Title:
ARROWHEAD GUARD
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A preferred embodiment of an arrowhead guard comprises a conically-shaped cover that moves from a shielding position to a non-shielding position as an arrow is drawn back for firing. The shielding and non-shielding positions are achieved by providing a pipe having an internal spiral groove, and a rod housed within the pipe having a guiding pin positioned within the spiral groove. As the arrow is drawn back for firing, the pin follows the spiral groove causing the rod, and hence the cover, to rotate out of the intended path of the arrow to be fired.



Inventors:
Sabi, Yossi Ben (Fresh Meadows, NY, US)
Application Number:
12/356383
Publication Date:
07/23/2009
Filing Date:
01/20/2009
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
473/578
International Classes:
F41B5/22; A63B65/02
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20080264400Gas Charged Bowstring Vibration SuppressorOctober, 2008Wright
20090139508Magnetic nock systemJune, 2009Harwath et al.
20080236556Fall-away arrow restOctober, 2008Sims et al.
20090101128Paintball gun with synchronous setting unitApril, 2009Lian
20070232419Fungo batting assistance machineOctober, 2007Kosjer
20060201490Method of converting baseball pitching machine to pitch lacrosse ballsSeptember, 2006Villar
20080251058Compact Crossbow with Improved EfficiencyOctober, 2008Colley
20090095270ACHERY RELEASE AIDApril, 2009Graves
20070215136Robotic mobile amusement systemSeptember, 2007Seguin et al.
20060260597Barrel system for a paintball markerNovember, 2006Anderson
20070283942Piston structure of toy gunDecember, 2007Tai et al.



Primary Examiner:
NICONOVICH, ALEXANDER R
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
GOTTLIEB RACKMAN & REISMAN PC (NEW YORK, NY, US)
Claims:
1. An arrowhead guard for shielding an arrowhead of an arrow mounted in a firing position on a bow having a bowstring comprising: a first elongated section having a front end, a rear end and a pin; a second elongated section having a front end, a rear end and a guiding path, said guiding path adapted to receive said pin, and said first elongated section and said second elongated section being in rotable, sliding engagement along said guiding path; a cover, said cover being connected to said front end of said first elongated section; a base at said rear end of said second elongated section, said base adapted to attach said arrowhead guard to said bow; and a line having a first end and a second end, said first end of said line being attached to said rear end of said first elongated section, and said second end of said line being adapted to attach to said bowstring; wherein said line has a length that allows said cover to rotate from a shielding position to a non-shielding position when said second end of said line is attached to said bowstring and said bowstring is drawn back for firing said arrow.

2. The arrowhead guard of claim 1, wherein said non-shielding position is approximately 45 to 315 degrees from said shielding position.

3. The arrowhead guard of claim 1, wherein said second elongated section has a channel through which said line is positioned.

4. The arrowhead guard of claim 1, wherein said first elongated section is a rod, said second elongated section is a pipe and said rod is disposed in rotatable sliding engagement within at least a portion of said pipe.

5. The arrowhead guard of claim 4, further comprising a biasing spring, said biasing spring resisting forward movement of said rod.

6. The arrowhead guard of claim 1, wherein said second end of said line has a clasp to attach said second end of said line to said bowstring.

7. The arrowhead guard of claim 1, further comprising an extension element to accommodate arrows of varying lengths, said extension element being adapted to fit in a slot in said base.

8. The arrowhead of claim 1, further comprising a selectively adjustable connector, said selectively adjustable connector joining said cover to said first elongated section.

9. The arrowhead guard of claim 1, wherein said guiding path is in the form of a spiral groove.

10. An arrowhead guard for shielding an arrowhead of an arrow mounted in a firing position on a bow comprising: a first elongated section having a front end, a rear end and a pin; a second elongated section having a front end, a rear end and a spiral groove, said spiral groove adapted to receive said pin, and said first elongated section and said second elongated section being in rotable, sliding engagement along said spiral groove; a cover, said cover being connected to said front end of said first elongated section; a base at said rear end of said second elongated section, said base adapted to attach said arrowhead guard to said bow; and a spring having a first end and a second end, said spring being attached to said first elongated section and said second elongated section.

