Title:
Mattress Wrap Bedding System
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The Mattress Wrap Bedding System holds bedding in place over deep mattresses. Standard-sized mattresses are accommodated including twin, full, queen, eastern king and California king. Easy changing of the bed clothes is achieved for deep heavy mattresses. Mattresses using this system can be on box springs, other foundations, platform beds, futon beds, and other flat surfaces such as steel bed platforms in truck cabs. Mattress wrap bedding includes four major components. Bedding is designed to be connected to ribbons on the mattress sides. Adjustable ribbons connect the bedding to an anchor. Bedding anchors include under-mattress, mattress cover, mattress, bed frame, and platform bed anchors. Connectors and fasteners make up the fourth major component. A smooth outer appearance is achieved for the bedding ensemble so that bulges do not appear under blankets, coverlets, quilts and comforters. Mattress wrap bedding includes bottom sheets, mattress pads, other mattress toppers, and top sheets also.



Inventors:
Peterson, Marlene Marian (Clinton, MD, US)
Application Number:
12/391310
Publication Date:
07/09/2009
Filing Date:
02/24/2009
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
5/498, 5/499, 24/90.1, 5/497
International Classes:
A47C21/02; A44B11/25; A47G9/02; A47G9/04
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
WILSON, BRITTANY M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Marlene Marian Peterson (Clinton, MD, US)
Claims:
What I claim as my invention is:

1. A connectable bed clothing item for use with connectors, side ribbons, a bedding anchor, and a mattress; the connectable bed clothing item comprising: a) a cloth that covers at least the width and length of the mattress; b) at least one corner connector holder as part of each corner of at least one end of the cloth; c) each corner connector holder being releasably connectable by one of the connectors to a connector holder of one of the side ribbons; d) being in use comprising being positioned over the mattress, each corner connector holder of the cloth being connected to one of the side ribbons, each of the side ribbons being connected to the bedding anchor, and at least some of the connections being made by the connectors; and e) when in use, each connector holder of the cloth being located from the bottom edge of the mattress at a distance equal to the total length of one of the connectors, one of the side ribbons, another one of the connectors, plus the length of one of the bedding anchor connector holders from the mattress bottom edge.

2. A connectable bed clothing item of claim 1 having the name connectable bottom sheet, further comprising at least one corner connector holder as part of each corner of the cloth.

3. A connectable bottom sheet of claim 2 having the name connectable flat bottom sheet, further comprising the cloth being flat having no corner seams.

4. A connectable bottom sheet of claim 2 having the name connectable snugly fitted bottom sheet, further comprising: a) dimensions greater than the width and length of the mattress; b) one seam on each corner of the cloth extending from the corner top of the cloth to the outside edge of the cloth on a line parallel to the corner-vertical-line when the cloth is in use; c) each seam of the cloth having two edges before being sewn; and d) the angle measure between the two edges of each seam of the cloth being approximately 90 degrees when the cloth is laid flat before the seam edges have been sewn together to make a snug fit, when sewn, of each corner of the cloth to the mattress.

5. A connectable bottom sheet of claim 2 having the name connectable loosely fitted one seam bottom sheet, further comprising: a) dimensions greater than the width and length of the mattress; b) one seam on each corner of the cloth extending from the corner top of the cloth to the outside edge of the cloth on a line parallel to the corner-vertical-line when the cloth is in use; c) each seam of the cloth having two edges before being sewn; and d) the angle measure between the two edges of each seam of the cloth being less than 90 degrees when the cloth is laid flat before the seam edges have been sewn together to make a loose fit, when sewn, of each corner to the mattress having an amount of looseness dependent upon the angle measure.

6. A connectable bottom sheet of claim 2 having the name connectable loosely fitted two seam bottom sheet, further comprising: a) dimensions greater than the width and length of the mattress; b) two seams on each corner of the cloth; c) each of the seams of each corner of the cloth having the same length; d) the two seams on each corner meeting at a common vertex; e) the two seams of each corner at the common vertex extending from the corner top of the cloth to the outside edge of the cloth; f) each seam of the cloth having two edges before being sewn; and g) for each corner of the cloth the total angle measure between the two seam edges of one of the seams plus the angle measure between the two seam edges of the other seam at the same corner being less than 90 degrees when the cloth is laid flat before the seam edges have been sewn together to make a loose fit, when sewn, of each corner to the mattress having an amount of looseness dependent upon the angle measure.

7. A connectable bottom sheet of claim 2 having the name connectable horizontal corner seam bottom sheet, further comprising: a) dimensions greater than the width and length of the mattress; and b) at least one horizontal seam on each corner located down from each corner top of the cloth.

8. A side ribbon for use with connectors, a connectable bed clothing item, a bedding anchor, and a mattress; the side ribbon comprising: a) a fabric main member; b) when in use the main member having a place A; c) when in use the main member having a place B; d) place A having a connector holder releasably connectable by a first one of the connectors to an external item from the group consisting of the connectable bed clothing item and the bedding anchor; e) place B having a connector holder releasably connectable by a second one of the connectors to an external item from the group consisting of the connectable bed clothing item and the bedding anchor; f) being in use type 1 comprising being connected to the connectable bed clothing item and connected to the bedding anchor when the connectable bed clothing item is positioned over the mattress wherein each corner connector holder of the connectable bed clothing item is connected to one of the side ribbons wherein being in use is being in use type 1; g) being in use type 2 comprising being in use type 1 and further comprising the connectable bed clothing item being a bottom sheet comprising at least one corner connector holder as part of each corner; h) when in use, the connector holder of place A being connected to an external item different than the external item connected to the connector holder of place B wherein the connector holders of place A and place B are connected to connector holders of the external items; i) the main member length being from the group consisting of adjustable and nonadjustable wherein adjustment comprises a change in length of the main member when not in use; and j) the main member when being in use type 2 having been made adjustably taut.

9. A side ribbon of claim 8 having the name V shaped side ribbon, further comprising: a) when in use the main member having a place C; b) the distance from place A to place B being equal to the distance from place B to place C; c) place C having a connector holder releasably connectable by a third one of the connectors to the same external item connected to place A; d) the connector holder of place A and the connector holder of place C being releasably connectable to different connector holders of the same external item; and e) when in use, the connector holder of place C being connected to the same external item connected to the connector holder of place A.

10. A side ribbon of claim 8 having the name single-folded overlap side ribbon for use with a fastener, further comprising: a) the main member being a flexible strip; b) the strip having a part A; c) part A having an end A; d) end A being place A; e) the strip having a part B; f) part B having an end B; g) end B being different than place B; h) part A being contiguous with part B; i) part B having multiple sets wherein each set has at least one opening; j) overlap of part B onto itself having a location of contact; k) the location of contact having at least one of the sets in a first portion of part B positioned directly over at least one of the sets in a second portion of part B; l) the fold created by the overlap being place B; m) the fastener being inserted at the location of contact into at least one opening in the first portion and also into at least one opening in the second portion wherein the two portions are fastened together; and n) the location of contact being selected to adjust the length of the fastened strip to fit the mattress depth.

11. A side ribbon of claim 8 having the name circular overlap side ribbon for use with a fastener, further comprising: a) the main member being a flexible strip; b) the strip having a part A; c) part A having an end A; d) end A being different than place A and end A being different than place B; e) the strip having a part B; f) part B having an end B; g) end B being different than place A and end B being different than place B; h) part A being contiguous with part B; i) part A having at least one set wherein the set has at least one opening; j) part B having multiple sets; k) overlap of a portion of part A with a portion of part B having a location of contact; l) the overlap causing the strip to be circular; m) the location of contact having at least one of the sets in the portion of part A positioned directly over at least one of the sets in the portion of part B; n) the fastener being inserted at the location of contact into at least one opening in the portion of part A and also into at least one opening in the portion of part B wherein the two portions are fastened together; o) the location of contact being selected to adjust the length of the fastened strip to fit the mattress depth; and p) the strip being flattened having the overlap in the middle area wherein one of the folds having been created being place A and the other fold having been created being place B.

12. A side ribbon of claim 8 having the name two piece overlap side ribbon for use with a fastener, further comprising: a) the main member being two strips being releasably attachable to each other; b) the first fabric strip having an end A; c) end A being place A; d) the first strip having a part B having an end B; e) end B being different than place B; f) part B having at least one set wherein the set has at least one opening; g) the second fabric strip having a part C having an end C; h) end C being different than place B; i) end C having multiple sets; j) the second strip having an end D being place B; k) overlap of a portion of part B with a portion of part C having a location of contact; l) the location of contact having at least one of the sets in the portion of part B positioned directly over at least one of the sets in the portion of part C; m) the fastener being inserted at the location of contact into at least one opening in the portion of part B and also into at least one opening in the portion of part C wherein the two portions are fastened together; and n) the location of contact being selected to adjust the length of the fastened strip to fit the mattress depth.

13. A mattress cover bedding anchor for use with a mattress, comprising: a) a mattress cover; b) at least one set of corner connector holders; c) the set having at least one corner connector holder on each corner of the mattress cover; and d) all of the connector holders in the set being the same distance from both the top and bottom edges of the mattress when the mattress cover is positioned for use on the mattress.

14. A mattress bedding anchor comprising: a) a mattress; b) at least one set of corner connector holders; c) the set having at least one corner connector holder on each corner of the mattress; and d) all of the connector holders in the set being the same distance from both the top and bottom edges of the mattress when the mattress is positioned for use.

15. A bed frame bedding anchor for use with a mattress, comprising: a) abed frame; b) each corner of the bed frame having at least one corner connector holder; and c) all of the connector holders being the same distance from the top edge of the mattress when the mattress is positioned for use on the bed frame.

16. A connector holder attachment for use with a side ribbon, a connector, and a bed frame bedding anchor; comprising: a) a material piece of at least one member having at least one first end and at least one second end; b) the first end having at least one connector holder being releasably connectable by the connector to a connector holder of the side ribbon; and c) the second end attachable to a bar-like element of the bed frame bedding anchor.

17. A connector holder attachment of claim 16 having the name flexible connector holder attachment, further comprising at least one member of the material piece being made of flexible fabric, and an opening at the second end through which the first end can be fed after being looped around the bar-like element of the bed frame bedding anchor.

18. An under-mattress full-extent bedding anchor for use with a mattress, comprising: a) a first fabric member for placement under the mattress; b) the first fabric member having four corners; c) each corner of the first fabric member being at the edge of a corner of the mattress when the first fabric member is in position under the mattress; d) the first fabric member having a shape staying within the width and length boundaries of the mattress when the mattress is on the first fabric member; e) each corner of the first fabric member having at least one secondary fabric member; and f) each secondary fabric member having at least one connector holder protruding beyond the mattress when the mattress is on the first fabric member.

19. An under-mattress short-extent bedding anchor for use with side ribbons and a mattress, comprising: a) an under-mattress bedding anchor main-part; b) at least four peripheral parts; c) the under-mattress bedding anchor main-part comprising 1) a fabric member for placement under the mattress, 2) the fabric member having a shape staying within the width and length boundaries of the mattress when the mattress is on the fabric member, 3) the fabric member being releasably connectable to at least four peripheral parts by at least one connector holder of the fabric member, and 4) each corner of the mattress having at least one peripheral part extended toward the corner when the fabric member and peripheral parts are in position; d) each peripheral part comprising a fabric member being releasably connectable to at least one item from the group consisting of another peripheral part, the under-mattress bedding anchor main-part, and one of the side ribbons; e) at least four corner fabric extension sets wherein each set has at least one peripheral part and each set has no disconnected parts; and f) at least one corner fabric extension set fully extending to each corner of the mattress having at least one connector holder protruding beyond the mattress for connection with at least one of the side ribbons when the under-mattress short-extent bedding anchor is in position.

20. An under-mattress bedding anchor main-part for use with peripheral parts and a mattress, comprising: a) a fabric member for placement under the mattress; b) the fabric member having a shape staying within the width and length boundaries of the mattress when the mattress is on the fabric member; c) the fabric member being releasably connectable to at least four peripheral parts by at least one connector holder of the fabric member; and d) each corner of the mattress having at least one peripheral part extended toward the corner when the fabric member and peripheral parts are in position.

21. An anchor ribbon peripheral part for use with an under-mattress bedding anchor main-part, comprising: a) a fabric member having at least two ends; b) each end of the fabric member having a connector holder being releasably connectable by a connector to a connector holder of an item external to the fabric member; and c) at least one connector holder on at least one end being releasably connectable by a connector to a connector holder of the under-mattress bedding anchor main-part.

22. An anchor corner piece peripheral part for use with side ribbons and connectors, comprising: a) a fabric outside section; b) the outside section having a first side member; c) the outside section having a second side member; d) the first side member having at least one connector holder; e) the second side member having at least one connector holder; and f) each connector holder of the outside section being releasably connectable by at least one connector to at least one side ribbon.

23. The anchor corner piece of claim 22 having the name bow and fence anchor corner piece, further comprising: a) the first side member having a fence shape having at least two post shapes and at least one lateral board shape meeting each post shape; b) the second side member having a fence shape having at least two post shapes and at least one lateral board shape meeting each post shape; c) the outside section having a middle member; and d) the middle member having a bow shaped connector holder comprising a bow shaped member and a background member wherein the bow shaped member is fastened to the background member at the middle of the bow and at both ends of the bow giving two openings for use by at least one connector.

24. The anchor corner piece of claim 23 for use with a mattress and a short-extent under-mattress anchor, further comprising: a) a fabric inside section that lies flat under the mattress when the anchor corner piece is in use; b) the inside section having at least one connector holder being releasably connectable by a connector to a connector holder of an element of the short-extent under-mattress bedding anchor; and c) the inside section being at an approximate 90 degree angle with the outside section wherein the anchor corner piece snuggly fits the angle of the mattress when at least one connector is inserted in the outside section and inserted in at least one side ribbon connected to a connectable bed clothing item being in use over the mattress.

25. The anchor corner piece of claim 22 having the name x-cross anchor corner piece, further comprising: a) the outside section having a middle member; b) the middle member having an x-cross member; c) the x-cross member comprising a connector holder; d) the x-cross member connector holder having a first strip member extending to the second side member from the first side member; e) the first strip member being attached to the first side member; f) the first strip member being attached to the second side member; g) the x-cross member connector holder having a second strip member extending to the second side member from the first side member and the second strip member crossing over the first strip member; h) the second strip member being attached to the first side member; and i) the second strip member being attached to the second side member.

26. The anchor corner piece of claim 25 for use with a mattress and a short-extent under-mattress anchor, further comprising: a) a fabric inside section that lies flat under the mattress when the anchor corner piece is in use; b) the inside section having at least one connector holder being releasably connectable by a connector to a connector holder of an element of the short-extent under-mattress bedding anchor; and c) the inside section being at an approximate 90 degree angle with the outside section wherein the anchor corner piece snuggly fits the angle of the mattress when at least one connector is inserted in the outside section and inserted in at least one side ribbon connected to a connectable bed clothing item being in use over the mattress.

27. The anchor corner piece of claim 22 having the name mesh anchor corner piece, further comprising the outside section comprising a mesh material having openings usable as connector holders.

28. The anchor corner piece of claim 27 for use with a mattress and a short-extent under-mattress anchor, further comprising: a) a fabric inside section that lies flat under the mattress when the anchor corner piece is in use; b) the inside section having at least one connector holder being releasably connectable by a connector to a connector holder of an element of the short-extent under-mattress bedding anchor; and c) the inside section being at an approximate 90 degree angle with the outside section wherein the anchor corner piece snuggly fits the angle of the mattress when at least one connector is inserted in the outside section and inserted in at least one side ribbon connected to a connectable bed clothing item being in use over the mattress.

29. The anchor corner piece of claim 22 having the name triple singleton anchor corner piece, further comprising: a) the outside section having a middle member; b) the middle member having at least one connector holder; c) the first side member free of contact with the middle member; and d) the second side member free of contact with the middle member.

30. The anchor corner piece of claim 29 for use with a mattress and a short-extent under-mattress anchor, further comprising: a) a fabric inside section that lies flat under the mattress when the anchor corner piece is in use; b) the inside section having at least one connector holder being releasably connectable by a connector to a connector holder of an element of the short-extent under-mattress bedding anchor; and c) the inside section being at an approximate 90 degree angle with the outside section wherein the anchor corner piece snuggly fits the angle of the mattress when at least one connector is inserted in the outside section and inserted in at least one side ribbon connected to a connectable bed clothing item being in use over the mattress.

31. A “M” peanut connector comprising: a) a rigid material forming a single non-straight line segment having an outer shape similar to the outer shape of a capital letter “M” having a midpoint not reaching the bottom, wherein the top and bottom of the connector are related to the top and bottom of the capital letter; b) the line segment extent having at least one thickness comprising width, depth, and shape; c) the line segment being traceable from one point on the perimeter, along the entire perimeter of the line segment, including all inner and outer areas of the line segment, and around back to the one point without crossing over any other point of the line segment; d) the line segment having two ends; e) the line segment having 1) two long sides having longitudinal axes being parallel and equal in length, 2) having a left top member and a right top member, each top member being from the group consisting of truncated and non-truncated, 3) a middle dip between the left top member and the right top member wherein the middle dip is extended from the two top members, 4) the extreme point of the middle dip being located at a distance from the bottom of the connector equal to 60% to 80% of the length of the connector, 5) the bottom end of each long side being extended up forming two extensions, each extension extending upward toward the center line of the connector stopping short of the center line leaving an opening between the two extensions, then each of the two extensions changing direction being further extended upward stopping short of the middle dip, wherein the longitudinal axis of each extension is parallel to the longitudinal axes of the long sides, then each of the two extensions changing direction again being further extended toward the closest long side of each, then each of the two extensions stopping short being the two ends of the connector leaving an opening to each side, and 6) the two internal distances between each extension and the nearest long side to each extension being the same; and f) each end having a shape being from the group consisting of a non-encumbering shape and an encumbering shape.

32. A “G” peanut connector comprising: a) a rigid material forming a single non-straight line segment having a shape similar to a capital letter “G” wherein the top, bottom, left, and right of the connector are related to the capital letter; b) the line segment extent having at least one thickness comprising width, depth, and shape; c) the line segment being traceable from one point on the perimeter, along the entire perimeter of the line segment, including all inner and outer areas of the line segment, and around back to the one point without crossing over any other point of the line segment; d) the line segment having an oblong shape further comprising 1) an opening on the right side, 2) a first end and a second end, 3) a bar in the middle area, 4) the end of the bar being the second end of the line segment, 5) the second end being to the right of the inside of the left side, 6) the second end being to the left of the right side, 7) the bar consisting of the portion of the connector from the second end to the right side, 8) the second end leaving an opening into the lower inner area of the connector, and 9) the top of the line segment extending down and then stopping being the first end of the connector, 10) the first end being short of the bar leaving the opening on the right side; and e) the first end and the second end having a shape being from the group consisting of a non-encumbering shape and an encumbering shape.

33. A “B” peanut connector comprising: a) a rigid material forming a single non-straight line segment having a shape similar to a modified capital letter “B” wherein the top, bottom, left, and right of the connector are related to the capital letter; b) the line segment extent having at least one thickness comprising width, depth, and shape; c) the line segment being traceable from one point on the perimeter, along the entire perimeter of the line segment, including all inner and outer areas of the line segment, and around back to the one point without crossing over any other point of the line segment; d) the line segment having two ends; e) the shape of the line segment comprising 1) the top of the left side continuing to the right forming the top of the connector then changes direction going downward stopping short of the half of the external length of the connector, and finally continuing again by changing direction to the left stopping short of the inside of the connector leaving an opening, and 2) the bottom of the left side continuing to the right forming the bottom of the connector then changes direction going upward stopping short of the half of the external length of the connector, and finally continuing again by changing direction going to the left stopping short of the inside of the connector leaving an opening; and f) each end having a shape being from the group consisting of a non-encumbering shape and an encumbering shape.

34. A one-turn hallway peanut connector comprising: a) a rigid material forming a single non-straight line segment having an oblong external shape having an opening into the connector; b) a one-turn hallway wherein the hallway proceeds from the opening; c) the line segment extent having at least one thickness comprising width, depth, and shape; d) the line segment being traceable from one point on the perimeter, along the entire perimeter of the line segment, including all inner and outer areas of the line segment, and around back to the one point without crossing over any other point of the line segment; e) the line segment having a first end and a second end, 1) the first end starting in the middle area of the left side of the connector, the line segment proceeding from the first end upward to the top left side of the connector, 2) then diverting to the right for the width of the connector, 3) then diverting downward the entire length of the connector, 4) then diverting to the left for the width of the connector, 5) then diverting upward in line with the start of the connector, 6) then stopping short of the first end of the connector leaving the opening into the connector, 7) then continuing again by diverting to the right forming a first wall of the hallway, and 8) finally diverting upward going past the first end of the connector, stopping short of the inside top of the connector, and forming a second wall of the hallway, wherein the end of the line segment at this place where the line segment stops is the second end; and f) each end having a shape being from the group consisting of a non-encumbering shape and an encumbering shape.

