Title:
Roof tarp system and method for use
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The present invention includes a roof tarp system and method for sealing an opening in a roof or other opening in a building. The roof tarp system comprises a tarpaulin structure having a top surface, a bottom surface and having a surface area defined by a perimeter edge. A micro-adhesive strip is located around the perimeter edge of the bottom surface, the micro-adhesive strip comprising a solid formulation selected from the group consisting of a synthetic resin, a thermoplastic, and a non-curing rubber with a built in primer. The micro-adhesive strip is adapted to bond with the roof such that the opening in the roof is protected from the elements by the tarpaulin structure. The adhesive strip is protected through the use of a covering. The covering is adapted to be removed during use of the roof tarp system.



Inventors:
Diaz, Antonio Jose (Miami Lakes, FL, US)
Application Number:
12/381795
Publication Date:
07/16/2009
Filing Date:
03/16/2009
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04B1/34
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
GILBERT, WILLIAM V
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
William R. Trueba, Jr. (Miami, FL, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A method of protecting a roof having a surface comprising: providing a tarp having an adhesive strip located adjacent a perimeter of an underside of said tarp, said adhesive strip comprising a solid formulation selected from the group consisting of a synthetic resin, a thermoplastic, and a non-curing rubber with a built in primer, said adhesive strip protected by a covering; locating said tarp over the roof; removing said covering from said adhesive strip; and applying pressure to a top of said tarp around said perimeter such that said adhesive strip makes contact with the surface of the roof, said adhesive and said surface creating a substantially waterproof bond.

2. The method of claim 1 further comprising the step of collocating said underside of said tarp within the contours of the roof.

3. The method of claim 2 further comprising performing the step of removing said covering after said collocating step.

4. A method of protecting an opening in a building from the elements, the opening defined by the building structure, the method comprising: providing a tarp having a micro-adhesive strip located adjacent a perimeter of an underside of said tarp, said micro-adhesive strip comprising a solid formulation selected from the group consisting of a synthetic resin, a thermoplastic, and a non-curing rubber with a built in primer, said adhesive strip protected by a covering; locating said tarp over the opening such that said perimeter is placed adjacent the building structure defining the opening; removing said covering from said micro-adhesive strip; and applying pressure to a top of said tarp around said perimeter such that said micro-adhesive strip makes contact with the surface of the building structure, said micro-adhesive and said surface creating a substantially waterproof bond.

5. The method of claim 4 further comprising the step of collocating said underside of said tarp within the contours of the surface of the building structure.

6. The method of claim 5 further comprising performing the step of removing said covering after said collocating step.

7. A roof tarp system for sealing an opening in a roof comprising: a tarpaulin structure having a top surface, a bottom surface and having a surface area defined by a perimeter edge; a micro-adhesive strip located adjacent said perimeter edge of said bottom surface, said micro-adhesive strip comprising a solid formulation selected from the group consisting of a synthetic resin, a thermoplastic, and a non-curing rubber with a built in primer, said micro-adhesive strip adapted to bond with the roof such that the opening in the roof is protected from the elements by said tarpaulin structure; and a covering protecting said adhesive strip, said covering adapted to be removed during use of the roof tarp system.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

The present application is a continuation in part of application Ser. No. 11/373,448 filed Mar. 11, 2006, pending, which is a continuation in part of application Ser. No. 11/339,877 filed Jan. 26, 2006, now U.S. Pat. No. 7,299,588.

The present invention relates to a roof tarp and method of using a novel roof tarp system.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

During the Hurricane season of 2005, the inventor of the present invention realized that there was a need to provide homeowners with a better way of dealing with wind damaged roofs. During the hurricane season, homeowners who had damaged roofs contacted contract roofers to place tarps on their roofs. As was carefully noted on television, roofers were overcharging the government and homeowners when placing “blue” tarps on wind damaged roofs. It was also noted that only flat/shingle roofs could be protected by the blue tarps. Those homeowners and business owners with a barrel tile roof were left without a remedy to seal a damaged roof from further water intrusion.

