Title:
Sighting Device with Trajectory Compensation
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An illuminated sighting device includes a reflective sight component with a reflective surface for facing a user and an adjustable imaging component with a plurality of reticles. Each reticle has a unique trajectory compensation pattern including a plurality of reticle marks that denote a plurality of distances for a particular projectile launching device and/or projectile. A light source is arranged for projecting light through a selected one of the reticles and onto the reflective sight component so that reflective sight marks are incident on the reflective sight component in proportion to the reticle marks of the selected reticle for view by a user during aiming



Inventors:
Lorocco, Anthony T. (Dallas, TX, US)
Application Number:
12/026841
Publication Date:
08/06/2009
Filing Date:
02/06/2008
Assignee:
TRUGLO, INC. (Richardson, TX, US)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F41G1/30
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
TROY, DANIEL J
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Alvin R. Wirthlin (Allen, TX, US)
Claims:
I/We claim:

1. An illuminated sighting device comprising: a reflective sight component having a reflective surface for facing a user; an adjustable imaging component having a plurality of reticles, each reticle having a plurality of reticle marks denoting trajectory compensation for a plurality of distances; and a light source arranged for projecting light through one of the reticles and onto the reflective sight component; wherein the adjustable imaging component is movable to position one of the plurality of reticles in alignment with the light source so that reflective sight marks are incident on the reflective sight component in proportion to the reticle marks of the one reticle for view by a user during aiming.

2. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 1, wherein at least two of the reticle marks of one reticle are spaced closer than at least two of the reticle marks of another reticle.

3. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 2, wherein each reticle represents a different crossbow having a particular draw weight.

4. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 2, wherein each reticle represents a different projectile launching device.

5. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 2, wherein each reticle represents a different projectile having at least one predetermined property.

6. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 5, wherein the at least one predetermined property comprises weight.

7. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 5, wherein the at least one predetermined property comprises velocity.

8. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 1, wherein the adjustable imaging component comprises a disk with openings into which the reticles are installed, the disk being rotatable about a pivot axis to position one of the reticles into alignment with the light source.

9. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 8, wherein the disk is oriented generally horizontally.

10. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 8, wherein the disk is oriented generally vertically.

11. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 1, wherein the adjustable imaging component comprises a bar with openings into which the reticles are installed, the bar being linearly movable to position one of the reticles into alignment with the light source.

12. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 11, wherein the bar is oriented generally horizontally.

13. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 11, wherein the bar is oriented generally vertically.

14. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 1, wherein the reflective sight component comprises a transparent lens with a reflective coating.

15. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 1, wherein the reflective sight component comprises an elongate blade with a reflective surface formed on the blade.

16. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 1, and further comprising an open sight frame, the reflective sight component being mounted in the frame.

17. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 1, and further comprising a tubular housing, the reflective sight component being installed in the housing.

18. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 1, wherein the reticle marks are arranged to form reflective sight dots on the reflective sight component when exposed to the light source.

19. A method of aiming a projectile launching device toward a distant target, the method comprising: providing a plurality of reticles, each reticle having a unique trajectory pattern for a particular projectile launching device and/or projectile; selecting a particular reticle based on the particular projectile launching device and/or projectile; and superimposing at least a portion of the unique trajectory pattern over the target in accordance with a distance from the projectile launching device and the target.

20. A method according to claim 19, wherein each unique pattern comprises a plurality of reticle marks denoting trajectory compensation for a plurality of distances.

21. A method according to claim 19, and further comprising: providing a reflective sight component having a reflective surface for facing a user; and projecting light through the selected reticle and toward the reflective sight component to create the unique trajectory pattern on the reflective sight component.

22. A method according to claim 19, and further comprising providing a tubular housing operably associated with at least one of the plurality of reticles; wherein the step of superimposing at least a portion of the unique trajectory pattern comprises looking through the tubular housing.

23. A sighting device comprising: an adjustable imaging component having a plurality of reticles, each reticle having a plurality of reticle marks denoting trajectory compensation for a plurality of distances, the adjustable imaging component being movable to select one of the plurality of reticles to thereby compensate for a particular projectile launching device and/or projectile.

