Title:
WASHER CAP AND ROTATING STOOL
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A stool includes a collapsible frame, a triangular seat and a back. The frame includes a bottom hub with three telescopingly adjustable legs and enlarged feet. A top hub is rotatably coupled to the bottom hub for 360 degree rotation, and includes three seat-supporting arms that extend from the top hub, and a pair of uprights that extend from two of the arms. The seat hook-attaches to loops on ends of the arms, and the back extends between the uprights. The legs and arms are pivoted to their respective hubs, but the pivots are slightly frictional so that the arms and legs remain in adjusted positions, with stops on the hubs stopping the legs and arms in their upwardly-pivoted use positions. The frictional pivots include lubricious plastic that facilitates quiet unfolding of the stool, which is important when hunting.



Inventors:
Hoffman, Fredrick Scott (Holland, MI, US)
Pringnitz, Todd A. (Mount Pleasant, IA, US)
Application Number:
12/350522
Publication Date:
07/09/2009
Filing Date:
01/08/2009
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47C4/04; A47C4/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
NELSON JR, MILTON
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
PRICE HENEVELD LLP (GRAND RAPIDS, MI, US)
Claims:
The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

1. A collapsible article for hunting and outdoor use, comprising: a frame including a tubular frame member and a second frame member shaped to receive an end of the tubular frame member; a washer cap attached to the end of the tubular member; the washer cap including a sleeve portion for closely engaging an end of the tubular frame member and opposing standoffs on the sleeve portion having a flat outer surface and aligned holes; and a pivot pin extending through transverse holes in the tubular frame member and through the aligned holes in the standoffs and through mating holes in the second frame member to thus pivotally interconnect the tubular frame member to the second frame member.

2. The article defined in claim 1, wherein the tubular frame member has a round cross section, and the sleeve portion includes a cylindrically shaped recess shaped to longitudinally receive the round cross section.

3. The article defined in claim 1, wherein the washer cap is formed from a plastic material.

4. The article defined in claim 1, wherein the second frame member comprises a hub and includes opposing flanges with the mating holes therein.

5. The article defined in claim 4, wherein the second frame member includes a stop flange extending between the opposing flanges that limits a rotation of the tubular frame member on the second frame member.

6. A collapsible article for hunting and outdoor use, comprising: a frame including a tubular frame member, a U-shaped shackle, and a second frame member with a connector for connecting to the U-shaped shackle, the U-shaped shackle having protruding free ends defining opposing first holes; a connector plug including a plug portion closely engaging an end of the tubular frame member and including an extension extending from the plug portion, the extension including a stem and a pivot-forming portion with a transverse hole therein; and a pivot pin extending through the first holes and through the transverse hole to thus pivotally interconnect the tubular frame member to the connector of the second frame member.

7. The collapsible article defined in claim 6, wherein the pivot-forming portion is barrel-shaped and includes opposing flat end surfaces.

8. The collapsible article defined in claim 7, wherein the connector includes a hook adapted to releasably engage the shackle.

9. A collapsible article for hunting and outdoor use, comprising: a frame including first and second tubular frame members; first and second connector plugs each including a plug portion closely engaging an end of the respective first and second tubular frame members and each further including an extension extending from the plug portion, the extensions each including a longitudinally-extending stem and a pivot-forming portion with a transverse hole and a flat surface perpendicular to the transverse hole; the pivot-forming portions of the first and second connector plugs being shaped to mate with the flat surfaces abutting and the transverse holes aligned and the plug portions extending in different directions; and a pivot pin extending through the transverse holes to pivotally interconnect first and second connector plugs and hence pivotally interconnect the first and second tubular frame members.

10. The collapsible article defined in claim 9, including a U-shaped shackle with protruding ends engaging opposing outer surfaces of the pivot-forming portions of the first and second connector plugs, the pivot pin extending through holes in the protruding ends to pivotally connect the shackle to the first and second tubular frame members.

11. The collapsible article defined in claim 10, wherein the pivot-forming portions are barrel-shaped.

12. The collapsible article defined in claim 9, including a quick-connect hook-shaped connector releasably engaging the shackle.

13. The collapsible article defined in claim 12, including another frame member attached to the shackle.

14. The collapsible article defined in claim 13, wherein the another frame member includes a seat.

15. The collapsible article defined in claim 9, wherein the first and second connector plugs are mirror images of each other.