35. A three-turn hallway peanut connector comprising: a) a rigid material forming a single non-straight line segment having an oblong external shape having an opening; b) a three-turn hallway wherein the hallway proceeds from the opening; c) the line segment extent having at least one thickness comprising width, depth, and shape; d) the line segment being traceable from one point on the perimeter, along the entire perimeter of the line segment, including all inner and outer areas of the line segment, and around back to the one point without crossing over any other point of the line segment; e) the line segment having a first end and a second end, 1) the first end starting at the right of the left side of the connector in the middle area of the connector, the line segment proceeding from the first end to the left side of the connector, 2) then diverting upward creating a first turn of the connector proceeding upward to the top left side of the connector, 3) then diverting to the right for the width of the connector, 4) then diverting downward the entire length of the connector, 5) then diverting to the left for the width of the connector, 6) then diverting upward in line with the left side of the connector, 7) then stopping short of the first turn of the connector leaving the opening into the connector, 8) then diverting to the right forming a first wall of the hallway, 9) then diverting upward going past the first end of the connector and stopping short of the inside top of the connector forming a second wall of the hallway, 10) then continuing again by finally diverting to the left stopping short of the inside of the connector, forming a third wall of the hallway, and leaving an opening from the end of the hallway into the inner area of the connector, wherein the end of the line segment at this place where the line segment stops is the second end; and f) each end having a shape being from the group consisting of a non-encumbering shape and an encumbering shape.

36. A truncated triangle peanut connector comprising: a) a rigid material forming a single non-straight line segment having two ends and an opening; b) the line segment extent having at least one thickness comprising width, depth, and shape; c) the line segment being traceable from one point on the perimeter, along the entire perimeter of the line segment, including all inner and outer areas of the line segment, and around back to the one point without crossing over any other point of the line segment; d) the line segment being a truncated trilateral shape being a quadrilateral; e) the truncation being at the top of the connector; f) one of the two side laterals having the ends and the opening; and g) each end having a shape being from the group consisting of a non-encumbering shape and an encumbering shape.

37. A peanut-shell peanut connector comprising: a) a rigid material forming a single non-straight line segment having two ends and an opening into an inner area; b) the line segment extent having at least one thickness comprising width, depth, and shape; c) the line segment being traceable from one point on the perimeter, along the entire perimeter of the line segment, including all inner and outer areas of the line segment, and around back to the one point without crossing over any other point of the line segment; d) the line segment having 1) a single convex curvature forming the top of the connector, 2) a single convex curvature forming the bottom of the connector, 3) an elongation from the top curvature to the bottom curvature forming the right side of the connector, 4) a first convex curvature and a second convex curvature both on the left side wherein the first convex curvature forms the top left side of the connector and the second convex curvature is at the bottom left side of the connector, 5) the opening formed on the left side between the two convex curvatures, 6) the beginning of the first convex curvature being the first end of the connector, and 7) the second end of the line segment being at the end of the continuation of the line segment upward from the second convex curvature stopping short of the first convex curvature, then proceeding again by concavely curving inwardly and upwardly being to the right of the inside of the first convex curvature, going past the first end, and finally stopping short of the left inside of the connector, wherein a winding entrance has been formed to the connector's inner area; and e) each end having a shape being from the group consisting of a non-encumbering shape and an encumbering shape.

38. A bracket peanut fastener comprising: a) a rigid material forming a single non-straight line segment having a shape similar to a left square bracket font symbol “[”, wherein the top, bottom, and left of the fastener are related to the symbol; b) the line segment extent having at least one thickness comprising width, depth, and shape; c) the line segment being traceable from one point on the perimeter, along the entire perimeter of the line segment, including all inner and outer areas of the line segment, and around back to the one point without crossing over any other point of the line segment; d) the shape of the line segment comprising 1) a left side, 2) the line segment continuing from the top of the left side diverting to the right and stopping creating the top of the connector, 3) the top of the fastener being shorter than the height of the fastener, 4) the line segment continuing from the bottom of the left side diverting to the right and stopping creating the bottom of the connector, and 5) the bottom of the fastener being shorter than the height of the fastener; e) the line segment having two ends; and f) each end having a shape being from the group consisting of a non-encumbering shape and an encumbering shape.

39. A “UT” peanut fastener comprising: a) a rigid material forming a single non-straight line segment having a shape similar to a capital letter “U”; b) the line segment extent having at least one thickness comprising width, depth, and shape; c) the line segment being traceable from one point on the perimeter, along the entire perimeter of the line segment, including all inner and outer areas of the line segment, and around back to the one point without crossing over any other point of the line segment; d) the shape of the line segment being oblong wherein the top of the oblong shape has been removed; e) the line segment having two ends; and f) each end having a shape being from the group consisting of a non-encumbering shape and an encumbering shape.

40. A bed clothing item for use with a mattress comprising: a) a cloth having at least one permanently attached straight flexible tie on at least two corners of the cloth; b) each tie being capable of being tied to an external anchoring item; and c) when each corner of the cloth having at least one tie has been tied to the external anchoring item by the ties, the bed clothing item is held in place over the mattress.

41. A connectable bedding tie for use with a connector, a connectable bed clothing item, and an anchoring item; the connectable bedding tie comprising: a) a fabric strip having a first end and a second end; b) the first end having a connector holder being releasably connectable by the connector to a connector holder of one of the items; and c) the second end being a straight flexible tie capable of being tied to the other item.

42. A CSA system for use with connectors and a mattress, comprising: a) a connectable bed clothing item releasably connectable to at least two side ribbons; b) a bedding anchor releasably connectable to at least four side ribbons; c) at least two side ribbons releasably connectable to the connectable bed clothing item and releasably connectable to the bedding anchor; d) the connections being made by the connectors; e) the connectable bed clothing item comprising 1) a cloth that covers at least the width and length of the mattress, 2) at least one corner connector holder as part of each corner of at least one end of the cloth, and 3) each connector holder being releasably connectable by one of the connectors to a connector holder of one of the side ribbons; f) each side ribbon comprising 1) a fabric main member, 2) when in use the main member having a place A, 3) when in use the main member having a place B, 4) place A having a connector holder releasably connectable by one of the connectors to an external item from the group consisting of the connectable bed clothing item and the bedding anchor, 5) place B having a connector holder releasably connectable by a second one of the connectors to an external item from the group consisting of the connectable bed clothing item and the bedding anchor, 6) being in use type 1 comprising being connected to the connectable bed clothing item and connected to the bedding anchor when the connectable bed clothing item is positioned over the mattress wherein each corner connector holder of the connectable bed clothing item is connected to one of the side ribbons wherein being in use is being in use type 1, 7) being in use type 2 comprising being in use type 1 and further comprising the connectable bed clothing item being a bottom sheet comprising at least one corner connector holder as part of each corner, 8) when in use, the connector holder of place A being connected to an external item different than the external item connected to the connector holder of place B wherein the connector holders of place A and place B are connected to connector holders of the external items, 9) the main member length being from the group consisting of adjustable and nonadjustable wherein adjustment comprises a change in length of the main member when not in use, and 10) the main member when being in use type 2 having been made adjustably taut; g) the bedding anchor being an anchor selected from the group consisting of a mattress cover bedding anchor, a mattress bedding anchor, a bed frame bedding anchor, an under-mattress full-extent bedding anchor, and an under-mattress short-extent bedding anchor; h) the mattress cover bedding anchor comprising 1) a mattress cover, 2) at least one set of corner connector holders, 3) the set having at least one corner connector holder on each corner of the mattress cover, and 4) all of the connector holders in the set being the same distance from both the top and bottom edges of the mattress when the mattress cover is positioned for use on the mattress; i) the mattress bedding anchor comprising 1) the mattress, 2) at least one set of corner connector holders, 3) the set having at least one corner connector holder on each corner of the mattress, and 4) all of the connector holders in the set being the same distance from both the top and bottom edges of the mattress when the mattress is positioned for use; j) the bed frame bedding anchor comprising 1) a bed frame, 2) each corner of the bed frame having at least one corner connector holder, and 3) all of the connector holders being the same distance from the top edge of the mattress when the mattress is positioned for use on the bed frame; k) the under-mattress full-extent bedding anchor comprising 1) a first fabric member for placement under the mattress, 2) the first fabric member having four corners, 3) each corner of the first fabric member being at the edge of a corner of the mattress when the first fabric member is in position under the mattress, 4) the first fabric member having a shape staying within the width and length boundaries of the mattress when the mattress is on the first fabric member, 5) each corner of the first fabric member having at least one secondary fabric member, and 6) each secondary fabric member having at least one connector holder protruding beyond the mattress when the mattress is on the first fabric member; and l) the under-mattress short-extent bedding anchor comprising 1) an under-mattress bedding anchor main-part, 2) at least four peripheral parts, 3) the under-mattress bedding anchor main-part comprising a fabric member for placement under the mattress, the fabric member having a shape staying within the width and length boundaries of the mattress when the mattress is on the fabric member, the fabric member being releasably connectable to at least four peripheral parts by at least one connector holder of the fabric member, and each corner of the mattress having at least one peripheral part extended toward the corner when the fabric member and peripheral parts are in position, 4) each peripheral part comprising a fabric member being releasably connectable to at least one item from the group consisting of another peripheral part, the under-mattress bedding anchor main-part, and one of the side ribbons, 5) at least four corner fabric extension sets wherein the set has at least one peripheral part and the set has no disconnected parts, and 6) at least one corner fabric extension set fully extending to each corner of the mattress having at least one connector holder protruding beyond the mattress for connection with at least one of the side ribbons when the under-mattress short-extent bedding anchor is in position.

43. A CS subsystem for use with connectors, a bedding anchor, and a mattress; the CS subsystem comprising: a) a connectable bed clothing item releasably connectable to at least two side ribbons; b) at least two side ribbons releasably connectable to the connectable bed clothing item and releasably connectable to the bedding anchor; c) the connections being made by the connectors; d) the connectable bed clothing item comprising 1) a cloth that covers at least the width and length of the mattress, 2) at least one corner connector holder as part of each corner of at least one end of the cloth, and 3) each connector holder being releasably connectable by one of the connectors to a connector holder of one of the side ribbons; and e) each side ribbon comprising 1) a fabric main member, 2) when in use the main member having a place A, 3) when in use the main member having a place B, 4) place A having a connector holder releasably connectable by a first one of the connectors to an external item from the group consisting of the connectable bed clothing item and the bedding anchor, 5) place B having a connector holder releasably connectable by a second one of the connectors to an external item from the group consisting of the connectable bed clothing item and the bedding anchor, 6) being in use type 1 comprising being connected to the connectable bed clothing item and connected to the bedding anchor when the connectable bed clothing item is positioned over the mattress wherein each corner connector holder of the connectable bed clothing item is connected to one the side ribbons wherein being in use is being in use type 1, 7) being in use type 2 comprising being in use type 1 and further comprising the connectable bed clothing item being a bottom sheet comprising at least one corner connector holder as part of each corner, 8) when in use, the connector holder of place A being connected to an external item different than the external item connected to the connector holder of place B wherein the connector holders of place A and place B are connected to connector holders of the external items, 9) the main member length being from the group consisting of adjustable and nonadjustable wherein adjustment comprises a change in length of the main member when not in use, and 10) the main member when being in use type 2 having been made adjustably taut.

44. A CA subsystem for use connectors, at least two side ribbons, and a mattress; the CA subsystem comprising: a) a connectable bed clothing item releasably connectable to at least two side ribbons; b) a bedding anchor releasably connectable to at least four side ribbons; c) the connections being made by the connectors; d) the connectable bed clothing item comprising 1) a cloth that covers at least the width and length of the mattress, 2) at least one corner connector holder as part of each corner of at least one end of the cloth, and 3) each connector holder being releasably connectable by one of the connectors to a connector holder of one of the side ribbons; e) the bedding anchor being an anchor selected from the group consisting of a mattress cover bedding anchor, a mattress bedding anchor, a bed frame bedding anchor, an under-mattress full-extent bedding anchor, and an under-mattress short-extent bedding anchor; f) the mattress cover bedding anchor comprising 1) a mattress cover, 2) at least one set of corner connector holders, 3) the set having at least one corner connector holder on each corner of the mattress cover, and 4) all of the connector holders in the set being the same distance from both the top and bottom edges of the mattress when the mattress cover is positioned for use on the mattress; g) the mattress bedding anchor comprising 1) the mattress, 2) at least one set of corner connector holders, 3) the set having at least one corner connector holder on each corner of the mattress, and 4) all of the connector holders in the set being the same distance from both the top and bottom edges of the mattress when the mattress is positioned for use; h) the bed frame bedding anchor comprising 1) a bed frame, 2) each corner of the bed frame having at least one corner connector holder, and 3) all of the connector holders being the same distance from the top edge of the mattress when the mattress is positioned for use on the bed frame; i) the under-mattress full-extent bedding anchor comprising 1) a first fabric member for placement under the mattress, 2) the first fabric member having four corners, 3) each corner of the first fabric member being at the edge of a corner of the mattress when the first fabric member is in position under the mattress, 4) the first fabric member having a shape staying within the width and length boundaries of the mattress when the mattress is on the first fabric member, 5) each corner of the first fabric member having at least one secondary fabric member, and 6) each secondary fabric member having at least one connector holder protruding beyond the mattress when the mattress is on the first fabric member; and j) the under-mattress short-extent bedding anchor comprising 1) an under-mattress bedding anchor main-part, 2) at least four peripheral parts, 3) the under-mattress bedding anchor main-part comprising a fabric member for placement under the mattress, the fabric member having a shape staying within the width and length boundaries of the mattress when the mattress is on the fabric member, the fabric member being releasably connectable to at least four peripheral parts by at least one connector holder of the fabric member, and each corner of the mattress having at least one peripheral part extended toward the corner when the fabric member and peripheral parts are in position, 4) each peripheral part comprising a fabric member being releasably connectable to at least one item from the group consisting of another peripheral part, the under-mattress bedding anchor main-part, and one of the side ribbons, 5) at least four corner fabric extension sets wherein each set has at least one peripheral part and each set has no disconnected parts, and 6) at least one corner fabric extension set fully extending to each corner of the mattress having at least one connector holder protruding beyond the mattress for connection with at least one of the side ribbons when the under-mattress short-extent bedding anchor is in position.

45. A SA subsystem for use with connectors, a connectable bed clothing item, and a mattress; the SA subsystem comprising: a) a bedding anchor releasably connectable to at least four side ribbons; b) at least two side ribbons releasably connectable to the connectable bed clothing item and to the bedding anchor; c) the connections being made by the connectors; d) each side ribbon comprising 1) a fabric main member, 2) when in use the main member having a place A, 3) when in use the main member having a place B, 4) place A having a connector holder releasably connectable by a first one of the connectors to an external item from the group consisting of the connectable bed clothing item and the bedding anchor, 5) place B having a connector holder releasably connectable by a second one of the connectors to an external item from the group consisting of the connectable bed clothing item and the bedding anchor, 6) being in use type 1 comprising being connected to the connectable bed clothing item and connected to the bedding anchor when the connectable bed clothing item is positioned over the mattress wherein each corner connector holder of the connectable bed clothing item is connected to one of the side ribbons wherein being in use is being in use type 1, 7) being in use type 2 comprising being in use type 1 and further comprising the connectable bed clothing item being a bottom sheet comprising at least one corner connector holder as part of each corner, 8) when in use, the connector holder of place A being connected to an external item different than the external item connected to the connector holder of place B wherein the connector holders of place A and place B are connected to connector holders of the external items, 9) the main member length being from the group consisting of adjustable and nonadjustable wherein adjustment comprises a change in length of the main member when not in use, and 10) the main member when being in use type 2 having been made adjustably taut; e) the bedding anchor being an anchor selected from the group consisting of a mattress cover bedding anchor, a mattress bedding anchor, a bed frame bedding anchor, an under-mattress full-extent bedding anchor, and an under-mattress short-extent bedding anchor; f) the mattress cover bedding anchor comprising 1) a mattress cover, 2) at least one set of corner connector holders, 3) the set having at least one corner connector holder on each corner of the mattress cover, and 4) all of the connector holders in the set being the same distance from both the top and bottom edges of the mattress when the mattress cover is positioned for use on the mattress; g) the mattress bedding anchor comprising 1) the mattress, 2) at least one set of corner connector holders, 3) the set having at least one corner connector holder on each corner of the mattress, and 4) all of the connector holders in the set being the same distance from both the top and bottom edges of the mattress when the mattress is positioned for use; h) the bed frame bedding anchor comprising 1) a bed frame, 2) each corner of the bed frame having at least one corner connector holder, and 3) all of the connector holders being the same distance from the top edge of the mattress when the mattress is positioned for use on the bed frame; i) the under-mattress full-extent bedding anchor comprising 1) a first fabric member for placement under the mattress, 2) the first fabric member having four corners, 3) each corner of the first fabric member being at the edge of a corner of the mattress when the first fabric member is in position under the mattress, 4) the first fabric member having a shape staying within the width and length boundaries of the mattress when the mattress is on the first fabric member, 5) each corner of the first fabric member having at least one secondary fabric member, and 6) each secondary fabric member having at least one connector holder protruding beyond the mattress when the mattress is on the first fabric member; and j) the under-mattress short-extent bedding anchor comprising 1) an under-mattress bedding anchor main-part, 2) at least four peripheral parts, 3) the under-mattress bedding anchor main-part comprising a fabric member for placement under the mattress, the fabric member having a shape staying within the width and length boundaries of the mattress when the mattress is on the fabric member, the fabric member being releasably connectable to at least four peripheral parts by at least one connector holder of the fabric member, and each corner of the mattress having at least one peripheral part extended toward the corner when the fabric member and peripheral parts are in position, 4) each peripheral part comprising a fabric member being releasably connectable to at least one item from the group consisting of another peripheral part, the under-mattress bedding anchor main-part, and one of the side ribbons, 5) at least four corner fabric extension sets wherein each set has at least one peripheral part and each set has no disconnected parts, and 6) at least one corner fabric extension set fully extending to each corner of the mattress having at least one connector holder protruding beyond the mattress for connection with at least one of the side ribbons when the under-mattress short-extent bedding anchor is in position.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

Mattress Wrap Bedding System

Provisional Application

Application No. 61033019

Clinton, Md. 20735 (US)

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

(Not Applicable)

REFERENCE TO SEQUENCE LISTING, A TABLE, OR A COMPUTER PROGRAM LISTING COMPACT DISC APPENDIX

(Not Applicable)

BACKGROUND

The invention pertains to bedding and components to keep the bedding in place. One of the typical bedding groups of this invention wraps a mattress by a combination of a bottom sheet, side ribbons, and a bedding anchor placed under the mattress. In addition to under-mattress anchors, various other types of anchors permit bedding to be anchored. These include modified mattresses, zippered mattress covers, bed frames, and platform beds. They are modified by the addition of bedding anchor elements. The Mattress Wrap Bedding System (MWBS) was developed to keep bed clothing from slipping off of mattresses while providing ease of use.

In prior art, fitted bottom sheets have elastic around the entire sheet. This elastic edge can easily pop off of deep mattresses. Also mattress toppers with fitted skirts have this same problem. In addition to elastic along the entire edge of bottom bedding, sheet straps and sheet suspenders have been used. But all of these methods require movement of the mattress with each change of the bedding. Because many mattresses are now very deep and heavy, moving the mattress in any way during the changing of bedding is burdensome. The MWBS does not require a mattress to be lifted or moved during the changing of bedding.

The MWBS provides a means to anchor bottom sheets and top sheets too. Further the MWBS provides a solution for anchoring mattress toppers and even atypical sheets which are approximately the same dimensions as the width and length of mattresses. Prior art to secure mattress toppers on mattresses has included elastic corner bands. The mattress has to be lifted to slip the bands under the corners of the mattress. This is difficult if the mattress is heavy. Also, the corner bands that fit shallow mattresses can be ineffective on deep mattresses.

Platforms beds may not include a box foundation. The mattress may be placed directly on top of a slick surface or onto slats not providing the friction needed to keep fitted sheets on the mattress. Also, access to the bottom of the mattress may be obstructed by a slight rail on the platform bed. This makes it difficult to get at the bottom of the mattress to lift it in order to slip the surrounding elastic edges of fitted sheets and mattress topper skirts under the mattress. Further if the platform bed base is made of slats, lifting the mattress may be troublesome for keeping the slats in position. The MWBS does not require access to the bottom of the mattress when changing bedding.

Deep mattresses come in many depths at one inch intervals up to 24 or more inches. This has made it necessary to find and buy bedding that comes in different sizes based upon the depth of a particular mattress. The pocket size for fitted bedding with an elastic perimeter has to be within two or three inches of a specific mattress depth to fit. The MWBS doesn't need a bottom sheet to be fitted by an elastic band around the entire bottom edge of the sheet. Thus, in the MWBS, a bottom sheet can fit any mattress depth. This is possible because of the wide selection and adjustment features of MWBS side ribbons. The MWBS provides a complete solution which maintains aesthetically pleasing bedding ensembles.

SUMMARY

An example Mattress Wrap Bedding group includes a flat bottom sheet, an under-mattress anchor and side bedding ribbons. The flat bottom sheet is made with little holders on each corner. The holders are for connectors so the sheet can be anchored. In this example, an anchor is under the mattress lying on a foundation or platform. Then short mattress side ribbons are attached to the sheet and anchor. This bedding group can include a mattress pad which is also secured to the same anchor. The mattress pad would have its own set of side bedding ribbons.

The basis of the MWBS is the anchoring of bedding in order to keep it in position over the mattress. Bedding is anchored in a manner to allow easy changing of bedding. To change bedding, first the side ribbons are released from the old bedding. Then the old bedding is replaced by fresh bedding. Finally the side ribbons are connected to the fresh bedding. The Mattress Wrap Bedding System has a number of components which can be used in various combinations for specific bedding groups.

1) The first major component in the MWBS is the bedding itself. The bedding can be any item of bed clothing which is to be secured in place on top of a mattress. The most common bedding item is a bottom sheet. The bedding in the MWBS has connector holders. One or more connector holders are placed on or near each corner of a bottom sheet or other bedding. Connector holders can also be placed at the sides of bedding in less usual implementations. Connectors are inserted in these holders. Options for holders for connectors include strips of ribbon and loops sewn to the corners of the sheet. Also, a holder for a connector can simply be the material between two holes when the holes have been punched into a sheet. The intervening material between the two holes is called a bridge. The hole edges could be stitched the same as button holes on a shirt.

