Title:
PROBE GOLF TRAINING PUTTER
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A putting training system is described which includes a modified putter head and may include a modified golf ball. The putter head includes sensor prongs which project from the putter head face.



Inventors:
Clark, Derek (San Marcos, CA, US)
Application Number:
12/029598
Publication Date:
08/13/2009
Filing Date:
02/12/2008
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
473/280, 473/409, 473/200
International Classes:
A63B69/36
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
CHIU, RALEIGH W
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
WESLEY B. AMES (ESCONDIDO, CA, US)
Claims:
1. A golf training putter head, comprising a body comprising a planar ball contact face; and two spaced apart prongs projecting from said face.

2. The putter head of claim 1, wherein said prongs are spaced apart a distance less than the diameter of a standard golf ball.

3. The putter head of claim 1, wherein said prongs are spaced apart a distance slightly greater than the diameter of a standard golf ball.

4. The putter head of claim 1, wherein said prongs are substantially perpendicular to said face.

5. The putter head of claim 1, wherein said prongs diverge.

6. The putter head of claim 1, further comprising a contact sensor in said face between said prongs.

7. The putter head of claim 6, wherein centered contact of a golf ball with said sensor produces a visible display.

8. The putter head of claim 7, wherein said display comprises an LED which illuminates upon said centered contact.

9. The putter head of claim 1, wherein said prongs are mounted on at least one spring pivot.

10. The putter head of claim 9, wherein said prongs are mounted in a first insert which is replaceably mounted in said body behind said face.

11. The putter head of claim 10, wherein said first insert is replaceable with a putting insert.

12. The putter head of claim 9, wherein lateral deflection of a prong upon ball contact is indicative of an off-center contact.

13. A golf putting training ball comprising a spherical ball having two, substantially parallel, spaced apart circumferential grooves, wherein said ball has the diameter substantially that of a standard golf ball.

14. The ball of claim 13, wherein said ball is the weight of a standard golf ball.

15. The ball of claim 13, wherein said ball comprises a circumferential metal band.

16. The ball of claim 13, wherein the width of said grooves are approximately 3 mm.

17. The ball of claim 13, wherein interior of said grooves are central cylinder sections with diameters of approximately 12 mm.

18. A golf putting training system, comprising a golf training ball having two parallel, spaced apart circumferential grooves; and a golf training putter comprising a putter head body having a planar ball contact face, and two spaced apart prongs protruding through said face, wherein said ball and said putter are configured such that said prongs can fit within said grooves without contacting said ball.

19. A golf putting training method comprising striking a golf training ball with a golf training putter causing said ball to roll; and observing whether the behavior of said ball or an indicator on said putter or both are indicative of a desired putting action, wherein said putter comprises a putter head body having a ball contact face with two spaced apart prongs protruding from said face.

20. The method of claim 19, wherein said ball comprises a spherical ball having two circumferential parallel grooves wherein the spacing of said grooves matches the spacing of said prongs.

21. The method of claim 19, wherein said observing includes observing whether said ball wobbles as it rolls following said striking.

22. The method of claim 19, wherein said observing comprises observing whether a ball strike indicator light on said putter changes in a manner indicative of either correct or incorrect ball strike.

23. The method of claim 19, wherein said prongs are parallel.

24. The method of claim 19, wherein said prongs diverge.

25. The method of claim 19, further comprising repeating said striking and observing a plurality of times.

26. The method of claim 20, wherein when said putter strikes said ball with a correct strike, said prongs insert into and exit from said grooves without contacting said ball.

Description:

RELATED APPLICATIONS

NOT APPLICABLE.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to the field of golf, and more particularly to the field of putting.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The following discussion is provided solely to assist the understanding of the reader, and does not constitute an admission that any of the information discussed or references cited constitute prior art to the present invention.

