Title:
Contact lens container with circulating solution system
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A portable compact contact lens storage case with an integrated reservoir for storing a supply of contact lens treatment solution with an internal system for applying and circulating the contact lens treatment solution. The portable compact lens storage case is also characterized by its narrow width, small size and portability.



Inventors:
Haggin, Aaron (Tayorsville, UT, US)
Application Number:
12/315850
Publication Date:
09/17/2009
Filing Date:
12/03/2008
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A45C11/04; A45C11/00; A61L12/08
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
FIDEI, DAVID
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
GRANT R CLAYTON (SANDY, UT, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A compact container for holding contact lenses and a supply of treatment solution, the compact container having a length, a width, and a height, the compact container comprising: a fluid storage reservoir, the reservoir being constructed from a flexible resilient material; a base member connected to the reservoir, said base member having a top surface and a bottom surface, the top surface of the base member having one or more receptacles integrated therein, each receptacle capable of holding a contact lens and a quantity of treatment solution, each receptacle also having a solution port; a lid attached to the base member, the lid capable of assuming an open position and a closed position; a fluid circulation system comprising a tube extending into the interior of the reservoir, thereby providing direct fluid communication between the solution ports and the interior of the reservoir; and the length of the compact container being no greater than about five inches, the width being no greater than about three inches, and the height being no greater than about five inches.

2. The compact container of claim 1 wherein the overall shape of the compact container is that of a whiskey flask.

3. The compact container of claim 1 wherein the compact container has an oblong cross section.

4. The compact container of claim 1 wherein the length is about four and one-half inches, the width is about one and one-half inches, and the height is about four and one-half inches.

5. The compact container of claim 1 wherein the lens receptacles are approximately one-half inch deep.

6. The compact container of claim 1, wherein the receptacles comprise a textured surface.

7. The compact container of claim 1 wherein the lid comprises an outer surface and an inner surface, and wherein the lid further comprises a reflective material being disposed on the inner surface.

8. The compact container of claim 1 wherein the tube has a diameter of approximately 1/16 of an inch.

9. The compact container of claim 1, wherein the lid is connected to the base member by a hinge, said lid further comprising a latch, said latch releasably interlocking with a second latch on the base member thereby maintaining the lid in the closed position.

10. The compact container of claim 1 wherein the compact container further includes a contoured recess to removably receive a bottle of eye-drops.

11. The compact container of claim 1 wherein the top surface of the reservoir further includes a bore extending into the interior of the reservoir, said bore having a set of female threads, the base member also having a neck extending from the bottom surface of the base member, the neck having a set of male threads, whereby the base member is removably connected to the reservoir by the male threads on the neck rotatably engaging the female threads on the bore.

12. A portable compact container for holding contact lenses and a supply of treatment solution, the portable compact container comprising: fluid storage means for storing the supply of the treatment solution, the fluid storage means capable of being compressed upon the application of a force exerted by a person, the fluid storage means returning to its original shape upon the removal of said force; receiving means for storing contact lenses connected to the fluid storage means, said receiving means also capable of holding treatment solution, the receiving means further comprising a lid means; and circulating means for filling the receiving means with the treatment solution residing in the fluid storage means, the circulating means also capable of extracting the treatment solution from the receiving means back into the fluid storage means.

13. The portable compact container of claim 12 wherein the fluid storage means is comprised of a flexible resilient material.

14. The portable compact container of claim 12 wherein the compact container is generally whiskey flask shaped.

15. The portable compact container of claim 12 wherein the cross section of the portable compact container is substantially oblong in shape.

16. The portable compact container of claim 12 wherein the portable compact container has a length, a width, and a height, the length of the compact container being no greater than five inches, the width no greater than three inches, and the height no greater than five inches.

17. The portable compact container of claim 12 wherein the circulating system includes a supply tube extending from the receiving means into the fluid storage means, the circulating system also comprising at least one port directed into the receiving means.

18. The portable compact container of claim 12 further comprising a connecting means for connecting the receiving means and the fluid storage means.

19. The portable compact container of claim 18, wherein the connecting means is comprised of a threaded neck extending from the receiving means and a threaded bore extending into the fluid storage means, the threaded neck rotatably engaging the threaded bore.