2) The next major MWBS component is the side ribbon. The side ribbon is connected to the bottom sheet and also connected to the anchor. The term side ribbon in the MWBS simply refers to a short strip like structure that lies against the side of a mattress. However, in some constructions, a side ribbon can be more than a pure strip shape. The side ribbon is attached to the sheet with a connector such as a connector ring with a gate that opens and closes. Such rings include carabiner rings and gate rings. However, a connector used to connect a bottom sheet to a side ribbon does not need to having an opening and closing mechanism. The top and bottom ends of side ribbons have holders so any of these connectors can be inserted in holders in the side ribbons. The top of the side ribbon connects to bedding. The bottom of the side ribbon connects to an anchor. So there is a sheet with a connector holder, then a connector, next a side ribbon, another connector, and then the anchor. Note that the top and bottom of a side ribbon are generally reversible as long as the connector holder configurations on the bedding and the anchor match.

3) The third major component in the Mattress Wrap Bedding System is the anchor. Anchors come in a wide variety of types and styles. The types of anchors include under-mattress anchors, zippered mattress cover anchors, mattress anchors, bed frame anchors, and platform bed anchors.

4) The fourth major component in the Mattress Wrap Bedding System is the connector. Connectors are used to connect a bedding component to side ribbon components and to connect the side ribbon components to a bedding anchor component. The purpose of all this is to keep the bedding component in place over a mattress.

There is a great variety of component selections for making individual styles of Mattress Wrap Bedding. Following are highlights of all four major MWBS components.

1) MWBS bottom sheets do not need to be fitted. The elastic perimeter on prior art fitted bottom sheets was the mechanism to keep them on the mattress. In the MWBS a different method of keeping bedding on the mattress is used. Thus bottom sheets can be completely flat with no corner seams. Alternatively, there can be one or more corner seams in the bottom sheets. These corner seams would typically allow looseness at each corner for ease in accessing the connector holders on the underneath of the bedding, as opposed to tightly fitted bottom sheets. Also, the types of corner seams and the amount of looseness can be chosen for the appearance of the bedding. MWBS bedding has connector holders. Bedding can have a single connector holder on each corner. Also opposing connector holders can be located on the sides of each corner. The bedding is connected to side ribbons. The side ribbons are connected to an anchor. In order for an anchor to be connected to side ribbons, the anchor has connector holders too.

2) So one of the MWBS components is side bedding ribbons. They can be made from various elements such as short strips of satin, various types of adjustment straps, elastic lace, and even decorative metal chains. Each side ribbon has holders for connectors on each end. Some basic types of these connector holders include a loop, the bridge of material between two holes, and a tag.

3) Carabiner rings and gate rings are commercially available connectors that will work with mattress wrap bedding connector holders. Also invented and described within this specification are connectors and fasteners which meet MWBS needs and are inexpensive to manufacture. These special MWBS connectors and fasteners are called peanut connectors and fasteners. The first one designed had an outer shape that looked like a curved peanut shell; hence all inherited the name peanut.

4) There are several types of anchors. One type of anchor is an under-mattress anchor. The under-mattress anchor lies under a mattress with each corner of the anchor having at least one connector holder which protrudes from under the mattress to connect with one or more side ribbons. All holders for connectors are called connector holders regardless of what item of the MWBS on which they are used. So this includes connector holders on sheets, mattress toppers, side ribbons, and anchors.

5) Instead of anchors placed under the mattress, the mattress itself can act as an anchor. All the mattress needs is connector holders fastened into the corner areas during a step in the manufacturing process. Loops can be sewn permanently to each corner of the mattress much like labels are sewn to mattresses. However, these “labels” are actually loops or other forms of holders for connectors. More than one connector holder can be located at or near each corner of the mattress. Side ribbons are then connected directly to these loops; or to any other type of connector holder which has been put in the mattress corners.

6) Also a zippered mattress cover can act as an anchor. As with the mattress, all the zippered mattress cover needs is connector holders sewn into the corner areas.

7) Another anchor option is for bed frames and platform beds to have structural components which serve the purpose of connector holders. Little metal bars would work for this. To soften the connection between a side ribbon and a metal bar, a cloth piece can be looped through the opening created by the metal bar. Then a connector can connect the side ribbon to this cloth piece.

8) And instead of using side ribbons, bedding ties can be directly sewn onto bedding. When bedding ties are used, connector holders are not required on the bedding. Bedding ties would seem to be more likely used on mattress toppers rather than bottom sheets, because mattress toppers aren't changed very often. However, the other option of side ribbons works equally well on both bottom sheets and mattress toppers.

The purpose of Mattress Wrap Bedding is to:

1) Provide bottom sheets that do not pop off;

2) Provide mattress toppers which do not slide while on the mattress;

3) Provide bottom sheets that can be changed without struggling with a big, heavy mattress;

4) Provide bedding that is usable on all mattress depths;

5) Provide for multiple bedding items to be secured on a mattress;

6) Result in a solution that is easy to use;

7) Provide a solution that does not produce bulges that show in a made bed;

8) Result in a solution whose individual components are aesthetically pleasing yet hidden from view when the bed is made; and

9) Provide a solution that can be produced inexpensively.

The major components of the MWBS are basically independent of each other. Therefore these components can be available from multiple sources and still work together, unless special designs are developed. The MWBS can be used to develop single components, single bottom groups, single bedding ensembles, and can be used for the development of entire bedding lines.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 shows one type of MWBS group. A MWBS bottom sheet is on top of a mattress. An under-mattress anchor is shown placed under the mattress. Side ribbons under the sheet corners connect the bottom sheet to the anchor ribbons.

FIG. 2 is a corner view of the bedding group in FIG. 1 with the bottom sheet flipped over so the side ribbon is on top of the sheet corner.

FIG. 3 shows the side bedding ribbon with attached connectors on both ends.

FIG. 4 shows a corner of a MWBS flat bottom sheet with the sewn-in connector holder showing.

FIG. 5 shows the corner of the main-part of the under-mattress fabric anchor in FIG. 1. The corner of the main-part is connected to an anchor ribbon. Under-mattress anchors can have anchor ribbons. Then the anchor ribbons are connected to side ribbons.

FIG. 6 is the corner of a MWBS bottom sheet with one seam. The sheet loosely fits the corner and does not have elastic surrounding the bottom edge of the sheet as do commonly available fitted bottom sheets.

FIG. 7 is the same sheet corner shown in FIG. 6, but the sheet corner is now flipped over on the bed to show the connector holder that has been sewn into the corner seam.

FIG. 8 is the currently available industry standard, a fitted bottom sheet, that has been modified for use as a MWBS sheet. The modification of an added connector holder does not show when the sheet in placed with the connector holder next to the mattress as in this figure.

FIG. 9 is a different view of the same sheet corner as in FIG. 8, but in this FIG. 9 the sheet is turned over and placed on the bed with the connector holder showing. Also shown is a connector inserted in the connector holder. It needs a side ribbon and attachment to an anchor to complete the MWBS bottom bedding assembly.

FIG. 10 is a two seam corner for a MWBS bottom sheet. This fits the corner in a loosely flowing manner. The amount of looseness can be adjusted in the design of the bottom sheet corner seams.

FIG. 11 is a MWBS bottom sheet with a horizontal seam at the bottom of the sheet. The connector holder is placed on this bottom horizontal seam.

FIG. 12 is an example of a simple short horizontal seam high up near the top edge of the mattress. The seam is made by forming a short pleat or loop.

FIG. 13 is another elegant single short horizontal seam. This seam is a short gathering stitch which has been pulled and secured.

FIG. 14 is the simple sheet corner pattern for fitted MWBS bottom sheets with one seam on each corner.

FIG. 15 shows a simple loop sewn into the corner seam of a sheet to serve as a holder for a connector.

FIG. 16 shows a connector holder where the ends are not joined to each other, but spaced apart for easy access by a connector.

FIG. 17 shows an hour glass shaped connector holder made as a twisted and tacked strip.

FIG. 18 shows the first step of folding a wide ribbon lengthwise to make an hour glass holder for connectors.

FIG. 19 is the second step in forming an hour glass connector holder. It is a view of the folded satin strip with one end fastened in a corner seam of a sheet.

FIG. 20 is the third step in forming an hour glass connector holder. It shows the twisted satin strip with its other end fastened in the corner seam of the sheet.

FIG. 21 represents the results of tacking together the middle of the satin strip. This forms the hour glass shape. This figure is a side view of FIG. 17.

FIG. 22 is a sheet corner pattern for a loosely fitted, one seam corner. This figure is also a sheet corner pattern for a two seam corner.

FIG. 23 illustrates the two seam corner with the edges shown in FIG. 22 overlapped and stitched.

FIG. 24 shows a V-shaped connector holder with two openings. To the right of the V-shaped connector holder is another shape for two openings. This has horizontal placement of the two openings. The V-shape is the correct way to place the openings. The horizontal placement is the wrong way.

FIG. 25 shows a single loop connector holder. The placement of the loop holder shows that a tag connector holder can be put there instead of the loop.

FIG. 26 illustrates the use of the bridge of material between two holes as a holder for a connector.

FIG. 27 shows the placement of a connector holder on either of two options consisting of a two seam corner and a corner with no seams. The option of two seams is shown as dashed lines. The material of the sheet corner is bunched together under the connector holder.

FIG. 28 is the first drawing for making the short horizontal corner seam shown in FIG. 11.

FIG. 29 shows the first fold in making the horizontal seam.

FIG. 30 shows the design for the second fold in making the horizontal seam.

FIG. 31 shows the results of making the second fold.

FIG. 32 shows the measurements for turning up the small side corners for the horizontal corner seam.

FIG. 33 illustrates the results on the underside of the sheet of turning up the small side corners for the horizontal corner seam. This figure also illustrates the placement of a connector holder on the horizontal seam.

FIG. 34 illustrates the results on the topside of the sheet corner when the small side corners have been turned up on the short horizontal corner seam. This figure is the same as FIG. 11 except the seam stitching is not shown here.

FIG. 35 shows the design for changing the short horizontal corner seam from an unfitted corner to a fitted corner.

FIG. 36 shows the finished fitted corner on the underside of the sheet. This figure also shows the placement of a connector holder on the resulting horizontal seam.

FIG. 37 shows the topside of the finished fitted corner having the short horizontal corner seam.

FIG. 38 starts the development of a different version of a short horizontal seam at a corner of a bottom sheet. This is developed into a simple horizontal loop seam placed just down from the top corner of the sheet.

FIG. 39 shows the first fold in developing the horizontal loop seam.

FIG. 40 shows placement of the horizontal loop seam. After the seam has been sewn, the top of the sheet corner is to be folded down as shown in FIG. 41.

FIG. 41 shows the underside of the sheet corner which has a short horizontal seam stitched in an open place in the sheet fabric. The topside is shown in FIG. 12.

FIG. 42 shows the underside of the sheet corner where a sample connector holder has been sewn onto the loop created by the horizontal seam.

FIG. 43 is a diagram showing the method to locate a single connector holder on the corner of a flat bottom sheet.

FIG. 44 is a diagram showing center, side and end connector holder positions on the corner of a flat bottom sheet.

FIG. 45 is a diagram showing the method to locate opposing connector holders on the corners of a flat bottom sheet.

FIG. 46 is a drawing of a corner of the sheet in FIG. 43. The corner of the sheet is draped over a dummy mattress box.

FIG. 47 is a drawing of a fabric remnant with ink markings on it corresponding to FIGS. 44 and 45. This fabric remnant is draped over a corner of a dummy mattress box to illustrate the way a sheet with such a corner will drape over the corner of a mattress. This shows a relatively large hang amount. This is the distance that the connector holders hang down from the edge of the mattress. Also shown are opposing connector holders placed only a short distance from the center-connector-holder.

FIG. 48 is another drawing of the same fabric remnant in FIG. 47. This time the fabric remnant is pulled back to illustrate a small amount of hang from the edge of the mattress to the connector holder.

FIG. 49 shows one type of connector holder that can be used in FIGS. 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, and 48. The topside of the sheet has only 3 buttons showing. The underside of the sheet has the usable portion of the connector holder. A round gate ring is shown as the connector.

FIG. 50 shows more than one bedding item anchored to a MWBS zippered mattress cover. The mattress cover has connector holders sewn into its corners so it can be an anchor in the MWBS.

FIG. 51 shows a mattress corner where the layers of bedding in FIG. 50 are secured to an anchor corner piece of the mattress cover also shown in FIG. 50.

FIG. 52 is an anchor corner piece with three single-loop connector holders.

FIG. 53 shows that the body of the anchor corner piece from FIG. 52 does not need to come to the edge of the mattress, but can lie back from the corner of the mattress. Then the loops of the anchor corner piece can be extended to the edge of the mattress. After they are extended the mattress can be placed down on the under-mattress anchor which uses the anchor corner piece.

FIG. 54 shows the loops from the anchor corner piece in FIG. 52 protruding from under the mattress corner. FIG. 54 also shows some features of side ribbons and sheet connector holders.

FIG. 55 shows the positioning of a MWBS bottom sheet, mattress, under-mattress anchor, and platform bed along with side ribbons.

FIG. 56 is an example of an under-mattress fabric anchor with six sides. Only the main-part of the anchor is shown. The anchor ribbons are not shown.

FIG. 57 is an example of an under-mattress polygonal anchor. Only the main-part of the anchor is shown. The anchor ribbons are not shown.

FIG. 58 is an example of a full-extent under-mattress anchor. Full-extent anchors do not use anchor ribbons.

FIG. 59 is an example of an x-cross full-extent under-mattress anchor.

FIG. 60 shows the main-part of an under-mattress mesh anchor along with anchor ribbons, anchor corner pieces, connector holders, and some connectors.

FIG. 61 is a single-loop connector holder where one side of the loop is narrower than the other side to facilitate access by a connector.

FIG. 62 is an anchor corner piece made out of mesh material.

FIG. 63 is a double loop connector holder to permit connectors attached to different side ribbons to have their own loop, instead of sharing a single loop.

FIG. 64 is the double loop connector holder in FIG. 63 with connectors included. Each connector would be connected to a different side ribbon.

FIG. 65 is another example of an anchor corner piece.

FIG. 66 shows the pattern for making a jewelry box anchor corner piece.

FIG. 67 is the cut out jewelry box anchor corner piece ready to have a connector holder put in it for connection to the main-part of a short-extent under-mattress anchor. Instead it can be sewn to an anchor ribbon, or sewn to the corner of a full-extent under-mattress anchor. If the bottom part of the anchor corner piece is removed, then the top part can be sewn to a mattress cover or to a mattress.

FIG. 68 shows the jewelry box corner piece placed on a mattress corner with the underneath portion of the jewelry box corner piece under the mattress.

FIG. 69 is a strip of satin ribbon to be used in making a bow connector holder.

FIG. 70 shows the first step in making the bow connector holder.

FIG. 71 shows the completion of the bow connector holder.

FIG. 72 shows three bow connector holders on an anchor corner piece with a base that looks like a fence. This is one type of a bow and fence anchor corner piece. Another type is to only have the center bow where the fence parts on the sides serve as the side connector holders.

FIG. 73 shows how the two pieces of the fence corner piece are put together for placement on the end of an anchor ribbon.

FIG. 74 shows loops from multiple anchor ribbons at the corner of a mattress. This corner does not have a single anchor ribbon with an anchor corner piece with multiple connector holders. Instead each of the connector holders comes from a separate anchor ribbon.

FIG. 75 shows an under-mattress anchor with examples of multiple anchor ribbons coming from each corner of the main-part of the anchor to the corners of the mattress, as in FIG. 74.

FIG. 76 shows the main-part of an under-mattress anchor that has connector holders for multiple anchor ribbons to come from each corner.

FIG. 77 is the corner of the main-part of an under-mattress anchor showing detail of three vertically placed connector holders, three connectors, and three anchor ribbons to be extended to the corner of a mattress.

FIG. 78 shows connector holders made by four holes forming three bridges. Each bridge consists of the material between two holes where each bridge is a connector holder.

FIG. 79 shows three adjacent loops for insertion of connectors. Two different types of connectors are illustrated. The front sides of the loops are half the size of the back of the loops to allow easy insertion of connectors.

FIG. 80 has four connector holders formed by folding a strip of satin and sewing each fold in place on the anchor. Two different types of connectors are illustrated.

FIG. 81 is the corner of an under-mattress anchor with 3 connector holders where each is the bridge of material between two holes. The sets of holes are placed in a vertical position rather than the previous horizontal placements.

FIG. 82 shows the process of cutting square and rectangular holes.

FIG. 83 shows the process of cutting circular holes.

FIG. 84 shows the process of cutting diamond shaped holes.

FIG. 85 shows the process of cutting slits.

FIG. 86 is a full-extent under-mattress anchor with a connector holder on each corner and a connector holder on each of the two sides. This anchor is to be used under the mattress in the slip-on anchor assembly shown in FIGS. 86 through 91.

FIG. 87 shows three side ribbons with connector holders to be used in the slip-on anchor assembly.

FIG. 88 shows an example full-extent anchor that can be used on top of a mattress in the slip-on anchor assembly.

FIG. 89 is the assembly of the under-mattress anchor from FIG. 86, the three side ribbons with connectors from FIG. 87, and the top anchor from FIG. 88. This is the slip-on anchor assembly.

FIG. 90 shows the slip-on anchor assembly from FIG. 89 actually slipped onto a mattress over one of its sides.

FIG. 91 shows the mattress and its slip-on anchor assembly laid down on a foundation support which could be a platform bed. The remaining side of the anchor assembly needs to be attached with three more side ribbons with connectors.

FIG. 92 provides a solution if the side ribbons on the corners of the slip-on anchor assembly do not stay on the corners of the mattress during the process of slipping the assembly on the mattress. Opposing connector holders or anchor corner pieces can make a secure fit over the corners of the mattress that will hold as the slip-on anchor assembly is put on the mattress.

FIG. 93 shows a mattress which is also a bedding anchor. The mattress has connector holders fastened to its corner seams. To allow the mattress to be flipped over to even the wear on both sides, connector holders can be fastened into both the top and bottom corner seams of the mattress.

FIG. 94 shows a bed frame without any support for an under-mattress anchor.

FIG. 95 shows that the bed frame itself can have connector holders as part of its structure. This makes use of an under-mattress anchor unnecessary. The bed frame itself becomes the anchor.

FIG. 96 illustrates possible measurements for bed frame or platform bed connector holders made of metal and other rigid materials.

FIG. 97 shows a fabric piece to be attached to a metal connector holder. The flexible fabric loop provides an alternative to direct use of the metal connector holder by a connector.

FIG. 98 shows the position of the fabric piece when attached to a metal bar on a bed frame or a platform bed.

FIG. 99 illustrates that metal bars can be put on the sides of bed rails.

FIG. 100 shows that a hook can be used to serve as a connector holder as an alternative to a bar.

FIG. 101 shows that the bridge formed between holes and slits can be used on platform beds to serve as connector holders as an alternative to other types of bars and also to hooks. The bridge is a type of bar.

FIG. 102 shows possible measurement considerations for two slits on a platform bed used to make a connector holder consisting of the bridge between the slits.

FIG. 103 shows a clasp which can be used in the adjustment of a MWBS side ribbon. This type of clasp is often found on suspenders.

FIG. 104 shows the part often used to control the adjustment of brazier straps and lingerie garter belts. This type of part can also be used to adjust side ribbons in the MWBS.

FIG. 105 shows a side ribbon with an adjustable strap as found on brazier straps and lingerie garter belts.

FIG. 106 shows a side ribbon with a belt and belt buckle as the means to adjust the length of the side ribbon to fit various mattress depths. The belt can be made of a relatively soft cloth.

FIG. 107 is a short luggage strap used as a side ribbon. Also shown are a G peanut connector and a truncated triangle peanut connector.

FIG. 108 is a side ribbon made of a circular band of non stretchable satin with a stretchable elastic insert.

FIG. 109 shows use of a mesh fabric and a braided mesh fabric. This strip of material can be folded over and secured at any point to provide different lengths for its use as an adjustable side ribbon. The connector shown is a bracket peanut fastener.

FIG. 110 is a monogrammed elastic head band used as a side ribbon.

FIG. 111 shows that a strip of fabric with sets of holes along the entire strip of the fabric can be used as a side ribbon. The strip of fabric with holes can be folded over at any point and secured to determine the length of the side ribbon for fit on various mattress depths. Once secured for a particular mattress depth, the bracket peanut fastener shown in the figure would not be removed. Instead the top connector shown at the top of the figure would be released from the sheet when the sheet is changed.

FIG. 112 is the similar to FIG. 111 except the side ribbon fabric is not in a single piece. Two pieces are used here. Also a different fastener is used. This is a UT fastener.

FIG. 113 shows a military belt buckle. This figure primarily illustrates that what is used as circular belts normally can be used as two separate pieces for side ribbons. It secondarily illustrates the use of a military belt buckle as a method of length adjustment for a side ribbon.

FIG. 114 shows varieties of extension components.

FIG. 115 is the G Peanut Connector.

FIG. 116 is the M Peanut Connector.

FIG. 117 is the B Peanut Connector.

FIG. 118 is the Bracket Peanut Fastener.

FIG. 119 is the UT Peanut Fastener.

FIG. 120 is the Peanut-Shell Peanut Connector.

FIG. 121 is the Three-Turn Hallway Peanut Connector.

FIG. 122 is the Truncated Triangle Peanut Connector.