Golf, although a simple game, demands both dedication and concentration. From tee to green, many decisions have to be made regarding club selection, lie of the ball, obstacles, and wind, just to name a few. However, having finally reached the putting surface, known as the green, at least one of those problems is moot, that being the one of club selection. The putter is one club that, if used in conjunction with the correct putting method, is one answer to lowering a player's handicap, i.e., having been able to hole out in fewer strokes.

Some training putters have been described.

Ognjanovic, U.S. Pat. No. 5,709,610 describes a golf club/golf ball impact detection system contained in a golf club head. The system includes a plurality of push buttons which, when depressed, activate associated LEDs providing a visual indication of golf ball impact location on the club face.

Henwood, U.S. Pat. No. 5,792,001 describes a putting stroke training device which includes X- and Y-axis acceleration sensors for detecting respectively “any abnormal acceleration or deceleration of the putter head” and “whether the face of the putter strikes a golf ball perpendicular to the path of the putter head.”

Ogjanivic, U.S. Pat. No. 6,248,021 describes a “putter having a head with an elastomer or thin hard material face cover protecting piezoelectric sensor electrically connected with light emitting diodes (LEDs) arranged to visually indicate the impact location . . . . Each teaching club has a matching Professional Golf Association approved club for golf course play.”

Villacorta, U.S. Pat. No. 6,518,384 describes a golf ball in which it is stated that “first and second annular members are coupled to the ball in substantially parallel spaced-apart relation. The spacing of the first and second annular members defines a spherical zone of the ball that projects radially outwardly from the center beyond the outer peripheral surfaces of the first and second annular members . . . . The device provides rapid tactile and visual feedback of a misstroke.”

Galanis et al., U.S. Pat. No. 6,736,735 describes a sports swing training apparatus and “concerns a club for impacting an object . . . . The club has a microprocessor, a plurality of infrared sources, a plurality of infrared sensors, and indicators configurable in a configuration indicating proper club face alignment and in a configuration indicating club face misalignment.

Collins et al., U.S. Pat. No. 6,875,122 describes a laser putting device which can be attached to a golf putter. The device is stated to include a laser, a housing for the laser, wire to connect the laser to a power source, a battery source, and a trigger. The device is stated to “simultaneously address here common problems for golfers: aim, effective loft, and inconsistent and off-center impact points.”

Lin, U.S. Pat. No. 6,923,728 describes a golf club face impact alignment system which includes first and second light emitting units which are attached to golf club face, and first and second light sensing units which are attached to a base. The club is swung between the first and second light sensing units. If light from the emitting devices is not detected at the first and second light sensing units simultaneously, the golf club face is not properly aligned.

McGinty et al. U.S. Pat. No. 6,923,729 describes a golf training club apparatus which is stated to have “a plurality of optical sensors adjacent the face for detecting contact between the face and the golf ball and electronics mounted with the head for processing signals from the sensor for analyzing at least the location of the contact between the face and the golf ball . . . . The electronics also analyze whether the ball is tending to slice or hook be detecting lateral movement of the ball during contact with the club face.”

Umlauf, Appl. No. DE20011019740, Publ. No. DE10119740 published 2002-10-24 describes a golf putting training device which includes a laser light transmitter which transmits light to a reflector on the putter. Reflected light is detected by a horizontal row of sensors so that putter deviation from the target direction is indicated.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to a golf training system. More specifically, the invention concerns a training system, e.g., a four piece training system, for putting which features a modified putter head which provides immediate feedback on proper ball contact and preferably also proper stroke follow-through. In exemplary cases, this is provided with a combination of the modified putter head and a corresponding modified ball.

Thus, a first aspect of the invention concerns a golf training putter head which includes a body having a planar ball contact face and one or more prongs, usually two spaced apart prongs, projecting from the face of the head. Generally, for use the putter head will be mounted with a shaft and grip.

In particular embodiments, a pair of prongs are substantially parallel to each other; a pair of prongs diverge; there are two spaced apart prongs which are spaced apart a distance less than the diameter of a standard golf ball (e.g., the space between is about ¼ to ¾ of the ball diameter, or ¼ to ½, ¼ to ⅓, ⅓ to ½, ⅓ to ⅔, ½ to ¾ of the ball diameter. Preferably the two prongs are substantially parallel to each other and substantially perpendicular to the club face, or at least substantially perpendicular to a midline through the long dimension of the face.