11. The arrowhead guard of claim 10, wherein said cover alternates from a shielding position to a non-shielding position when said arrow is drawn back for firing.

12. The arrowhead guard of claim 10, wherein said cover is in a non-shielding position when said spring is in a retracted state, and said spring is in an extended state when said cover is in a shielding position.

13. The arrowhead guard of claim 10, wherein said spring retracts as said cover rotates from said shielding position to said non-shielding position.

14. The arrowhead guard of claim 10, wherein said cover comprises non-reflective material.

15. The arrowhead guard of claim 10, wherein said cover comprises a non-reflective coating.

16. An arrowhead guard for shielding an arrowhead of an arrow mounted in a firing position on a bow comprising: a first elongated section having a front end and a rear end; a second elongated section having a front end and a rear end, said first elongated section and said second elongated section being in rotable, sliding engagement with one another; a cover, said cover being connected to said front end of said first elongated section and adapted to rotate with said first elongated section; a base at said rear end of said second elongated section, said base adapted to attach said arrowhead guard to said bow; and a spring having a first end and a second end, said first end of said spring being attached to said first elongated section and said second end of said spring being attached at said second elongated section; wherein said cover alternates between a shielding position and a non-shielding position when said cover rotates with said first elongated section.

17. The arrowhead guard of claim 16, said first elongated section comprising a pin and said second elongated section comprising a guiding path adapted to fit said pin, wherein said pin passes along said guiding path when said cover alternates between said shielding and non-shielding position.

18. The arrowhead guard of claim 17, wherein said guiding path is curved.

19. The arrowhead guard of claim 17, wherein said guiding path is located on an external surface of said second elongated section.

20. The arrowhead guard of claim 17, wherein said guiding path is located on an internal surface of said second elongated section.

21. The arrowhead guard of claim 17, wherein said cover rotates at least 45 degrees in conjunction with said pin passing along said guiding path.

22. The arrowhead guard of claim 17, wherein said guiding path is in the form a spiral groove.

23. An arrowhead guard for shielding an arrowhead of an arrow mounted in a firing position on a bow comprising: a cover; and a fastener, said fastener being hingedly attached to said cover with a spring loaded hinge, and biased a closed position.

24. The arrowhead guard of claim 23, wherein said fastener has an end, said end being adapted to shift said fastener from a closed position to an open position when force is applied to said end.

25. The arrowhead guard of claim 24, wherein said fastener further comprises at least one prong, said at least one prong adapted to apply friction to said arrow when said fastener is in a closed position.

26. The arrowhead guard of claim 23, wherein said cover is conically shaped.

27. The arrowhead guard of claim 23, further comprising foam applied on the inside of said cover to increase friction between said cover and said arrowhead.

Description:

This application claims priority of U.S. provisional application, Ser. No. 61/011,415 filed on Jan. 17, 2008.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to a protective apparatus for preventing harm and/or damage to individuals and inanimate objects. More specifically, the invention relates to an apparatus for shielding sharp points and edges. Even more particularly, this invention relates to an arrowhead guard that shields the tip of an arrow while the arrow is mounted on a bow in a firing position so as to prevent the arrowhead from cutting or piercing an individual and/or unintentionally causing damage.

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

In the wilderness, bow hunters must overcome many elements of adversity in order to have a successful hunt. For example, a hunter must cope with environmental factors, such as inclement weather and rough, mountainous, slippery or otherwise irregular terrain. Likewise, a hunter must also be stealthy and manage the amount of noise and movement that is made during the hunt so as to reduce the chance of alerting prey of the hunter's approach. Furthermore, a hunter must take precautions to prevent unexpected and serious injuries in the wilderness which can result in death.

In the context of bow hunting, safety is of particular concern since an arrow is often times mounted on a bow in a firing position so that a hunter can act more quickly and efficiently in the event that the hunter finds prey that is within striking distance. Having the arrow mounted on the bow in a firing position while stalking prey and walking through the wilderness saves time for a hunter who would otherwise have to take precious extra seconds to draw an arrow from a quiver and then successfully mount the arrow on the bow before attempting to strike the prey. However, until now, it was dangerous to walk in the wilderness with an arrow placed in a firing position because the sharp arrowhead is exposed. When the head of a mounted arrow is exposed, there is a significant risk that the head will penetrate the skin and flesh, which may lead to a loss of blood and even death if not promptly treated. The risk of harm may be manifested when the hunter, for example, trips or falls as a result of the irregular terrain, causing an arrowhead to penetrate his own flesh or that of a fellow hunter.