FIG. 123 is the One-Turn Hallway Peanut Connector.

FIG. 124 is the Rounded B Peanut Connector.

FIG. 125 illustrates the principle of bedding ties. This figure also shows the use of a single side ribbon to attach a bottom sheet to two different connector holders on an anchor.

FIG. 126 shows the first step in securing a bedding tie using two connectors.

FIG. 127 shows the second step in securing a bedding tie using two connectors.

FIG. 128 shows the final step in securing a bedding tie using two connectors.

FIG. 129 shows five different positions for side ribbons connected to a single bedding item.

FIG. 130 shows the main-part of an under-mattress anchor in the middle of a mattress. The figure shows a trapezoid formed by a side of the mattress, two anchor ribbons, and a side of the main-part of the anchor. The trapezoid feature and mattress/anchor relationship provide the basis for a formula to determine the length of anchor ribbons.

FIG. 131 shows the mattress and bedding references which can be matched to the corresponding mathematical references in FIG. 130.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A typical MWBS bottom bedding group includes a bottom sheet, a mattress topper, side ribbons, connectors, and a bedding anchor. First in this description, a more basic bottom bedding group is described; one that does not include a mattress topper. Then each of the major components of the Mattress Wrap Bedding System is described in detail. This is followed by miscellaneous descriptions to complete the entire Mattress Wrap Bedding System.

The Mattress Wrap Bedding System provides a wide selection of components and solutions. It is not expected that a designer of mattress wrap bedding would chose to use everything described in this specification in developing a bedding line. One of the most basic MWBS groups includes a bottom sheet, four short side ribbons that lie along the side of the mattress at the corners, and an anchor underneath the mattress. Using connectors, the side ribbons are connected to the bottom sheet and also to the anchor. Various prior art commercially available connectors can be used, and also the new peanut connectors can be used. In addition there are other types of groups. Rather than side ribbons, bedding ties can be used. In addition to bottom sheets, other bedding can be secured by the same anchor. Some configurations do not involve an anchor under the mattress. Instead, anchor elements can be put on a zippered mattress cover and even on the mattress itself. Also, anchor elements can be part of a bed frame or a platform bed. If there is no support for an anchor to be placed under a mattress, a top anchor can be used to secure the bottom anchor in place. This is called a slip-on anchor assembly.

Following are the steps in assembling a basic MWBS group. This basic configuration example is illustrated in FIG. 1.

1) First the under-mattress anchor is prepared by attachment of the anchor ribbons to the main-part of the anchor. It is placed on the foundation or the platform bed.

2) Next, the mattress is laid on top of the under-mattress anchor with its anchor ribbons. The ends of the anchor ribbons protrude from under the mattress. These ends of the anchor ribbons have loops or other holders ready to have connectors put into them. This part of the MWBS group is expected to stay in place a long time, perhaps even during the entire useful life of the mattress.

3) Then four short side ribbons are selected which fit the depth of the mattress. The side ribbons can be a strip of elastic lace with a loop at each end. The loops provide places for connectors to fit into. The loops are called connector holders. Connectors are put on both ends of the side ribbons.

4) The four side ribbons are next connected to the four anchor ribbons. The connector at the bottom end of each side ribbon is slipped into the protruding loop (or other connector holder) of an anchor ribbon. The side ribbons are now hanging loose at each corner of the mattress.

5) Once the side ribbons have been connected to the anchor, they are expected to stay in place a long time, though not as long as the anchor and anchor ribbons. Side ribbons can be removed and washed periodically as needed. Side ribbons can also be switched for a new style if desired.

6) A bottom sheet with holders for connectors at each corner is placed on top of the mattress.

7) Each side ribbon along with a top connector is brought up to a corner of the sheet. This connector at the top of the side ribbon is slipped into the connector holder on a corner of the bottom sheet.

8) The bottom sheet is regularly changed by disconnecting it from the side ribbon, putting a new sheet on the mattress and connecting the side ribbon to the fresh bottom sheet.

9) This has described the process of establishing the basic configuration example and then regularly using it to secure and change bedding.

This MWBS specification description starts with the basic configuration example and then proceeds to describe the MWBS components in detail. The following description detail is organized as follows.

1) Basic Configuration Example and Introductory Information (0146)

2) Instructions for Making Bottom Sheets (0156)

3) Introduction to Side Ribbons and Anchor Corner Pieces (0183)

4) Anchor Instructions (0193)

5) Side Ribbon Structure and Components (0219)

6) Connectors (0222)

7) Bedding Ties (0235)

8) Preferences for Side Ribbon and Bedding Tie Corner Positions (0238)

9) Other Preferred Choices for the MWBS (0239)

10) Formulas for Determining the Length of Anchor Ribbons (0245)

11) MWBS Reference Numbers, Letters, and Point Designations (0248)

12) Specification Coverage Statement (0249)

FIG. 1 is a sample MWBS group which includes an anchor main-part 01 with anchor ribbons 02. The anchor is placed under the mattress 03. A bottom sheet 04 is placed on top of the mattress and connected with side ribbon and connector combinations 05. FIG. 2 shows a corner of the bed where the bottom sheet 04 is turned over with the connector holder 08 now on top. Note that in FIG. 01, the connector holders are on the underside of the sheet. In FIG. 2 the side ribbon and the anchor ribbon combinations are shown in more detail and referenced by number 05. The individual connectors have reference number 07. The connectors could be gate rings, carabiner rings, or other connectors. FIG. 3 points out the individual side ribbon 06 and the separate connectors 07. The connectors open and close to slip into the connector holders on the side ribbons and on the sheets. In this figure the connector holder 08 on the side ribbon is a simple loop. FIG. 4 illustrates that a flat sheet 04 is a MWBS sheet by having a connector holder sewn to each corner. This is just one type of MWBS bottom sheet and one type of connector holder. FIG. 5 shows the connection of the anchor main-part 01 with an anchor ribbon 02. A connector 07 is used. The type of connector holder 08 on the end of the anchor ribbon is a simple loop. In this example the anchor connector holder 09 is merely a bridge of material made by cutting or punching two holes in the anchor fabric. The anchor is placed semi-permanently under the mattress. The bottom sheet is laid on top of the mattress. By use of connectors, the side ribbons releasably attach the bottom sheet to the anchor, until the sheet is changed for cleaning.

To prepare the bed for the under-mattress anchor shown in FIG. 1, first the mattress is lifted up from off of the foundation. Then the under-mattress anchor is placed on top of the foundation with the four anchor ribbons extending to the four bed corners. Finally, the mattress is lowered back onto the foundation. The under-mattress anchor can stay in place for as many years as desired.

On a daily basis or as often as desired, the bottom sheet can be changed. Changing a bottom sheet involves detaching the sheet from the side ribbons and reconnecting the side ribbons to a fresh sheet. The top connector ring in FIG. 3 is shown with its gate open. To change the bottom sheet, on each corner the top connector ring is opened and slipped out of the connector holder on the old sheet. The old sheet is removed and a fresh bottom sheet is laid on the bed. The gate on the connector is again opened and the connector is slipped into the connector holder on the fresh sheet. The ease of changing sheets is largely dependent upon the ease of use of the connectors. In addition to connector rings, other connectors will work. Connectors that don't require opening and closing and yet are secure are described later. These are the peanut connectors.

The bottom sheet would usually be placed on the bed with the connector holders face down on the mattress and therefore not showing. This placement hides the side ribbon assembly giving an aesthetically pleasing appearance. Also, by thus placing the holders on the underside, the sheet does not bunch up under the side ribbon. Therefore an added benefit to having the loops on the underside of the bottom sheet is that the size of the sheet does not interfere with the connection. This allows a particular sheet size to be used on a wider range of mattress depths.

For occasional cleaning, the side ribbon can be removed, washed and returned to the bed. And the side ribbon can easily be replaced with a new one. The side ribbon would be replaced if it got dirty somehow laying against the side of the mattress. The side ribbon could also be replaced if a new style was chosen for some reason. A different side ribbon might look prettier or work better depending upon its design.

An under-mattress anchor can stay in place on the foundation or platform bed for the life of the mattress. Or the anchor can be replaced. However, replacement of the under-mattress anchor would require lifting the mattress.

The possibilities for under-mattress anchors are numerous. There are various anchor materials and designs that can be used. Any article that can be placed flat under a mattress and to which four anchor ribbons can be connected can serve as an under-mattress anchor main-part. An anchor main-part connected to releasably connectable peripheral parts is called a short-extent under-mattress anchor. The main-part of such an anchor can extend to the mattress corners, but still has releasably connectable peripheral parts that extend beyond the mattress for connection with side ribbons. A full-extent under-mattress anchor has no releasably connectable corner parts. Both short-extent and full-extent under-mattress anchors can be made from textile fabrics. A relatively strong fabric such as duck cloth, also called canvas will work. Peripheral extension parts can be made from ribbon material, duck cloth, and any other appropriate fabric.

The anchor on a ship needs to be heavy in order to hold the ship in place. However, an under-mattress bedding anchor used to hold a sheet in place does not need to be heavy or otherwise super strong. The weight of the mattress provides the weight necessary to hold the anchor in place, which in turns holds the sheet in place. (Note that an exception to this is the slip-on anchor assembly.) The strength of the anchor material and structure is primarily to withstand the weight of the mattress on it. Also, if it is desired to turn a mattress over to allow even wear on the mattress, an under-mattress anchor made of strong material has some advantages. It should stay together and stay reasonably in place as the mattress is lifted up off of the anchor, turned and replaced down on top of the anchor.

MWBS bottom sheets do not have a need for the elastic edge that surrounds the perimeter of the current industry standard bottom sheets. The purpose of the elastic edge is to hold the sheet in place. In the MWBS the sheet is held in place by the anchoring system, so the elastic edge is superfluous. So a range of new designs for bottom sheets are possible in the MWBS.

1) FIG. 1 shows a MWBS bottom sheet with no seams. In appearance this bottom sheet looks like a top sheet has been laid on the bed, because the anchoring system is hidden from view.

2) In FIGS. 6 and 7 is shown a MWBS bottom sheet with one seam at each corner. The design in these figures permits a loosely fitting corner. FIG. 6 shows the sheet with the holders for connection on the underside of the sheet and thus out of view. FIG. 7 shows the same sheet turned over and laid on the bed with the connector holder facing up. This figure also has a ring connector ready to be connected to a side ribbon.

3) In FIGS. 8 and 9 is shown the standard fitted bottom sheet with the addition of connector holders for the MWBS. It can include an elastic band around the bottom perimeter of the sheet, if desired. However, there is no real purpose for an elastic band on fitted bottom sheets in the MWBS. Lifting up the corner to insert a connector for the tightly fitting corner in FIG. 8 is more difficult than lifting up the loosely fitted corner shown in FIG. 6.

4) MWBS bottom sheets can have more than one seam per corner. Shown in FIG. 10 is a triangular shape with two seams at a corner. This is another option for a loosely fitted corner.

5) FIG. 11 shows a sheet with a horizontal seam at the bottom of the sheet corner. The attachment of a connector holder would be on this broad horizontal seam at the bottom of the sheet corner. This sheet only partially extends down the side of the mattress leaving the mattress area largely exposed. A colored mattress cover with a pretty design could be used to cover the mattress sides. Then the sheet in FIG. 11 would be placed over the mattress cover.

6) Two very different types of short horizontal seams are shown in FIGS. 12 and 13. These horizontal seams are located just down from the top of the sheet corner, rather than being on the bottom of the sheet. The short horizontal seams would be about 2 to 3 inches long. These two short horizontal seam designs can provide total coverage of the mattress sides and they have an elegant look. FIG. 12 is a short straight horizontal seam. FIG. 13 is a short gathered horizontal seam.

7) In the FIGS. 6 through 11, the X's identify seams as opposed to fold lines.

The overview of the four major MWBS components has been completed. Following are descriptions for making each of the major components.

1) First, instructions for making MWBS bedding are given. Bedding is the first major MWBS component.

2) Second, an introduction is given to the second major component of the MWBS which is the side ribbon. Side ribbons are connected to connector holders on under-mattress anchors, as well as to other types of anchors. Along with this introduction to side ribbons, the connector holders on under-mattress anchors and some other anchors are described. This description includes single connector holders as well as anchor corner pieces with multiple connector holders.

3) This is followed by a complete description for making all of the various types of bedding anchors. The third component of the MWBS is the bedding anchor. As a note, all MWBS anchors are bedding anchors; as opposed to a ship's anchor, for example.

4) After the anchors, the side ribbons are revisited in greater detail.

5) Then there are descriptions of the peanut connectors and fasteners. The peanut connectors are primarily used for connecting the other major components to each other. Peanut fasteners are primarily used for fastening parts of side ribbons to themselves. Connectors and fasteners are the fourth major component of the MWBS.

6) Finally this is followed by miscellaneous descriptive information.

Bedding for the Mattress Wrap Bedding System includes any bedding that is to be secured in place over the mattress including bottom sheets, mattress pads, mattress toppers, moisture sheets, and even any top bedding to be secured. The following descriptions for MWBS bottom sheets and mattress pads apply equally to any other bottom bedding and to any top bedding for the MWBS.

1) First, specific instructions are given for fitted and loose sheets with one seam in each corner with several ways to sew in holders for connectors.

2) Then a description is given of fitted and loose sheets with two corner seams. The two seams provide different ways to attach connector holders and also provide nicely shaped triangular corners.

3) The descriptions for slanted seams at each corner are followed by descriptions for making sheet corners with very short horizontal seams.

4) Another type of MWBS sheet described is one with no seams and yet including connector holders so it can be secured. This is a flat sheet with connector holders as shown in FIG. 1. Instructions are provided for finding the location of connector holders on these flat unfitted sheets.

5) Then an example for some connector holders is described for flat sheets as well as other types of sheets.

6) This is followed by remarks about connector holders on mattress toppers with no overhang which also applies to bottom sheets which do not hang over the sides of the mattress. These mattress toppers and sheets are the same size as the mattress widths and lengths for which they are made and typically have a large perimeter seam or piping which can be used to place connector holders. In the MWBS, a bottom sheet does not need to hang over the sides of the mattress by any amount. However, a mattress cover would then be needed.

7) Finally, sheet placement relative to other bedding group components is shown by examples in FIGS. 50 through 55.

8) This will complete the description of MWBS sheets and will be followed next in line by descriptions of MWBS anchors. So now the description of making MWBS sheets will begin with the traditional fitted bottom sheet.

A MWBS fitted bottom sheet is made with one seam on each corner, similar to prior art fitted bottom sheets. FIG. 14 provides the extremely simple corner pattern for a one seam fitted corner. Cut from L1 to D1 and from R1 to D1 thus removing the blocked out square on the corner of the sheet. Join edges L1D1 to R1D1. When placing the edges together, also put in a connector holder. Then stitch down the joined edges to make the seam. Come in about ¼″ on the edges for the stitching. A corner view of this sheet is shown in FIGS. 8 and 9. Holders for a single seam can be made in various ways.

1) As one option, only one connector holder can be sewn into each corner seam. It can be placed at the very top of the seam or placed anywhere along the seam as long as it falls above the bottom edge of the mattress when the sheet is placed on the mattress.

2) Example connector holders are shown in FIGS. 15, 16, and 17. The example holders can be made from a short strip of hem tape, seam binding, ribbon, or other material. For clarity in the figures, the short strip of material has a striped pattern on one side and it has a polka dot pattern on the other side. The example connector holders are placed in a single vertical seam at each corner of the fitted sheet, as shown in the figures.

3) FIG. 15 shows a simple loop placed in the corner seam of the sheet where the ends of the short strip of material meet together.

4) FIG. 16 is an improvement over FIG. 15. The ends of the short strip of material are placed with one end below the other end. This is an improvement because it is not necessary to fiddle around trying to open up a loop to insert a connector. Instead of the second end being all of the way below the first end, it can come down only half of the width of the short strip or some other amount less than the full width of the short strip. When inserted, this makes a connector ring hang from the connector holder in a nicer position, but the opening is a bit more difficult to access for the bed maker.

5) FIG. 17 shows the use of a strip of double face satin 1½″ wide to make a connector holder. This hour glass shaped connector holder provides an opening with easy access for a connector. This particular holder also allows the connector to hang nicely from the holder. First the satin is folded in half along its length as shown in FIG. 18. End A is placed in the seam as shown in FIG. 19 and sewn. End B is unfolded and refolded the opposite way and placed in the seam below the other end. The result is shown in FIG. 20. The midpoints C and D of the satin can optionally be put together and tacked as shown in a side view of the holder in FIG. 21. The front view was shown in FIG. 17. Instead of the hour glass connector holder being attached in a seam, it can be attached to a flat area. If attached to a flat area of a sheet, the ends of the hour glass connector holder need to be properly reinforced; such as with cute buttons or little discs of strong fabric.

6) Instead of connector holders made from short strips of material, connectors can be formed from two closely placed holes. The resulting bridge of material between the two holes can be used to hold a connector. Holes can be cut or punched into a seam, to each side of a seam, and to a flat area without a seam. The edges of the holes can be strengthened with fabric glue or they can be stitched in the same manner as button holes. Also a piece of cloth with similar holes can be sewn or glued over the area. This will reinforce the bridge connector holder when tension is applied to it from the side ribbon. The reinforcement will also keep the holder from undue wear and tear as connectors are inserted and removed in changing bedding.

7) These connector holders are not just restricted to use on fitted sheets with one seam. They can be used on a variety of sheet, side ribbon, and anchor designs.

FIG. 22 provides a single seam corner pattern different than the pattern in FIG. 14. In FIG. 22 the loose version of the one seam corner is achieved by cutting the line segments D1L2 and D1R2, where the letters L and R denote left and right side points. Then these two edges are joined and stitched together for the single seam. The sheet corner looseness is determined by the size of the angle L2D1R2. FIGS. 6 and 7 show the finished look of this loosely fitted one seam corner. A bottom sheet having a loose corner makes it easier to change the sheet. Then the corner of the bottom sheet can be easily lifted to access the connector holder underneath.

In addition to single seam corners, sheets can have two seams at each corner as shown in FIG. 10. Two seams allow two attachment places for the ends of the connector holders. Another advantage of a two seam corner is that it can provide a double thickness of material to support connector holders which are put between the two seams rather than in the seams. And, the two seam corner can be chosen purely for appearance. The two seam corner is a loosely fitted corner rather than a tightly fitted corner. The one seam corner pattern given in FIG. 22 can also be used for a two seam corner. After cutting the edges D1L2 and D1R2, lay one side over the other by joining D1L2 to D1R1 and sew this first seam at these joined edges. Edges D1L1 and D1R2 will have already been joined, so they can now be stitched together too. This forms the two seams. The smaller the angle L2D1R2 is, the looser the corner will be. FIG. 23 shows two triangles, L1R2D3 and D3L2R1, which have been formed in creating the two seams. These little triangles can be trimmed off. Note that the X marks in FIG. 23 indicate where the stitching of the seams is.

Sheet corners which have two slanted seams, as shown in FIG. 10, can be made with various types of holders for insertion of connectors. Four examples are described below. The X marks are put on seam lines. Unmarked lines are either fold lines or lines indicating the bottom or top corner edge of the sheet.

1) On the left in FIG. 24 is a connector holder in the shape of a V. The center of the connector holder is stitched in place on the sheet. The point of stitching is indicated by the X. Extending up from the center X position are short strips of ribbon or seam binding. These strips form two openings for use by a connector. The end of each little strip is sewn into a corner seam. This is a good way to affix this connector holder. The wrong way is shown at the right in FIG. 24. The right connector holder has the same two short fabric strips but now placed horizontally across the triangular corner. It is very difficult to insert or remove a round ring or any other shaped connector with the two openings placed horizontal to each other. Note that the point designations provided in the left of FIG. 24 are the same as in FIG. 23 and better show where they appear when the sheet corner is placed on a mattress.

2) FIG. 25 shows a large tag placed on the corner. In this figure the tag is merely a single loop. The top of the loop is sewn to something such as hem tape. The hem tape is sewn in place across the span of the triangular sheet corner as indicated by the X stitch marks. Although a loop tag is shown in FIG. 24, tags of a single strip of material can used for connections such as Velcro®. This allows an alternative to the use of carabiner rings and similar connectors. For the alternative connection feature offered by tags, one part of the connector would be on the tag and the other half of the connector would be on the side ribbon. In addition to Velcro® type combinations, one half of a snap combination or one half of a side release buckle can be sewn into the tag. The other half of these fastening systems would then be on the side bedding ribbon. A tag is not a preferred choice if one half of a connector is on the tag and the other half of the connector is on a side ribbon.

3) FIG. 26 shows square holes placed into the double thick material within the triangle. This provides reinforcement for the edges of the holes. The edges could then be stitched such as button holes are stitched. Other reinforcement may also be considered such as backing provided by iron-on patch material.

4) The sheet corner shown in the right of FIG. 27 can either have no seams or it can have two seams. If the dashed lines in FIG. 27 are not used in the design, the sheet corner has no seams. Otherwise, the dashed lines are the location of the two seams. The single opening connector holder is merely sewn to a flat sheet corner. In the process of sewing the connector holder in place, the material of the sheet is bunched up under the connector holder. Fold lines are shown under the little holder. Even though this design has no corner seams, it can result in a loosely fitted corner depending on the location of the ends of the connector holder. However if seams are desired, they can be put in the positions indicated by the dashed lines. For this design, even when seams are used, the loose material in the sheet corner is bunched up under the connector holder. The advantage of two seams is that they provide a place to sew in the ends of the connector holder. However, the connector holder ends can be sewn directly onto a flat sheet if they are reinforced. A connector is not shown in the right side of FIG. 27 so that the fold lines can be better illustrated. A drawing to the left of the sheet corner in FIG. 27 illustrates the use of a connector in this design. In this design the single opening of the connector holder runs horizontally. An oval connector is a preferred shape here. Note that with this type of connector holder, the connector may not lie flat against the mattress when the attached side ribbon is pulled taut. This should be considered in the use of any single opening connector holder that lies horizontally. The oval shaped connector can solve this difficulty. It is undesirable to have a connector twisted and bulging under the covers of a made bed.