Past use of tarps provided little relief. There had to be a better way of providing home owners with a cost effective tarp system that would easily be applied to a roof or other opening, regardless of the roof type. The problem was exacerbated by the lack of available building materials to repair damaged roofs and windows after natural disasters.

The customary way of applying tarps to wind-damaged roofs is known in the art. The materials needed are nails, sand bags, blue tarps, and wood strips. The method of covering or patching a damaged roof is by first placing a blue tarp over the wind damaged part of the roof. Then, the tarp is secured to the roof using weights or other structures to prevent the tarp from blowing off the roof. Lastly, wood strips are placed to run perpendicular to the horizontal axis of the roof and then nailed to the roof. As can be seen by the method, under normal circumstances, the method of patching a roof is beyond the scope of a normal homeowner. In addition, the use of nails, screws and other fasteners to secure the tarp to the roof often damaged roof tiles, shingles or other portions of the roof by creating another point of penetration where rain and moisture could make its way to the interior of the building.

Although others have suggested the use of tarps to protect property from foul weather in the past, these solutions have taught the use of nails, screws and other fasteners. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 3,202,193 to Ware, titled “protective covering,” discloses the creation of a tarp-like structure using a plurality of bags adhered together by overlapping the bags. However, '193 to Ware teaches that the protective covering, when adapted to cover a wall or other surface, may be fastened by nails, staples, or other conventional fastening means. Ware also teaches that the bags that make up the covering or tarp be provided with reinforced areas adjacent the periphery to receive the nails, staples or other conventional means. U.S. Pat. No. 1,871,101 to Waltz, titled “fastener for tarpaulins,” discloses a method of securing an attachment to tarpaulins in the form of a rope which may be used to secure the tarpaulin in place. In particular, Waltz discloses the use of a triangular plate for the corners of the tarpaulin provided with perforations through which the rope is laced to secure the tarpaulin. Neither Ware nor Waltz provide a solution to the problem of providing an easy-to-secure tarpaulin for use on damaged roofs or other openings to buildings.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION

The following section of the written description describes some of the objects of the present invention, but the section is not exhaustive of all of invention's objects.

An object of this invention is to it eliminate the need of using contractors to place an emergency tarp on a wind damaged roof by providing an easy to use tarp system.

Another object of this invention is to minimize the costs incurred when temporarily patching a roof.

Yet another object of this invention is to minimize the elements needed to temporarily patch a roof.

A further object of this invention is to provide a tarp that can easily be lifted upon a damaged roof.

Another object of this invention is to minimize the damage incurred when placing a tarp on a damaged roof.

Yet another object of this invention is to provide a tarp that can be applied to a variety of roof surfaces, including barrel tile, concrete, metal, clay, shingle, wood and rubber (or other polymer).

It is a further object of the invention to provide a tarp system that can be bonded to a damaged roof or opening in a building to protect the interior from the elements without the need for additional fasteners or ropes.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is a roof tarp system and method for use. The tarp system of the present invention eliminates the need for using nails, sandbags, and wood strips to hold down a traditional tarp placed on a wind-damaged roof. This makes the tarp of the present invention user-friendly to most homeowners and others seeking to protect their homes and commercial property because it eliminates the need to lift onto the roof additional elements traditionally used to secure a tarp onto a roof. The roof tarp system of the present invention further allows for temporarily patching barrel type roofs.

The roof tarp system of the present invention comprises a square or rectangular shaped tarp that has a first and a second face. The tarp system further comprises an adhering strip that runs parallel and abuts all edges of the tarp. A covering covers the strip.

The roof tarp is used by placing the tarp's first face over the damaged roof, then removing the covering from the strip, then applying pressure to the second face of the tarp at locations immediately above the strip so that the strip adheres to the roof.

The present invention includes a method of protecting a roof or other building opening. The method comprises providing a tarp having an adhesive strip located around a perimeter of an underside of the tarp. The adhesive strip comprises a micro-adhesive solid formulation selected from the group consisting of a synthetic resin, a thermoplastic, and a non-curing rubber with a built in primer. The adhesive strip is protected by a covering to prevent it from adhering to itself or an unintended surface prior to use. The method further comprises locating the tarp over the roof, removing the covering from the adhesive strip; and applying pressure to a top of the tarp around the perimeter such that the adhesive strip makes contact with the surface of the roof. In this way, the adhesive and the surface create a substantially waterproof bond. The method of the present invention further comprises the step of collocating the underside of the tarp within the contours of the roof.