24. A sighting device according to claim 23, wherein at least two of the reticle marks of one reticle are spaced closer than at least two of the reticle marks of another reticle.

25. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 23, wherein each reticle represents a different projectile launching device.

26. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 23, wherein each reticle represents a different projectile having at least one predetermined property.

27. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 26, wherein the at least one predetermined property comprises weight.

28. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 26, wherein the at least one predetermined property comprises velocity.

29. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 23, wherein the adjustable imaging component comprises a disk with openings into which the reticles are installed, the disk being rotatable about a pivot axis to adjust the positions of the reticles.

30. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 23, wherein the adjustable imaging component comprises a bar with openings into which the reticles are installed, the bar being linearly movable to adjust the positions of the reticles.

31. An illuminated sighting device according to claim 23, wherein the adjustable imaging component comprises at least three reticles.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates generally to sighting devices for cross bows, archery bows, firearms, or other projectile launching devices, and more particularly to a sighting device having trajectory compensating sight marks for superimposing on a target during aiming.

Reflex sights typically include a partially reflective lens and a battery-powered light source that projects light onto the reflective lens to define a reflex dot which is superimposed on a target as viewed through the lens. However, since such sights typically have a single reticle that must be adjusted on the fly for different target distances, the user's ability to quickly superimpose the reflex dot on a target at varying distances is limited.

In an effort to overcome these problems, several improvements have been proposed. By way of example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,924,234, and U.S. Pat. No. 5,653,034 disclose reflex sights with either a fluorescent-doped fiber optic or light pipe that receives ambient light along its length and transmits that light to its ends. Light projecting from one of the ends is incident on a lens as a reflex dot or reticule that can be superimposed on a target. With this arrangement, the light intensity of the reflex dot is directly dependent on the ambient light level. However, due to their complicated shape, the fiber optics can be difficult to manipulate, shape and position on the sight housing, leading to increased manufacturing time and expense. Again, such sights only provide a single reflex dot and therefore limit the user's ability to quickly position the dot on a target at varying distances. Although reflex sights with multiple reticles are known, these reticles are only adjustable to select between different reticle images such as an illuminated dot, cross hair, circle, or combinations thereof.

Other non-reflex sights have been proposed with multiple vertically stacked sight points to compensate for varying target distances. However, many of these sights unduly obscure a user's view of the target and/or may not be separately adjustable to accommodate a user's particular firearm, bow, arrow type and shooting style for varying target distances or heights. Some of these vertically stacked sights are not illuminated and therefore may be difficult to use in low light conditions. In addition, such sights only compensate varying target distances for a particular projectile and firearm. It would therefore be desirable to provide an illuminated reflective sighting device that overcomes at least some of the disadvantages of the prior art.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

According to one aspect of the invention, an illuminated sighting device includes a reflective sight component having a reflective surface for facing a user; an adjustable imaging component having a plurality of reticles, each reticle having a plurality of reticle marks denoting trajectory compensation for a plurality of distances; and a light source arranged for projecting light through one of the reticles and onto the reflective sight component. The adjustable imaging component is movable to position one of the plurality of reticles in alignment with the light source so that reflective sight marks are incident on the reflective sight component in proportion to the reticle marks of the one reticle for view by a user during aiming.

According to a further aspect of the invention, a method of aiming a projectile launching device toward a distant target includes providing a reflective sight component having a reflective surface for facing a user and a plurality of reticles. Each reticle has a unique trajectory pattern for a particular projectile launching device and/or projectile. A particular reticle is selected based on the particular projectile launching device and/or projectile and light is projected through the selected reticle and toward the reflective sight component to create the unique trajectory pattern on the reflective sight component. At least a portion of the unique trajectory pattern is superimposed over the target in accordance with a distance from the projectile launching device and the target.