In certain embodiments, a single prong is used which projects substantially perpendicular from the putter face or at least to a midline through the long dimension of the face.

Also in certain embodiments, a pair of prongs are spaced apart a distance slightly greater than the diameter of a standard golf ball, e.g., for parallel prongs the space between is 0.05 to 0.375, 0.10 to 0.30, 0.10 to 0.25, or 0.10 to 0.20 inches greater than the diameter of the ball.

In many embodiments, the prongs are mounted on spring pivots; each of a pair of prongs is mounted on separate pivots; a pair of prongs are linked together in a single unit and mounted on a single pivot.

In preferred embodiments, lateral deflection of a prong and/or contact of a prong with a ball during ball strike is indicative of an off-center contact; lateral deflection of a prong and/or contact of a prong with a ball during ball strike produces an illuminated display (e.g., illumination of one or more LEDs) indicative of an off-center contact; lateral deflection of a prong and/or contact of a prong with a ball following centered contact ball strike produces a indicative of a lateral motion of the club head, e.g., a wobble visible as the ball rolls.

In certain embodiments, the putter head includes a central contact sensor in the face between the prongs, e.g., an electromechanical sensor or an optical sensor; centered contact of a golf ball with the central contact sensor produces a visible display, e.g., a display which includes an LED which illuminates upon centered contact.

In preferred embodiments, the prongs (and preferably also a central contact sensor and/or other contact sensors which are included) are mounted in a first insert which is replaceably mounted in the putter head body behind the face; the first insert is weighted to provide normal putter weight and balance; the putter head body is weighted with removable weights to provide normal weight and balance when the first insert is installed; the first insert is replaceable with a putting insert. Alternatively, the respective inserts provide all or a portion of the face.

In a related aspect, the invention concerns a golf putting training ball which is a spherical ball having at least one circumferential groove, and usually two, substantially parallel, spaced apart circumferential grooves. Usually the ball has the diameter substantially that of a standard golf ball. Usually the ball is substantially the weight of a standard golf ball.

In certain embodiments, the ball includes a circumferential metal band, e.g., around the center section of the ball between the grooves; the width of grooves is approximately 2.5, 3, 3.5, 4, 4.5, or 5 mm; at the interior of the grooves are central cylinder sections, e.g., with diameters of 5-7, 7-10, 10-12, 12-15, or 15-20 mm, or has a diameter of approximately 10, 12, or 14 mm.

Likewise, in another related aspect, the invention provides a golf putting training system which includes a golf training ball having two parallel, spaced apart circumferential grooves, and a golf training putter which includes a putter head body having a planar ball contact face, and two spaced apart prongs protruding through the face, where the ball and said putter are configured such that the prongs can fit within the grooves without contacting the ball.

In particular embodiments, the ball and/or the putter are as described for aspects above or otherwise described herein for the present invention.

In particular embodiments, the system also includes a replacement insert allowing (e.g., approved by a golf regulatory entity) course play when the training insert is replaced with the course play insert. The system may additionally or alternatively include one or more golf balls bearing markings (e.g., dark markings) substantially matching the position and size of the grooves(s) in the golf training ball.

The invention further provides a golf putting training method which involves striking a golf training ball with a golf training putter causing the ball to roll, and observing whether the behavior of the ball or an indicator on the putter or both are indicative of a desired putting action (and/or an undesired putting action may also be indicated in the case of an incorrect putting action). The putter includes a putter head body having a ball contact face with two spaced apart prongs protruding from the face.

In particular embodiments, the putter and/or the ball is as described for an aspect above or otherwise described herein for the present invention.