16. The collapsible article defined in claim 9, wherein at least one of the first and second connector plugs includes a stop surface for limiting an outward rotation of the first connector plug on the second connector plug, and hence for limiting a relative rotation of the first and second tubular frame members.

17. A collapsible stool that can be collapsed very quietly, comprising: a frame including multiple metal frame members forming a collapsible framework for a seat and a back, the metal frame members being joined together at joints by pivot-forming connectors made of lubricious plastic material; each of the pivot-forming connectors including holes defining pivots but including flat surfaces forming lubricious bearing surfaces to support quite rotation and also including plastic material spacing the metal frame members of each joint from each other.

18. A collapsible stool comprising: a collapsible leg framework including a lower hub; a collapsible seat-supporting framework including an upper hub pivotally connected to the lower hub for 360 degrees of rotation; a collapsible back-supporting framework pivoted to the seat-supporting framework for movement between a collapsed position and an upright use position.

Description:

This application is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 12/196,402, filed Aug. 22, 2008, entitled COLLAPSIBLE STOOL FOR HUNTING AND OUTDOOR USE, which claims benefit under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) of provisional application 61/019,950, filed Jan. 9, 2008, entitled COLLAPSIBLE HUNTING STOOL.

BACKGROUND

The present invention relates to a folding stool, such as may be used for hunting, photography, and other outdoor applications.

Hunting stools must be durable and long-lasting, yet light weight, portable, easy to set up, and comfortable for seated individuals. They preferably should be adjustable to fit different body sizes and preferences, with any adjustment being quiet, intuitive, and easily done. Also, the equipment should be adapted for use in a variety of different situations encountered in the wild. Still further, it is desirable that the equipment have relatively few components to minimize labor, cost and assembly. I do not know of any existing stools that satisfactorily meet these requirements and functional demands, in my opinion.

SUMMARY OF THE PRESENT INVENTION

The present inventive stool includes several innovative features. The hubs for supporting the legs and seat are cast metal, such that they are more durable and less noisy than existing known designs. They are pivotally interconnected for 360 degree rotation of the seat, such that the hunter does not have to change his/her position in the seat . . . but instead can simply rotate the seat. The legs are connected to rotate downward into a folded dense storage position, and the seat-supporting arms also rotate downward into their storage position parallel the legs. The legs are infinitely telescopingly adjustable, and are quietly adjustable. They include enlarged feet that do not sink into mud and soft soil. The seat clips into U shackles (loops) on the upper arms, such that they are durable and easy to erect. This creates a comfortable hammock-like seat arrangement. This also leaves the ends of the arms free for mounting back rest hinges, gun mounts, camera mounts, and other accessories to the stool. The back is optional, and includes folding uprights that co-exist with the folding seat-supporting arms and legs. The seat is padded, quilted for aesthetics, insulated for comfort, and both functional and visually pleasing.

In one aspect of the present invention, a stool includes a frame and a seat supported on the frame. The frame includes a top hub and seat-supporting arms extending from the top hub, and further includes a bottom hub and legs extending from the bottom hub. The top and bottom hubs are rotationally connected so that the seat and seat-supporting arms can be rotated without changing a position of the legs.

In another aspect of the present invention, a stool includes a frame and a seat supported on the frame. The frame includes at least one hub. Seat-supporting arms extend from the at least one hub and also legs extend from the at least one hub. The seat-supporting arms and the legs each are movable between a raised position for use and a lowered position where the arms and legs extend parallel each other in a collapsed storage position.

In another aspect of the present invention, a stool includes a frame including seat-supporting arms extending from a hub and a pair of uprights extending from ends of two of the seat-supporting arms. The arms and uprights are movable between a raised position for use and a lowered position where the arms and legs extend parallel each other in a collapsed storage position. A seat is attached to the seat-supporting arms. A back is attached between the uprights.

In another aspect of the present invention, a stool includes a frame and a seat supported on the frame, the frame including at least one hub, seat-supporting arms extending from the at least one hub. The arms and seat include a hook attachment system that supports the seat in a hammock-simulating manner, the hook attachment system including several hooks shaped to releasably engage several mating shackles.

In another aspect of the present invention, a stool includes a frame and a seat supported on the frame. The seat is a flexible insulated padded construction with at least three hooks for engaging mating loops on the frame for supporting the seat in a hammock-simulating arrangement.