The present invention also includes a method of protecting an opening in a building from the elements, the opening defined by the building structure. The method comprises the steps of providing a tarp having a micro-adhesive strip located around a perimeter of an underside of the tarp. The micro-adhesive strip comprises a solid formulation selected from the group consisting of a synthetic resin, a thermoplastic, and a non-curing rubber with a built in primer. The steps further comprise locating the tarp over the opening such that the perimeter is placed adjacent the building structure defining the opening; removing the covering from the micro-adhesive strip; and applying pressure to a top of the tarp around the perimeter such that the micro-adhesive strip makes contact with the surface of the building structure. The micro-adhesive and the surface create a substantially waterproof bond. Again, the underside of the tarp may be collocated within the contours of the surface of the building structure prior to applying the pressure to the adhesive to ensure that a proper seal is created.

The present invention includes a roof tarp system for sealing an opening in a roof comprising a tarpaulin structure having a top surface, a bottom surface and having a surface area defined by a perimeter edge. A micro-adhesive strip is located around the perimeter edge of the bottom surface, the micro-adhesive strip comprising a solid formulation selected from the group consisting of a synthetic resin, a thermoplastic, and a non-curing rubber with a built in primer. The micro-adhesive strip is adapted to bond with the roof such that the opening in the roof is protected from the elements by the tarpaulin structure. The adhesive strip is protected through the use of a covering. The covering is adapted to be removed during use of the roof tarp system.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The subject matter which is regarded as the invention is particularly pointed out and distinctly claimed in the claims at the conclusion of the specification. The foregoing, and other objects, features, and advantages of the present invention are shown and described in the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments which should be viewed in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1A shows a roof tarp on a barrel type damaged roof;

FIG. 1B shows the roof tarp on a shingle type damaged roof;

FIG. 2 is a side view of the roof tarp applied on a barrel type roof;

FIG. 3 is a side view of the roof tarp wherein the placement of the tar strip and the covering are shown;

FIGS. 4a-4b shows both faces of the roof tarp;

FIG. 5 shows a plurality of tarps being attached and aligned together;

FIG. 6a-6b shows a method of folding the roof tarp so that all grommets are aligned together;

FIG. 6c shows a rope being attached to the grommets of the roof tarp; and

FIG. 6d shows a homeowner lifting a roof tarp onto a roof.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The present invention relates to a tarp system and method used to temporarily protect a damaged roof or similar opening from the elements until more permanent repairs can be made. It is important to note that the embodiments of the invention described below are only examples of some of the uses of the teachings described herein. In general, statements made in the specification do not limit any of the various claimed inventions. Moreover, some statements may apply to some inventive features but not to others. Unless otherwise indicated, singular elements may be in the plural and vice versa with no loss of generality. Similar reference numerals and letters represent similar components and system features throughout the drawings and the written description.

FIG. 1a diagrammatically illustrates a tarp 10 placed on a barrel-tiled roof. The tarp system 10 can be used on other openings such as around the frame of a window. As shown in FIGS. 3-4b, one embodiment of a roof tarp comprises a square or rectangular shaped tarpaulin 10 having a first and a second face and a strip 12 that runs parallel and abuts all edges of the tarp 10. In the illustrated embodiment, the strip 12 is at-least two and a half inches in width from each edge of the tarp 10 and is at-least a sixteenth of an inch in height from the first face of the tarp 10. A covering 14 covers the strip 12. The tarp can be made of any material known in the art used to cover damaged roofs, for example, poly tarpaulin. The strip 12 can either be made of tar, self-adhering membranes or other micro-adhesive materials. For example, the adhesive strip 12 may be comprised of a micro-adhesive material such as a solid formulation of synthetic resins, thermoplastics, or non-curing rubbers with a built in primer, sandwiched between the underside of the tarp 10 and a release liner or covering 14. In one embodiment, the covering 14 can either be made of cellophane or of a paper backing material. The covering protects the adhesive material from coming into contact with other surfaces until installation.