20. The portable compact container of claim 12 wherein the compression of the fluid storage means creates a positive pressure whereby the treatment solution is conducted from the fluid storage means and into the receiving means, by way of the circulating means.

21. The portable compact container of claim 21, wherein the returning of the fluid storage means to its original shape after being compressed creates a negative pressure whereby a portion of the treatment solution is sucked from the receiving means through the circulating means and returned to the fluid storage means.

22. The portable compact container of claim 12, further comprising a second receiving means for mounting a bottle of eye-drops.

23. A compact container for holding contact lenses and a supply of treatment solution, the compact container having a length, a width, and a height, the compact container comprising: a fluid storage reservoir, the reservoir comprising a flexible resilient material, the reservoir further comprising a threaded bore; a base member connected to the reservoir, the base member comprising a threaded neck, said threaded neck rotatably engaged with the threaded bore, said base member further comprising a top surface and a bottom surface; two lens receptacles formed in the top surface of the base member, each receptacle capable of holding a contact lens and a quantity of treatment solution, each receptacle also having a solution port whereby the treatment solution is both expelled into the receptacle and sucked from the receptacle; a lid attached to the base member by a hinge, the lid comprising an inner and an outer surface, the inner surface comprising a reflective material, and the lid capable of assuming an open position and a closed position; a fluid circulation system comprising a tube extending into the interior of the reservoir, thereby providing direct fluid communication between the solution ports and the interior of the reservoir, the fluid circulation system expelling treatment solution into the receptacles when the reservoir is squeezed by a person and sucking the treatment solution from the receptacles when the reservoir returns to its normal position; and the length of the compact container being no greater than about five inches, the width being no greater than about three inches, and the height being no greater than about five inches.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation of co-pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/284,785, filed Nov. 21, 2005, which is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/382,703, filed Mar. 6, 2003, entitled, which are hereby incorporated by reference herein in their entireties, including but not limited to those portions that specifically appear hereinafter, the incorporation by reference being made with the following exception: In the event that any portion of the above-referenced application is inconsistent with these applications, this application supercedes said above-referenced applications.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not Applicable.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. The Field of the Invention

The present invention relates generally to contact lens storage cases, and more particularly, but not necessarily entirely, to compact contact lens storage cases having an integrated fluid storage reservoir with a circulation system.

2. Description of Related Art

Contact lenses were invented more than 100 years ago. as an alternative to eye glasses. Though they were originally made from glass, and later hard plastic, contact lenses today are customarily made from soft plastic. Contact lenses are small, thin disks specially designed to be placed directly onto the surface or cornea of the eye. While they are most commonly used to correct vision problems such as nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism, they may also be used to treat certain eye conditions and diseases. For example, contacts often are used by individuals who have had cataract surgery but did not receive lens implants. In addition, people without vision problems occasionally wear contact lenses to enhance or manipulate the colors of their eyes.

There are two primary types of contact lenses: hard and soft. Hard contact lenses come in two forms: non-gas permeable and gas permeable. Gas-permeable lenses allow oxygen to reach the corneal surface, are more flexible than the non-gas permeable lenses, and are the most commonly used form of hard contact lens. Soft contact lenses also come in two forms: daily wear and extended wear. Both types of lenses are made from thin, flexible, plastic material. The daily-wear lenses require daily removal, cleaning and storage. Extended-wear lenses are designed to be worn overnight; however recent studies indicate that extended-wear lenses should be worn for the shortest practical period, ideally for one day, because of the increased risk of infection associated with these lenses. This recommendation militates against overnight wear.

While contact lenses provide a great benefit to their users, they require significantly more attentiveness than a pair of simple eyeglasses. Mineralized deposits can form on the surface of the contact lenses, thereby causing discomfort to the wearer. In addition, micro-organisms can flourish on the lenses as well. Even without the mineralized deposits and the micro-organisms, nearly all contact lenses need to be hydrated periodically in order to maintain their proper flexibility and comfort to the user. It should be recognized, that contact lenses are also easily damaged and are notoriously difficult to locate once they have been lost or misplaced.

Appropriate cleansing of contact lenses varies depending on the type of lenses. But, all lenses require regular, thorough cleaning and disinfecting. It is especially important that daily-wear and extended-wear users follow the recommended regimen of lens cleaning, rinsing, disinfecting, enzymatic cleaning and lens case cleaning. With all lenses, only commercially prepared sterile solutions are recommended. Lenses that are cleaned regularly last longer, are more comfortable and lower the risk of eye infection.

