Title:
Surfboard stand
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A stand for a surfboard includes an upper member and a lower member. The upper member is comprised of at least two members. The lower member is comprised of a first distal end and a second distal end. The upper member is connected with the lower member at the first distal end of the lower member.



Inventors:
Erwin, William (Encinitas, CA, US)
Application Number:
12/011240
Publication Date:
07/30/2009
Filing Date:
01/24/2008
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
211/207, 211/125
International Classes:
A47F5/13
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
GARFT, CHRISTOPHER
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
LAW OFFICES OF ANDREW SCHROEDER (Santa Maria, CA, US)
Claims:
1. A stand for a surfboard comprising: an upper member and a lower member; the upper member is comprised of at least two members; the lower member is comprised of a first distal end and a second distal end; the upper member is connected with the lower member at the first distal end of the lower member.

2. The stand of claim 1 wherein the upper member comprises at least three members.

3. The stand of claim 1 wherein the upper member and the lower member further comprise a cooperating detent and a hole sized to fit the detent.

4. The stand of claim 1 wherein the second distal end of the lower member is V-shaped.

5. The stand of claim 1 wherein the upper member comprises at least one cushion disposed on the outer surface of the upper member.

6. The stand of claim 1 further comprising a telescoping member disposed between the upper member and the lower member.

7. A double stand for a surfboard comprising at least two U-members, a bridge, and a spike; the U-members are connected with the bridge, and the spike is affixed with the bridge.

8. The double stand for a surfboard further comprising an elongate telescoping apparatus; the elongate telescoping apparatus is disposed between the bridge and the spike.

9. (canceled)

10. (canceled)

11. (canceled)

12. (canceled)

13. (canceled)

14. (canceled)

15. (canceled)

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates with an apparatus for the purpose of retaining surfboards above sand on a beach.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

One of the most popular sports and recreational activities around the world is surfing. Surfers can be found throughout all parts of the world. In fact, surfing is so popular that it has been a longtime tourist draw for many coastal cities around the world. Surfing has become so popular that it has been recently added to the Olympic games.

One of the problems facing all surfers is the difficulty in maintaining their surfboards in pristine shape. In some cases, surfers have difficulty in avoiding cracks, holes, and other compromises in their surfboards. Some surfboards are relatively fragile, especially many fiberglass surfboards. Even a light bump can create a gaping hole in a fiberglass surfboard thereby making it susceptible to water entering within its body. For these reasons it is important to be careful with its handling.

One of the difficulties with handling a surfboard on the beach is how to place it on the beach. Some surfers simply lay their surfboards flat on the sand. Other surfers violently stab their surfboards into the sand to vertically position them above the sand. And other surfers subject their surfboards to unnecessary abrasions by setting them up against various rocks, pylons, or walls.

Another problem which inheres with surfboards is the UV (ultra-violet) radiation to which they are subjected. Over time, constant UV radiation can delaminate the surface of the board. As the surface of the surfboard heats up, the resin can separate from the fiberglass thereby creating a bubbling effect. This bubbling effect can significantly damage the surfboard over time.

Yet another problem facing surfers with respect to their surfboards is getting sand mixed into the wax which they place onto the outer surface for traction. As sand is mixed into the wax of the board, it creates an unsightly mess which is difficult to remove.

Therefore, what is clearly needed in the marketplace is an apparatus which can gently and firmly retain a surfboard above the sand on a beach. Such an apparatus should be stable, lightweight, compact, and in some cases, detachable. This apparatus should also help minimize exposure to UV radiation by positioning it in a vertical position with the ground such that the board receives less exposure in terms of surface area. Moreover, this apparatus should help prevent sand from mixing into the wax of the surfboard. And this apparatus should be detachable and easy to stow away in a small travel bag.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIGURES

FIG. 1a is a frontal view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 1b is a plan view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 1c is a plan view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a plan view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a frontal view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 4 is a side view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 5 is a frontal view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 6a is a frontal view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 6b is a frontal view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 7a is a frontal view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 7b is a frontal view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 8a is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 8b is a plan view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 8c is a plan view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 8d is a plan view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 8e is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 9a is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 9b is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 9c is a side view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 9d is a side view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 9e is a plan view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 9f is a plan view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 10a is a side view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 10b is a frontal view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 10c is a rear view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 10d is a plan view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 10e is a plan view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 11a is a side view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 11b is a plan view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 11c is a plan view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 12a is a side view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 12b is a frontal view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 12c is a rear view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 12d is a plan view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 12e is a plan view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 13a is a side view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 13b is a side view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 14 is a side view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 15a is a side view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 15b is a side view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

According to a preferred embodiment of the present invention, a unique apparatus is used to retain a surfboard above the sand on a beach.