In certain embodiments, the ball includes a spherical ball having two circumferential parallel grooves, where the spacing of those grooves matches the spacing of the prongs; the observing includes observing whether the ball wobbles as it rolls following the striking; the observing includes observing whether a ball strike indicator light on the putter changes in a manner indicative of either correct or incorrect ball strike; the prongs are parallel; the prongs diverge.

In many cases, the method further includes repeating the striking and observing a plurality of times, e.g., at least 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, or 50 times in a single training session.

In many configurations, when the putter strikes the ball with a correct strike and follow through, the prongs insert into and exit from the grooves without contacting the ball, e.g., without contacting a wall of a groove.

The phrase “substantially perpendicular to the club face” means substantially perpendicular to at least the horizontal (usually long) direction of the club face, and may or may not be substantially perpendicular to the vertical (usually short) direction of the club face. In this context, “substantially” means effectively perpendicular, and will be within 7, more preferably within 5, and most preferably within 3 degrees or even within 2 or 1 degrees of perpendicular.

In the context of pairs of prongs projecting from the face of a putter head, the term “substantially parallel” means within 7, more preferably within 5, and most preferably within 3 degrees or even within 2 or 1 degrees of parallel. In the context of pairs of grooves in golf balls for the present invention, the term “substantially parallel” means

The phrase “lateral motion of the club head” and similar terms referring to motion of the club head during a golf stroke which has a component of motion deviating away from the intended path of the ball. Such motion of the club head may, for example, be a curving motion, a relatively straight pull or push, and/or a twisting of the club head very close to the time of ball contact.

Additional embodiments will be apparent from the Detailed Description and from the claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 shows a perspective top and front exploded view of the internal working parts of the putter head of FIG. 1.

FIG. 2 shows a perspective top and front view of the putter head of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 shows the modified golf ball.

FIG. 4 shows the balance replacement insert for the putter head.

FIG. 5 shows a double offset prong sensor lever.

FIG. 6 shows a single central probe contact and a double offset prong sensor in place in the putter head.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The present invention is designed to assist a golfer to improve their putting. The approach to accomplish this is through use of a putter having a modified head, i.e., a modified putter head. In particular, this modified putter head is designed such that the user receives clear indication of both correct and incorrect ball strike and follow through, in contrast to devices which register only the ball strike portion and thus do not assist the user in avoiding pushing or pulling the putter head upon contact. Further, the present putter head accomplishes this using a simple design which does not require complex signal processing to provide feedback indication of correct stroke.

The dual function of the present putter head is accomplished using a putter head (or a putter head and ball combination) which indicates both centered ball strike, and stroke/ball deviations immediately after the ball strike. In addition, the putter can be designed so that the putter can be readily reconfigured as a standard putter, allowing a golfer to use the same putter in actual play as that which was used for developing a proper putting stroke. Certain variations of the modified putter are described in more detail below, along with a modified ball adapted for use with certain of the putter heads.

Modified Putter Heads

The present modified putter heads may be configured in many different ways. In general, these putter heads incorporate prong sensors projecting from the face of the putter, and usually also include at least one sensor which senses contact between the putter head face and the golf ball. Such sensor(s) is located between a pair of prongs, and is used to sense centered ball strike. The prong sensors require nearly centered ball strike, but also produce a visual indication of lateral movement of the putter head at or immediately after initial ball strike, i.e., movement in a generally horizontal direction perpendicular to the normal or desired path of the putter head during the stroke. An exemplary embodiment of a putter head and an associated modified ball are described below, along with additional embodiments of the putter head which may be used with standard golf balls.

Exemplary Embodiment

As indicated above, the invention concerns a modified putter head (which can, in most cases, be mounted on any desired putter shaft. In advantageous embodiments, the putter head is an electro-mechanical device, but can also be configured as only mechanical or as including electro-optical components.

In usual embodiments, the putter head includes a pair of prong sensors projecting from the face of the putter head. These prong sensors are advantageously supplemented with a contact sensor which is located between the prongs.

