Title:
Insect capturing cap
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An insect controlling ball cap for outdoorsman and hunters includes a plurality of user serviceable pest control segments that are user attached to various segments of the hat, while preserving user comfort. A kit for retrofitting to a conventional cap is also disclosed. Attachment means made of Velcro®-brand fastener material for mounting critical components comprises an elongated anchoring band is disposed around the cap's dome, a secondary band at the rear, and an upper attachment disk. A plurality of insect control segments are mounted in spaced, offset relation atop the cap. A plurality of attachment tabs packaged on peel-away strips fasten the control segments to the attachment means. A sticky outer surface of the control segments treated with an insect capturing, gummy substance captivates insect pests.



Inventors:
Needham, Ricky V. (Moro, AR, US)
Application Number:
12/069946
Publication Date:
08/20/2009
Filing Date:
02/15/2008
Primary Class:
2/4
International Classes:
A42B1/24
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MORAN, KATHERINE M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Ricky V. Needham (Moro, AR, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. An insect controlling cap for outdoorsman, comprising: an upper, generally dome-shaped top having a bill at a front and a rear; a plurality of insect control segments with sticky, bug-capturing surfaces adapted to be user attached to the hat, the plurality including generally triangular primary control segments; attachment means for anchoring and holding the insect control segments, the attachment means comprising an elongated, primary attachment band encircling the cap, a secondary attachment band at the rear of the cap, and an attachment disk at the top of the hat; and, a plurality of attachment tabs for securing the control segments to the attachment means, the tabs having an adhesive surface adhesively affixed to a peel strip substrate for packaging which is adapted to be adhesively affixed to the control segments, and an outer surface of attachment materials adapted to be coupled to said attachment means to mount said control segments on said cap.

2. The insect controlling cap of claim 1 wherein said attachment means comprises Velcro®-brand fastener material.

3. The insect controlling cap of claim 2 further comprising secondary insect control segments for the rear of the cap that are irregularly shaped to be placed near the cap rear.

4. The insect controlling cap of claim 3 wherein each attachment tab is in the form of a disk, with a circular shape.

5. The insect controlling cap of claim 3 wherein each attachment tab outer surface is formed of Velcro® brand material for mating with the similar Velcro® brand material in said attachment means.

6. An insect controlling cap for outdoorsman, comprising: an upper, generally dome-shaped top having a bill at a front and a rear, the top comprising several generally triangular shaped portions, a rear void, rear irregular shaped portions bordering said void, and a plurality of apertured ventilation buttons; a plurality of generally triangular primary insect control segments with sticky, bug-capturing surfaces adapted to be user attached to the hat over said triangular portions; a pair of secondary insect control segments for covering the rear irregularly shaped portions of the cap, each secondary control segment comprising sticky, bug-capturing surfaces; attachment means for anchoring and holding the insect control segments, the attachment means comprising an elongated, primary attachment band encircling the cap, a secondary attachment band at the rear of the cap, and an attachment disk at the top of the hat; a plurality of attachment tabs for securing the control segments to the attachment means and offsetting them over said ventilation buttons, the tabs having an adhesive surface adhesively affixed to a peel strip substrate for packaging which is adapted to be adhesively affixed to the control segments, and an outer surface of attachment materials adapted to be coupled to said attachment means to mount said control segments on said cap.

7. The insect controlling cap of claim 6 wherein said attachment means comprises Velcro®-brand fastener material.

8. The insect controlling cap of claim 7 wherein each attachment tab is in the form of a disk, with a circular shape.

9. The insect controlling cap of claim 8 wherein each attachment tab outer surface is formed of Velcro® brand material for mating with the similar Velcro® brand material in said attachment means.

10. An insect controlling kit for ball caps comprising an upper, generally dome-shaped top having a bill at a front and a rear, the top comprising several generally triangular shaped portions, a rear void, rear irregular shaped portions bordering said void, and a plurality of apertured ventilation buttons, the kit comprising: a plurality of generally triangular primary insect control segments with sticky, bug-capturing surfaces adapted to be user attached to the hat over said triangular portions; a pair of secondary insect control segments for covering the rear irregularly shaped portions of the cap, each secondary control segment comprising sticky, bug-capturing surfaces; attachment means for anchoring and holding the insect control segments, the attachment means comprising an elongated, primary stick-on attachment band encircling the cap, a secondary stick-on attachment band at the rear of the cap, and a stick-on attachment disk at the top of the hat; a plurality of attachment tabs for securing the control segments to the attachment means and offsetting them over said ventilation buttons, the tabs having an adhesive surface adhesively affixed to a peel strip substrate for packaging which is adapted to be adhesively affixed to the control segments, and an outer surface of attachment materials adapted to be coupled to said attachment means to mount said control segments on said cap.