In still another aspect of the present invention, a stool includes a frame including seat-supporting arms and uprights. A seat is supported on the arms and a back is supported on the uprights. The back includes a thoracic-supporting section extending between the uprights and a lumbar-supporting section extending between the uprights, and further including a strap that connects the thoracic-supporting section to at least one of the lumbar-supporting section and the seat, the strap being adjustable and/or rotatable to change an amount of support received from the one section.

In another aspect of the present invention a collapsible article for hunting and outdoor use comprises a frame including a tubular frame member and a second frame member shaped to receive an end of the tubular frame member. A washer cap is attached to the end of the tubular member; the washer cap including a sleeve portion for closely engaging an end of the tubular frame member and including opposing standoffs on the sleeve portion having a flat outer surface and aligned holes. A pivot pin extends through transverse holes in the tubular frame member and through the aligned holes in the standoffs and through mating holes in the second frame member to thus pivotally interconnect the tubular frame member to the second frame member.

In another aspect of the present invention, a collapsible article for hunting and outdoor use comprises a frame including first and second tubular frame members. First and second connector plugs each include a plug portion closely engaging an end of the respective first and second tubular frame members and each further include an extension extending from the plug portion. The extensions each include a longitudinally-extending stem and a pivot-forming portion with a transverse hole and a flat surface perpendicular to the transverse hole; the pivot-forming portions of the first and second connector plugs being shaped to mate with the flat surfaces abutting and the transverse holes aligned and the plug portions extending in different directions. A pivot pin extends through the transverse holes to pivotally interconnect first and second connector plugs and hence pivotally interconnect the first and second tubular frame members. In a narrower aspect, a U-shaped shackle is also attached to the pivot pin.

In another aspect of the present invention, a collapsible article that can be collapsed very quietly comprises a frame including multiple metal frame members joined together at joints by plastic connectors, the multiple frame members and joints including a first joint formed by a first connector engaging a first tubular frame member and joined by the first connector to a second frame member. The article further includes a second joint formed by a second connector engaging a third tubular frame member and joined by the second connector to a fourth frame member, the first and second connectors including plastic material. The first connector engages an end of the first tubular frame member and includes opposing standoffs forming flat surfaces with aligned holes on opposite sides of the end. A first pivot pin extends through the aligned holes and through mating holes in opposing flanges in the second frame member for pivotal connection thereto. The second connector engages an end of the third tubular frame member and includes an extension with a first transverse hole and having a flat surface. The fourth frame member has an end configured to matingly engage the flat surface and having a second transverse hole that aligns with the first transverse hole. A second pivot pin extends through the first and second transverse holes to pivotally connect the third tubular frame member to the fourth frame member.

In another aspect of the present invention, a collapsible stool is provided that can be collapsed very quietly. The stool includes a frame having multiple metal frame members forming a collapsible framework for a seat and a back. The metal frame members are joined together at joints by pivot-forming connectors made of lubricious plastic material. Each of the pivot-forming connectors include holes defining pivots but include flat surfaces forming lubricious bearing surfaces to support quite rotation and also include plastic material spacing the metal frame members of each joint from each other.

In another aspect of the present invention, a collapsible stool comprises a collapsible leg framework including a lower hub, and a collapsible seat-supporting framework including an upper hub pivotally connected to the lower hub for 360 degrees of rotation. A collapsible back-supporting framework is to the seat-supporting framework for movement between a collapsed position and an upright use position.

These and other aspects, objects, and features of the present invention will be understood and appreciated by those skilled in the art upon studying the following specification, claims, and appended drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a fully-assembled stool embodying the present invention in a use position.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the stool in a collapsed position (minus the removable seat and back upholstered components).

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective view of the pivotally-connected hubs of the stool.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the seat of the stool clip-attached to the seat-supporting arms.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged side view of one of the hook and U-shackle (loop) connections for holding the seat.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged perspective view of one of the telescoping legs including its clamp.

FIG. 7 is an enlarged perspective view of the foot of the leg.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the back and torso-support components.

FIGS. 9-11 are perspective views of the frame, FIG. 9 showing the frame in a use position, FIG. 10 showing the frame partially collapsed, and FIG. 11 showing the frame fully collapsed.

FIGS. 12-14 are orthogonal views of FIG. 9; and

FIGS. 15-17 are orthogonal views of FIG. 11.