Moreover, even if the risk of bodily harm is not of particular concern, another deficiency in current designs is that there are limited means by which to protect the arrowhead itself. In particular, even though the arrowhead is shielded when the arrow is positioned in a quiver, an arrowhead is typically exposed when the arrow is mounted on a bow ready for firing. Leaving the arrowhead or tip exposed increases the risk of contact with a tree or rock and/or other hard objects and surfaces which in turn may cause the arrowhead or tip to become deformed, dull or even break.

Furthermore, with the tip of the arrow exposed when the arrow is mounted in a firing position, the edges and facets of a sharpened metallic arrowhead cause light to be reflected. Reflections of light may alert prey to the approach of a hunter, causing the hunter to lose the opportunity to make successful strike.

Based on the foregoing, there has been an apparent need for a protective apparatus that guards an arrowhead and also prevents an arrowhead from causing injury to individuals, but which can easily be removed when a hunter is ready to attempt to strike at prey.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In view of the deficiencies and drawbacks in the prior art, it is a primary object of the present invention to provide a protective apparatus for preventing harm and death caused by an exposed arrowhead;

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a arrowhead guard that allows hunters to walk through the wilderness with a mounted arrow that is ready to be fired without fear of being injured by the arrowhead;

It is another object of the present invention to provide a arrowhead guard that prevents accidental damage to the arrowhead itself;

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a selectively retractable arrowhead guard that is retracted as a bowstring and/or arrow is drawn so that the arrowhead is exposed for a reduced amount of time before the arrow is fired;

A further object of the present invention is to provide a cover for an arrowhead to prevent light from reflecting off of the edges and/or facets of the arrowhead which may alert prey to the approach of a hunter;

Another object of the present invention is to provide a multi-purpose arrowhead guard that stabilizes an arrow and prevents it from falling off an arrow rest when the arrow is mounted in a firing position;

An additional object of the present invention is to provide a multi-purpose arrowhead guard that it is adapted to be attached to a conventional quiver similar to an ordinary arrow;

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a multi-purpose arrowhead guard that is adapted to act as a quiver, and/or link to other arrowhead guards;

Other objectives of the present invention will become apparent from the description of the invention that follows.

In its broadest aspects, the invention is a protective apparatus for guarding the arrowhead of an arrow. In one preferred embodiment, the apparatus comprises a conically-shaped cover or cup that moves from a guarding position to a non-guarding position as an arrow is drawn back for firing. The guarding and non-guarding positions are achieved by providing a pipe or cylinder having an internal spiral groove, and a rod housed within the pipe or cylinder having a guiding pin positioned within the spiral groove. As the arrow is drawn back for firing, the pin follows the spiral groove causing the rod, and hence the cover, to rotate out of the intended path of the arrow to be fired. Additional details regarding this particular embodiment, as well as details pertaining to a number of other embodiments, are provided below.

It should be noted that the features provided in the context of a particular embodiment are not limiting merely because they are discussed in the context of a given embodiment. Rather, it should be understood that a number of features discussed below may be applied to one or more of the other embodiments described herein.

Furthermore, even though the terms arrowhead, broadhead and tip may have somewhat different meanings to hunters and others with ordinary skill in related arts, it should be understood that these terms are used interchangeably in the context of the invention(s) described herein unless otherwise noted. Likewise, It should be understood that references to the foregoing terms are also intended to encompass many forms of arrowheads and arrow tips, including without limitation, bullets points, blunt points, field points, judo points, bow fishing points, mechanical broadheads and fixed broadheads.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

With reference to the attached drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the arrowhead guard attached to a bow, with the cover of the arrowhead guard shown moving between a guarding position and a non-guarding position;