11. The insect controlling cap of claim 10 wherein said attachment means comprises Velcro®-brand fastener material.

12. The insect controlling cap of claim 11 wherein each attachment tab is in the form of a disk, with a circular shape.

13. The insect controlling cap of claim 12 wherein each attachment tab outer surface is formed of Velcro® brand material for mating with the similar Velcro® brand material in said attachment means.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates generally to insect capturing systems of the type used with clothing articles. More particularly, the present invention relates to hats ideally used outdoors for hunting that are equipped with insect capturing means, and to insect control kits adapted to be retrofitted to conventional hats to capture and control insects.

2. Description of the Related Art

Most hunters and avid outdoorsman are familiar with baseball style hats that are adjustable and easy to use. They very popular amongst outdoorsman who value the extra warmth. When hunting or traveling through wooded areas, fields, or swamps, or when fishing on lakes or ponds, outdoorsman are subject to a multitude of annoying flying insects. Flying and biting insects, such as mosquitoes and the like, are particularly bothersome. When hunting in relatively warm weather, particularly when near swamps and ponds, vicious swarms of mosquitoes are quite common, particularly in the southern United States. Chemical repellents have been used, but their odor can be objectionable. Deer hunters for example, are well aware that shifting winds can convey various scents long distances and frighten away or startle deer and other game animals. Although insect-protective clothing and head coverings are known in the art, such gear can be cumbersome and clumsy. Known systems occlude the hunter's view, and interfere with normal hunter comfort.

Accordingly, there have been many insect repelling or controlling systems introduced in the art.

For example, U.S. Pat. No. 4,277,024 issued Jul. 7, 1981 discloses aroma-dispensing tabs that can function as an insect repellant. The tabs can be applied to a variety of surfaces, such as apparel, to exude a pleasant fragrance or to function as an insect repellent. The tab has a perforated dome defining a vented chamber holding an absorbent pad saturated by liquid scent. A layer of pressure-sensitive adhesive facilitates attachment of the tab to various surfaces.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,003,635 issued Apr. 2, 1991 discloses clothing articles with insect repellent strips. Elongated, flexible insect repellent strips are secured in cavities in the clothing to repel insects from the person wearing such apparel. The system may be used with a variety of clothing items including trousers, hats, and shirts.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,071,704 issued Dec. 10, 1991 discloses a multilayered laminate which may be filled with an insect repellant. The device has an adhesive layer for attaching the device to a variety of surface targets.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,155,950 issued Oct. 20, 1992 discloses a tick repellant belt worn by an outdoorsman to repel insects. The belt has a barrier preventing ticks from moving upwardly onto the body. The barrier includes various adhesive surfaces.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,249,310 issued Oct. 5, 1993 discloses an article of clothing for detecting and monitoring the infestation of ticks and other crawling insects.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,577,271 issued Nov. 26, 1996 discloses headgear that provides an insect barrier. A headpiece having a crown and a brim has an outer edge extending around the crown, an eyepiece on the brim, and a knitted veil attached between the eyepiece and the headpiece to cover the face.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,656,282 issued Aug. 12, 1997 discloses a package containing a volatile solution-impregnated patch made of a peelable barrier film. The pouch has a substrate saturated with insect repellent fluid. A pressure sensitive adhesive film has a connecting portion which is peelably sealed to the inside of the pouch. When the pouch is peeled open, the backing film is exposed and placed against a target surface, such as a patch of clothing.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,875,493 issued Mar. 2, 1999 discloses a head covering with an insect-excluding module, as well as temperature regulation and a rain cover module.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,049,904 issued Apr. 18, 2000 shows an insect protective head screen attachable to a baseball style hat. The device attaches to the button on top of the hat.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,162,454 issued Dec. 19, 2000 shows a substrate impregnated with insect repellent. The insect repellent is disposed within a breakable packet, such that when the breakable packet is broken, the insect repellent is directed through the fibrous substrate for release through the apertured film.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,233,738 issued May 22, 2001 shows a generally cylindrical, insect protective head screen placed over a baseball style cap or the like. It attaches to the button on top of the baseball cap by an elastic strip at the inside top of the head screen. A material such as fabric is connected to the bottom of the screen to hold a drawstring and form a screen collar that can be selectively tightened around the neck of the user.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,936,269 issued Aug. 30, 2005 discloses an insect repellent substrate for headwear. A felt base is impregnated with a repellent carrier for insect control. The carrier composition includes a mixture of wax and a naturally occurring insect repellent such as pyrethrum oil, or scented or aromatic oils such as citronella oil, rosemary oil, or eucalyptus oil. Strips of the fabric base material may be attached to headwear such as a headband or cap so that it is in contact with the wearer's hair or body.