5) This completes the instructions and considerations for making MWBS sheets with 2 slanted corner seams.

Rather than the vertical and slanted seams just described, some MWBS bottom sheets can have short horizontal corner seams instead. Three types are shown in FIGS. 11, 12, and 13. Shown in FIG. 11 is the first type of short horizontal seam. It is made by folding under a corner to create the horizontal seam at the bottom of the sheet. All of the steps in making this seam are shown in FIGS. 28 through 37. FIG. 11 shows how this corner hangs on a mattress. The mattress is indicated by reference number 03. The bottom sheet is referenced by the number 04. The sheet does not extend to the bottom of the mattress. The connector holder is placed on the sheet horizontal seam. Because the sheet only comes down a little ways from the top edge of the mattress, the side ribbon is exposed. Following are instructions for making this sheet which has the short horizontal seam located at the bottom of the sheet corner.

1) FIG. 28 shows the corner of a sheet where the tip is point D2. A point, L3, needs to be selected as the place at which the corner is to be folded up. On the other side of the corner, a point R3 needs to be found where the line segment D2R3 is equal to the line segment D2L3. This distance can be about 3 inches or as desired. FIGS. 29 through 37 continue to illustrate how to make the horizontal seam. The dashed line segment L3R3 is the first fold line.

2) FIG. 29 shows the result of folding up the corner.

3) FIG. 30 illustrates the next step. First the point L4 needs to be selected. The point L4 determines how deep the seam will be. The distance from point L4 down to the extended line segment L3R3 is the seam depth. This is the amount of space given for placement of a connector holder, so it should be about ½ inch to 3 inches. Second, the corresponding point R4 on the other side needs to be located. It is the same distance from the extended line segment L3R3 as is L4. Now the dashed line segment L4R4 is the line on which the next fold up is made. When folded, point L3 is brought up to point L5 and point R3 touches point R5.

4) The completed fold is shown in FIG. 31. The sheet corner can be stitched at this point and a connector holder put on the seam. However, if it is desired to have the seam continue around the sheet for a more finished look, then the steps for doing this are shown in FIGS. 32, 33, and 34.

5) So, to make a broad border seam around the sheet, the little corners at points L4 and R4 can be folded up for a third folding process as illustrated in FIG. 32. To do this, find the midpoint of line segment L4L5 and mark it as point L6. Draw a perpendicular line segment, L6L7, from point L6 to the line segment L4R4. The point of intersection is point L7. Do the same thing for the other side finding points R6 and R7 and then drawing the line segment R6R7.

6) Continue the next step by observing the same figure, that is, FIG. 32. Fold the left corner up by putting point L4 on point L5. This will create a fold on the dashed line segment L6L7. Sew in place. Then fold the right corner up by putting R4 on point R5 causing a fold on the dashed line segment R6R7. Sew in place.

7) FIG. 33 shows the result of the folds from FIG. 32. Point L4 is now on top of point L5. This joint point is now named point L8. So point L8=L5=L4 in this figure. Also, point R8 is now the name of the position of the points R5 and R4. Now a connector holder can be put on this corner seam.

8) FIG. 33 is the underside of the sheet where the connector holder is placed. FIG. 34 shows the sheet corner flipped over so the connector holder no longer shows. The points L7 and R7 are on different sides in this figure because the sheet has been flipped over. The corner hangs loosely in a gentle fold from the corner top of the mattress. Note that in FIGS. 31 and 33 the corner tip, point D2, can be folded under or trimmed off as desired for a more finished appearance. This is an unfitted bottom sheet. It also could be an unfitted top sheet.

9) At this stage a further step can result in a fitted sheet: This is shown in FIGS. 35, 36, and 37.

    • a. First, select a point D4 where the sheet corner is directly over the top corner of the mattress. D4 is a corner top point of the connectable bed clothing item. (As a note of definition a corner top of a connectable bed clothing item is the point directly over the corresponding mattress corner, at the top tip of the mattress corner, when the connectable bed clothing item is placed on the mattress for use. The top tip of the mattress corner is also simply called the mattress corner top.) Find the point D5 by drawing a perpendicular line segment from point D4 to the line segment L7R7. The point D5 should be the midpoint of the line segment L7R7. The line segment D4D5 is the length of the overhang of the sheet from the top edge of the mattress. (Note that the point designation D3 is skipped and D4 is used instead because D3 is used in FIGS. 23 and 24 for an entirely different purpose.)
    • b. Second, mark the dashed line segment D4D2D5. This dashed line is not a folding line or a seam line. It is there just for lining up the next folding process.
    • c. Third, measure the length of line segment L7D4 which is the same length as line segment R7D4.
    • d. Fourth, locate point L8. The line segment L8D4 is the same length as line segment L7D4. Also the angle D5D4L7 is the same size as angle L7D4L8. Then similarly locate point R8. Note that angle L8D4R8 is a right angle. For a loose sheet corner, rather than a fitted corner, make this angle less than 90 degrees.
    • e. Fifth, fold the left side down by putting L8 on point D5. Sew in place.
    • f. Sixth, fold the right side down by putting point R8 on point D5. Sew in place.
    • g. The resulting folds will look like FIG. 36. If angle L8D4R8 was chosen to be a right angle, this is a fitted sheet corner with a very thick pad. This is the underside of the sheet where the connector holders show.
    • h. FIG. 37 shows the topside of the sheet corner from the previous FIG. 36.
    • i. There have been 3 variations of the short horizontal seam at the bottom edge of a sheet. These have been shown in FIGS. 31, 34, and 37. If the pocket depth, D4D5 is short, a long skirt can be sewn into the seam around the entire sheet. This will hide the sides of the mattress and also hide the side ribbons at the corners to enhance the appearance of the design.

A second type of a short horizontal seam is the horizontal loop seam. It is illustrated on a mattress in FIG. 12. This seam is not at the bottom of the sheet as was the previous seam. The horizontal loop seam is located just down from the top corner edge of the sheet. This seam can be made by folding the corner material of a flat sheet up on itself to form a loop. The loop is called a flap. The steps to make this seam are shown using FIGS. 38 through 42. The finished seam is shown in FIG. 12 with the connector holder face down on the mattress and out of view. This same sheet corner is shown with the connector holder position face up on the mattress in FIGS. 41 and 42; though in FIG. 42 the connector holder hasn't been attached yet. Note that the corner tip, also called the corner tail of the sheet is extremely shortened in FIGS. 38, 39, and 40 for ease in fitting the views on a single page. The actual corner tail can and should be quite long and luxurious as shown in FIGS. 12 and 41. In FIG. 42 a V shaped connector holder is shown sewn onto the middle part of the flap. The bottom part of the flap can be stabilized by tacking it to the sheet position directly below, though this isn't necessary. Alternatively, a connector holder can be sewn directly into the seam. Note that the amount of material taken up to form the flap should be as small as possible otherwise the sides of the tail will fall awkwardly.

1) FIG. 38 shows the corner of the sheet where the dashed line segment L9R9 will be the bottom of the flap. The tip of the sheet corner is indicated by the point named D2.

2) FIG. 39 shows the fold on line segment L9R9.

3) FIG. 40 shows the placement of the short horizontal seam on the open fabric. The short horizontal seam is made by stitching the line segment L10R10 in the middle of the fabric. The points L10 and R10 are chosen in the middle of the triangular area based upon the length desired for the seam and based upon the width of the flap that is needed. The seam length L10R10 can be about 2 to 3 inches long. The width distance from L10R10 to L9R9 just needs to be sufficient to place a connector holder. This finishes the sewing of the seam. The only thing left is to fold down the corner tip D2 and to add a connector holder.

4) FIG. 41 shows the sheet corner from FIG. 40 as it looks when it has been placed on a mattress. The sheet corner has an interesting look as it flows down. FIGS. 40 and 41 are the same thing except they provide different views and also the sheet corner in FIG. 41 has much more depth. As said, the sheet corner in FIGS. 38, 39, and 40 is shown as much shorter than it should actually be. FIG. 41 provides the correct length of the distance between the seam L10R10 and the tip of the sheet corner D2.

5) FIG. 42 shows the addition of a V-shaped connector holder. This holder is shown as stitched to the flap formed by the L10R10 seam. The three places required to be stitched are indicated by X marks. In FIG. 42 a connector is shown inserted into the connector holder. This double opening connector holder is sewn to the flap created by the sewing of the horizontal seam. At this point the bottom part of the horizontal seam flap L9R9 can also be sewed in place.

6) Variations of the horizontal seam described can be made. A longer horizontal seam could wrap around the corner and allow for two connector holders on each side of the corner. Thus, in addition to the central connector holder, connector holders could be on each end of the horizontal seam too. Also the horizontal seam can wrap around the entire sheet for design aesthetics.

A third type of short horizontal seam for a MWBS sheet corner is the horizontal gathered seam. It is illustrated in FIG. 13. It is like the horizontal loop seam in that it is located just down from the top corner edge. This seam is made with a gathering stitch. On the sheet corner, the place is located where it is desired to put a connector holder. Then a seam is created by a sewing a long running stitch several inches long at this place. Next, the fabric is pulled together or in other words gathered. The gathered seam is then sewn tightly in place. The short gathered seam has been finished. On the underside of the sheet, a connector holder can be sewn onto the short horizontal seam which has been made. This is a pleasant way of taking in some of the looseness at a corner and providing a place to put a connector holder.

Besides bottom sheets with corner seams, the MWBS includes bottom sheets with no corner seams. These are totally flat and thus totally unfitted bottom sheets. The sheet in FIG. 1 is a flat bottom sheet. The only issue for making MWBS flat bottom sheets is figuring out where to put the connector holders.

1) The width and length dimensions of a flat bottom sheet for the Mattress Wrap Bedding System can be whatever is desired as long as it covers the top of the mattress. And for this discussion, the flat sheet must drape over the sides of the mattress too.

2) The formulas in the following paragraphs are for finding the position of connector holders on a big flat rectangular piece of cloth in order to turn that big piece of cloth into a MWBS bottom sheet.

3) Detailed information on the derivation of the formulas is given in the following paragraphs. However, there is no need to understand how the formulas came about. In order to make a MWBS flat sheet all that is needed is an understanding of how to use the formulas. To understand how to use the formulas all that is needed is to examine examples that use the formulas. Therefore to just understand how to use the formulas, jump now to paragraphs 169 and 170. Though, reading through the following paragraphs might be helpful, even if the technical detail is skimmed over and not fully understood.

Measurements are discussed in this paragraph in order to provide introductory information for the formulas in the paragraphs immediately following this one. A flat sheet with connector holders is shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 4. The measurements HMS, HME, HCH, WM, LM, WS, and LS are described below and all of them are shown in FIG. 48.

1) The width and length of a mattress are indicated by WM×LM. W is for the width. L stands for the length. And the subscript M indicates that these dimensions are the dimensions of the mattress.

2) The width and length of the sheet are indicated by Ws×LS where the subscript S indicates that these dimensions are for the sheet.

3) The amount of sheet that hangs or drapes over the two sides of the mattress is each equal to HMS. The H stands for hang amount. As before the M refers to the mattress. In this case the S stands for side rather than sheet. So HMS is equal to the amount of the sheet that is hanging down from the top edge of the mattress to a side edge of the sheet. The amount hanging on both sides is equal.

4) The amount of sheet that hangs or drapes over the top and bottom ends of the mattress is each equal to HME. Again, the H stands for hang amount. As before the M refers to the mattress. The E indicates that this is the amount hanging over the top and bottom ends of the mattress. So HME is equal to the amount of the sheet that is hanging down from the top edge of the mattress to an end edge of the sheet. The amount of sheet hanging down at the top end of the mattress is equal to the amount hanging down at the bottom end.

5) Note that commonly HMS is not equal to HME.

6) Then the sheet dimensions are WS×LS. The width of the sheet is WS=WM+2HMS. This is the width of the mattress plus the amount of sheet falling over the left side plus the amount falling over the right side of the mattress. And length of the sheet is LS=LM+2HME. This is the length of the mattress plus the amount of sheet falling over the top of the mattress plus the amount of sheet falling over the bottom of the mattress.

7) These flat sheets can hang or drape over the edge of the mattress so that the sheet is shorter than, equal to, or longer than the mattress depth. If the amount of sheet hanging over the edge of the mattress is shorter than the mattress depth, then the sides of the mattress will show. Also part of the side ribbons will show. If the amount of sheet hanging over the edge of the mattress is equal to or greater than the mattress depth, then the mattress sides will not show and the side ribbons will not show.

8) As an example, a full bed will be used where WM×LM=54×75. The sheet is to hang over each side edge of the mattress by 20 inches. So HMS=20. Also for this example, the sheet is to hang over the top and bottom ends by 21 inches. So HME=21. This will cover a full-sized mattress that has a depth of 20 inches. The bottom sheet has a width of WS=WM+2HMS=54+2(20)=94. And the bottom sheet has a length of LS=LM+2HME=75+2(21)=117. So WS×LS=94×117.

9) In addition to observing the amount that the sheet hangs down from the edge of the mattress, we can observe the amount that the connector holder hangs down from the edge of the mattress. HCH=hang down distance of a connector holder from the top edge of the mattress. When HCH=0, the connector holder is placed on the sheet where it lies directly over the top edge of the mattress. This is the preferred position for the connector holder. However for customized implementations, consideration has been allowed for placement of a connector holder further down on the sheet. In this case HCH might be equal to 1, 2 or 3 inches or some other amount.

Many of the flat sheets commercially available are of various non-proportional sizes to the mattresses for which they are intended. As an example, for a queen-sized mattress of 60×80 the available flat sheet sizes include 87×105, 90×102, 90×104, 94×105 and 100×102. Varying flat sheet sizes are due to lack of standardization in general and also due to the varying depths of mattresses to be accommodated. To make a MWBS flat bottom sheet, connector holders are put on the corners of a flat sheet of fabric. This is like putting connector holders on a top sheet, except that top sheets have a wide seam on the top and a narrow seam on the bottom. A MWBS flat bottom sheet would have equal sized seams on the top, bottom, and both sides. Locating the position to put the connector holders is complicated by the various sheet sizes that are not proportional to a given mattress size. Locating the position of a connector holder on each sheet corner is based upon two formulas. One formula gives the number of inches to come in from the side of the sheet for the position of a connector holder. The other formula gives the number of inches to come in from the top and bottom end of the sheet for the position of a connector holder. Following are instructions for locating the position of a single connector holder at the center of each corner of a flat bottom sheet at the top edge of the mattress or down from the top edge. The reference characters below correspond to those in FIG. 43. The sheet has reference number 04 and includes the entire inside area of the outer rectangle. The mattress has reference number 03 and only covers the inside area of the inner rectangle. The mattress is underneath the sheet. It is important that all of the point and length references can be easily seen in the figure, thus the sheet is way oversized for the mattress.

1) For all four corners the number of inches to come in from the side of the sheet is:

    • IS=(WS−WM−2HCH)÷2. And for all four corners the number of inches to come in from both the top and bottom ends of the sheet is:


IE=(LS−LM−2HCH)÷2.

2) WS and LS are the width and length of the flat sheet. WM and LM are the width and length of the mattress. HCH is the number of inches that a connector holder hangs down from the top edge of the mattress. When HCH=0, the connector holder on the sheet lies directly over the top edge of the mattress corner. If HCH is not equal to zero, then the connector holder is placed further down on the sheet and lies over the mattress at some spot along the side of the mattress.

3) FIG. 43 shows a flat sheet 04 as the outermost rectangle. The dimensions of the sheet are shown in the top left corner as WS×LS. The innermost rectangle is the mattress 03 with dimensions WM×LM. The middle rectangle is shown as dashed lines and it fixes the position of the connector holders on the sheet if HCH>0. (Note that if HCH=0, the dashed rectangle and the mattress rectangle 03 would be the same rectangle.) The innermost rectangle represents the boundary of the mattress. The innermost rectangle also represents the inner boundary of the sheet. The inner boundary of the sheet is the same as the width and length dimensions of the mattress. The sheet does not need to be proportional to the mattress, but the dashed rectangle for the connector holders is, and must be, proportional to the mattress 03. In the figure, the sheet 04 is way too big for the mattress 03. If these size relationships were actually used, the sheet would not only be lying over the mattress but all over the floor too. However, by exaggerating the sheet size, the figure better illustrates the various measurements needed to place the connector holders. Note that the connector holders are not at the top of the mattress corner, but are further down. Thus HCH is not equal to zero. The distance HCH is shown by a row of stars. There is only one connector holder per corner in FIG. 43. These connector holders are called center-connector-holders (CCH). They are at the center of the mattress corner. A center-connector-holder is one type of a corner connector holder.

4) Looking at the bottom of FIG. 43 and going from left to right, we have a formula giving the makeup of the width of the sheet. The sheet width, WS, is made up of:

    • Is=the number of inches to come in from the left side of the sheet for a CCH,
    • HCH=hang down distance of a CCH from the top edge of the mattress,
    • WM=mattress width,
    • HCH=hang down distance of a CCH from the top edge of the mattress; and
    • Is=the number of inches to come in from the right side of the sheet for a CCH.
      Note that the hang down distance for the connector holders is always the same for all 4 connector holders. This maintains the proportionality of the dashed rectangle to the mattress size of width and length. In FIG. 43 we only see the top of the mattress 03, so to speak. The mattress 03 is actually underneath the sheet 04.

5) So the formula for the sheet width is:


WS=IS+HCH+WM+HCH+IS

Algebra is used to solve this equation for the value of IS:


IS=(WS−WM−2HCH)÷2.

The number of inches to come in from the sides of the flat sheet to put the connector holders is equal to IS.

6) The elements of the sheet length, LS, are shown on the right of FIG. 43:

    • IE=the number of inches to come in from the top end of the sheet for a CCH,
    • HCH=hang down distance of a CCH from the top edge of the mattress,
    • LM=mattress length,
    • HCH=hang down distance of a CCH from the top edge of the mattress, and
    • IE=the number of inches to come in from the bottom end of the sheet for a CCH.

7) The formula for the sheet length is:


LS=IE+HCH+LM+HCH+IE.

Algebra is used to solve this equation for the value of IE:


IE=(LS−LM−2HCH)÷2.

The number of inches to come in from both the top and bottom ends of the flat sheet to put a connector holder is IE.

8) The steps just given describe the location of just one connector holder per sheet corner placed at the corner center.

Opposing connector holders at each corner can be used instead of a single central connector holder. FIG. 44 shows the nomenclature for all of the connector holders. The center-connector-holder (CCH) position has just been described. The non central connector holder located at the top or bottom end of the sheet is called an end-connector-holder (ECH). The non central connector holder located on either of the two sides of the sheet is called a side-connector-holder (SCH). If a side-connector-holder has an opposing end-connector-holder, it is a corner side-connector-holder. Corner side-connector-holders and end-connector-holders could optimally be 6 to 12 inches from the corner. The following instructions are for locating corner side and end connector holders at the top edge or down from the top edge of the mattress. (Note that connector holders can be located up from the top edge of the mattress, though this is not an optimal position. This would put the connector holders inside of the inner boundary of the sheet. However, it might be useful so a sheet could be placed on more than one size of mattress.) The distance of these connector holders to the center is DTC. FIG. 45 shows the positions of the four end-connector-holders (ECH) and the positions of the four corner side-connector-holders (SCH). Note that ECHs and SCHs in opposing pairs and close to a corner are a second type of corner connector holders. The first type is a center-connector-holder.

1) The number of inches to come in from the side of the sheet to place an end-connector-holder (ECH) is called ISE. FIG. 45 shows that ISE=IS+DTC. The number of inches to come in from the top and bottom of the sheet to place an end-connector-holder (ECH) is IE.

2) The number of inches to come in from the side of the sheet to place a corner side-connector-holder (SCH) is IS. The number of inches to come in from the top and bottom ends of the sheet to place a corner side-connector-holder (SCH) is called IES. FIG. 45 shows that IES=IE+DTC.

3) DTC is equal to the corner distance. The corner distance is the distance between a corner connector holder and its corresponding corner. A corner distance is measured from the corner-vertical-line, also called the vertical line. The corner-vertical-line is the vertical line segment on the side of a mattress at the dead-on corner position from the top edge of the mattress to the bottom edge of the mattress. For a connectable bed clothing item, the corner distance is measured from this vertical line to the corner connector holder when the connectable bed clothing item has been placed on the mattress for use. This corner distance is measured along a horizontal line parallel to a side edge of the mattress. The horizontal line must contain a point on the vertical line and a point on the corner connector holder. All of this allows a corner distance to be defined for a corner connector holder on a connectable bed clothing item which hangs down from the top edge of the mattress. A center-connector-holder can be off center by a certain amount and so a center-connector-holder has a corner distance in addition to side-connector-holders and end-connector-holders having corner distances. Optimally a center-connector-holder should have a corner distance of 0 in which case it is dead-on.

A dummy mattress and dummy sheets can be used by a bedding designer to quickly understand the diagrams in FIGS. 43, 44 and 45. A cardboard box can be taped together and even painted white for effect if desired. Then it serves as a dummy mattress box. Cotton fabric remnants serve extremely well as dummy sheets. A “small” corner on a dummy sheet is exactly the same size as a “large” corner on a flat sheet purchased from a store. A corner is a corner is a corner.

