Title:
Cylindrical valve system
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The Cylindrical Valve System is a more efficient method of allowing Intake and Exhaust to occur in an internal combustion engine or similar device. It removes the restrictive camshaft, valves and valve springs and substitutes two highly efficient tubes spinning on roller bearings. Try to imagine turning a camshaft and overcoming the restriction of the valve springs, it is impossible. However, with the Cylindrical Valve System it is easily accomplished by hand.



Inventors:
Pascale, John Earl (Providence, RI, US)
Application Number:
12/012745
Publication Date:
08/06/2009
Filing Date:
02/05/2008
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F01L7/02
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
KAMEN, NOAH P
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
John Earl Pascale (Providence, RI, US)
Claims:
1. The “Cylindrical Valve System” replaces the typical camshaft, rods, valves and springs of an internal combustion engine with a much less restrictive two (2) tube system for the distribution of air-fuel mixture and exhaust.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

“Not Applicable”

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSERED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

“Not Applicable”

REFERENCE TO SEQUENCE LISTING, A TABLE, OR A COMPUTER PROGRAM

“Not Applicable”

BACK GROUND OF THE INVENTION

A typical internal combustion engine is comprised of cylinders containing pistons which are connected to a crankshaft. Pistons move up and down inside the cylinders and rotate the crankshaft which produces the power. A camshaft drives push rods which in turn move rocker arms that push valves down to allow air fuel mixture to enter the piston head on the intake stroke. An additional set of valves are pushed down on the exhaust valves to allow exhaust to escape during the exhaust stroke. Each valve is returned to its original position by a valve spring. This sequence is typical in four stroke engines. Stroke one being the intake stroke with the intake valve open, stroke two compression with both valves closed, stroke three power beginning with the spark plug firing burning the air fuel mixture and driving the piston downward. The final stroke is the exhaust stroke having the exhaust valve open to allow the exhaust gases to escape. This cycle continues over and over producing the power the engine was designed to perform.

Valve systems for internal combustion engines produce a great of drag and friction which reduces its efficiency. All of the components of this valve system, the camshaft, push rods, rocker arms and valve springs are fighting the power the crankshaft, driven by the pistons, is trying to create.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The Cylindrical Valve System is comprised of two tubes, one for the intake and one for the exhaust (FIG. 1). Each tube has strategically placed holes or slots to allow the flow of the air-fuel mixture into and the exhaust from the piston cylinders at the appropriate times. The two tubes of the Cylindrical Valve System, replacing the camshaft, push rods, rocker arms, valve springs and valves, will greatly increase efficiency in the typical internal combustion engine or similar devices. This invention will reduce fuel consumption of the engine by directing power to the task it was designed for rather wasting the power internally.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 Is a Cross Section of a piston cylinder and the head showing the Cylindrical Valve System tubes for Intake and Exhaust. It also shows the relationship as to the placement of the tubes to the piston cylinder, Intake and Exhaust ports.

FIG. 2a Is a Cross Section of a four cylinder engine utilizing the Cylindrical Valve System and the relationship of the tubes to each cylinder. This drawing concentrates on the Intake side of the engine.

FIG. 2b Is a Cross Section of a four cylinder engine utilizing the Cylindrical Valve System and the relationship of the tubes to each cylinder. This drawing concentrates on the Exhaust side of the engine.

COMPACT DISCS

Machine Format: IBM-PC

Operating System: MS-Windows

List of Files:

    • 1. Cylindrical Valve System.ppt, 25,118,720 Bytes, Created; Thursday, Feb. 8, 2007, 1:23:03 PM,
    • Opens With: Microsoft PowerPoint, Click on Slide Show, then View Slide Show. This Powerpoint demonstration gives a pictorial and written depiction of the “Cylindrical Valve System” showing the Air-fuel Mixture in Orange and the Exhaust in Purple.
    • 2. Animated Video.wmv, 710,656 Bytes, Created; Sunday, Feb. 4, 2007, 4:01:06 PM
    • Opens With: Windows Media Player. Animation of Cylindrical Valve System with Air-fuel Mixture depicted in Orange and the Exhaust depicted in Purple.
      Both Compact Discs Labeled “Copy 1” & “Copy 2”, submitted herewith are exact in content.(Identical)