U.S. Pat. No. 7,107,625 issued Sep. 19, 2006 discloses a hat with an insect screen. The insect screen has a portion connectable to either the top section or a fabric member to cover a user's head.

U.S. Pat. No. 7,243,375 issued Jul. 17, 2007 discloses an insect protection net that covers the head, trunk, arms, hands, legs, and feet of the human body. A fastener couples the net to the human body. The net is coated with an insecticide and/or a repellent.

However, no known, reasonably comfortable and easy-to use system provides an integrated hat with insect controlling means that functions without interfering with the wearers' comfort. No practicable system may be user installed in the field, or service rapidly and conveniently when parts are replaced as insects accumulate.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

This invention provides an improved insect control system for retrofitting to a conventional ball cap or hunting hat. Moreover, it provides a hat equipped with my segmented insect control system. My cap is ideal for hunters that includes a plurality of user serviceable pest control segments that are adapted to be attached to various segments of a conventional hat, while preserving user comfort. A kit for retrofitting to a conventional cap is also disclosed.

Attachment means are provided on the hat for mounting critical components. An elongated anchoring band made of Velcro®-brand fastener material is attached around the cap's dome. A secondary band of Velcro®-brand fastener material at the hat's rear anchors lower portions of the sticky, bug-capturing control segments. The bands are complemented and assisted by an upper attachment disk mounted upon the cap's dome.

The attachment means secure a plurality of insect control segments that are mounted in spaced, offset relation atop the cap. A plurality of generally triangular, primary insect control segments are removably secured over the generally triangular sections of the ball cap. Preferably there are two secondary insect control segments mounted at the cap rear, over irregularly shaped hat portions.

A plurality of attachment tabs that are packaged on peel-away strips are used to hold the control segments. Each tab has a smooth surface temporarily adhesively joined to a peel strip for storage, and an opposite surface made of complimentary Velcro®-brand fastener material that enables affixation to the above-mentioned attachments bands and the disk. These tabs can be removed by hand from their storage strip, and affixed a smooth surface on the insect control segments. Once the tabs are installed, the segments can be placed atop the hat over the respective body portions to be covered, with the tabs affixed to the attachments bands or disk by the Velcro®-brand fastener materials. A sticky outer surface of the control segments treated with an insect capturing, gummy substance will captivate insect pests, without the use of pesticides, chemical sprays, or clumsy body covering such as nets or veils.

Thus a basic object is to provide a convenient and efficient means for controlling annoying insect pests such as mosquitoes.

Another basic object is to provide a cap that captures mosquitoes and other annoying insect pests.

It is also a fundamental object to provide an insect control kit that may be user-retrofitted in the field to conventional ball caps to capture annoying insects.

Another object is to provide an insect attractant and capturing system of the character described that is ideal for hunters. It is a feature of my invention that insects are quietly and efficiently captured without movements that might startle or frighten away game animals.

Yet another object is to provide a system of the character described that is comfortable and non-distracting.

Another basic object is to provide a hat with user applied insect control strips that attract and capture mosquitoes.

Another object of my invention is to provide an insect capturing system that applies to the various geometrically shaped segments of conventional ball caps. It is a feature of my invention that the preferred kit includes multiple shaped segments that fit above all of the various surface segments of conventional caps.

Another basic object of the invention is to provide a high degree of protection against mosquitoes.

A still further object is to provide an insect capturing kit for caps of the character described, that enables them to capture insects.

Another important object is to provide an insect capturing system of the character described that is conveniently employed in conjunction with a conventional adjustable baseball style hat which is adjustable and comfortable.

Another object is to provide an effective system for controlling insects that is effective for ventilated caps or hats. It is a feature of my invention that the preferred pest strips are mounted in an offset fashion to allow continued ventilation of the hat.

It is also an object to provide an insect controlling cap or hat for hunters that is comfortable and durable.