1) An ink pen can be used to copy one of the FIG. 43 corner markings onto one of the corners of a dummy sheet. FIG. 46 is a drawing of such a dummy sheet draped over a corner of a dummy mattress box.

2) FIG. 47 is a drawing of a fabric remnant with ink markings on it corresponding to FIGS. 44 and 45. This fabric remnant is draped over a corner of a dummy mattress box to illustrate the way a sheet with such a corner will drape over the corner of a mattress. This shows what happens when there is a large amount of hang combined with short spacing between the opposing connector holders and the center-connector-holder. (Note that in order to get the figure to fit on the page the center-connector-holder is way too close to the end point of the sheet.)

3) FIG. 48 is another drawing of the exact same fabric remnant used in FIG. 47. This time the fabric remnant is pulled back to put the opposing end and side connector holder locations close to the top side edges of the dummy mattress box. This illustrates a small amount of hang from the top edge of the mattress to the connector holders. It also shows a larger distance between the opposing connector holders and the center-connector-holder. The little squares to denote the connector holders have been replaced with three buttons. For the connector holder in FIG. 49, only the three buttons would show on the top side of the sheet.

As an example of only one connector holder per corner as in FIG. 43, the bed will be full-sized with the standard dimensions of 54×75. Also in this example the center-connector-holders will hang down 1½ inches from the top edge of the mattress. The sheet will be a non-proportional flat sheet with dimensions of 82×97.

1) Therefore, the given information is:


WM×LM=54×75


HCH=1.5


WS×LS=82×97

2) The following formulas give the positional distances for placement of a center-connector-holder at each corner.


IS=(WS−WM−2HCH)÷2=[82−54−2(1.5)]÷2=12.5 inches


IE=(LS−LM−2HCH)÷2=[97−75−2(1.5)]÷2=9.5 inches

Thus at each corner we need to come in 12.5 inches from the side and 9.5 inches from the top or bottom of the 82×97 sheet to mark the center-connector-holder position.

3) Thus, there is going to be one connector holder on each corner.

    • a) Position the big flat cloth identifying the top and bottom of the cloth. And identify the left and right sides of the cloth. The cloth is going be a MWBS bottom sheet once the connector holders have been put on it.
    • b) There are four positions to locate on the cloth; the top left, the top right, the bottom left, and the bottom right. Each is to have one connector holder.
    • c) Use a fabric pencil to mark each of the four positions on the cloth.
    • d) For the top left connector holder position, come down 9.5 inches from the top end of the cloth and at the same time come in 12.5 inches from the left side of the cloth. Mark this position on the cloth.
    • e) For the top right connector holder position, come down 9.5 inches from the top end of the cloth and at the same time come in 12.5 inches from the right side of the cloth. Mark this position on the cloth.
    • f) For the bottom left connector holder position, come up 9.5 inches from the bottom end of the cloth and at the same time come in 12.5 inches from the left side of the cloth. Mark this position on the cloth.
    • g) For the bottom right connector holder position, come up 9.5 inches from the bottom end of the cloth and at the same time come in 12.5 inches from the right side of the cloth. Mark this position on the cloth.

4) Draw a rectangle on a piece of paper to represent your big cloth. Then for each connector holder position, write down the distance to come in from the side and the distance to come down from the top end or to come up from the bottom end. Then use this as a guide to mark your cloth with a fabric pencil.

5) Note that instead of having HCH>0, having HCH=0 will put the center-connector-holders directly on the top edge of the mattress at the corner. Having HCH=0 is better than having HCH greater than 0, such as being equal to 1.5 as in this example. If HCH is not zero, the selection of side ribbon lengths can be difficult because it is not directly related to just the depth of a mattress.

Instead of a single center corner connector holder, this example provides for opposing connector holders on each corner as in FIG. 45. For this example each opposing connector holder is spaced 6 inches back from the mattress corner. Opposing connector holders may give a nicer tension across the corner of the mattress by having two side ribbons attached at the sides of the corners, rather than a single side ribbon in the center of the corner. For the opposing connector holders the distance from the holder to the center is 6 inches and thus DTC=6. The distance that the connector holders will hang down from the top edge of the mattress is 2 inches, so HCH=2. In this example the mattress is queen-sized with dimensions of 60×80. The sheet size has dimensions of 94×105.

1) First, we figure the values of IS and IE.


WM×LM=60×80


HCH=2


WS×LS=94×105


IS=(WS−WM−2HCH)÷2=[94−60−2(2)]÷2=15 inches


IE=(LS−LM−2HCH)÷2=[105−80−2(2)]÷2=10.5 inches

2) Second, we determine the positions of the end-connector-holders (ECH).


ISE=IS+DTC=15+6=21 inches


IE=10.5 inches

Thus at each corner we need to come in 21 inches from the side and 10.5 inches from the top or bottom of the 94×105 sheet to mark the 4 end-connector-holder positions.

3) Third, we determine the positions of the opposite side-connector-holders (SCH).


IS=15 inches


IES=IE+DTC=10.5+6=16.5 inches

Thus at each corner we need to come in 15 inches from the side and 16.5 inches from the top or bottom of the 94×105 sheet to mark the 4 corner side-connector-holder positions.

4) Thus, there are going to be two connector holders on each corner.

    • a) Position the flat big cloth identifying the top and bottom of the cloth. And identify the left and right sides of the cloth. The cloth is going be a MWBS bottom sheet once the connector holders have been put on it.
    • b) There are four corners on the cloth; the top left corner, the top right corner, the bottom left corner, and the bottom right corner. Each is to have two connector holders.
    • c) Use a fabric pencil to mark each of the eight positions on the cloth.
    • d) For the top left corner, there will be a connector holder back from the left side of the cloth. The left side connector holder is a corner side-connector-holder. And there will be a connector holder located down from the top end of the cloth. The top end connector holder is a corner end-connector-holder.

To find the side-connector-holder position for the top left corner, come down 16.5 inches from the top end of the cloth and at the same time come in 15 inches from the left side of the cloth. Mark this position on the cloth.

To find the end-connector-holder position for the top left corner, come down 10.5 from the top end of the cloth and at the same time come in 21 inches from the left side of the cloth. Mark this position on the cloth.

    • e) For the top right corner, there will be a connector holder back from the right side of the cloth. The right side connector holder is a corner side-connector-holder. And there will be a connector holder located down from the top end of the cloth. The top end connector holder is a corner end-connector-holder.

To find the side-connector-holder position for the top right corner, come down 16.5 inches from the top end of the cloth and at the same time come in 15 inches from the right side of the cloth. Mark this position on the cloth.

To find the end-connector-holder position for the top right corner, come down 10.5 from the top end of the cloth and at the same time come in 21 inches from the right side of the cloth. Mark this position on the cloth.

    • f) For the bottom left corner, there will be a connector holder back from the left side of the cloth. The left side connector holder is a corner side-connector-holder. And there will be a connector holder located up from the bottom end of the cloth. The bottom end connector holder is a corner end-connector-holder.

To find the side-connector-holder position for the bottom left corner, come up 16.5 inches from the bottom end of the cloth and at the same time come in 15 inches from the left side of the cloth. Mark this position on the cloth.

To find the end-connector-holder position for the bottom left corner, come up 10.5 from the bottom end of the cloth and at the same time come in 21 inches from the left side of the cloth. Mark this position on the cloth.

    • g) For the bottom right corner, there will be a connector holder back from the right side of the cloth. The right side connector holder is a corner side-connector-holder. And there will be a connector holder located up from the bottom end of the cloth. The bottom end connector holder is a corner end-connector-holder.

To find the side-connector-holder position for the bottom right corner, come up 16.5 inches from the bottom end of the cloth and at the same time come in 15 inches from the right side of the cloth. Mark this position on the cloth.

To find the end-connector-holder position for the bottom right corner, come up 10.5 from the bottom end of the cloth and at the same time come in 21 inches from the right side of the cloth. Mark this position on the cloth.

5) Draw a rectangle on a piece of paper to represent your big cloth. Then for each connector holder position, write down the distance to come in from the side and the distance to come down from the top end or to come up from the bottom end. Then use this as a guide to mark your cloth with a fabric pencil.

6) Again, as stated in the previous example, having HCH not equal to 0 is a poor choice.

This paragraph describes how to make one kind of a connector holder that can be used on flat bottom sheet. The positions for placement of connector holders are shown in FIGS. 43, 44 and 45 as little squares. These squares have been turned in FIGS. 46 and 47 and now appear as diamond shaped. FIG. 48 replaces these squares and diamonds with sample connector holders as they appear on the topside of a sheet. The topside of the sheet has 3 buttons showing. FIG. 49 shows the relationship of the buttons sewn on top of the sheet to the parts of the connector holder 08 sewn to the underneath of the sheet. The buttons on the topside of the sheet are shown in the left of the figure. The connector holder on the underside of the sheet is shown in the right of FIG. 49. A round gate ring is shown as the connector 07. A portion of a side bedding ribbon 06 is shown looped over the gate ring. The three button connector holder is just one type of connector holder that can be used on a flat sheet to make it a MWBS bottom sheet. Following are instructions on how to make this connector holder.

1) Cut a strip of ½″ wide hem tape or ribbon material. Each strip can be 3 to 6 inches long. Fabric glue can be applied to the ends of the strip to stop fraying. Or, if the material that the strip is made from melts rather than burns, the ends may be heat sealed instead. One source of heat is an open flame such as a lit match. If the ends don't actually enter the flame, they won't brown. The ends simply melt. This is a quick way to stop the ends from fraying. Other heat sources might be safer than an open flame, however. Another option is to simply fold the ends under and let them be sewn in place along with the buttons.

2) Select small buttons about 6/16″ diameter.

3) Put the center of the fabric strip on the point where the connector holder is to go on the sheet. This strip should be placed on the underside of the sheet.

4) On the underside of the sheet, a button can be put on this spot over the hem tape. This would result in a button on both the underside of the sheet and the topside of the sheet. Another option is to put a small cloth disc over this center point of the fabric strip. In FIG. 49, a small cloth disc is shown. It can be a disc punched out of duck cloth or some other strong material. The disc can be sealed with fabric glue. A small appliqué could also be used.

5) Next, put a button on the topside of the sheet at the same position. Instead of a button, a small appliqué could be used on the topside of the sheet. In FIGS. 48 and 49, a button is used on the topside of the sheet.

6) For the combination chosen in FIG. 49, sew the topside button, sheet, hem tape strip, and cloth disc together at the same spot. The middle spot of the connector holder has now been securely sewn in place.

7) Finally, fold under each of the ends of the hem tape strip about 6/16″. Sew down each end of the hem tape strip with buttons, discs or appliqués in the same way as the middle was sewn in place. By moving the ends up from the middle before sewing, the connector holder can be in the V shape shown in FIG. 49. The V shape makes it easy to insert a connector.

8) Note that if small cloth discs are used they can be made by a heavy duty paper punch capable of cutting through duck cloth. A hand paper punch doesn't generally work. A punch that produces holes in either 11/32″ or 13/32″ would work alright. The entire disc needs to have a fray stopping liquid applied. Since a sheet will be washed often, the connector holder needs to be machine washable.

The underside of the sheet is the side where the connector holders are sewn. Then, on the topside of the sheet the connector holders don't show. However, it is possible to make a bed with the sheet placed on the bed with the connector holders up. However, the side ribbon connection will show and is not very attractive. Another consideration is that when the connector holders are placed on top, any length of the sheet longer than the mattress depth will get bunched up under the side ribbon assembly. Therefore, it is preferable to place the sheet with the connector holders hidden from view.

Choosing a specific design for a MWBS sheet is based upon both function and appearance. The corner of a MWBS sheet should be easy to lift in order to access the connector holders underneath. If the sheet is fitted, it is necessary to reach up under a snug corner to disengage the connector from the connector holder when changing the bedding. However, the corners don't have to be completely flat as in the flat sheet just described, but can be somewhat loose as provided by the other options for sheet designs which have loosely fitting corner seams.

FIG. 50 shows four individual bedding items to be placed on a mattress. Using arrows, FIG. 50 also indicates the order in which the bedding items are to be placed on the mattress. FIG. 51 shows a bed corner after all of the bedding items have been assembled on the mattress along with the side ribbons and connectors.

1) First, the zippered mattress cover 12 is slipped onto a mattress. Since the cover will be on the mattress a long time, it should be beautiful with choices of designs, colors and materials. This bedding group does not have an under-mattress anchor. Instead this zippered mattress cover has connector holders and serves as the anchor.

2) Second, a mattress pad 11 which provides loft and thus additional comfort is placed on the mattress cover. This loft mattress pad has a large piped edge where hidden connector holder loops 08 have been placed. They are opposing connector holders on each side of the corners.

3) Third, a moisture sheet 10 with a striped pattern and in the shape of an octagon is placed on the mattress cover. It also has opposing corner connector holders 08.

4) The final bed cloth to be placed on the mattress cover over the other bedding items is a bottom sheet 04. This sheet is shown as though it were made of transparent chiffon so that the other bedding items show through it. This bottom sheet has loosely hung corners with two seams forming a triangle at each corner. The bottom sheet connector holder 08 has a V shape. The bottom sheet extends below the edge of the mattress.

Two mattress toppers, reference numbers 10 and 11, are shown in FIGS. 50 and 51. These toppers only cover the top of the mattress with no overhang at all. Such bedding has a seam running around the entire perimeter edge where connector holders can be sewn. However, some mattress toppers do have an overhang in the form of skirts. MWBS mattress toppers with skirts can have their skirts designed in the same manner as used for the sheets described above.

For a mattress topper which includes any bedding that lays on top of the mattress with no overhang, the connector holders are directly sewn into the top perimeter seam. The two mattress toppers, reference numbers 10 and 11, have opposing connector holders on each corner. One of the connector holders 08 is pointed out for each topper in FIG. 50. Both opposite connector holders are shown for a corner in FIG. 51. In the mattress topper with reference number 11, the connector holders have been made by forming loops. The fancy design of the perimeter seam was chosen to hide the loops. However for the mattress topper with reference number 10, the connector holders are obvious. These differences are simply design choices. For mattress topper 10 the ends of a short strip of ribbon material are sewn to the mattress topper leaving an opening for a connector. Note that the width of the ribbon used for connector holders needs to accommodate the smallest round gate ring or other connector that will be used to fit into the opening.

Instead of using loops and ribbon strips as connector holders, tags can be sewn into the perimeter seam of the mattress pad or other topper. Holes can then be cut or punched into the tags. Also, an extended seam edge on the mattress pad could allow for reinforced holes placed directly in the extended seam. The bridges between these holes could then be used as connector holders for side ribbons.

One consideration in the design of Mattress Wrap Bedding is the number of connector holders to put on each corner. Optimally, the corner of a sheet and other such bedding can have either a single center-connector-holder or it can have two opposing connector holders. If a design wanted to accommodate all possibilities then the bedding could have both a center and also opposing connector holders. FIG. 51 shows a mattress pad 11 and another mattress topper 10. Both of these mattress toppers have two opposing connector holders and no central connector holder. On the other hand, the sheet 04 has only one centrally placed connector holder on each corner. This configuration can be used in a bedding line where infrequently changed bed clothes, such as mattress toppers, are secured using opposing corner connector holders. One of the mattress toppers could be to add softness while the other topper could be used to provide moisture protection. Both of these mattress toppers can be anchored as shown in FIG. 51. If desired, the two side ribbons close to each other on each side of the corner could be put in a sleeve. Sheets which are changed frequently could be made with a single connector holder positioned centrally on the corner. The bottom sheet could be given exclusive right to the central area of the corner. Thus changing the sheet would not require getting mixed up with other side ribbons.

Every sheet, mattress pad, and other bedding item has its own side ribbons. But the side ribbons for multiple bedding items can share the same connector on an anchor. An example of this is shown in FIG. 51 where the bottom ends of the side ribbons for the mattress toppers are using the same connector.

In addition to mattress toppers, a bottom sheet can be made like the mattress toppers just described. The bottom sheet does not need to hang over the sides of the mattress. The sheet can simply lie on top of the mattress with the same dimensions as the mattress width and length. If such a sheet is used in the MWBS, then it needs to have a large perimeter seam for connector holders the same as just described for mattress toppers. In this case the bottom sheet would not cover the sides of the mattress. The sides can be covered by enclosing the mattress in a fancy zippered cover to provide both protection and beauty.

A zippered mattress cover in MWBS is not only for protection of the mattress, but can also serve as an anchor. Instead of an under-mattress anchor, a zippered mattress cover can be used as the anchor. A zippered mattress cover with connector holders is shown in FIGS. 50 and 51. The mattress cover has reference number 12. Its zipper has reference number 14. And the anchor corner pieces sewn into the mattress cover have reference number 13. They are called jewelry box corners because of their similarity to the decorative gold metal corners on fancy wooden jewelry boxes. FIG. 51 shows a side ribbon connecting the bottom sheet to a connector holder in a jewelry box corner piece on the zippered mattress cover. Also shown are the mattress toppers connected to the zippered mattress cover. In FIG. 51, two different types of connector holders are shown in the jewelry box corner piece 13. Two of the three connector holders are made by placing two holes in the material. The third connector holder is a loop shown on the left. This jewelry anchor corner piece is sewn into the mattress cover and is part of the mattress cover.

MWBS sheets and other bedding items have connector holders on them so they can be anchored. There are two basic types of connector holders for bedding. The first type includes one or more ribbon strips, the bridging material between two holes, and a loop. The second type is a tag:

1) Holes can be cut or punched directly in sheets, bedding anchors, and bedding ribbons. Carabiner rings and other connectors can slip through these holes. The bridges of material between two holes are used as connector holders in FIGS. 5 and 26. Ribbon strips and loops sewn onto a sheet, anchor, or a bedding ribbon can be also used to hold a connector. Note these can be sewn onto the top of anchors in addition to being sewn to the edges. The ends of a loop meet together. The ends of a ribbon strip do not meet. Some of the ribbon strips connector holders which have been shown are in FIGS. 2, 16, 17, and 49. Some of the loops used for holders for connectors are in FIGS. 3, 5, 15, and also in FIG. 51 on the left of the jewelry corner piece 13. The use of widely spaced holes, broad loops, and wide ribbon strips allows the connector to lie flat and not unduly tug on its associated bedding item. However, if the distance is too great, smaller connectors can't be used.

2) The other type of connector holder for the MWBS is a tag. Tags can be sewn onto sheets. They can also be sewn to the ends of side ribbons, anchor ribbons and even to anchors. The tag can be fitted with one half of a fastener, such as one half of a strong snap. The other half of the fastener would be on the corresponding side ribbon or other alternate bedding component. In our snap example, this would be the other half of the strong snap. Another example would be hook and loop combinations, such as the brand Velcro®. Another use of a tag would be to provide a place to put a hole or holes. A single round hole could be used by a garter clip and other types of clips. A rectangular hole could be used by a bulldog clip. A single hole or double holes could be used by rings. Alternatively, the tag can be of extremely soft, thin material usable by a garter clip similar to garter clips on sheet straps and sheet suspenders. Putting holes in tags and then sewing these tags into sheets and other MWBS bedding takes the place of putting holes directly in the bedding item.

The basic instructions for making MWBS bottom sheets has been completed. Even though the instructions for making MWBS sheets have been given for specific types of bedding such as mattress pads and fitted and flat bottom sheets, these instructions also directly apply to any bedding to be anchored over a mattress. This includes top sheets and blankets which can be anchored just at the bottom end. Before giving instructions for making anchors, an introduction to side ribbons and anchor corner pieces follows. FIGS. 52 and 53 show an anchor corner piece as it is put on a foundation before the mattress has been set on top of it. FIG. 54 shows this corner piece with the mattress on top of it and just the connector holders 17 protruding out from under the mattress. FIG. 54 also shows two very different types of side ribbons. In order to better illustrate the placement of the side ribbons, the sheet is shown with the wrong side up. The connector holder 23 is on top of the sheet. It has a flap 22 to cover it. The length of the sheet 04 is shorter than the depth of the mattress 03. It is shorter so that the sheet doesn't bunch up under the side ribbon which it can do when the sheet is placed with the wrong side up like this.

The sheet in FIG. 54 has a two seam corner which forms a triangle. The central connector holder is a loop which has reference number 23. The sheet has reinforced opposing connector holders, only one of which is shown. The opposing connector holder is on the right side and is made from two square holes in the material with reference number 28. The triangular corner is pointed out as reference number 20. The central connector holder 23 is sewn across an upper area of the triangular corner piece of the sheet. The sheet has reference number 04. The seam where the central connector holder loop has been sewn has reference number 21. In this particular case, a side ribbon cover with reference number 22 has also been attached in the seam. For those designs where it is desired that the side ribbons be on top of the sheet, the side ribbons will look nicer if they have a side ribbon cover over them. However, as stated before, having the side ribbons on top of the sheet is probably not the best choice.

The central side ribbon is a circular band of stretch lace. It has reference number 24. This side ribbon is connected to the sheet and anchor by two peanut connectors. Peanut connectors do not have an opening and closing mechanism. The shape of the peanut connectors is what maintains their hold in bedding ribbons. The connector at the top of the side ribbon is a G peanut connector with reference number 25. The connector at the bottom of the side ribbon is an M peanut connector with reference number 26. The G peanut connector is placed in a flipped over position in this figure. Note that the top part of the G Peanut connector is wide. Also note that the bottom part of the G peanut connector and both ends of the M peanut connector are narrow. The top part of the G peanut connector is wide because this part is going to be unhooked every time the sheet is changed. However, the narrow bottom end of the G peanut connector will remain in place every time the sheet is changed. Also both narrow ends of the M peanut connector will not be disengaged whenever the sheet is changed. When a sheet is changed, the top of the G peanut connector will be unhooked from the sheet connector holder 23. The side ribbon will then lie loose while the sheet is changed. As the side ribbon is lying loose, the bottom part of the G peanut connector needs to stay hooked into the top part of the side ribbon. Also the M peanut connector needs to stay connected to the bottom of the side ribbon and to the anchor connector holder 17. The narrow openings on the G and M peanut connectors keep them from inadvertently becoming unhooked while the sheet is being changed.