As mentioned above, commercially available contact lens solution has been developed to aid contact lens wearers in cleaning and disinfecting their lenses. The contact lens solutions have also been developed to aid in re-hydrating the lenses. The solution is normally marketed in large bottles usually containing a supply of solution for several weeks or up to several months.

Various types of contact lense storage cases have been devised as a convenient means of cleaning, disinfecting and storing the lenses. The most simple device consists of a small fluid-tight storage compartment of sufficient size to receive one or two of the lenses. Typically, the lenses are stored in separate compartments so as not to reverse the lenses as they may be different. One compartment is usually marked with an “L” denoting the left lens and the other an “R” denoting the right lens.

Once the lenses have been removed from the eyes of the wearer and placed into their respective storage compartments, a small amount of solution, usually just enough to cover the contact lens lenses, is added to the storage compartment. The lenses are typically soaked overnight or until needed again. The soaking process acts to clean, disinfect and re-hydrate the lenses.

One significant drawback that exists in the prior art is that the contact lens storage container and contact lens solution bottles are not integrated into one portable compact unit, thus, the contact lens wearer must carry a separate storage case and solution bottle. One attempt to overcome this drawback is found in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,905,819 and 5,127,517, both awarded to Clements et al. These patents describe a contact lens storage case attached to the top of a bottle of treatment solution. While the Clements et al. patents disclose a contact lens storage case with an included fluid container, these devices still have undue limitations. Most importantly, the devices disclosed in the Clements et al. patents do not lend themselves easily to the portability required by today's active lifestyles. In particular, the shape and the size of the devices are not conducive to easily fit in a pocket or small purse. For example, the disclosed devices are bulky and would not be convenient for biking, hiking, or other outdoor activities. In addition, the devices are excessively heavy due to the size of the treatment solution bottle.

Another problem inherent the devices disclosed in the Clements et al. patents is the inability of the claimed devices to re-circulate the contact lens solution. In fact, Clements et al. teaches away from circulating the contact lens solution and incorporates the use of one-way duck-bill valves to prevent circulation. This characteristic of the inventions disclosed in Clements et al. is problematic because without a convenient and portable contact lens case, wearers of contact lenses tend to forego the requisite cleaning and disinfecting if they are away from home.

Thus, there exists a need for a truly portable contact lens storage container with an integrated solution reservoir containing an extended supply of contact lens treatment solution.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention comprises an all-in-one portable contact lens storage case with an integrated storage reservoir and circulating solution system. The present invention is characterized by its compact size and portability. In addition, the circulating solution system of the present invention allows an effective amount of the contact lens treatment solution to be directly injected into the contact lens receptacles. The circulating system also allows excess solution to be removed from the contact lens receptacles, thereby preventing any spillage.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The features and advantages of the invention will become apparent from a consideration of the subsequent detailed description presented in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is an perspective view of one previously available device;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a first embodiment of the present invention, illustrated with the lid open;

FIG. 3 is a profile view of the first embodiment of the present invention with the lid closed;

FIG. 3A is a perspective view of the first embodiment, illustrated with the lid closed;

FIG. 4 is a top view of the first embodiment of the present invention, illustrated with the lid open;

FIG. 5 is an elevated perspective view showing the first embodiment of the present invention in the disassembled state;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line A-A in FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is partial view of a second embodiment of the present invention having a recess for an eye drop bottle; and

FIG. 8 is a view of a third embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE ILLUSTRATIVE EMBODIMENTS

For the purposes of promoting an understanding of the principles provided in accordance with the present invention, reference will now be made to the embodiments of the invention illustrated in the drawings and specific language will be used to describe the same. It will nevertheless be understood that no limitation of the scope of the invention is thereby intended. Any alterations and further modifications of the inventive features illustrated herein, and any additional applications of the principles of the invention as illustrated herein, which would normally occur to one skilled in the relevant art and having possession of this disclosure, are to be considered within the scope of the invention claimed.

It must be noted that, as used in this specification and the appended claims, the singular forms “a,” “an,” and “the” include plural referents unless the context clearly dictates otherwise. Thus, for example, reference to “a solution” includes a mixture of two or more of such solutions and reference to “an airtight seal” includes reference to one or more of such seal.