FIG. 2 is a partial cross-section and elevated view the arrowhead guard depicted in FIG. 1, taken along lines 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the cover of the arrowhead guard depicted in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the adjustable front end connector of the arrowhead guard depicted in FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of a second elongated section or pipe with spiral groove of the arrowhead guard depicted in FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of a first elongated section or rod with guiding pin of the arrowhead guard depicted in FIG. 1;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the spring positioned within the pipe of the arrowhead guard depicted in FIG. 1;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the base of the arrowhead guard of FIG. 1;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the extension element of the arrowhead guard of FIG. 1;

FIG. 10 is a magnified, partial cross-section and elevated view the rod, pipe and other components of the arrowhead guard depicted in FIG. 2;

FIG. 11 is a partial cross-section and elevated view of a second embodiment of the arrowhead guard;

FIG. 12 is a partial cross-section and elevated view of a third embodiment of the arrowhead guard;

FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional view of the base of the arrowhead guard taken along lines 13-13 of FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 is a partial cross-section and elevated view of a fourth embodiment of the arrowhead guard with the cover of the arrowhead guard shown moving from a guarding position to a non-guarding position;

FIG. 15 is a perspective view of a fifth embodiment of the arrowhead guard; and

FIG. 16 is a perspective view of a sixth embodiment of the arrowhead guard.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

With reference to FIGS. 1 through 10, there is shown a first embodiment of an arrowhead guard 10 of the present invention. The arrowhead guard 10 comprises a cover or cup 20, such as the one shown in FIG. 3, that is conically-shaped to conform to the general profile, contours and dimensions of a typical arrowhead. While the cover 20 is preferably conical, it should be understood that the cover 20 can assume other well-known geometric shapes (e.g., pyramid, square, domed, spherical, cylindrical) or even artful configurations (e.g., animal heads), so long as the internal space provided within the cover 20 can comfortably accommodate a given arrowhead. Preferably, the cover 20 is constructed of aluminum, other metals or heavy plastics so that it can withstand the impact of an arrowhead without sustaining significant damage. Also, if metal or other reflective material is used to construct the cover, it is desirable to coat the cover with non-reflective paint or other generally non-reflective substance(s) known in the art.

A selectively adjustable front end connector 40 which is attached to the cover joins the cover 20 to a first elongated section or rod 30. An example of a rod utilized in connection with the present invention is depicted in FIG. 6. The adjustable front end connector 40 accommodates different types of bows and/or arrows. The connector 40 compensates for differences in the distance between the position of the arrowhead when an arrow is mounted in a firing position and the cover 20 when the arrowhead guard 10 is mounted on a particular bow. For example, if the arrowhead guard 10 is positioned beside (i.e., parallel to and at the same height as) an arrow that is mounted for firing, the distance between the cover 20 and the arrowhead can be different than the distance between the cover 20 and the arrowhead where the arrowhead guard 10 is positioned diagonally or directly below the same arrow mounted in a firing position. The connector 40 compensates for such differences by allowing the cover 20 to slide and be locked at a selected distance. Similarly, the adjustable front end connector 40 permits the arrowhead guard 10 to be used with bows having varying degrees of thickness and or other configurations.

As shown most clearly in FIGS. 3 and 4, a preferred embodiment of the front connector 40 comprises a first projecting plate 42, which extends from the base of the cover 20, and a second projecting plate 44, which extends from the rod 30, that are in sliding engagement with one another. The front connector 40 has a loop 45 through which the rod 30 is secured. As shown in FIGS. 1 through 4 (as well as in the context of other embodiments that are shown in FIGS. 11, 12, and 14), an elongated slot 46 is provided in the second projecting plate 44, and an aperture 48 sized to fit a fastening bolt 49 is provided in the first projecting plate 42. The position of the cover 20 can be adjusted by selectively loosening the bolt 49, sliding the cover 20 towards or away from the rod 30 along the length of the slot 46, and then tightening the bolt 49 when the cover 20 is suitably positioned. While the preferred embodiment of the arrowhead guard 10 incorporates an adjustable connector 40, it should be understood that a cover may be fused or otherwise conventionally attached to a rod (e.g., with a one-piece arm bridging the cover and rod), without requiring use of the adjustable connector 40 shown as part of the preferred embodiment.