One method of adjusting the length of a side ribbon is shown in FIG. 54 by side ribbon 24 made of stretch lace. Also, elastic bands are an efficient way of providing for the adjustment of length. Another method is illustrated by side ribbon 30. This is an adjustment strap as found on hockey garter straps and suspender straps. The side ribbon adjustment strap 30 has a simple loop connector holder 31 on the top end. The bottom end of the adjustment strap is a natural connector holder. In selecting the type of adjustment to use, an important note is that all four side ribbons on a sheet when the bed is made don't have to be super tight for the bottom sheet to have a taut appearance over the mattress. A surprising amount of looseness in the side ribbons can be tolerated for a nicely made bed.

Adjustment can be achieved purely by adjustment features of the side ribbon such as described in the previous paragraph. However, it should be noted that side ribbons don't have to be adjustable. The adjustment of length can be achieved by using different sized connectors chosen for the depth of the mattress. Also, adjustment of length can be achieved by a combination of side ribbon adjustment features and choice of different sizes of connectors. If it is desired to use different sized connectors, label information can be used to indicate connector sizes or provide bedding line names. Connector 29 illustrates that a round aluminum carabiner ring can have label information imprinted on it. The carabiner ring does not need to be round. An oval carabiner ring is shown at reference number 32. Different sizes of carabiner rings can be used as the key element in the length of a side ribbon assembly to fit particular mattress depths. Mattress depths vary by 1″ intervals rather than amounts less than an inch. Thus sizing for side ribbon connectors may be based on one inch increments. As an example of using difference sized connectors for providing different side ribbon assembly lengths, consider a side ribbon in a nonadjustable 9 inch size with options of carabiner rings of length 1″, 2″, 3″ and even 4″. Then with carabiner rings at both ends of the ribbon, the length of the side ribbon assembly can extend to 17 inches. This is the 9 inch basic ribbon length with two 4 inch connectors on each end of the ribbon. The side ribbon assembly can be further adjusted in this example if the side ribbon is made of elastic. And multiple connectors can be added to the ends of side ribbons. If long connectors are used, an oval shape is preferable over a round shape.

Completing the examination of FIG. 54, at the top of the sheet is a side panel 27 to reinforce the placement of connector holders on the sheet. In this side panel, the bridge of material between two holes 28 is used as a connector holder. The mattress 03 is shown at the bottom of the figure. There are three connector holders 17 protruding from under the mattress. These are extended from an anchor corner piece which is shown in FIGS. 52 and 53 without the mattress lying on top of it.

FIG. 52 shows an anchor corner piece 15 on the end of an anchor ribbon. The anchor corner piece shown is a triple single-loop corner piece. It is one type of a triple singleton anchor corner piece. The anchor ribbon extends from the main-part of an under-mattress anchor. The position of the main-part of an under-mattress anchor is shown in FIG. 1. However unlike FIG. 54, there are no anchor corner pieces in FIG. 1. Though not shown in FIG. 1, the anchor ribbons there have only one connector holder on their ends. In contrast, the anchor corner piece in FIG. 52 has three single-loop connector holders 17. The anchor corner piece is placed with part of it on top of the corner of the box foundation, platform bed or whatever foundation is used. Only the single-loops of the anchor corner piece go beyond the edge of the foundation. The rest of the under-mattress anchor being placed on top of the central area of the foundation. Because the anchor corner piece is releasably connectable to the anchor ribbon, the under-mattress anchor is a short-extent anchor. If the anchor corner piece were permanently sewn into the anchor body, the under-mattress would be a full-extent anchor. Then the mattress is placed on top and just the connector holders 17 of the anchor corner piece protrude from under the mattress as shown in FIG. 54.

FIG. 53 shows that it is not necessary for the body of the corner piece to be located exactly at the corner of the mattress. The connector holders 17 can be extended out to where the actual corner of the mattress is. This allows for slight variations in mattress size. Also, FIG. 52 shows that if the opposing connector holders are not to be used, they can be laid down under the mattress so they don't protrude from under the mattress. This is also true for the center-connector-holder. The arrows 18 in this figure indicate the laying down of these ribbon holders during their placement on the foundational support of the mattress. The distance 19 in FIG. 53 is the distance that the connector holders can be extended if the corner piece falls short of the mattress edge.

To install an under-mattress anchor, the mattress is first taken off of the foundational support which can be box springs, a platform bed, and other types of foundations. Under usual circumstances this is a onetime positioning of the under-mattress anchor when it is placed on the foundation. If the anchor is a short-extent under-mattress anchor, first the main-part is placed on the foundation. Then anchor ribbons and/or anchor corner pieces are attached and positioned. Then the mattress is picked up and placed on top of the anchor and foundational support. One type of anchor corner piece is shown in FIGS. 52 and 53. It has reference number 15 in FIG. 52. In these figures, the foundational support has reference number 16.

FIG. 55 illustrates the placement of an under-mattress anchor with respect to the other major components of the MWBS. At the bottom of the figure is the made bed 33. The sequence of making the bed is depicted above reference number 33. First, an empty platform bed or any type of platform is available. This is referenced by number 16. Next, an under-mattress anchor is placed on the platform. The under-mattress anchor in FIG. 55 is a single ring anchor 34 which consists of a single O-ring with anchor ribbons. Other versions of the ring anchor are made by adding more rings to form various shapes. Any shape that allows for extension to the four mattress corners and, if desired, to the two mattress sides can be used. After the under-mattress anchor is positioned on the platform, the mattress 03 is laid on top of the under-mattress anchor and platform. The under-mattress anchor stays in this position. It is not disturbed when the sheets are changed. Next, the bottom sheet 04 is put over the mattress. This particular bottom sheet has a row of three connector holders. The bridge of material between two holes qualifies as a connector holder. Note that one hole placed near the edge of a piece of material can also be used to insert a connector, although having just one hole may cause the connector to be at an angle with the mattress. Multiple sets of holes allow for the bottom sheet to fit on various depths of mattresses. Therefore adjustment for the depth of a mattress includes a string of connector holders at different positions on a sheet corner in addition to the adjustment features of a side ribbon, use of extension components, and also connectors with different lengths. Finally for making the completed bed, the side ribbons 06 are connected to the connector holders on the sheet and the connector holders on the ends of the anchor ribbons 35 via the connectors 07. The anchor ribbons 35 have single loop connector holders. The single loop connector holder 17 has one side of the loop narrower than the other. This allows easy insertion of a connector when making a bed. The made bed 33 shows the connector holders on the anchor ribbons not yet attached to the connectors. Also, in reference 33 the mattress lines are not shown. Thus the sheet is on top of the mattress, the mattress is on top of the under-mattress anchor, the under-mattress anchor is on top of the platform, and the side ribbons with connectors attach the bottom sheet to the anchor ribbons.

The next paragraphs describe the making of MWBS anchors and parts of anchors including anchor ribbons and anchor corner pieces. This will later be followed by instructions for making MWBS side ribbons, MWBS peanut connectors and fasteners, and then general instructions and information.

An anchor provides a place to connect and stabilize a side ribbon. The side ribbon extends upward from the anchor to the bottom sheet and holds the sheet in place. There are several types of MWBS anchors. These include under-mattress anchors, zippered mattress cover anchors, and slip-on anchor assemblies. Also, the mattress itself can serve as an anchor for bedding when the mattress has loops or other connector holders added to its corners. Further, specially designed fabric pieces having at least one connector holder can be attached to the corners of a conventional bed frame so that the bed frame itself can serve as an anchor. Besides mattresses with connector holders, bed frames can also have integrated connector holders as part of their structure and so serve as bedding anchors in that way. Fabric pieces can be attached to these bed frames made with rigid integrated connector holders. This also applies to platform beds. When attached to an integrated connector holder, a fabric piece can provide a more easily used flexible connector holder. The under-mattress anchors come in various types including ring anchors, solid fabric anchors, polygonal anchors, and mesh anchors. Cloth bedding anchors should be attractive even though they may only be seen once. And certainly the corner parts of cloth anchors should be attractive because these will be seen when the bed is made.

The anchors illustrated so far are an under-mattress anchor 01 in FIG. 1, a zippered mattress cover anchor 12 in FIGS. 50 and 51, and an O-ring anchor 34 in FIG. 55. We have seen two types of anchor corner pieces. The jewelry box corner piece 13 is shown on the zippered mattress cover anchor in FIGS. 50 and 51. The triple single-loop anchor corner piece 15 is shown in FIGS. 52, 53 and 54.

Several features of an under-mattress anchor are the material used to make it, the location of connector holders on the anchor, and the shape of the anchor. An under-mattress anchor and the side ribbons connected to it are usually stabilized by the weight of the mattress on top of the under-mattress anchor. The weight and strength of the material used to make an under-mattress anchor are fairly unimportant for making the side ribbons stable. The second feature of an under-mattress anchor is the location of the connector holders on the anchor. The position of the connector holders needs to correspond to the four corners of the mattress. Two connector holders may also be needed to correspond to the two sides of the mattress when it is desired to secure some bedding from the mattress sides. However, note that the O-ring under-mattress anchor only has one connector holder. The third under-mattress anchor feature mentioned is its shape. The actual shape of the anchor is inconsequential except for design aesthetics. FIG. 56 is the main-part of an irregular shaped six sided under-mattress anchor. The body of the anchor main-part has reference number 37. The connector holder locations which point to the four corners of the mattress are indicated by reference number 38. The locations of the two connector holders which can be used in the securing of bedding items at the side of the mattress are indicated by reference number 39. A couple of connectors 07 are shown attached to connector holders 17. An anchor ribbon 02 is shown attached to one of the connectors.

The main-part of the next under-mattress anchor is shown in FIG. 57. It is a simple polygonal anchor 40. A large round connector 07 is pointed out. There are two square and two oval connectors also shown. The framework of a simple polygon anchor is a flat, closed structure with connected straight line segments from multiple polygons, where the polygons can be different from each other in shape. The polygons can be regular or irregular, they can be simple or complex, and they can be concave or convex. The frame line segments can be bands of material such as ribbon fabric or cord. Alternatively, the anchor frame can be an integrated structure. For example, a thin sheet of plastic with polygonal holes can be used as an under-mattress anchor.

FIG. 58 is an example of a full-extent under-mattress anchor 41. The body of full-extent anchors extends to all 4 corners of the mattress. The body does not have to extend to the sides to be called a full-extent anchor, only the corners. These anchors do not have any releasably connectable anchor ribbons and they don't have any releasably connectable anchor corner pieces. Instead full-extent anchors have permanently attached connector holders that extend beyond the mattress corners. These can be permanently attached single connector holders or permanently attached elaborate anchor corner pieces with connector holders. Short-extent under-mattress anchors have releasably connectable peripheral parts to the four corners. Full-extent under-mattress anchors don't have releasably connectable peripheral parts to the corners, but may have releasably connectable parts to the sides of the mattress. The member of a full-extent under-mattress anchor that extends to a corner can be a permanently attached anchor ribbon. FIG. 59 has an x-cross full-extent anchor 42. The connector holder coming from the top side of the x-cross anchor could be an anchor ribbon 35 or a very long connector holder 17. Releasably connectable anchor ribbons and other releasably connectable peripheral parts can only come from the sides of full-extent anchors. Though not shown in the figure, any anchor having a connector holder on one side would have a connector holder on the other side too. The anchor corner piece 13 in FIG. 59 is a jewelry box anchor corner piece. Both anchors in FIGS. 58 and 59 are shown as lying on a platform bed or other foundational support 16.

Consideration should be given to using somewhat strong material to make full-extent anchors. Duck cloth also called canvas, outdoor fabrics, and strong denim would be good options. If a lighter fabric is used, then reinforcement of the corners with a stronger fabric would be appropriate.

FIG. 60 has a short-extent anchor main-part 43 made of mesh material along with an odd assortment of releasably connectable anchor ribbons and anchor corner pieces for illustration purposes. The holes in mesh usually have the same shape throughout. The holes are generally small in size and usually either circular, oval, square or rectangular. The mesh fabric has a couple of advantages. Mesh fabric is readily available. It is typically used for laundry bags. Another advantage of using mesh fabric in a bedding anchor is that connectors can be hooked anyplace in the mesh.

A feature of the MWBS illustrated in FIG. 60 is that releasably connectable anchor ribbons can be made longer by adding extension components 44. In the MWBS, anchor ribbons are typically not stretchable to adjust the length to fit various sizes of mattresses. However, other adjustment methods can be used and also releasably connectable anchor ribbons are extendable. An anchor ribbon can be exactly sized for a particular under-mattress anchor main-part size and mattress size. Alternatively, a releasably connectable anchor ribbon can make use of extension components. The ability to add and remove extensions from a releasably connectable anchor ribbon allows the anchor to be used on all different mattress sizes. An extension to a releasably connectable anchor ribbon can be another releasably connectable anchor ribbon.

The top left corner 45 of the main-part of the mesh anchor is partially extended to the corner. Mesh can also be used in full-extent under-mattress anchors. Mesh can be used in anchor corner pieces, releasably connectable or not. A releasably connectable mesh anchor corner piece is shown as reference number 46. Any of the mesh holes serve as places to slip in connectors. The releasably connectable mesh anchor corner piece 46 is shown in FIG. 62 as it would appear if pulled up by connectors attached to side ribbons. The side ribbons are not shown, only the connectors.

Another type of anchor corner piece 47 is at the top left corner of the anchor. Any anchor corner piece is a part of the anchor to which it is either connected to or permanently attached to. The anchor corner piece 47 is a releasably connectable anchor corner piece connected to the anchor main-part 43 by a connector 07. It is shown in FIG. 65 as it would appear if it had connectors from side ribbons bringing the flaps of the corner piece up the sides of the mattress. As side ribbons are connected to the sides of lying down anchor corner pieces, the sides of these corner pieces are brought up into position against the side of the mattress. This anchor corner piece 47 and the mesh anchor corner piece 46 are different from the jewelry box anchor corner piece. In contrast, the jewelry box anchor corner piece 13 does not lie flat when unattached from a side ribbon, but is sewn into a permanent upright position.

Anchor corner piece 48 at the bottom left of FIG. 60 has three single loops. It has an uneven type of single loop 49 which makes it easy to insert connectors. The other type of loop 17 shown in FIG. 52 involves some difficulty in separating the two sides of the loop to insert a connector. The uneven loop 49 is also shown in FIG. 61. A connector 07 is shown inserted in the uneven loop. One side of the loop is much narrower than the other side.

In the lower right of FIG. 60 is releasably connectable anchor corner piece 50. The releasably connectable anchor ribbon 02, which is connected to anchor corner piece 50, has a tag 51 as a connector holder. The tag has holes in it to facilitate the insertion of the B peanut connector 52. The connector on the other end of the anchor ribbon is a rectangular shaped carabiner ring 53.

The anchor corner piece 50 in the lower right of FIG. 60 is a releasably connectable anchor corner piece. In fact, all of the anchor corner pieces in FIG. 60 are releasably connectable. The anchor corner piece 50 is a triple double-loop type. There are two loops 54 at each connection point so that different side ribbons can use different loops. The connectors from two different side ribbons are shown inserted into the loops in FIG. 64. Both connectors are shown having gates. Even though two loops are shown, it isn't necessary to have these double loops because more than one connector will fit into the same single loop. Note that the loops in corner piece 50 and the loops in FIG. 64 are the same size in front and back, making it necessary to fiddle around a bit to open the hole of the loop for inserting and removing connectors. This is in contrast to the loop type shown in FIG. 61 and the loops shown in FIG. 63. However, the connection of a side ribbon with an anchor is generally not changed often so loops as shown in FIG. 64 can be used in this case.

Instructions for making a jewelry box anchor corner piece are shown in FIGS. 66, 67 and 68. Anchor corner pieces can be connected to anchor ribbons, sewn directly into anchor ribbons, connected to under-mattress main-parts, and they can be sewn directly into full-extent anchors. FIG. 66 is a pattern for a sample jewelry box corner piece. The corner piece shown here is very plain, but can be elaborate as found on fancy jewelry boxes.

1) The vertical striped lines on the top left and top right of FIG. 66 show the area of the material to be cut out.

2) The marked line segment coming down from angle b is to be cut.

3) The angle e area can be cut out or simply folded under the material piece from angle f.

4) It is the intention of the pattern to have the center triangle b with the two holes come out slightly from the side of the mattress. This makes it easier to slip connectors into the holes. Note that loops could be used as connector holders instead of holes. To get the middle c to come out from the corner of the mattress, the sum of a+b+c needs to be greater than 180 degrees. The greater the amount is over 180 degrees, then the looser the fit of the anchor corner piece against the mattress corner.

5) The angle a measurement should be the same as the measurement of angle c. In this sample, they are both 90 degrees or in other words they are both right angles.

6) The sum of the remaining angles f and d needs to be equal to 90 degrees as their edges are sewn together. They need to fit the 90° mattress corner. Note that f and d are the remaining angles because angle e is either cut out or placed under angle f.

7) All of the six angles when added together should equal 360 degrees, of course.

8) FIG. 67 shows the jewelry box anchor corner piece cut out of the pattern from FIG. 66. When the edges of the angle areas off and d are sewn together they are called the first section of the corner piece. The combination of a+b+c is called the second section. The first side is a. The middle is b. The second side is c. Note that the nomenclature for the two sides can be reversed so that c can be the first side and a can be the second side. The end of the first section needs to be trimmed in whatever shape is desired. Then this end of the first section of f and d can be permanently sewn into a full-extent anchor. It can also be permanently sewn into one end of a releasably connectable anchor ribbon. Instead the first section of this jewelry box anchor corner piece can have a connector holder allowing it to be a releasably connectable peripheral part all by itself. FIG. 68 shows this last option. The first section is trimmed to a V shape and a connector holder of two holes put in it (actually the bridge between the two holes holds the connector).

9) FIG. 68 shows the finished jewelry box anchor corner piece located at the corner of a mattress. In place of each set of two holes, it could have a loop or another type of connector holder sewn at these same places. For a loop, see reference 13 on FIG. 51.

Another anchor corner piece is the bow and fence corner piece. Making this anchor piece is illustrated in FIGS. 69, 70, 71, 72 and 73.

1) The bow used as a connector holder has two openings for the connector. A short strip of double faced satin ribbon can be selected for making the bow. A ribbon width of 1½″ will accommodate most connector sizes. The wide width and shiny surface on both sides of the ribbon material also provide beauty to enhance a bedding ensemble. FIG. 69 shows folding each end of the double faced satin strip in thirds. Point A is put on point B and point C is put on point D.

2) FIG. 70 shows the bow connector holder's progress after the first step of folding the ends. The ends can be sewn at the stitch marks indicated at the A and C ends of the short satin strip of material. Then the width for the middle of the bow needs to be marked on the satin ribbon strip with short line segments at points D and B. This width will determine what size connectors can use the bow as a connector holder. In order for a connector to use the bow, the width of the connector needs to be equal to or greater than the distance between the line segment marked by point D and the line segment marked by point B.

3) In FIG. 71 both A and C ends are brought into the middle of the ribbon and sewn across the area between the two line segments marked in the previous figure. This forms two openings. End A is brought to point B. End C is brought to point D. The overlap middle part of the bow is then stitched together and to the back of the ribbon strip. This is pointed out as reference number 55.

4) Also in FIG. 71, two strips of hem tape are selected. These are referenced by number 56. One strip is put on each end of the bow. This provides a place to sew the bow to the fence.

5) Then the hem tape segments of the bows are sewn to the fence part of the anchor corner piece. The end result is shown in FIG. 72. Reference number 57 indicates the part of the bow fence corner piece that is at the bottom edge of the mattress corner.

6) The fence is made in two pieces according to the pattern in FIG. 73. Then the two sides of the fence are brought together as indicated in FIG. 73 and sewn in place. Point A is put on point B. Point C is put on point D. The square ends of the two parts of the fence are put on top of each other and sewn securely in place. This forms a right angle so that the anchor corner piece will fit the mattress corner.

7) The bottom halves of the two fence parts are folded up and form the unseen base for the corner piece under the mattress with reference number 57 in FIG. 72. This completes the instructions for making the bow and fence anchor corner piece.

Anchor corner pieces are not absolutely necessary. FIG. 74 shows a corner where the loops from three different anchor ribbons are just out from under the edge of the mattress. Connectors are in the loops ready to attach to side ribbons. So there can be three separate anchor ribbons coming from the main-part of a short-extent under-mattress anchor as in FIG. 74. Or there can be a single anchor ribbon with an anchor corner piece where the corner piece has three different connector holders such as loops, as in FIGS. 52, 53 and 54. The previous paragraphs looked at anchor corner pieces. Following is an examination of the use of multiple anchor ribbons coming from the main-part of a short-extent under-mattress anchor when it is desired not to use anchor corner pieces.

FIGS. 75 and 76 show that multiple anchor ribbons can lead to a single mattress corner.

1) The top left corner of FIG. 75 is the same corner as FIG. 74. This corner has reference number 58 in FIG. 75. In FIG. 74 only the ends of the anchor ribbons are shown protruding from under the mattress. In FIG. 75, the mattress is not yet laid on top of the under-mattress anchor and the anchor ribbons are shown in their entirety. The anchor ribbons are connected to the main-part of the short-extent under-mattress anchor by connector holders 59 which are simply the bridges of material between the square holes. The hole edges may need to be reinforced depending on the material used.