As used herein, “comprising,” “including,” “containing,” “characterized by,” and grammatical equivalents thereof are inclusive or open-ended terms that do not exclude additional, unrecited structural elements or method steps.

The previously available devices are characterized by large and bulky contact lens holders that are impracticable for away-from-home use due to their relatively heavy weight, especially if the user is participating in an outdoor activity such as skiing, biking or hiking. In particular, the previously available devices lack an all-in-one portable contact lens case with an integrated container for storing contact lens solution.

An example of one previously available device is illustrated in FIG. 1. The contact lens holder 10 illustrated in FIG. 1 is comprised of a contact lens case 11 connected to the top of a solution bottle 16. The solution bottle 16 contains treatment solution for cleaning the contact lenses (not shown) placed in the recessed chambers 12. The contact lens case 11 is designed to fit on a wide range of commercially available containers. Thus, when empty, the solution bottle 16, may be replaced with another purchased at a retail site, or it may be refilled. In general, the solution bottle 16, when full, is heavy and contains a supply of treatment solution which may last several months.

The contact lens case 11 of FIG. 1 has two recessed chambers 12 for storing contact lenses. A lid 18 closes over the recessed chambers 12. A distributor head 20 is used to fill the recessed chambers 12 with the treatment solution. When the lid 18 is closed, the distributor head 20 cannot squirt solution into the recessed chambers 12. Further, the distributor head 20 cannot suck excess treatment solution from the recessed chambers 12. In addition, the distributor head 20 cannot circulate the treatment solution once it has been squirted into the recessed chambers 12. As discussed above in connection with the device shown in FIG. 1, the overall length, width, height and cylindrical shape of the device make it impracticable to place into a pocket or small purse. While the contact lens holder 10 is portable in the sense that it can be taken from place to place, it is not convenient to be constantly carried by a user, especially when outdoors or at work.

As will be seen and described below, the illustrative embodiments of the present invention are compact and extremely portable, unlike the previously available devices, making it extremely useful to contact wearers.

Referring now to FIGS. 2-7, generally, the illustrative embodiments of the present invention are directed to a portable light-weight contact lens container, generally designated at 100, which includes its own integrated supply reservoir 112, with an internally situated system for circulating the contact lens solution. A front perspective view of the first embodiment of the present invention is shown in FIG. 2, with a lid 104 assuming an open position.

The contact lens container 100 comprises a base member 110 integrated with the reservoir 112 as shown in FIG. 2. The base member 110 has two lens receptacles 116 recessed in its top surface 118 for holding contact lenses. The base member 110 and the lens receptacles 116, are one example of a means for receiving and holding contact lenses. The receiving means can refer to any storage case designed to receive and hold contact lenses. It will be appreciated that the means for receiving is merely one example of accomplishing the storage of the contact lenses, other suitable arrangements known or readily ascertainable, to those skilled in the art, may be used and are within the scope of the present invention.

The receiving means can refer to any storage case designed to receive and hold two contact lenses. The lens receptacles 116 should be of sufficient depth to receive a contact lens (not shown) and hold a effective amount of contact lens solution to clean, disinfect and hydrate the lenses. The lens receptacles 116 are preferably cupped shaped with a circular opening, but may be any shape as long as it is of sufficient volume to hold a contact lens. Each of the two receptacles 116 is provided with one of two solution ports 108 located below the respective rims 119 of the receptacles 116, whose purpose an function will be further explained below. The lens receptacles 116 may optionally have a textured surface 117 as shown best in FIG. 4, and explained in connection therewith. The textured surface aids in cleaning the contact lenses when the lenses make contact with the surface.

Referring again to FIG. 2, the reservoir 112 is preferably comprised of a flexible resilient material, such as plastic or the like, and should be capable of storing a supply of treatment solution. The reservoir 112 should be of sufficient internal volume to store a supply of treatment solution for up to several days or weeks, depending on the recommended usage and needs of the user. For example, one illustrative volume for the reservoir 112 is in the range from about 150 ml to about 400 ml while another illustrative volume is 250 ml to about 750 ml. The reservoir 112 can be replenished with treatment solution from a larger commercially available product, normally sold in a bulk amount and in a cylindrical type container. The reservoir 112 should also be of sufficient durability to withstand the rigors of outdoor activity such as backpacking, skiing or biking. The oblong shape of the reservoir 112, as particularly shown in FIG. 4 also promotes efficient squeezing. The reservoir 112, is one example of a fluid storage means for storing a supply of treatment solution. Other suitable arrangements known or readily ascertainable, to those skilled in the art, may be used and are within the scope of the present invention.