In yet a further embodiment of the invention above, as seen in FIGS. 4a-6c, the tarp 10 further comprises of four grommets 16, wherein each grommet 16 is attached to the tarp 10 at each corner of the tarp 10, and a lifting means 18 attached to the grommets 16. The lifting means 18 might be a rope or a cable. Each Grommet 16 is reinforced to be able to hold the weight of the tarp 10 without ripping from the tarp 10. Although this alternative embodiment includes the use of grommets 16, grommets are not required for use of the present invention. The tarp system 10 of the present invention may be used solely with the use of the adhesive strips 12.

The present invention includes a method of using the tarp system 10. The method comprises the steps of lifting the tarp system 10 onto a damaged roof or opening and then placing the first face (bottom side) of the tarp over the damaged roof or opening. The micro-adhesive material 12 is capable of creating a bond with common roof materials, including concrete, clay, metal, rubber (or other polymer), tar paper, shingles, and other composite materials used for roof tiles. The tarp should be manipulated to fit the shape of the surface of the roof. For example, if the roof is a barrel-tiled roof, the tarp should be pressed into the valleys formed by the rows of roof tile. In this way, the underside of the tarp material is correlated to the contours of the roof tile. Next, the covering 14 is removed from the adhesive strip 12. Finally, pressured is applied to the second face (top surface) of the tarp 10 at a location immediately above the adhesive strips 12 so that the strip 14 adheres to the roof. The bond created between underside of the tarp 10 and the surface of the roof is strong enough to permit the system to withstand strong winds. Testing has shown that the tarp system 10 is able to withstand winds in excess of forty (40) miles per hour. In addition, because the adhesive material 12 forms a bond with the roof surface around the periphery of the tarp, the tarp system 10 creates a substantially water proof barrier.

As seen in FIG. 5, the present invention further comprises a method of using at least two of the roof tarps described above in conjunction with each other to cover a larger area of a damaged roof. The method of using at least two roof tarps described above comprises the steps of lifting two tarps 10 on to a damaged roof and then aligning the first face of the first tarp 10 with the second face of the second tarp 10 so that the edge of the second tarp 10 overlaps the first tarp 10, the tarps 10 being linearly aligned 20/22. Next, the covering 14 is removed from the second tarp 10 and pressure is applied to the second tarp 10 so that the first and the second tarps 10 are attached together via the adhesive material. Next, the first faces of the tarps 10 are placed over the damaged roof, the coverings 14 from the strips 12 are removed, and pressure is applied to the second faces of the tarps 10 at locations immediately above the strips 12 so that the strips 12 adhere to the roof.

As seen in the embodiments illustrated in FIGS. 6a-6c, the tarp 10 is folded together prior to lifting the tarp onto a roof. Upon the tarp 10 being folded so that all grommets 16 are overlapping each other, a lifting means 18 is attached to the grommets 16. FIG. 6c shows a homeowner lifting the tarp 10 onto a roof.

As seen in FIGS. 1a-b, the roof tarp can be used on shingle roofs, barrel tile roofs or other types of roofing systems.

An advantage of this invention is that it eliminates the need of using a contractor/roofer to place an emergency tarp over a wind damaged roof. Another advantage of this invention is that it is a cost effective way of temporarily patching a damaged roof, especially after a natural disaster when building materials are scarce and more permanent repairs may be weeks if not months away. Yet another advantage of this invention is that it minimizes the elements needed to temporarily patch a roof. A further advantage of this invention is that it can easily be lifted onto a damaged roof. Another advantage of this invention is that it minimizes the damage to ones roof when securing the tarp to the damaged roof, because no other traditional fasteners, like nails or screws are required.

As described above, yet another advantage of this invention is that it can be applied to a barrel tile roof and roofs having contours, such as a metallic roof.

Although the present invention has been described in considerable detail with reference to certain preferred versions thereof, other versions are possible. Therefore the spirit and the scope of the claims should not be limited to the description of the preferred versions contained herein. The claims appended hereto are meant to cover modifications and changes within scope and spirit of the present invention.