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention, along with features of novelty appurtenant thereto, will appear or become apparent in the course of the following descriptive sections.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

In the following drawings, which form a part of the specification and which are to be construed in conjunction therewith, and in which like reference numerals have been employed throughout wherever possible to indicate like parts in the various views:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary pictorial view of a hunter wearing a cap equipped with the insect control kit of the invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged, front plan view of a cap adapted to receive my insect controlling kit;

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of the cap of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a top plan view of the cap of FIGS. 2 and 3;

FIG. 5 is a bottom plan view of the cap of FIGS. 2-4;

FIG. 6 is a rear plan view of the cap of FIGS. 2-5;

FIG. 7 is a plan view of a primary insect control segment for application to regular triangular portions of the cap, showing how it is packaged, and illustrating placement of a trio of attachment tabs;

FIG. 8 is a plan view similar to FIG. 7, but omitting the attachment tabs;

FIG. 9 is a plan view of a secondary control segment for application to the irregular right rear surface portion of a cap, showing how it is packaged prior to deployment;

FIG. 10 is a plan view of a secondary control segment for application to the irregularly shaped left rear surface portion of the cap, illustrating placement of the preferred attachment tabs;

FIG. 11 is an isometric view of the preferred tabs disposed on their tab strip;

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary isometric view illustrating how the preferred attachment tabs are removed from the tab strip for deployment upon various control segments;

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary isometric view illustrating the manual placement of selected tabs upon a control segment; and,

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary pictorial view illustrating the attachment of a tabbed control segment upon the cap of FIGS. 2-6.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

With initial reference directed to FIGS. 1-6 of the appended drawings, a ball cap or hat constructed generally in accordance with the best mode of the invention has been generally designated by the reference numeral 20. A hat equipped with only portions of the invention (i.e., the fastening bands made of Velcro®-brand material) has been designated by the reference numeral 21 in FIGS. 2-6. As explained in detail hereinafter, the invention comprises a plurality of sticky, bug-capturing segments that are adapted to be disposed about the external surface periphery of the hats 20, 21 to capture insect pests 22, 24. For example, an insect 24 is illustrated captured upon a segment of the invention, where it can no longer attack or bother the wearer 26.

A conventional ball cap comprises an upper, generally dome-shaped top portion 28 adapted to sit upon the head of a wearer 26, having a front 30 from which a conventional bill 32 projects outwardly. The front 34 of the bill 32 is conventionally reinforced with a plurality of parallel, arcuate stitches 36. Stitching 37 reinforces the front lip 39 (FIG. 5) of the bill 32. Conventional stitching 38 beneath the cap dome 28 (FIG. 3), and above the bottom 33 of the dome, secures the bill to the dome.

Dome 28 comprises several radially spaced-apart, fabric portions that are conventionally sewn together. For example, noting FIGS. 2 and 4, there is a generally triangular front left portion 42 and a generally triangular front right portion 43 that adjoin each other at boundary 45, and which are secured by conventional stitches 47. A generally triangular left side portion 49 adjoins an irregularly shaped left rear portion 50 across border 52. A right rear irregular portion 55 adjoins a generally triangular right side portion 56 across boundary 57. Adjoining triangular portions 43 and 56 similarly are stitched on sides of boundary 59. Most caps include conventional apertured ventilation buttons 60 for comfort. As seen in FIG. 5, the bottom inside of the cap comprises a plurality of intersecting and radially spaced-apart fabric strips that internally line or cover the previously discussed boundaries and stitching.

Referencing FIGS. 4-6, the bottom periphery 64 of the dome has a lower, encircling band 66 (FIG. 5) whose terminal ends 68, 69 (FIG. 6) can be adjusted to fit the cap to differently sized persons. As recognized by those skilled in the art, these ends are conventionally covered with Velcro®-brand fastener material, comprising hook and loop materials that bind the ends together in an adjustable fashion. Similar materials have been used with other parts in my insect control kit 23, as described below.

Ends 68, 69 (FIG. 6) mate together beneath a rear, somewhat rectangular void region 71 at the rear of the cap. When the cap is worn, void region 71 is positioned at the back of the wearer's head. The curved, reinforced edge 73 defines the border of region 71, which shapes the rears of irregular rear cap portions 50 and 55 so that they are shaped differently than the generally triangular cap portions 49, 56 etc.