Pivotally mounted on the rear of the base member 110 with a hinge 120 is a lid 104 having a lid lock 102. The hinge 120 comprises a pin connecting the lid 102 to the base member 110. Other suitable arrangements known or readily ascertainable, to those skilled in the art, may be used and are within the scope of the present invention, i.e., a composite lid 104 and base member 110 having a flexible connection allowing the lid 104 to assume an open position and a closed position. Further, the lid lock 102 may be substituted for by any number of equivalent structures known or readily ascertainable, to those skilled in the art, such as a clasp or elastic member. In short, any means whereby the lid is held shut. The bottom surface of the lid 104 optionally having a reflective surface 106, such as a mirror, attached thereto to assist the lens wearer in inserting and removing the lenses from his or her eyes.

The front of the base member 110 further having a second lid latch 114 to releasably receive the lid lock 102 when the lid 104 is closed. When the lid 104 is closed, as seen in FIGS. 3 and 3A, a substantially fluid tight seal should be formed between the lid 104 and the top surface 118 of the base member 110 thereby preventing any contact lens solution from leaking from the lens receptacles 116. A gasket or other sealing material may be used to create the fluid tight seal between the top surface 118 and the lid 104. A raised ridge or flange may also be used to form the seal. The lid 104 in the closed position also serves to maintain the lenses in the lens receptacles 116.

The lid 104 is one example of a lid means for forming a fluid tight seal. It will be appreciated that the system for fastening disclosed herein is merely one example of accomplishing the securing of the engagement assembly to the snow-traveling device, other suitable arrangements known or readily ascertainable, to those skilled in the art, may be used and are within the scope of the present invention, i.e., a separate lid for each of the lens receptacles 116. Further, one skilled in the art can design other lid means to create a fluid type seal, that would be encompassed by the scope of the present invention.

Referring now specifically to FIGS. 3, 3A, and 4, the contact lens container 100 is illustrated showing one overall illustrative shape. FIGS. 3 and 3A show the contact lens container 100 with its lid 104 closed in a profile view and front view, respectively. The length 140 and height 144 of the present invention are no greater than five inches as shown in FIGS. 3 and 3A. The width 142, as illustrated in FIG. 3, of the illustrated embodiment is typically no greater than three inches. The length, width and height may be smaller than the above indicated measurements thereby making it more convenient to carry.

In one embodiment, the general shape of the contact lens container 100 can be compared to that of a whiskey flask, but is by no means limited to that shape. A whiskey flask is characterized by its thin profile and curved body. The curvature allows the whiskey flask to conform to a part of the human body, such as a hip. A cross-sectional view of the contact lens container 100 is oblong as can be seen in FIG. 4. In a separate embodiment, the invention is approximately the size and shape of a pack of cigarettes.

The contact lens container 100 is compact and portable, and its size should allow the user to easily store it in a pocket or a purse out of view. It will be appreciated that one advantage of the present invention is its narrow profile. It would be undesirable to have a contact lens case that is cylindrical in shape, as represented in FIG. 1, since it would be difficult to store in a small pocket or purse.

The embodiment of the present invention represented in FIGS. 2, 3, 3A and 4 is shown disassembled in FIG. 5. Disassembly allows the reservoir 112 to be filled with treatment solution. In the embodiment represented in FIG. 5, the base member 110 has a threaded neck 122 extending from its bottom surface (not explicitly represented in FIG. 5). The reservoir 112 has a threaded bore 124 adapted to receive the threaded neck 122 of the base member 110. When assembled, the threaded bore 124 and threaded neck 122 form a fluid tight seal. The threaded bore 124 also serves as a means to fill and empty the reservoir 112 with contact lens treatment solution or other fluid. It will be appreciated that the threaded bore 124 disclosed herein is merely one example of accomplishing the means to fill and empty the reservoir 112, other suitable arrangements known or readily ascertainable, to those skilled in the art, may be used and are within the scope of the present invention.