The rod 30 to which the cup 20 is attached is adapted to be in sliding engagement with a second elongated section, tube or pipe 50. An example of a pipe 50 utilized in connection with the present invention is depicted in FIG. 5. As shown most clearly in FIGS. 2, 5, 6 and 10, the rod 30 has at least one guiding pin or tooth 32 that is located towards the rear end of the rod 30 and is sized to fit within a guiding path, which in the preferred embodiment is a spiral groove 52 formed on the internal surface of the pipe 50. One end of a cable or line 54 is attached to the rear end of the rod 30 and runs through to the rear of pipe 50 and then through the base 60, which receives or is otherwise merged with the rear end of the pipe 50. The line 54 proceeds through a passageway 62 in the base 60 and the second end of the line 54 is attached, as shown in FIG. 1, to the bowstring with a clasp 56, hook or other conventional fastener known in the art. The line 54 should be relatively taut and of a length that causes the rod 30 to be pulled rearward when the bowstring is drawn back for firing.

During use of the arrowhead guard 10 with a bow and arrow, the cover 20 moves from a shielding position, where the arrowhead is covered, and a non-shielding position, where the arrowhead is exposed and the intended flight path of the arrow is clear. Movement from a shielding to a non-shielding position is achieved as a user draws back the bowstring just before firing the arrow. When the bowstring is pulled back by the user, the line 54 is pulled with it, thereby pulling the rod 30 as well. As the rod 30 is pulled by the line 54 to the rear of the pipe 50, it also rotates as a result of the pin 32 moving in conjunction with and along the spiral groove 52. The rotation of the rod 30 causes the cover 20 to rotate from a shielding to a non-shielding position, thereby exposing the arrowhead and clearing the intended flight path of the arrow.

So that the movement and rotation of the cover 20 does not interfere with the arrow, the spiral should not be too extreme, allowing the arrowhead to clear the space that the cover 20 needs to occupy as the cover 20 rotates. Conversely, the spiral must be sufficiently extreme so that the cover 20 clears the intended flight path of the arrow when the bowstring is drawn. Accordingly, it is preferable for the rod 30 and cover 20 to rotate in the range of about 45 to 315 degrees, but any number of degrees is acceptable so long as there is no interference with the arrow and/or vision of a user. In addition, it is preferable that the spiral groove 52 does not run the entire length of the pipe 50. This feature allows the rod 30 to be extended (or retracted) to, for example, accommodate varying arrow lengths without causing the rod 30 to continue to rotate as it is extended (or retracted).

A number of different dimensions and configurations for the rod and pipe are feasible. Preferably, however, the pipe 50 has a cylindrical configuration suited to accommodate the rod 20 (which preferably also has a cylindrical configuration) as it slides and rotates within the pipe 50. Furthermore, in conjunction with this and other embodiments of the invention, it should be understood that the rod may incorporate the spiral groove while the pipe incorporates one or more pins around which the spiral groove passes. It should also be understood that a rod may be used in place of a pipe, and vice versa, with appropriate modifications (if necessary) that are easily understood to those with skill in the art.

In conjunction with or instead of the line 54, the arrowhead guard 10 may incorporate a spring 51 in order to effect movement of the rod 30 and cover 20 from a shielding to a non-shielding position. An example of a spring 51 utilized in connection with the present invention is depicted in FIG. 7. The rod 30 is biased by a spring 51, which pulls the rod 30 in a rearward direction within the pipe 50. As described above, when the rod 30 is retracted and held back by the spring 51, the cover 20 is in the open or non-shielding position. As the rod 30 is extended from the rear to engage the cover 20 on the arrowhead, it rotates in conjunction with the spiral groove 52 causing the cover 20 to rotate into the closed or shielding position. The cover 20 is thus in a non-shielding position when the spring 51 is in a retracted state, and the spring is in an extended state when the cover 20 is in a shielding position. The tension of the spring 51 causes the cover 20 to stabilize the arrow and prevent it from moving off its rest. As the bowstring is drawn back with the arrow, the rod 30 begins to retract. As discussed above, the rod 30 preferably retracts straight back for a limited distance and then rotates as it retracts further back in conjunction with the spiral groove 54. As the rod 30 rotates, the cover 20 also rotates so it does not interfere with the firing of the arrow. Although FIGS. 1, 2 and 10 depict both the spring 51 and line 54 in connection with a particular preferred embodiment, it should be understood that the spring 51 and line 54 can be used individually, without necessarily requiring use of the other or in tandem, in order to retract the cover 20.