FIGS. 18-19 are top and side views of one of the arms (29) that both supports a rear of the seat and that connects to an upright (30) as shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 20 is a side view of the arm (29) in FIG. 19 including the clasp 32 and supporting the upright (30).

FIG. 21 is a top view of the forwardmost seat-supporting arm (29) but which does not connect to an upright.

FIGS. 22-26 includes perspective, three orthogonal, and a cross section of the washer cap shown in FIGS. 1 and 18.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

A hunting stool 20 (FIGS. 1-3) includes a collapsible frame 21 made of lightweight tubular (metal) components, triangular seat 22, and back 23 with lumbar support 24. The frame 21 includes a bottom hub 25 with three telescopingly adjustable legs 26 and enlarged feet 27. In particular, it is contemplated that the tubes can be made of a suitable material including, but not limited to, polymer, carbon/glass fiber, reinforced composite, titanium, magnesium, boron, steel and aluminum materials. A top hub 28 is rotatably coupled to the bottom hub 25 for rotation about a vertical axis, and includes three seat-supporting arms 29 that extend from the top hub 28. A pair of uprights 30 extend from an outer end of two of the arms 29. The seat 22 includes hooks 31 that attach to loops 32 (also called “shackles”) on ends of the arms 29 (see FIG. 5), and the back 23 (and lumbar support 24) (see FIG. 8) extend between the uprights 30. The top hub 28 is connected to the bottom hub 25 by a vertical bolt 33 (FIG. 3), and rotates 360 degrees on plastic washers 34A located between the bottom hub 25 and the top hub 28. The legs 26 and arms 27 are all pivoted to their respective hubs (25 and 28), but the pivots are preferably slightly frictional so that the legs 26 and arms 29 remain in adjusted positions. The hubs 25 and 28 include flanges forming stops on the hubs to limit outward movement of the legs 26 and arms 29 in their upwardly/outwardly-pivoted positions. The illustrated frictional pivots preferably include washer caps 40 (or equivalent) that facilitate a slightly frictional, smooth and noise-free unfolding (or folding) of the stool 20, which allows the process of setting up and collapsing the stool to be very quiet. This can be particularly important when hunting or photographing in the wild.

The triangular seat 22 (FIG. 4) includes a thermoformed fabric-covered or upholstered cushion, and includes straps sewn to its bottom with the hooks 31 on each end (i.e., at each corner). The seat 22 is supported at each corner by hooking the hooks 31 to the loops (shackles) 32 on the seat-supporting arms 29.

The back 23 (FIG. 8) includes a thoracic-supporting upper section 34 formed by a thermoformed fabric covered cushion, with a pocket 34′ sewn into each end for engaging a top of the uprights 30. The illustrated mid-level lumbar support 24 is similar in shape and size to the thoracic-supporting section, and also includes a loop at each end for engaging the uprights 30. A looped strap 35 extends between the section 34, support 24 and a rear of the seat 22. The looped strap 35 includes a lower buckle adjustment 35A that can be shortened/adjusted to increase lumbar support provided by the support 24. It is contemplated that the upper looped strap can be made adjustable to raise a rear/middle of the seat 22 if desired.

The bottom hub 25 (FIG. 3) is generally triangular in shape (or Y-shaped), and is cast of a rigid metal for strength and light weight. The hub 25 includes three outwardly-facing U-shaped throats, each throat including a top flange 38 and side flanges 39 receiving a top end of one of the legs 26. A washer cap 40 (such as nylon or other lubricious material) is positioned inside of each side flange 39, and a pivot pin 41 extends through the side flanges 39, caps 40 and legs 26 to form a lightly frictional pivot. It is the top flange 38 that forms a stop for limiting upward/outward movement of the legs 26. The legs 26 can be pivoted inwardly/downwardly to a collapsed folded position (FIGS. 2, 11, 15-17) for compact storage and transport. Notably, the space within each throat forms a recess for matably receiving a top of the arms 29 for optimal strength and stability.

The three telescopingly adjustable legs 26 (FIG. 6) each include telescoping tubes (such as two or three, depending on a length of extension desired) and tube clamps 43 with threaded locking member 43A (or the like) for securing the tubes in an extended or collapsed position. Notably, the legs 26 are infinitely telescopingly adjustable. This allows a hunter to position his/her seat at an optimal height, such as for viewing or aiming out a window/slit of a stand. It further allows the stool to be positioned level, even when on uneven ground. Further, its adjustment is extremely quiet, since it does not include any items that snap or click into position. Enlarged feet 27 (FIG. 7) are attached to the end of each leg 26. The feet 27 include an enlarged footprint (e.g., 4.5″×4″ or about 18 sq. inches) so that they do not tend to sink into soft soil. The illustrated feet 27 have a rough-surfaced bottom . . . for non-slip engagement with the ground.