According to yet a further aspect of the invention, a sighting device includes an adjustable imaging component having a plurality of reticles. Each reticle has a plurality of reticle marks denoting trajectory compensation for a plurality of distances. The adjustable imaging component is movable to select one of the plurality of reticles to thereby compensate for a particular projectile launching device and/or projectile. The sighting device may be embodied as an illuminated sight, a telescopic sight, an open sight, a reflex sight, and so on.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The foregoing summary as well as the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments of the present invention will be best understood when considered in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein like designations denote like elements throughout the drawings, and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an illuminated sighting device in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a diagrammatic view of the primary components of the sighting device of FIG. 1 during operation;

FIG. 3 is a top plan view of an adjustable imaging component for trajectory compensation that forms part of the sighting device of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a rear elevational view of a first sighting pattern as viewed by the user when the adjustable imaging component is in a first position;

FIG. 5 is a rear elevational view of a second sighting pattern as viewed by the user when the adjustable imaging component is in a second position;

FIG. 6 is a rear elevational view of a third sighting pattern as viewed by the user when the adjustable imaging component is in a third position;

FIG. 7 is a rear elevational view of a fourth sighting pattern as viewed by the user when the adjustable imaging component is in a fourth position;

FIG. 8 is a diagrammatic view of an illuminated sighting device in accordance with a further embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 9 is a diagrammatic view of an illuminated sighting device in accordance with yet another embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 10 is a top plan view of an adjustable imaging component in accordance with a further embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 11 is a diagrammatic view of an illuminated sighting device incorporating the imaging component shown in cross section as taken along line 11-11 in FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is an isometric view of an adjustable imaging component in accordance with yet another embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 13 is a diagrammatic view of an illuminated sighting device incorporating the imaging component of FIG. 12 in a first orientation; and

FIG. 14 is a diagrammatic view of an illuminated sighting device incorporating the imaging component of FIG. 12 in a second orientation.

It is noted that the drawings are intended to depict exemplary embodiments of the invention and therefore should not be considered as limiting the scope thereof. It is further noted that the drawings are not necessarily to scale. The invention will now be described in greater detail with reference to the accompanying drawings.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Referring to the drawings, and to FIG. 1 in particular, an illuminated sighting device 10 in accordance with the present invention is illustrated. The sighting device 10 preferably includes a base member 12 with a bracket assembly 14 and a sight assembly 16 connected to the base member. The bracket assembly 14 is adapted for attaching the sight assembly 16 to a projectile launching device such as a crossbow (not shown) or the like. However, it will be understood that the sighting device 10 may be adapted for use with any projectile launching device such as a bow, pellet gun, BB gun, rifle, pistol, paint marker, and so on. Likewise, the sighting device 10 can be used with other devices such as telescopes, sighting scopes, and so on, in order to quickly align the device with a distal target or scene.

The bracket assembly 14 is preferably of conventional construction and includes opposing mounting bars 15 (only one shown) that extend longitudinally and together form a dovetail-shaped groove 18 for receiving a similarly shaped mounting projection (not shown) associated with a projectile launching device or the like. Bolts 20 extend though one of the bars 15 and thread into the other of the bars for adjusting the lateral width of the groove 18 so that the bracket assembly may be tightened or loosened, as required, with respect to the mounting projection (not shown). A height adjustment mechanism 22 and a windage adjustment mechanism 24 may be provided in conventional fashion for adjusting both the lateral and vertical positions of the sight assembly 16. By way of example, it may be necessary to adjust the lateral position of the sight assembly 16 when used during windy conditions and/or when calibrating the sight device 10. Likewise, vertical adjustment of the entire sight assembly 16 may be needed when initially calibrating the sighting device 10 with a particular crossbow (or other device) and arrow (or other projectile), when shooting from different distances and/or heights, such as from the ground or a tree stand, and so on.

The sight assembly 16 preferably includes an image generating portion 26 connected to a rearward end 28 of the base member 12, a reflective sight component 30 mounted within an open sight frame 32 that extends generally upwardly and rearwardly from a forward end 34 of the base member, and an adjustment knob 36 connected to the base member between the rearward and forward ends. The adjustment knob 36 is arranged to rotate clockwise or counterclockwise to adjust the luminous intensity of an image incident on the reflective sight component to accommodate a user during both bright daylight and low light level conditions. The knob 36 is preferably arranged to have detent positions so that discrete levels of luminous intensity can be selected. The knob can also be provided with an “off” position when the sighting device 10 is not in use. To that end, an alignment mark 38 may be provided on the frame 12 and suitable marks (not shown) may be provided on the knob 36 to indicate the different intensity levels as well as the “off” position. In accordance with a further embodiment, the knob 36 may be replaced with an ambient light sensor so that the luminous intensity can be automatically adjusted. With this arrangement, a separate on/off switch may be provided either as a user manipulated device or as a tilt sensor or the like with an electronic timer for automatically turning on/off the sighting device.