In the exemplary embodiment shown in FIG. 1 and FIG. 2, three probes or sensors are used, in this case acting as electrical and mechanical contacts. Thus, the modified putter head 10 includes a body 12 in which is mounted a probe insert in insert cavity 13 which includes two lever probes or prong sensors 14 and 15. These lever probes or sensor prongs extend outwardly from the putter face 18 (preferably essentially perpendicularly) through prong slots 20 and 21 for contact with a modified ball 50. As illustrated, in a properly executed putt, the prongs enter the grooves 52 and 53 in the modified golf ball without contacting the ball. The prong sensors are mounted on pivots 22 and 23, being urged under spring tension to their neutral positions. A central probe contact 26 is located in the putter face between the two prong sensors, surrounded by sensor insulator 27 and penetrating through probe sensor aperture 16 in the putter face. Each of the sensors is electrically connected to a power source (e.g., battery) and to indicator circuits (e.g., on a circuit board). In most cases it is desirable to have simple circuitry, so in such designs the indicator controls are hard wired. Of course, the indicator response logic may also be programmed in software, but the approach adds complexity and usually cost.

The three probes can be referred to as a center probe and two outer probes. The center probe is shorter than the two outer probes, preferably essentially flush with the putter face. In this exemplary embodiment, the probes are electrically connected to three lights 28, 29, and 30 (e.g., two red (outer lights) and one green (central light)) located on top of the putter head. When contact with the ball occurs, a corresponding outer light will be activated by contact of the prongs sensors with the ball (e.g., any face of the grooves in the ball), thereby giving the user an indication of where the putter face engaged the ball—whether toward the head or toe of the putter. Contact with the center probe without contact with either of the prong sensors will activate a display corresponding to centered contact (e.g., a central green LED), while contact with the center probe followed by contact with at least one prong sensor will activate a display indicative of centered contact and lateral putter movement following contact (e.g., illumination of a central green LED and one of the red outer LED corresponding to the direction of lateral movement).

The back of the insert recess can be blocked using a back plate 32. Optionally, the putter also includes balance slugs 34 and 35 which fit into holes or channels or the like (not shown) in the putter body.

The main embodiment of the insert can be replaced by a weight replacement embodiment for normal putting use. Preferably with the weight replacement insert in place, the putter is an approved putter for course play. The weight replacement insert is illustrated in FIG. 4. The weight replacement insert 60 slides into the insert recess 13 in the putter head 10 and is retained using a screw which slides through the insert and threads into threaded screw receptacle 36. The front of the weight replacement insert has three projections 62, 63, and 64 which slide into the apertures 16, 20, and 21 such that the front surfaces of the projections are flush with the face of the putter. To complete the flush face, in this embodiment a filler washer 11 fits into the face around the central projection 64 of the insert. With the weight replacement insert in place, the putter has a flat face without substantially any recesses or projections which could cause a struck ball to take an erroneous path.

Generally, it is desirable for the weight of the putter head with the weight replacement insert to closely match the weight of the same putter head with the sensor insert (along with any desired compensating or balancing weights) in place. Of course, a weight replacement insert may be constructed in a variety of materials, and may be designed to be retained in the putter head body in any of a variety of different ways, e.g., using one or more clamps, multiple screws, clips, and the like. Any such fasteners should hold the insert stably in position. Advantageously the sensor insert and the weight replacement insert can be exchanged using no tools or only simple tools, e.g., to facilitate changing the inserts at a golf course.

Alternate Embodiments

One alternative design incorporates a single pivoting prong sensor. That is, instead of having two independent prongs extending from the face of the putter head which have separate and independent pivot points, an alternative embodiment using similar prongs extending from the putter face, but within the putter head the prongs are connected to form a single pivoting prong structure. This pivoting prong structure pivots at a single point.