The arrowhead guard 10 is mounted to a bow at the base 60 of the arrowhead guard 10 using a bolt fitted through aperture 64. Other conventional forms of mounting the arrowhead guard 10 to a bow or other bow accessories known in the art may be employed as well, provided, at the very least, that there is no interference with the line 54, other moving parts or vision of the user who is firing an arrow. As shown individually in FIG. 9, an optional extension element 70 to accommodate arrows of different lengths is provided. The extension element 70 is secured in a slot 66 at the rear end of the base 60. When the extension element 70 is used, aperture 74 is used to mount the arrowhead guard 10 to a bow. Of course, it should be understood that longer bases may be provided to eliminate the need for an extension element. Likewise, it should be understood that extension elements of varying lengths can be provided to accommodate different length arrows.

A second preferred embodiment of an arrowhead guard 110 is depicted in FIG. 11. The arrowhead guard 110 comprises first elongated section or rod 30 connected to a second elongated section, tube or section 150, wherein the rod 30 is secured with a spring 151 to the rear of the pipe 150 and/or base 160. In this particular embodiment, the pipe 150 has a guiding path in the form of a cutout, external curved guide or channel 152, and the rod 130 has a pin or tooth 132 that is guided by the curved guide 152 similar to the spiral groove 52 described in connection with the preceding embodiment of the arrowhead guard 10. Before an arrow is mounted in a firing position, the rod 130 is held by the biasing spring 151 in a retracted position. As the rod 130 is manually pulled against the biasing spring 151 when preparing to shield an arrow that is resting in a firing position, the pin 132 is guided by the curved guide 152, causing the rod 130 (and the cover 120 attached at the end thereof) to rotate. Thus, when an arrow is mounted to a bow in a firing position, the rod 130 is extended and rotated, and the cover 120 is placed into a shielding position over the arrowhead. As described previously, because the biasing spring 152 pulls rearward on the rod 130, there is a force applied by the cover 120 against the arrowhead when the cover 120 is placed over the arrowhead. This force helps stabilize the arrow, preventing it from falling off an arrow rest when the arrow is mounted in a firing position. This is particularly helpful when, for example, the bow is held in a somewhat vertical orientation such as while walking, or even when held upside down. When the arrow and bowstring are drawn, the rod 130 (which is biased by the spring 152) and cover 120 retract with the arrow. While the arrow retracts straight back, the pin 132 and curved guide 152 cause the rod 130 and cover 120 to rotate into a non-shielding position as the rod 130 retracts. This allows the arrow to be fired straight ahead without interference in its path by the cover 120. As shown in FIG. 11, this embodiment also comprises an optional extension element 170 and a selectively adjustable front connector 140.

A third preferred embodiment of an arrowhead guard 210 is depicted in FIG. 12. The cover 220 is hingedly attached to an elongated section or rod 230, with an adjustable front end connector or adjustable arm 240 extending between the hinge 222 and cover 220. The cover 220 is biased in a shielding position with a spring 224 that is attached at one end to the rod 230, and at its opposite end to the cover 220, preferably along the connector 240. A cable or line 234 is also attached to the cover 220, preferably along the connector 240, and is guided to the rear end of the rod 230 and through a passageway 262 (shown in FIG. 13) in the base 260. The other end of the cable 234 is attached to the bowstring with a clasp or conventional fastener, as shown in FIG. 1. This embodiment also comprises an optional extension element 270.

Generally, when the apparatus is in use with a mounted arrow in a firing position, the cover 220 protects the arrowhead until the arrow is drawn for firing. In particular, when the bowstring and arrow are drawn by a hunter, the line 234 is also pulled and with it the cover 220 against the biasing spring 234. In this embodiment, as the line 234 is drawn and the cover 220 alternates to an open or non-shielding position, the arrowhead becomes exposed. Once the arrow and bowstring are released, the cover 220 remains biased by the return spring 224, but in the open position. In particular, when the line 234 pulls the cover 220 against the biasing spring 224, the spring 224 continues to extend to a maximum length. Eventually, as the cover 220 continues to be pulled, the spring 224 exceeds the maximum stretch and becomes at least partially relaxed so that the cover 220 remains in the open position even after the arrow is fired. In this embodiment, the cover 220 may be manually adjusted back to the closed position when the next arrow is mounted.

