forced to bend beyond 15° in colder weather. It would therefore be desirable to provide a portable roofing shingle support system that exploits the support capacity of a roof's apex.

Working on a roof is also normally a noisy endeavor. Noise from typical roofing operations, or even walking back and forth on the roof, generally can be heard in the structure or building, causing disruption to the occupants and/or to the surrounding neighborhood. Besides the noise, dropping heavy shingle bundles on the roof can possibly damage the structure. As such, it would be desirable to provide a shingle support system which reduce the noise and/or provide a shock absorptive capacity to reduce at least some of the noise and cushion or absorb some of the shock associated with handling roofing shingles.

While there have been developed some roof support systems, such systems do not offer the characteristics of portability shock and sound absorption, affordability, adjustability, safety, and simple use, and there is a need for an improved support system having such qualities.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Based upon the foregoing, one or more embodiments of the present invention may comprise a support system for conveniently staging and accessing roofing materials above and across each side of a gabled roof, said system comprising a pair of longitudinally-extending base members, the base members each having a generally triangular-shaped radial cross section, and means for joining the base members to each other. The means for joining the base members may comprise a sheathing, such as an elastomeric netting, or may comprise one or more straps. Further, the system may optionally comprise means for securing the platform in desired position easily such as nails or screws.

A second embodiment is also disclosed that comprises a method of stacking roofing shingle bundles on a roof having a peak, the method comprising placing a first shingle support system about the peak of the roof, the first shingle support system comprising two longitudinally-extending base members that, when placed on opposite sides of the peak of the roof, form a substantially horizontal shingle support surface; and stacking at least one bundle of shingles on the first shingle support system.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is an end view of a prior art manner of stacking roofing shingle bundles on a peak of a roof.

FIG. 2 is an end view of a second manner of stacking roofing shingle bundles on a peak of a roof.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a roofing shingle support.

FIG. 4 is a top view of the roofing shingle support of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a side view of the roofing shingle support, illustrated on a peak of a roof with roofing shingle bundles stacked on the support.

FIG. 6 is an end view of the roofing shingle support with roofing shingle bundles of FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the roofing shingle support of FIG. 5.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a second embodiment of a roofing shingle support.

FIG. 9 is a top view of the roofing shingle support of FIG. 8.

FIG. 10 is a side view of the roofing shingle support of FIG. 8, illustrated on a peak of a roof with roofing shingle bundles stacked on the support.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

With reference to the figures, wherein like reference numerals refer to like and corresponding parts, and in particular with reference to FIGS. 1 and 2, views of a known method for stacking bundles 1 of roofing shingles are depicted. As illustrated in FIG. 1, for roofs 2 with lower pitches, the bundles 1 of shingles are typically laid across the peak 3 of the roof 2 and stacked upon each other. As illustrated in FIG. 1, the lower bundles 1 tends to flex significantly, which may damage the individual shingles.

As illustrated in FIG. 2, for higher pitched-roofs 2, a person may attach boards 4 parallel with the peak 3 of the roof 2 on opposite sides 5, 6 of the roof. The boards 4 may be used to support a bundle 7 of roofing shingles that is used as a base for the bundles 1 laid across the peak 3 of the roof. Again, however, the bundles 1 are bent and may be damaged. Additionally, if not stacked correctly, one or more of the bundles 1 may be prone to slipping from the stack and falling onto and possibly off the roof 2.

A first embodiment of a roof shingle support system 10 is depicted in FIGS. 3-7. The system 10 provides a substantially flat surface 12 onto which roofing materials are selectively positioned. The system includes supporting base members 16 and 18. The base members 16 and 18 may be generally of triangular configuration with first and second flat upper surfaces or tops 20, 22. Alternatively, the base members 16, 18 may be any of a plurality of other shapes that comprise relatively flat upper surfaces suitable for supporting roof shingle bundles 1 on a peak 3 of a roof 2. The two base members 16 and 18 may be configured to be symmetric and be positioned relative to one another so they are mirror images of each other about a center plane therebetween. However, the first and second base members 16 and 18 can be designed or conformed to accommodate odd roof designs. For example, the base members 16, 18 may be nonsymmetrical to accommodate differing slopes on each side of a particular roof apex. As shown in FIG. 6, the sloped bottoms 28, 30 of each base 16, 18 are designed to match or can be conformed to the corresponding and underlying slope on each side 5, 5 of the apex 3 of a pitched roof 2. The tops 20, 22 of the base members 16 and 18 are thus positioned in a substantially horizontal orientation for supporting roofing materials.