Directional arrows 128 show the respective engagement of the base member 110 and reservoir 112. Also shown is a supply tube 126, extending below-the threaded neck 122.

When the base member 110 and reservoir 112 are assembled by rotatably engaging the threaded neck 122 within the threaded bore 124, the supply tube 126 should extend into the reservoir 112 as shown in FIG. 6. The free end of the supply tube 126 should be of sufficient length to reach the bottom of the reservoir 112 or close thereto. It will be appreciated that the supply tube 126 thereby serves as a means for carrying the contact lens solution from the reservoir 112 to the lens receptacles 116 by way of the solution ports 108.

The lens receptacles 116 can be filled with contact lens solution by compressing the reservoir 112 by, for example, simultaneously squeezing the front and back of the reservoir 112. This compression action reduces the internal volume of the reservoir 112 and thereby increases the pressure in the interior of the reservoir 112. The increase in pressure forces the treatment solution stored in the reservoir 112 into the supply tube 126. The solution then exits the supply tube 126 through the solution ports 108 and into the lens receptacles 116. It will be appreciated that the solution ports 108 can also serve to remove the treatment solution from the receptacles 116. Further, since the solution ports 108 are disposed in the receptacles 116, the receptacles 116 can be filled or emptied either while the lid 104 is either open or closed. Upon removing the compression force on the reservoir 112, the reservoir 112 returns to its original shape due to its resilient nature thereby causing the formation of a negative pressure in the reservoir 112. This negative pressure acts to suck some portion of the treatment solution from the lens receptacles 116 and back into the reservoir 112. The negative pressure can also serve to remove excess solution from the lens receptacles 116. It is advantageous not to have a one-way valve, such as a duck-billed valve, as it allows the treatment solution to be circulated. The above described structure and structure illustrate on type of circulating means. It is within the scope of the present invention that any system using positive and negative pressure to fill and empty the receptacles 116 is within the scope of this invention, whether presently known or unknown.

It will be appreciated that the base member 110 and reservoir 112 may be coupled by a variety of different methods known to one skilled in the art other than the threaded bore 124 and threaded neck 122 as illustrated in FIG. 5, such as, a snap-on method. The base member 110 and reservoir 112 may also be hermetically sealed together, with the reservoir 112 being filled through a separate orifice having its own cap. It will be further appreciated that any liquid with beneficial properties may be used for the treatment solution. Typically, however, it is anticipated that the treatment solution will be a commercially available contact lens solution.

FIG. 7 shows a second embodiment of the present invention. The reservoir 112A is essentially identical to reservoir 112 as described previously, but reservoir 112A has been modified to accept and hold a bottle 132 of eye-drops. The modification includes forming a contoured recess 134 on the bottom 130 of the reservoir 112 adapted to completely contain the bottle 132. When placed in the bottom 130 of the reservoir 112, the bottle 132 should not impede the contact lens container 100 from standing upright on a flat surface. The bottle 132 is illustratively held in place by a tight fit in the contoured recess 134 on the bottom 130 of the reservoir 112.

FIG. 8 illustrates a third embodiment of the present invention. A base member 110A is similar to the base member 110 except that it comprises a sealing wall 150 extending from the top surface 188. The sealing wall 150 fitting into a channel 151 on a lid 104A when the lid 104A is in the closed position to thereby form a fluid tight seal to prevent any treatment solution from leaking. Additionally, the base member 110A further comprises two lid latches 154 to receive two lid locks 152 extending from the lid 104A. The two lid latches 154 ensure a more secure lock between the lid 104A and the base member 110A. The lid 104A may optional comprise a reflective surface 106. Further the base member 110A is attached to the reservoir 112.

It will be appreciated that the present invention provides a portable compact contact lens case with an integrated fluid reservoir with an internal circulating system.

It is to be understood that the above-described arrangements are only illustrative of the application of the principles of the present invention. Numerous modifications and alternative arrangements may be devised by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention and the appended claims are intended to cover such modifications and arrangements. Thus, while the present invention has been shown in the drawings and described above with particularity and detail, it will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art that numerous modifications, including, but not limited to, variations in size, materials, shape, form, function and manner of operation, assembly and use may be made without departing from the principles and concepts set forth herein.