In connection with this and other embodiments utilizing a cable, line, cord, rope, chain and/or spring, it should be understood that these components may run along the exterior surface of the elongated sections, pipes and/or tubes described herein, rather than within said components (and vice versa, where applicable), and still operate effectively to achieve the goals of the present invention. Furthermore, with at least some of the embodiments, the movement of the cover can be actuated by a trigger or other conventional actuating mechanism for alternating the position cover.

A fourth preferred embodiment of an arrowhead guard 310 is depicted in FIG. 14. This form of arrowhead guard 310 is operated without cables or lines. The front end of the arrowhead guard 310 has a cover 320 that is connected to a first elongated section 330. A selectively adjustable front end connector 340 joins the cover 320 to the first elongated section 30. The first elongated section 330 to which the cup 320 is attached is adapted to be in sliding engagement with a second elongated section 350, which has a hollow opening at the front thereof that receives the first elongated section 330. The first elongated section 330 is secured with a first biasing spring 351 to the rear of the second elongated section 350. The second elongated section 350 is hingedly attached to a third elongated section 380. Also, the second elongated section 350 is attached with a second spring 353 to the third elongated section 380.

The first spring 351 biases the cover 320 and applies a force in the direction of the bow. The spring 351 is thus utilized to adjust for the varying lengths of arrows so that longer arrows can be accommodated by simply pulling forward on the cover 320. Likewise, the pressure applied by the cover 320 with the spring 351 helps stabilize a mounted arrow so that it does not move out of place. The second spring 353 biases the second elongated section 350 and applies a force that rotates the second elongated section 350 in a downward arc as shown in FIG. 14. Thus, when an arrow mounted in the firing position is drawn back, the cover 320 moves rearward with the first spring 351 and downward with the second spring 353 out of the intended path of the arrow. Of course, it should be understood that the second spring may be mounted so that it pulls the cover 320 in a direction that is not downward (e.g., laterally, diagonally, upwardly) so long as the final position of the cover 320 does not interfere with the aiming and path of the arrow. Preferably, the hinge 322 is oriented and adapted to prevent the second elongated section 350 from rotating in an upward arc in the intended path of an arrow.

A fifth preferred embodiment of an arrowhead guard 410 is depicted in FIG. 15. This preferred embodiment presents a lacks many of the components described in connection with the previously presented embodiments. The arrowhead guard 410 comprises a cover 420 that is conically-shaped and a fastener 424. The fastener 424 is attached to the cover 420 at a spring-loaded hinge 422 that is biased in a closed or fastening position. The fastener preferably takes on the general shape of a tuning fork so that both prongs 425, 426 make frictional contact with the shaft of an arrow to which the arrowhead guard 410 is being applied. To apply the arrowhead guard 410 to an arrow, a user simply presses or applies force on the end 427 of the fastener with a thumb or other finger, lifting the prongs 425, 426 of the fastener 424. The user then releases the end 427 and the prongs revert back to a closed position. When the user is ready to shoot, the end 427 is pressed, and the arrowhead guard 410 is removed.

A sixth preferred embodiment of an arrowhead guard 510 is depicted in FIG. 16. In this embodiment a cover 520 is adapted to a narrow arrowhead known in the art. The cover 520 has no external fastener such as the fastener 424 shown in connection with the preceding embodiment. However, the cover 520 is able to remain connected to the arrowhead by virtue of at least one magnet embedded within or applied to the surface of the cover 520. Instead of or in conjunction with magnets applied to an arrowhead guard, foam or high-friction material may be applied on the inside of the cover to ensure that the cover does not fall off the arrowhead.

Although the invention is described in terms of particular embodiments, it is to be understood that the embodiments are merely illustrative of an application of the principles of the invention. Numerous modifications may be made and other arrangements may be devised without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.