FIG. 1a illustrates a preferred embodiment of the present invention. A stand 100 for a surfboard includes an upper member 101 and a lower member 102. The upper member is comprised of at least two members 103, 104. FIG. 1 illustrates one preferred embodiment where 3 members comprise the upper member. FIG. 4 illustrates another preferred embodiment with only 2 members wherein the upper member is V-Shaped 200. The lower member is comprised of a first distal end 105 and a second distal end 106. The upper member is connected with the lower member at the first distal end of the lower member.

In some preferred embodiments the stand may further comprise at least one cushion 121 for the purpose of retaining the surfboard with minimal scratches and abrasions. These cushions or pads may be made of rubber, or similar soft and durable materials. In some preferred embodiments these cushions may be replaceable. In other preferred embodiments these cushions may be disposable. And in others preferred embodiments these cushions may be “slip-on” such that a user may be able to quickly place them on and take them off with ease. And in other preferred embodiments the cushions may further comprise various indicia including, but not limited to logos, patterns, trademarks, ornamental or aesthetic designs. The possibilities are endless.

It should be noted here that the stand which is comprised of the upper member and lower member may be comprised of a panoply of different materials. In some preferred embodiments the stand may be comprised of aluminum. In other preferred embodiments the stand may be comprised of plastic. In other preferred embodiments the stand may be comprised of PVC. In other preferred embodiments the stand may be comprised of wood. In other preferred embodiments the stand may be comprised of various metals. In other preferred embodiments the stand may be comprised of any suitable materials expedient for use with the present invention.

FIG. 2 illustrates how a surfboard 88 is typically disposed within the upper member. FIG. 3 illustrates how two stands are used to retain a surfboard upon the sand. In some preferred embodiments at least two stands may be spaced apart from each other and thereby place a surfboard on top of the two stands.

FIG. 6a illustrates a preferred embodiment where the upper member and the lower member further comprise a cooperating detent 107 and a hole 108 sized to fit the detent. Through the use of the detent and hole, the upper and lower member may be disengagably connected with each other. FIG. 6b illustrates that in other other preferred embodiments the upper member and lower member may be threaded to connect with each other. FIG. 5 illustrates a preferred embodiment whereby the upper and lower members are affixed through simple interference fit.

FIGS. 7a and 7b illustrates a preferred embodiment wherein the stand further comprises a telescoping member 109. The telescoping member is disposed between the upper member and the lower member. The telescoping member can raise or lower the surfboard vertically from the sand as is suitable.

FIGS. 8a-d illustrates another preferred embodiment of a double stand 300 for a surfboard comprising at least two U-members 301, 302, a bridge 303, and a spike 304. The U-members are connected with the bridge, and the spike is affixed with the bridge. The double stand may be used with those surfboards which lend themselves to be used with only one double stand. The double stand may be more expedient with short boards than long boards. However, it may conceivably be used with either short boards or long boards. FIG. 8b also illustrates that in some preferred embodiments the U-members may further include a pad 305.

FIG. 9a-f illustrates that in some preferred embodiments the double stand may further include an elongate telescoping apparatus 350. The elongate telescoping apparatus is disposed between the bridge and the spike.

FIG. 10a-e illustrates a preferred embodiment of an R-stand 500 for a surfboard. The R-stand includes at least one horizontal fork 501 and a lower sand stake 502. The horizontal fork is comprised of at least two fork members 503, 504 which are disposed substantially horizontally with the ground. The horizontal fork is connected with the lower sand stake. FIG. 10 also illustrates that in some preferred embodiments the horizontal fork may include at least one cushion 510.

FIGS. 11a-c illustrates one preferred embodiment where the horizontal fork is articulably connected with the lower sand stake. FIG. 12a-e illustrates a preferred embodiment wherein the R-stand includes two horizontal forks spaced vertically from each other. FIG. 13 illustrates a preferred embodiment including a telescoping connection 505. The telescoping connection is disposed between the horizontal fork and the lower sand stake. FIG. 14 illustrates a preferred embodiment which includes an R-detent 506 and a cooperating orifice 507. The R-detent and the cooperating orifice are disposed on the horizontal fork and the lower sand stake. FIGS. 15a-15b illustrate how the preferred embodiment is to be used in operation.

Those skilled in the art will appreciate numerous variations in the present system, configuration and operation that are within the scope of the invention. Those skilled in the art will also appreciate how the principles illustrated in these preferred embodiments can be used in other examples of the invention. A particular reference number in one figure refers to the same element in all of the other figures.

Moreover, it will be apparent to the skilled artisan that there are numerous changes that may be made in embodiments described herein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. As such, the invention taught herein by specific examples is limited only by the scope of the claims that follow.