In one alternative (FIG. 5 and FIG. 6) to the dual straight prong embodiment described above, the alternative uses two angled prongs, e.g., in a single lever component 70. In this component, two angled prongs 72 and 73 extend from a central web 74. At the end of the component distal from the prongs is a pivot mount fitting 76. The double offset prong sensor lever can replace the two prong sensor levers 14 and 15 and the central probe contact 26 can be replaced with a single central probe contact 80 (see, FIG. 6). This allows practice of the invention with a normal golf ball. In a properly executed putt, the offset or angled prongs are positioned on either side of ball at contact of the ball with the putter face. If, however, the stroke is off center, one prong will contact the ball before the center sensor, while a pull or push will cause a prong to contact the ball after the ball has contacted the center sensor. The angled prong sensor is shown installed in a putter head body in FIG. 6. As shown, the angled prongs 72 and 73 project symmetrically out of the face of the putter head at diverging angles. The angled prongs are separated a distance such that a standard golf ball can contact the face of the putter without contacting either of the prongs.

Another alternative utilizes two straight prongs which are connected or are part of a single pivot prong sensor component. One type of embodiment functions similarly to the angled prong probe sensor embodiment and is suitable for use with unmodified balls. In this case, there are two substantially parallel prongs which are separated a by a distance slightly greater than the diameter of the intended ball, usually a standard golf ball. In this case, when striking the ball, if the strike is centered, the ball will contact the putter face without first contacting a prong. If there is substantially no lateral movement of the putter upon contact, the ball will roll away without contacting a prong, but if lateral movement occurs, at least one prong will contact the ball causing activation of a corresponding indicator and/or wobble of the rolling ball.

Yet another alternative embodiment uses a central prong, which may be the only prong, and a modified ball with a corresponding groove. With this embodiment, if the ball is contacted centrally, the central prong will enter the groove in the ball, and the only contact will be between the ball and the putter face. However, if the contact is not centered, the prong will contact the ball and indicated such non-centered contact. If contact is initially centered, but lateral movement occurs at contact or immediately following, indicator(s) will show the initial centered contact with lateral movement (e.g., with a light display as described above and/or ball wobble)

Modified Golf Ball

An item useful in the present invention is a modified or simulated golf ball which matches the projecting probes of the putter head. Thus, as illustrated in FIG. 4, the ball 50 has two parallel, symmetrically spaced, deep recesses or grooves 52 and 53 of substantially equal width separated by the center section 54 of the ball. Thus, the ball has a center section bracketed by two parallel grooves, and outside the grooves are the dish shaped outer sections 56 and 57. The grooves are of equal depth, such that the bottom of the grooves has the appearance of a central axle 58. In order to provide weight approximately equal to a standard golf ball, the ball may have a heavy material (e.g., a metal) distributed evenly around the ball (e.g., around the periphery of the center section). Such peripherally distributed weighting also contributes to rolling stability, assisting the use of the ball in the present system. Of course, such weight compensation may also be provided by using materials for the modified ball which bring the weight to equal or similar to the weight of the standard ball.

Even though such grooves are preferred, balls can also be made which have recesses which do not extend all the way around the ball. For example, a pocket type of recess could be used, preferably with appropriately placed weighting to maintain rotational balance for the ball. In use, the ball would be placed such that the pocket(s) is on the side of the ball which is to be struck with the putter, and oriented such that a the prongs of the training putter can cleanly insert into the pocket(s). Following contact, the functioning of the putter and ball would be essentially the same as for the ball having grooves, except that it may be beneficial to provide one or more bands around the ball to provide the visual wobble indication.

In addition to the described modified ball, a distinctively marked ball can be used for regular play to provide similar visual appearance to the modified ball. Thus, for example, a ball with at least one dark (e.g., black) band in position and approximate width matching the groove(s) in the modified ball can be beneficial because the golfer has a visual situation similar to the training situation with the modified ball. The band may be continuous all the way around the ball, but that is not necessary. In addition, the band provides the same visual indicator of lateral club head movement as that provided by the modified ball. In this way, the benefits of the training work can be additionally reinforced.