With additional reference to FIGS. 2 and 3, the image generating portion 26 preferably includes an adjustable imaging component 40 with a plurality of reticles 42, 44, 46, and 48, a light source 50 arranged on one side of the component 40 for projecting light through one of the reticles, as represented by phantom line 51, and a mirror 52 arranged on the opposite side of the component 40 for directing the reticle image toward the reflective sight component 30, as represented by phantom line 54, which is in turn reflected toward the user, as represented by phantom line 56. It will be understood that the mirror 52 can be embodied as any well-known reflective surface.

As shown, the adjustable imaging component 40 is preferably in the form of a circular disk 60 with circumferentially spaced apertures 58 that receive the reticles 42-48. The disk 60 is connected to a reticle selection knob 62 (FIG. 1) that in turn is rotatably connected to the base member 12. The selection knob preferably includes a lever 64 that can be manipulated by a user to position a desired reticle in alignment with the light source 50 to thereby project a desired image on the reflective sight component 30. Preferably, the selection knob 36 is arranged to rotate clockwise or counterclockwise with detent positions so that each reticle has a positive rest position in alignment with the light source as the selection knob is rotated. To that end, an alignment mark 65 may be provided on the frame 12 and suitable marks (not shown) may be provided on the knob 62 to indicate the different selectable trajectory compensation patterns.

Each reticle 42-48 preferably includes a lens onto which is etched or otherwise formed a predetermined pattern of marks 66, 68, 70 and 72 that relate to a particular set of shooting distances for different projectile launching devices and/or different projectiles. Each lens is preferably formed so that light is transmitted only through the sight marks 66-72 and blocked or filtered outside of the sight marks. A cover 74 (FIG. 1) is connected to the base member 12 for protecting the optical components against damage and ambient light. A window 76 is formed in the cover 74 so that light reflected by the mirror 52 reaches the reflective sight component 30.

The reflective sight component 30 preferably includes a lens 78 mounted in the sight frame 32 through well-known attachment means. The lens 78 is preferably constructed of a transparent material, such as glass, plastic or the like and includes a well-known reflective coating so that the user can see both the reflected image from the light source 50 at one or more predetermined wavelengths and the distant scene or target through the lens 78. It will be understood that although the lens 78 is shown as a generally curved disk, it may be flat and/or used in conjunction with other coatings, lenses, and/or lens configurations to produce a particular visual effect or to reduce or prevent unwanted visual effects as is well known.

The light source 50 is preferably in the form of a light emitting diode (LED) that emits radiant energy in the visible light region of the electromagnetic spectrum so that the resultant reflected image is visible to the naked eye. However, it will be understood that near infrared or other wavelengths may be used when accompanied by other viewing equipment, such as night vision devices. It will be further understood that other light sources can be used, such as dual-color or tri-color LED's to give the user a selectable color choice for the reflected image, incandescent bulbs, laser diodes, fluorescent-doped fiber optics, tritium lights, combinations thereof, and so on.

As shown in FIG. 4, a reflected image pattern 80 is incident on the lens 78 when the light source 50 is illuminated by a power supply (not shown), such as a battery or the like, to project light through the reticle 42 of the adjustable imaging component 40. Preferably, the reflected image 80 includes a plurality of reflective sight marks 82, 84, 86, and 88 proportionate in size and spacing to the reticle marks 66, 68, 70 and 72, respectively, of the reticle 42. Each reflective sight mark represents a different distance to a target from the user to compensate for the trajectory of a projectile for a particular projectile launching device. By way of example only, when the sighting device 10 is mounted on a high velocity crossbow with a typical crossbow arrow or bolt, the reflective sight marks 82-88 may represent distances of 20, 30, 40 and 50 yards, respectively. As shown, the sight marks are relatively close together since minimal compensation is required for trajectory deviation between the particular distances.