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The Cylindrical Valve System consists of two tubes or cylinders of similar length that extend from the front to the rear of the engine. (FIGS. 2a&b). These tubes are located in a head placed on top of the engine block and are attached to the engine block with bolts as a typical existing technology head would be attached. Sleeves or borings are made into the heads so as to allow the tubes to be inserted with a high degree of close tolerance so as to create a seal as to minimize leakage. Each tube is sealed at both ends and has a center shaft attached at each end so as to allow these tubes to spin freely and true. The front shaft, the one attached to the drive belt is longer so as to facilitate its proper attachment to the drive belt. The rear shaft is somewhat smaller and is contained completely within the head and does not protrude as does the drive or front shaft. Both the front and rear shafts are supported and pivot on roller bearings.

One tube, the intake tube, is dedicated to the intake of the engine and has openings cut into the tube, one for each cylinder, placed in a manner as to allow the air-fuel mixture to flow into the cylinder during the intake stroke of the engine (FIG. 2a). When the opening of this rotating tube begins to align with the intake port of a cylinder the descending piston draws the air-fuel mixture into that cylinder. Upon reaching the bottom of the intake stroke the opening has just rotated past the intake port and has sealed off the cylinder. Now the piston will rise in the cylinder and compress the air-fuel mixture, compression stroke, while the tube continues its rotation. At the top of the compression stroke the spark plug fires, causing the rapidly burning air-fuel mixture to drive the piston downward, power stroke. After completing the power stroke the piston rises in the exhaust stroke, the tube continues to rotate sealed from the cylinder until the end of the exhaust stroke. The cycle begins over again with the intake stroke as the tube has completed one revolution and has now begun to realigning itself with the intake port (See compact disc containing “Cylindrical Valve System”, Power Point Demo and Movie Maker Animation).

The second tube, the exhaust tube, is dedicated to the exhaust of the engine and also has openings cut into the tube, one for each cylinder, placed in a manner as to allow the exhaust to flow out of the cylinder during the exhaust stroke of the engine (FIG. 2b). When the opening of this rotating tube begins to align with the exhaust port of a cylinder the rising piston forces the exhaust out of the cylinder. At the upper most position, top dead center, of the piston the rotating tube opening has past the exhaust port and sealed the tube from the cylinder. The rotating tube continues to do so during the intake, compression, and power strokes until it has completed one revolution which begins the cycle again.

At the rear of the tube are two sets of slots cut around the tube in sections large enough to fully accommodate the sufficient flow of air-fuel mixture and exhaust. The air-fuel mixture will flow from the carburetion system into the tube through the slots, keeping the tube sufficiently charged with fuel. (FIG. 2a) Exhaust will flow out by means of the exhaust slots on the exhaust tube. (FIG. 2b).

Along each tube are seal rings, (FIGS. 2a, 2b) these separate any leakage from one piston to another therefore isolating heat and any unwanted movement of gases. These rings can be made of stainless steel or composites such as high heat ceramics.

The tubes of the Cylindrical Valve System could be constructed of any of the typical materials used in engines from stainless steel to aluminum or even any of the new ceramics. It is imperative that the tolerances be very small on both the tube and the boring or sleeve of the head of the engine. The tolerances should be easily maintained with the highly accurate computerized fabricating machines (CNC).

These tolerances should help maintain a higher efficiency of lubrication and engine performance. Lubrication will be facilitated with a typical oil pump forcing oil to the top of the head above the tubes at the seal rings and the roller bearings.

Cooling of the head is accomplished by water jackets located in the head and fed by aligning them with those in the engine block.

FIG. 2a Is a Cross Section of a four cylinder engine utilizing the Cylindrical Valve System and the relationship of the tubes to each cylinder. This drawing concentrates on the Intake side of the engine.

FIG. 2b Is a Cross Section of a four cylinder engine utilizing the Cylindrical Valve System and the relationship of the tubes to each cylinder. This drawing concentrates on the Exhaust side of the engine.

Compact Discs

1. NOT APPLICABLE