Operation of First Embodiment

Referring to FIG. 2, the golf ball 50 is placed upon the ground in such a way that the parallel grooves or recesses 52 and 53 are directly in line with the intended direction of travel. The putter head 10 containing the probe insert is placed behind the golf ball in the normal manner. The two extending prong sensor levers 14 and 15 (See, e.g., FIG. 2) should be directly in line with the parallel recesses in the ball and in line with the intended direction of travel of the ball. The putter head is placed centrally in the intended line of travel, and is then drawn backwards along the same line and then reversed in one smooth motion proceeding forward. In a correctly executed putt using the putter illustrated in FIG. 2, one of the prong levers passes on each side of the inner wheel 54 into the parallel grooves 52 and 53 of the modified ball without making contact with either wall until the central probe 26 (FIG. 2) comes into contact with the outer face of the inner wheel of the ball. The central LED 29 (see FIG. 3) will illuminate indicating a perfect putt. The putter head proceeds forwards along the line of intended travel. The ball will now be rolling forward, and absence of wobble indicates proper follow-through.

For better understanding of the functioning of the invention, consider the analogy between the two prong and two airplanes flying side by side on final approach to land on parallel runways (analogous to the two recesses in the ball), and emphasizes the necessity of good follow through on the putting stroke, i.e., stroking through the center of the ball. Thinking only “square” results in many cases in a slight lateral deviation of the putter face from the desired line of the putting stroke upon impact with the ball, resulting in a push or a pull, commonly referred to as “the yips.” Should a push or pull occur, at least one of the two contact sensor levers14 and 15 will make contact with a wall of the inner wheel 54 and/or a wall of at least one of the outer disks 56 and 57, activating the corresponding outside LED. The golf ball pushed or pulled off line will give a clear indication of error by imparting a wobble to the ball.

All patents and other references cited in the specification are indicative of the level of skill of those skilled in the art to which the invention pertains, and are incorporated by reference in their entireties, including any tables and figures, to the same extent as if each reference had been incorporated by reference in its entirety individually.

One skilled in the art would readily appreciate that the present invention is well adapted to obtain the ends and advantages mentioned, as well as those inherent therein. The methods, variances, and compositions described herein as presently representative of preferred embodiments are exemplary and are not intended as limitations on the scope of the invention. Changes therein and other uses will occur to those skilled in the art, which are encompassed within the spirit of the invention, are defined by the scope of the claims.

It will be readily apparent to one skilled in the art that varying substitutions and modifications may be made to the invention disclosed herein without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention. For example, variations can be made to the shape of the putter head body and to the materials used for construction. Thus, such additional embodiments are within the scope of the present invention and the following claims.

The invention illustratively described herein suitably may be practiced in the absence of any element or elements, limitation or limitations which is not specifically disclosed herein. Thus, for example, in each instance herein any of the terms “comprising”, “consisting essentially of” and “consisting of” may be replaced with either of the other two terms. The terms and expressions which have been employed are used as terms of description and not of limitation, and there is no intention that in the use of such terms and expressions of excluding any equivalents of the features shown and described or portions thereof, but it is recognized that various modifications are possible within the scope of the invention claimed. Thus, it should be understood that although the present invention has been specifically disclosed by preferred embodiments and optional features, modification and variation of the concepts herein disclosed may be resorted to by those skilled in the art, and that such modifications and variations are considered to be within the scope of this invention as defined by the appended claims.

In addition, where features or aspects of the invention are described in terms of Markush groups or other grouping of alternatives, those skilled in the art will recognize that the invention is also thereby described in terms of any individual member or subgroup of members of the Markush group or other group.

Also, unless indicated to the contrary, where various numerical values or value range endpoints are provided for embodiments, additional embodiments are described by taking any 2 different values as the endpoints of a range or by taking two different range endpoints from specified ranges as the endpoints of an additional range. Such ranges are also within the scope of the described invention. Further, specification of a numerical range including values greater than one includes specific description of each integer value within that range.

Thus, additional embodiments are within the scope of the invention and within the following claims.