As shown in FIG. 5, a reflected image pattern 90 is incident on the lens 78 when the adjustable imaging component 40 is rotated to expose the reticle 44 to the light source 50. As shown, the plurality of reflective sight marks 82-88 are proportionate in size and spacing to the reticle marks of the reticle 44 and preferably represent the same distances to the target as the sight marks 82-88 of the reflected image pattern 80. When the sighting device 10 is mounted on a medium-high velocity crossbow for a typical bolt, one or more of the sight marks 82-88 are spread apart more than the corresponding sight marks 82-88 of the reflected image 80 to compensate for the trajectory of the bolt which will travel at a slower velocity.

Likewise, as shown in FIG. 6, a reflected image pattern 92 is incident on the lens 78 when the adjustable imaging component 40 is rotated to expose the reticle 46 to the light source 50. The plurality of reflective sight marks 82-88 are proportionate in size to the reticle marks of the reticle 46 and preferably represent the same distances to the target as the sight marks of the reflected images 80 and 90. When the sighting device 10 is mounted to a medium velocity crossbow for a typical bolt, one or more of the sight marks 82-88 are spread further apart than the corresponding sight marks of the reflected image patterns 80 and 90 to compensate for the lower trajectory of the bolt at the specified distances.

Finally, as shown in FIG. 7, a reflected image pattern 94 is incident on the lens 78 when the adjustable imaging component 40 is rotated to expose the reticle 48 to the light source 50. The plurality of reflective sight marks 82-88 are proportionate in size to the reticle marks of the reticle 48 and preferably represent the same distances to the target as the sight marks of the reflected image patterns 80, 90 and 92. When the sighting device 10 is mounted to a low velocity crossbow for a typical bolt, one or more of the sight marks 82-88 are spread further apart than the corresponding sight marks of the reflected image patterns 80, 90 and 92 to compensate for the lower trajectory of the bolt at the specified distances.

In use, and by way of example only, the sighting device 10 of the present invention can be mounted on a crossbow with a particular pull strength or draw weight for compensating bolt drop at different yardages. The same sighting device 10 can be used on the same crossbow with a heavier or lighter bolt and/or can be mounted on another crossbow with greater or lesser draw weight and adjusted by rotating the adjustable imaging component 40 until the appropriate reticle is exposed to the light source. When the reticle has been selected, and prior to first use, the sighting device 10 may be calibrated in a conventional manner so that the bolt hits the target at a predetermined distance when one of the reflective sight marks, such as mark 82, is centered over the target. This can be done by turning the height adjustment mechanism 22 (FIG. 1) and/or the windage adjustment mechanism 24 in a clockwise or counterclockwise direction to adjust both the lateral and vertical positions of the sight assembly 16.

Although the sighting device 10 has been discussed for use with crossbows in the above example, it will be understood that the sighting device 10 can be adapted for use with any projectile launching device including, but not limited to, bows, pellet guns, BB guns, rifles, pistols, paint markers, and so on. The sighting device 10 can also or alternatively be used to compensate for the trajectory of a wide variety of projectiles including, but not limited to, arrows, bolts, bullets, balls, and so on, including their attendant properties such as weight, velocity, air resistance, and so on.

Moreover, although the reflective sight marks 82-88 are shown as dots, it will be understood that the reticle patterns may also or alternatively include lines, cross hairs, circles, combinations thereof and/or any shape or combination of shapes to denote a target at predetermined distances for trajectory compensation. In addition, it will be understood that the present invention is not limited to a circular disk 60 for the adjustable imaging component 40 nor to rotational movement for selecting a desired reticle, but may be shaped as a wedge (FIG. 10), rectangle (FIG. 12), triangle, and/or any other shape capable of moving along an arcuate or linear path or a combination thereof for selecting a desired reticle.