Attachment means are provided for anchoring and holding the insect control segments discussed hereinafter. When the invention is sold in kit form, the attachment means will be user applied to a conventional ball cap. A primary attachment band 75 is the largest portion of the attachment means. As seen, for example, in FIG. 4, the elongated, encircling band 75 extends substantially about the frontal and side periphery of the preferred cap. Band 75 anchors lower portions of the control segments as discussed hereinafter. A secondary attachment band 77 is attached to dome 28 at the rear of the cap, above region 71 (FIG. 6). Band 77 is generally parallel with edge 73 (FIG. 6), and it complements band 75. Finally, an upper circular attachment disk 78 sits atop the cap's dome 28. When my invention is sold in kit form, for retrofitting to existing baseball hats, bands 75 and 77 and disk 78, all made of Velcro®-brand fastener material, will be applied by the user to a conventional ball cap. These attachment means portions will be packaged with a strip backing over an adhesive base, for application to hats by the user. Hats 20 have the bands 75, 77 and disk 78 sewn in place.

Referring to FIGS. 7 and 8, a primary insect control segment 80 is generally triangular. The hat 20 uses four such primary segments, for covering each of the previously discussed generally triangular hat portions 42, 43, 49 and 56 (FIG. 4). The segments may be made of plastic film, and they preferably they are translucent. A camouflage pattern may be applied to them to match coloration of the hat. There are several, preferably three, attachment tabs 82, 83 affixed to the segment 80. FIG. 8 shows a segment 80 prior to application of tabs. Tabs 82 are disposed near the segment bottom, and when the segment is placed upon the cap to cover portions 42, 43, 49 or 56, for example, the bottom tabs 82 mate with band 75. The top attachment tabs 83 mate with the upper disk 78, as seen in FIG. 14. Each segment 80 has a smooth outer surface 85 to which the tabs 82, 83 are adhesively affixed. The sticky bottom surface 87 (i.e., FIG. 14) of the segments 80 is treated with an insect capturing gummy substance to capture insects, as illustrated in FIG. 1. Prior to installation, the segments 80 are disposed on a peel away backing strip 86, which, as in FIG. 14, may be peeled away from the segments 80 during or prior to installation. After strip 86 is removed, the bottom Velcro® attachment tabs 82 are pressed upon the Velcro® band 75 as in FIG. 13, and the tabs allow segment 80 to be firmly attached to the hat over a given triangular hat portion 42, 43, 49, and/or 56. Importantly, the spacing provided by the tabs 82, 83 over and upon band 75 and disk 78 respectively provides a small air gap between the segments and the surface of the cap, so apertured ventilation buttons 60 are not completely occluded. The latter feature enhances user comfort.

Turning to FIGS. 9 and 10, there are two secondary or irregular insect control segments shaped differently than segments 80. Segment 90 is designed for right rear cap portion 55, and segment 91 (FIG. 10) is designed to fit over left rear cap portion 50 (FIG. 4). Segments 90 and 91 are packaged on a peel strip 93. The smooth outer surface 95 of segment 90 has not received attachment tabs yet. Segment 91 has four attachment tabs disposed upon its outer surface 97. Lower attachment tabs 99 mate with the band 75 discussed earlier. Upper tab 101 mates with disk 78. The corner tab 102 mates with the rear band 77 (i.e., FIG. 4) discussed earlier. The lower sticky surfaces of segments 90 and 91, as before, stick to peel strips 93 until removal. With the segments and peel strips separated, and with the segments attached as in FIG. 1, the combined, exposed sticky surfaces will capture annoying insect pests as illustrated in FIG. 1. Preferably, the sticky substance used to capture insects is a polybutene, hot-melt pressure sensitive adhesive.

Referencing FIGS. 11, and 12, a plurality of attachment tabs 83 are adhesively affixed to a peel strip substrate 104 for packaging. Each tab 82 or 83 etc. is in the form of a disk, with a circular shape. The outer circular surfaces 106 of each tab are formed of Velcro® brand material for mating with the similar Velcro® brand material in bands 75, 77, and disk 78. The inner surface 108 (FIG. 12) of each tab is gummed, forming a tacky adhesive surface that adheres to substrate 104. When grasped by the hand 110, they can be removed as seen in FIG. 12 and applied to the control segments as in FIG. 13 in the manner discussed earlier.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that this invention is one well adapted to obtain all the ends and objects herein set forth, together with other advantages which are inherent to the structure.

It will be understood that certain features and subcombinations are of utility and may be employed without reference to other features and subcombinations. This is contemplated by and is within the scope of the claims.

As many possible embodiments may be made of the invention without departing from the scope thereof, it is to be understood that all matter herein set forth or shown in the accompanying drawings is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.