The top hub 28 (FIG. 3) is rotatably coupled to the bottom hub 25 by the bolt 33 and nut (not specifically shown), and is supported by the lubricious plastic washer 34A on the bottom hub 25 for 360 degrees of rotation. The rotation is totally quiet, such that a hunter can rotate without creating noise that would scare away prey. The top hub 28 is similar to the bottom hub 25 in its triangular (or Y) shape and three-throat design. Specifically, the top hub 28 is triangular (or Y) in shape, and is preferably cast of a rigid metal for strength and light weight. The hub 28 includes three outwardly-facing U-shaped throats, each throat including a top flange 48 and side flanges 49 receiving a bottom end of one of the arms 29. A cap 40 (such as nylon or other lubricious material) is positioned inside of each side flange 49, and a pivot pin 51 extends through the side flanges 49, caps 50 and arms 29 to form a lightly frictional pivot. The top flange 48 forms a stop for limiting upward movement of the arms 29. The arms 29 can be pivoted inwardly/downwardly to a collapsed folded position, with the arms 29 fitting into the depression between the throats on the bottom hub 25.

The pair of uprights 30 (FIGS. 1 and 13) extend from two of the arms 29, and are pivoted to the arms 29 by a pivot pin 61 for movement between an extended position (FIG. 13) and a collapsed folded position (FIGS. 2 and 16). In the extended position (FIG. 1), the back 23 is held so that it positions the back 23 at a desired angle for comfortable use (such as slightly rearward from vertical . . . such as about a 120-140 degree angle from the arms 29 depending on the designer's or user's preference, the preferred angle of the seat-supporting arms 29, and design criteria). In the collapsed folded position, the uprights 30 fold to a tight storage position parallel the legs 26 and seat-supporting arms 29. Also, the seat 22 and back 23 are made to be removed from the frame 21.

The seat 22 (FIGS. 1 and 5) includes hooks 31 (made of metal or plastic) that snap-attach to loops 32 (also called “U-shaped shackles”) on ends of the arms 29. As illustrated, a molded connector plug 55 (or 55A or 55B) engages an end of the seat-supporting arms 29, and the loops 32 are attached to a protruding end of the plug 55. Even though the hooks 31 (FIG. 5) include a safety-locking finger 31A that flexes to allow a “snap-attach,” they are durable plastic (or metal) and easily hooked into position, such that their engagement does not create noise. Further, the safety fingers 31A prevent accidental disengagement. The illustrated seat 22 is thermoformed. The value of the thermoformed seat is the following. Normally a hunter has to bring a separate insulated seat pad to place on top of the foldable camp stool. The pad increases warmth and comfort so that a hunter can sit still longer. By integrating the stiff yet flexible thermoformed seat pad into the design, we fix at least two problems associated with a basic camp stool. We increase comfort and warmth. Also, the thermoformed seat pad will flex and bend to match the shape of the user. Using just a webbing or nylon fabric seat would fail this product in the marketplace.

FIGS. 22-26 show details of the washer caps 50 (which are identical to washer caps 40). Each washer cap 50 includes a tubular sleeve portion 63 shaped to closely receive and engage an end of the tubular members 26, 29, and 30. An end wall 64 sets a position of the cap 50 on an end of the respective tubular members. The washer caps 50 (and 40) can be held in place by various means, such as by the pivot pin 61 (FIGS. 1 and 9) (which extends through opposing sides of the cap 50 as well as through holes in the associated tubular member), or by other means such as by friction fit, a set screw, or adhesive, or integral protrusion frictionally engaging a side hole in the tubular members. Opposing standoffs 65 are formed on the tubular sleeve portion 63. The standoffs 65 have a flat outer surface 66 and include aligned holes 67, such that they form integral washers on opposing sides of the sleeve portion 63. Further, the cap 50 is molded of a lubricious and strong plastic material, such as nylon. The integral washer/standoffs 65 greatly facilitate assembly since they reduce the number of parts required for assembly, and further they reduce assembly time since less parts have to be held in position during installation of various pivot pins/bolts such as pivot pins 61. Also, the caps 50 (and 40) greatly reduce any risk of noise, by physically preventing contact between adjacent tubular members, and by preventing rubbing of the pivot pins on tubular members.