With reference now to FIG. 8, a schematic view of an illuminated sighting device 100 in accordance with a further embodiment of the invention is shown. The sighting device 100 is similar in construction to the sighting device 10 previously described and includes the reflective sight component 30, adjustable imaging component 40, light source 50 and mirror 52 mounted within a tubular housing 102. The housing 102 may have an open rear end 104 or may be combined with other lenses and optical components to form a telescopic reflex sight. When the rear end 104 is left open it forms a rear sight ring. Likewise, the front end 106 of the tubular housing 102 functions as a front sight ring. Since the front sight ring will be perceived smaller than the rear sight ring when viewed in perspective by the user, alignment of both sight rings ensures the user that the sighting device 100 is properly aligned with the target. In this embodiment, the adjustable imaging component 40 is preferably horizontally mounted to a base portion 108 of the housing 102 to rotate about a generally vertical pivot axis 110 while the light source 50 is positioned for projecting light vertically through one of the reticles. The adjustable imaging component 40 may be accessible outside of the housing for direct manipulation by the user.

Referring now to FIG. 9, a schematic view of an illuminated sighting device 112 in accordance with another embodiment of the invention is shown. The sighting device 112 is similar in construction to the sighting device 100 previously described, with the exception that the adjustable imaging component 40 is preferably vertically mounted to the base portion 108 of the housing 102 to rotate about a generally horizontal pivot axis 114 while the light source 50 is positioned for projecting light at an angle through one of the reticles, which may also be oriented at an angle with respect to the pivot axis 114. The adjustable imaging component 40 can be accessible outside of the housing, as shown, for direct manipulation by the user.

Turning now to FIGS. 10 and 11, an adjustable imaging component 114 in accordance with a further embodiment of the invention includes a wedge-shaped disk 116 with an opening 118 centered about a pivot point 120 for receiving a pintle or the like to permit pivoting action of the component 114, as shown by arrow 122. An arcuate shoulder 124 extends generally upwardly from a surface 126 of the disk 116. A plurality of bores or apertures 128 (shown in hidden line in FIG. 10) extend radially through the shoulder 124 and a reticle 42, 44, 46 or 48 is installed in each bore. The light source 50 is positioned for projecting light into an aligned bore and its associated reticle. As shown in FIG. 11, the component 114 is positioned at an acute angle from horizontal so that the resulting reflective sight marks are properly positioned on the reflective sight component 30 when viewed by the user. However, it will be understood that the component 114 can be positioned in any orientation conducive to proper placement of the reflective sight marks on the reflective sight component 30.

Referring now to FIGS. 12-14, an adjustable imaging component 130 in accordance with another embodiment of the invention preferably includes a bar 132 of generally rectangular shape. A plurality of openings 134 extend through a thickness of the bar 132 and a reticle 42, 44, 48 or 48 is installed in each opening. The bar 132 is adapted for linear sliding movement within a housing (not shown) of the sighting device, as represented by arrow 136, to position a selected reticle in alignment with the light source 50. A plurality of detent positions, as defined by grooves 138, can be formed in the bar 132 for engagement with a spring-loaded ball, pin or the like (not shown) to ensure that the selected reticle is quickly and properly aligned with the light source. As shown in FIG. 13, the adjustable imaging component 130 is positioned generally horizontally whereas in FIG. 14, it is positioned generally vertically or at an angle deviating from vertical so that the mirror can be eliminated. However, it will be understood that the component 130 may be positioned in any orientation conducive to proper placement of the reflective sight marks on the reflective sight component 30.

It will be understood that the reflective sight component 30 in each of the above embodiments is not limited to a transparent lens or disk, but may alternatively be formed as a solid blade member with a reflective surface and/or an opaque or translucent surface as disclosed in copending U.S. application Ser. No. 11/458,333 filed on Jul. 18, 2006 and entitled “Illuminated Reflective Sighting Device,” the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.

It will be further understood that the adjustable imaging component may be adapted for use with any type of sight such as telescopic sights, open sights, reflex sights, and so on. By way of example, the reticles may be of sufficient size to be directly viewed by a user with or without magnification and can be located in the direct line of sight of the user to be directly superimposed on a target with or without further illumination.

It will be understood that the term “preferably” as used throughout the specification refers to one or more exemplary embodiments of the invention and therefore is not to be interpreted in any limiting sense. In addition, terms of orientation and/or position as may be used throughout the specification denote relative, rather than absolute orientations and/or positions.

It will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that changes could be made to the embodiments described above without departing from the broad inventive concept thereof. It will be understood, therefore, that this invention is not limited to the particular embodiments disclosed, but also covers modifications within the spirit and scope of the present invention as defined by the appended claims.