Alternatively, even if the base members 16, 18 are not exactly matched to a particular slope of roof, the orientation of the tops of base members 16, 18 may still be more horizontal to provide a suitable support which minimized bending or deformation of materials positioned thereon as compared to using no base members. As another alternative, if desired, each or either of base members 16 and 18 may have a shim selectively attached thereto to change the slope of the base member to match the underlying roof it is to be used on.

In alternative embodiments, the supporting bases may also comprise a continuous material rather than two separate bases 16, 18. In this case, the base will again be shaped to conform to the specification of the sloped roof 2. It can also be shaped to accommodate any unique longitudinal ridge 3 design.

In the embodiment of FIGS. 3-7, the roof shingle support system 10 may further comprise sheathing that envelopes or covers one or more sides of the supporting base members 16, 18. As illustrated, the sheathing may cover the top surfaces 20, 22; side surfaces 24, 26; and bottom surfaces 28, 30 of the support system 10. Alternatively, the sheathing may cover, for example, only the top surfaces 20, 22. If the base members 16, 18 are separate or discrete members, the sheathing may be the manner in which the base members 16, 18 are connected, and provide proper alignment of one base member 16 relative to the other base member 18. Furthermore, the sheathing may comprise a suitable non-slip surface, such that the shingle bundles 1 are less likely to slip off the support system 10.

In the embodiment of FIGS. 3-7, the sheathing may comprise an elastomeric netting 40. The elastomeric netting 40 may provide a slip-resistant surface so that the bundles 1 are less likely to slip or slide off of the base members 16, 18, and the support system 10 is less likely to slip or slide relative to the roof 2. Alternatively, rather than netting, the sheathing may comprise a sheet of non-porous material. To attach the netting or sheathing to the base members 16, 18, the netting or sheathing may be wrapped around both members and secured to itself and/or secured to the base members 16, 18. An adhesive may optionally be used, or any of a plurality of other attachment means may be utilized, such as hook and loop fasteners, thermal welding, or sewing. If a non-permanent attachment of the sheathing to the base members 16, 18 is utilized, a single sheathing may be used with a plurality different sized base members 16, 18. Alternatively, the base members may be sold as a kit with minimum-sized base members 16, 18 and a plurality of adjustment wedges that can be stacked with bases members 16, 18 before the sheathing is attached to the base members 16, 18. In this way, a single kit could accommodate multiple roof pitches.

The base members 16, 18 may be spaced slightly, as at 42. If it is desired to attach support system 10 to a roof, one or more nails, screws, or other fasteners may be inserted through the sheathing or netting and into the roof. For example, the fasteners may extend through the sheathing at the space 42 between the base members 16, 18.

A second embodiment of a roof shingle support system 100 is shown in FIGS. 7-10. Roof shingle support system 100 may be similar to support system 10, except that the base members 16 and 18 may be secured to one another by one or more straps 21 extending therebetween and attached to the top surfaces 20 and 22 of each, or wrapped around each base member 16, 18. The straps 21 may be flexible to allow the base members 16 and 18 to be folded about a centerline between them to facilitate storage or transport. The straps may be secured to the base members 16, 18 by any convenient means such as hook and loop attachments. If a removable The straps 21 may also extend outwardly from the base members 16 and 18 in any direction, to allow the straps 21 to be fixed to the roof on which the support system 100 is placed, so as to secure the position of system 100 and prevent movement of base members 16 and 18 relative to the roof.

The base can be manufactured from a foam material or similar materials. To reduce damage to the roof from the sustained weight and/or potential dropping of heavy shingle bundles, forming the base material from foam or the like will provide cushioning and shock-absorbent features. To mitigate noise associated with roofing operations, the base material also provides sound insulative properties. Other suitable materials are also contemplated. It should also be recognized that the dimensions of the system may vary, to accommodate smaller or larger loads, as desired. The system utilized the strong apex portion of the roof to provide desired support for roofing materials, and yet is lightweight and easily handled and used.

It is contemplated that a plurality of roof shingle support systems 10 or 100 may be used adjacent to each other down the peak of the roof to stack roofing shingle bundles. The support systems may be purchased by roofing contractor, or may be sold or leased by roof shingle suppliers upon delivery of a load of shingles. With the latter, the roofing contractor does not have to own and store large numbers of support systems, and the roof shingle supplier may lease the same support system 10 or 100 multiple times.

The foregoing description of embodiments of the present invention has been provided for the purposes of illustration and description. It is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise forms disclosed. Many modifications and variations will be apparent to practitioners skilled in the art. The embodiments were chosen and described in order to best explain the principles of the invention and its practical applications, thereby enabling others skilled in the art to understand various embodiments of the invention including various potential modifications as suited to the particular use contemplated. It is intended that the scope of the invention be defined by the following claims and their equivalents.