The illustrated washer caps 40 and 50 are identical in shape. However, it is contemplated that they can be different shapes and still perform their intended function, and/or that they can be integrally formed on ends of the legs or arms.

Connector plug 55 (FIG. 21) is the plug used at a front of the stool 20 for holding the seat 22. Notably, plug 55 does not support an upright 30. The plug 55 includes a plug portion 70 shaped to fit snugly into the end of a tubular member such as arm 29, and further includes a tube-abutting end wall 71. An extension 72 has a stem 72A that extends from the wall 71, and includes a pivot-forming cylindrical portion 73 that forms a transverse barrel-like shape with opposing flat ends on the end of the extension 72. A hole extends transversely through the cylindrical portion 73. The U-shaped shackle 32 includes opposing free ends adapted to engage the portion 73, and the pivot pin 61 extends through the hole in the portion 73 to pivotally connect the shackle 32 to the plug 55 and in turn to the arm 29. A set screw 74 extends through the arm 29 and into the plug portion 70 to secure the plug 55 to the arm 29.

Connector plugs 55A and 55B (FIGS. 18-20) are similar to plug 55. However, they are also adapted to support an upright 30. Plug 55A and 55B are mirror images of each other, such that a detailed description of plug 55A is sufficient for an understanding of the present invention. Specifically, plug 55A includes a plug portion 70, end wall 71, extension 72 and set screw 74. However, it includes only a half cylindrical portion 73A with a flat surface 75 along a longitudinal plane transverse to the hole. The stem 72 includes an end surface 75/77 shaped to receive an end of the mating plug 55B. The plug 55A is attached to one of the arms 29, and the second plug 55B is attached to one of the uprights 30. When assembled, the arm 29 and upright 30 can be positioned with the flat surfaces 75 of the two plugs 55A, 55B abutting. The shackle 32 can then be attached using the pivot pint 61, which pivotally attaches the shackle 32 to the joint and further pivotally attaches the upright 30 to the arm 29. Abutting stop surfaces 77 are formed in and extend radially from the hole for pivot pin 61 on each of the plugs 55A and 55B. The stop surfaces 77 are positioned to abut to limit outward rotation of the upright 30 about the pivot pin 61 as the upright 30 is moved from a collapsed storage position adjacent the arm 29 toward the use position. Thus, the upright 30 is limited to a particular maximum outward angular rotation on the arm 29. This angle depends on a desired angle of the upright 30 relative to the arm 29, which in turn depends on a desired angle of the arm 29 when in the use position.

Preferably, the hubs are metal (such as aluminum or other strong metal) and cast metal, such that they are more durable and less noisy than existing known designs. They are pivotally interconnected for 360 degree rotation, such that the hunter does not have to change his/her position in the seat . . . but instead can simply rotate the seat. The legs are connected to rotate downward into a storage position, and the arms also rotate downward into their storage position parallel the legs, which is a novel approach not found in known folding stools. This folding arrangement permits a more dense and shorter storage arrangement. Further, even though the arms fold up for use, they are securely held in their upright use position by the hooks on the seat . . . in a hammock-simulating manner that is very secure and comfortable to a seated user.

The legs are infinitely telescopingly adjustable, and are quietly adjustable, which is contrary to previous legs which include spring-biased detents that noisily snappingly-engage into selected holes when adjusted. The enlarged feet (which have about 18 square inches of surface area) do not sink into mud and soft soil. The seat clips into U shackles (loops) on the upper arms, instead of using a fabric pocket, such that they are more durable and easier to erect. This also creates the comfortable hammock-like seat arrangement noted above. This also leaves the ends of the arms free for mounting back rest hinges, gun mounts, camera mounts, and other accessories to the stool. The back is optional, and includes folding uprights that co-exist with the folding seat-supporting arms and legs. The padded seat is quilted for aesthetics, insulated for comfort, and both functional and visually pleasing.

It is to be understood that variations and modifications can be made on the aforementioned structure without departing from the concepts of the present invention, and further it is to be understood that such concepts are intended to be covered by the following claims unless these claims by their language expressly state otherwise.