2) The mattress corner at reference number 60 shows that anchor ribbons can be layered to connect to multiple bedding items. Reference number 61 points out the sets of holes placed at various depths to facilitate attaching the anchor ribbons to the main-part of the anchor. By having all three of these anchor ribbons come out from under the mattress at the same place, more than one bedding item can connect at the center of the mattress corner.

3) FIG. 76 shows connector holder pieces sewn into the rectangular shaped main-part of a short-extent under-mattress anchor. These pieces lie flat under the mattress. Also shown is an anchor ribbon connected through a set of two holes in one of the pieces. Once all anchor ribbons have been connected, the main-part plus all of the anchor ribbons is the complete short-extent under-mattress anchor.

4) FIG. 77 shows three connector holders made of short strips of ribbon or other material. They are fastened to the corner of the main-part of a short-extent under-mattress anchor. Each of these connector holders has a single opening. One of the connector holders has been pointed out as reference number 62. These connector holders also have reference number 62 in FIG. 75. Back to FIG. 77, the corner of the main-part is indicated by reference number 64.

5) FIG. 78 shows connector holders made by square reinforced holes, shown as reference number 65. These holes allow use by multiple connectors as shown at reference number 59 in FIG. 75. The reinforcement of the hole edges shown in the figure is stitching. The connector shown at reference number 32 in FIG. 78 is a commercially available oval carabiner ring.

6) Reference number 66 of FIG. 79 points to loops of ribbon sewn to the edge of a corner of the main-part of a short-extent under-mattress anchor. In making the loop, one side of the ribbon material has been folded in half while the other side hasn't. This allows easy insertion of connectors. However easy insertion of connectors isn't so important for main-parts because the attachment of connectors would only be done one time in most cases. A round gate ring 67 is shown as one of the connectors in this figure. The gate is shown at reference number 68. The other connector is a split key ring 69.

7) FIG. 80 shows a single strip of ribbon folded multiple times to form four connector holders 63. At each point of the fold, the ribbon is stitched to the corner. A rectangular carabiner ring 70 is shown as one of the connectors. The other connector is a B peanut connector 52. The corner is shown as reference number 64. The corner could be the corner of a short-extent under-mattress main-part, and the corner could also be the corner of a full-extent under-mattress anchor. A folded set of connector holders are also shown as reference number 63 on the lower left corner of the short-extent under-mattress anchor main-part in FIG. 75.

8) FIG. 81 shows multiple connector holders placed in a vertical position. This is similar to the placement of the connector holders 61 in FIG. 75 in the main-part there.

Different shapes of holes can be used to make connector holders. The size and shape of the holes along with the size of the connector used will determine how much of the underlying material will show through. Large hole openings may appear unattractive. Also the size and shape of the holes will determine how easy or difficult it is to insert a connector. For instance a slit shows a minimum of underlying material, but is the most difficult to use in inserting and removing connectors. There are some basic techniques that can be used in cutting the holes in fabric when developing prototype styles for MWBS items. Standard sized holes in weaker fabrics can be made by some of the available hand paper punches. A heavy duty desktop paper punch seems to work really well for strong fabrics. To make non-standard sized round holes and other hole shapes, a fabric pencil and some scissors can be used.

1) First, making a square shaped hole is shown. A square shape is penciled on a cloth as shown by reference number 71 in FIG. 82. Second, the material is folded in half along the midline of the square where points A and D meet together and points B and C meet. Third, both sides of the square are snipped along the dashed lines as shown in the cloth with reference number 72. Then fourth, the material is refolded as shown at reference number 73, along the midline of the square in the opposite direction so that points A and B meet and points C and D meet. Now both of these last two sides are cut on the dashed lines. The little square which has been cut out is removed. This yields the desired square hole.

2) FIG. 83 shows the cutting of a round hole. On the fabric piece with reference number 74 the diameter of the circle is determined and the circle circumference is penciled on the cloth. Then the circle is folded in half on the diameter DB so that points A and C meet on the fabric piece shown as reference number 75. Then the circle is folded a second time in fourths so that the points D and B also meet each other as shown by reference number 76. The circle can now be easily cut out along the dashed quarter circle.

3) A diamond shaped opening can be penciled on fabric as shown at reference number 77 of FIG. 84. Reference number 78 shows the material folded in half along the midline of the rectangle where points A and D meet and points B and C meet. Then a second fold is made so that all points A, B, C and D meet as shown at reference number 79. The diamond can then be cut along the dashed line.

4) Sometimes a slit can be attractive and all that is needed. A slit is shown penciled in the cloth with reference number 80 of FIG. 85. After the slit is penciled on the cloth, the instructions for cutting the slit are the same as for the square as shown at reference numbers 81 and 82.

5) If the material is strong and does not fray, the cut out hole edges can be left as is for use. If there is a problem with fraying, fraying liquid can be applied. If the hole edges need to be further strengthened, a backing material can be cut out with similar holes and glued with fabric glue onto the back of the fabric that has the original set of holes. As mentioned, the edges of the holes can be reinforced by stitching. And then some fabrics can be heat sealed if they melt rather than burn.

When placing an under-mattress anchor on a platform or box foundation, it may be difficult to figure out in what direction the anchor is to be placed. Also, when placing a sheet or other bedding item on a mattress, it may not be easy to determine the top and bottom ends from the sides. To solve this problem the connector holders on the top corners can be different colors or shades than the connector holders on the bottom corners.

One use of connector holders is as structural features on the main-part of a short-extent anchor for use by releasably connectable anchor ribbons if the main-part is small, or by releasably connectable anchor corner pieces if the main-part has the same width and length dimensions as the mattress. The connector holders on these bedding anchors should be attractive. So consideration should be given to using satin holders, interesting buttons to decorate the ends of holders, flowers, and other designs on anchor fabric. Aesthetic considerations are an important part of the bedding ensemble. Even an appliqué can be used as a connector holder with only the ends of the appliqué attached thus making an opening for connectors.

This completes the instructions and considerations for making anchors to be placed on a box foundation or other solid platform, where the mattress is then laid on top of the anchor. These have been called under-mattress anchors. However, a solid platform may not be available to provide a place to lay an under-mattress anchor. Maybe the mattress is only supported by an open framework insufficient to provide a spot to lay the under-mattress anchor. If an under-mattress anchor is to be used and the mattress does not have a solid or semi-solid platform on which to lay the under-mattress anchor, then the under-mattress anchor needs another way to stay put under the mattress.

There may be situations where there is no foundational support for placing an under-mattress anchor. Another option for supporting an under-mattress anchor in a position under the mattress is to use a slip-on anchor assembly. This involves assembling two under-mattress anchors together, where one will be on top of the mattress and the other anchor will be on the bottom of the mattress. The two anchors are connected with side ribbons along one side. This assemblage is slipped onto one of the sides of the mattress. The mattress is then laid down and the other side is connected with side ribbons.

1) Reference number 83 of FIG. 86 shows a full-extent under-mattress anchor for the bottom of the mattress. FIG. 87 shows three side ribbons 84 for the top side of the mattress. Connectors are on the top and bottom ends of the side ribbons. FIG. 88 shows another full-extent under-mattress anchor 85 for the top of the mattress. Both anchors have side-connector-holders 86 for the sides of the mattress. The types of anchors and side ribbons used are optional.

2) So in FIG. 89 the top and bottom anchors are connected along one side by three side ribbons. This leaves one side of the assembly of the two under-mattress anchors disconnected.

3) The mattress is propped up on its side. The dual anchor assembly is then slipped onto the mattress. FIG. 90 shows the anchor assemblage in FIG. 89 slipped on one side of the mattress.

4) FIG. 91 shows the mattress let down with the top anchor positioned to be connected with side ribbons to the anchor underneath the mattress.

5) And finally, the open side is ready to be brought together with side ribbons and connectors. The connectors 87 on the side ribbons serve double duty. They provide connection with the top anchor and are also available to provide connection to one or more bedding items. Bottom sheets and other secured bedding are placed on top of the top anchor and attached with a different set of side ribbons than the reference number 84 side ribbons, but can use the same connectors 87.

6) The adjustment feature of the side ribbons 84 can be chosen to allow the top anchor and bottom anchors to be cinched together, if desired.

7) If the dual anchor assembly slips off the two top corners during step 3 above, a solution is to use anchors which have opposing corner connector holders 88 as shown by the example in FIG. 92. (Note that anchor corner pieces can be used instead.)

8) A center-connector-holder is not required on the corners of the top anchor to stabilize the assembly. The position of a missing and unneeded center-connector-holder is shown in FIG. 92 by reference number 89. The top anchor is indicated by reference number 85. The top anchor is not used to secure bedding. It only secures the bottom anchor. In FIG. 92 the bottom anchor is not visible, but its corner pieces 90 are shown sticking out from under the mattress. The bottom anchor can use center-connector-holders on its corners to secure bedding. The mattress is indicated by reference number 03.

9) At reference number 91 is the center-connector-holder of an anchor corner piece of the bottom anchor, where the connector holder consists of a bridge of material between two holes. These holes are not connected with the top anchor. They will be used for the connection of bottom bedding. The two holes 92 will serve a dual purpose by having a first connector in them to connect the bottom anchor with the top anchor and a second connector in them to secure bottom bedding as needed. Only the first connector is shown in the figure.

10) Reference number 93 shows a jewelry box anchor corner piece. This corner encompassing piece adds stability when placing the dual anchor assembly over the mattress when the mattress has been set on its side.

11) In the dual anchor under-mattress assembly the anchor on top of the mattress plays no role in holding a bottom sheet on the mattress. The bottom sheet is placed over the top anchor. Alternatively, a mattress pad can be placed over the top anchor and then the sheet placed on top of the mattress pad. The only purpose of the top anchor is to hold the bottom anchor in place. It is the bottom anchor, as usual, which holds the sheet and other bottom bedding in place. The dual anchor assembly is not a very elegant solution. The preferred choice would be to use the zippered mattress cover 12 with connector holders as illustrated in FIGS. 50 and 51. The dual anchor assembly might be beneficial in applications where the package to be wrapped is not actually a mattress, but perhaps cargo or whatever else cannot be fitted with a zippered cover and can use the anchor assembly.

An entirely different type of anchor in the MWBS involves use of the mattress. The mattress itself can be an anchor as illustrated in FIG. 93. A mattress is made into an anchor by sewing connector holders into the bottom corners of the mattress. Sample connector holders are shown at reference numbers 94, 95 and 96. The connector holders with reference numbers 94 and 96 are elaborate. Instead, non-intrusive loops 95 can be used. Also, tags with holes in them could serve as connector holders for mattresses. Loops and tags would not look any different than labels sewn into the corner edges of the mattresses. Tags are illustrated at the top of the mattress at reference number 97 of FIG. 93. If the mattress is expected to be flipped, connector holders such as those shown at reference number 97 would be needed on both the top and bottom corner edges of the mattress. Connector holders can also be placed on the sides of mattresses.

We have examined mattresses with connector holders as anchors and zippered mattress covers with connector holders as anchors. We have also described under-mattress anchors in detail. It is to be noted that there are times when an under-mattress anchor can't be used. Such a situation is illustrated by the bed frame in FIG. 94. The bed frame drawn in the figure has a rail 98. A side metal strip 99 supports a heavy duty mattress built to fulfill the combined role of mattress and foundation. Also the bed frame may have a metal middle slat 100 to further support a heavy duty mattress. The empty spaces 101 in the bed frame do not provide any place to put an under-mattress anchor. If an under-mattress anchor must be used in this situation, then the combination of two under-mattress anchors in the under-mattress anchor assembly would work.

Another type of MWBS anchor is a bed frame or a platform bed with structural components which serve as connector holders. These little structural components can be made of metal, plastic, wood, and anything else appropriate depending on the type of bed frame or platform bed. Common shapes that are easy to use are rectangles and rings. These structural connector holders can be used directly as MWBS connector holders. For a softer implementation, releasably attachable flexible connector holders and anchor corner pieces can be inserted into these rigid connector holders. So MWBS side ribbons and connectors can use bed frame or platform bed connector holders directly. And they can use flexible attachments to these bed frame connector holders. Attachments can be made of any flexible material and so are called flexible attachments in addition to cloth attachments.

1) FIG. 95 shows three bed frame connector holders on the corner bed rail of a platform bed. The bed frame in the figure is made of metal. The middle metal connector holder follows the corner of the bed frame in order to blend with the shape of the bed frame.

2) FIG. 96 shows one of the metal connector holders to suggest some basic dimensions. The thickness (T) should be at least ¼″ and preferably less then ½″. The inner width (IW) should be about 1½″. The internal height (IH) should be at least ½″.

3) FIG. 95 shows the spacing, DTC, between an inside edge of the metal connector holder on the side to the closest inside edge of the center metal connector holder. The distance DTC should be about 6 to 12 inches.

4) FIG. 97 shows a cloth attachment with reference number 102. It has a connector holder 17. The cloth attachment is first folded over the metal connector holder. The top of the cloth attachment is then brought back under the metal bar and into a rectangular slot at the bottom of the cloth attachment. Finally when the top end of the cloth attachment is pulled tight it looks as shown in FIG. 98. To keep the cloth attachment from falling loose, snaps and other clasping devices can be used as shown by the circles with Xs in them 103. Note that cloth attachments can also be attached in various ways to other types of connector holders and to other structures depending on the design of the cloth attachment. Also the attachment is not limited to cloth but can be made of any suitable fabric. And rather than being inserted into an opening, the attachment can be wrapped around a structural component. More complex attachments can be made such as one which attaches to the rails on each side of a bed frame leg with a connector holder in the middle.

5) FIG. 99 shows that the metal connector holders can be integrated onto the sides of platform beds or onto the sides of bed frame rails.

6) FIG. 100 shows an open hook as an alternative to a closed rectangular shape. It would need to be tightly curved so that a cloth attachment of some sort or a connector would not slip out easily.

7) For flat platform beds with no bed rails, there may not be an easy place to put metal bars or hooks. In this case, two holes could be used as shown in FIG. 101. A mechanism for threading a cloth attachment connector holder through these two openings would need to be provided. As shown in FIG. 102, each hole should be a rectangular slit. Each slit length (SL) should be about 2″ long. The two slits should be separated by a distance (SD) in the range of ¼″ to ½″. Each slit opening (SW) should be at least ½″ wide.

The first two major components of the MWBS have been described. These are the sheets and other such bedding items, and the bedding anchors. Next, side ribbons are described. A side ribbon lies along the side of the mattress to connect an anchor with a bottom sheet, mattress pad or other bottom bedding. A side ribbon can be composed of satin ribbon, metal, cord, duck cloth, braid, mesh, and other materials in any combinations.

Detailed examples of side ribbons are given in FIG. 54 and FIGS. 105 through 114.

1) Examples of two side ribbons are given in FIG. 54. The first example is a side ribbon consisting of a circular band of elastic lace. The second example is a side ribbon which included an adjustment strap with a clasp. The clasp shown is commonly found on suspenders and hockey garter straps. FIG. 103 shows another shape of this clasp used on these types of stronger straps. Reference number 104 shows this clasp in a closed position and reference number 105 shows it in an open position. Reference number 106 of FIG. 104 shows the type clasp used on softer materials like garter straps and brazier straps. FIG. 105 uses this clasp 106 as its adjustment feature. The material for the straps can be very soft and can be very narrow such as the stretch material used to make some of the delicate garter straps.

2) The side release buckle 107 is also shown in FIG. 105. This popular buckle varies in widths (BW) from ½″ to 2″. Thus it can be used with narrow or wide side ribbons.

3) FIG. 106 shows a side ribbon in the form of a belt and belt buckle. If a braided belt is used then the hook can be inserted anywhere.

4) FIG. 107 shows a belt with a luggage strap and buckle to allow adjustment of the length. The bottom connector is a G peanut connector. The top connector is a truncated triangle peanut connector.

5) FIG. 108 illustrates a shiny satin girl's headband used as a side ribbon. The headband is made of non stretch satin with an elastic piece inserted for adjustment. The non stretch satin fabric is pointed out by reference number 108. The non stretch satin is bunched up over the elastic insert allowing room for the elastic to stretch. The two ends of the elastic insert are fastened at reference number points 109 and 110. A decoration 111 has been added.

6) FIG. 109 shows a braided mesh fabric strip used as a side ribbon. The strip of braided mesh can be folded over at any length and fastened there to provide adjustment of length. The braided mesh fabric was cut from another girl's headband and used in this example. A decorated peanut fastener 112 is used to fasten the mesh fabric in place. A loop has been sewn at the bottom of this strip, but it is unnecessary because the bottom connector could insert any place in the mesh strip. In addition to braided mesh fabric, the kind of mesh fabric used for laundry bags can be cut in strips and used for side ribbons. This side ribbon is a single-folded overlap side ribbon. The fold at the top is a connector holder.

7) FIG. 110 shows a third girl's headband used as a side ribbon. It is simply a circular band of soft elastic material. This side ribbon has been monogrammed to show the desirability of attractiveness and personality for side ribbons.

8) FIG. 111 shows a side ribbon made as a single strip of material. It is formed into a circle by a fastener. The peanut fastener joins the two ends at an appropriate length for a specific mattress depth. The side ribbon in this example is made from duck cloth. It has diamond shaped holes punched or cut into it. This type of side ribbon is a circular overlap side ribbon. When flattened this side ribbon has a fold at the top and a fold at the bottom. Each of these folds is a connector holder.

9) Note that in FIG. 111 the side ribbon has 4 ends. It has two internal ends. And it has two external ends which provide connection to a bottom sheet and to an anchor. These two external ends are the places where the fabric of the side ribbon folds over a connector holder connected to an item external to the side ribbon. The folds at the top and bottom of the circular side ribbon are by definition connector holders. This same side ribbon could be used in a noncircular manner exactly like the side ribbon in FIG. 109. In this case, the side ribbon then has only one internal end and two external ends connecting to external items.

10) FIG. 112 is the same basic type of side ribbon as in FIGS. 109 and 111, but made of two separated pieces. The pieces are joined at any point along their length to provide adjustment of the side ribbon length. FIG. 112 shows the use of a UT peanut fastener. The joined two pieces of the side ribbon can also be fastened with the bracket peanut fastener 112 which is used in FIG. 109. Other connectors such as carabiner rings of various shapes can be used as desired.

11) Typically the holes in the side ribbons in FIGS. 111 and 112 would be large enough to accommodate a large range of sizes of fasteners and other types of connectors. The term peanut fastener generally refers to connectors used primarily for fastening a side ribbon onto itself. These peanut fasteners are not well suited to connecting side ribbons to bed items and to connecting side ribbons to anchors.

12) The braided mesh side ribbon in FIG. 109 has large openings for peanut fasteners and other connectors. On the other hand, side ribbons made from laundry mesh material would typically have small openings and would be restricted to use of thin peanut fasteners and other connectors.

13) Any of the side ribbons in FIGS. 109, 111, and 112 can be made of mesh or can be made having sets of holes cut into a fabric strip. Either way, they both have sets of at least two holes for use by connectors. So instead of the sets of two holes shown in FIGS. 111 and 112, sets having more than two holes could be used. And the sets of holes do not need to be placed throughout the entire length of the fabric strips.

14) FIG. 113 shows a military belt buckle that allows adjustment of the length. Use of such a buckle would require a stronger material to withstand the saw tooth edge on the underside of the buckle. This side ribbon illustrates that the use of belt buckles does not require that the entire circular band of the belt be included as part of the side ribbon. It can be snipped and both ends fitted with a connector holder such as the loops shown.

Extension ribbons and extension connectors are components that can be added or removed from either side ribbons or anchor ribbons. When an extension component is added to a side ribbon or to an anchor ribbon, the extension component becomes a part of the side ribbon or the anchor ribbon. Adding extension components to side ribbons can allow for large differences in the depths of mattresses. And adding extensions to anchor ribbons can allow for the various different mattress sizes such as king-sized mattresses and queen-sized mattresses. To allow an anchor to fit on any sized mattress, a different set of four extension ribbons can be provided for each standard bed size to be accommodated. Alternatively, anchor ribbons can be provided which fit the largest size mattress. These anchor ribbons would have trim points marked on the ribbons. Then the person placing the anchor simply trims off the excess ribbon length to fit their particular mattress. A loop would need to be placed at each trim point for the insertion of connectors. Side ribbons can also be made with trim points and loops at each trim point. The full range of mattress depths can be accommodated by providing several basic lengths of side ribbons from which the bed maker can select. FIG. 114 is a kludge of extension components not to be put on a bed in the mix illustrated. The purpose of the figure is to show the variety of components that can be chosen for altering the length of a side ribbon.

1) The extension ribbon 113 is a piece of duck cloth where the length, EL, can vary by whatever amount is needed.

2) The extension connector 114 is a gold oval gate ring. The long oval shape enables the adding of length without widening the side ribbon structure. Various oval connectors with different lengths can be selected so that a side ribbon will fit a particular mattress depth.

3) The chain 115 is an extension ribbon composed of metal. In this case it is a gold filigree metal to add both functionality and attractiveness. Note that this pretty gold chain can also be used as a metal side ribbon. Whether used as an extension ribbon or a side ribbon, a ring connector can be inserted into any of the chain links 116 to adjust its length. In the illustration the top gate ring connector is inserted into the 6th link of the chain. Each link is at a right angle to the links before and after it, so a full view of a link is shown followed by the side view of the next link and so forth. The links in the top and bottom connectors are shown at side view. The chain shown does not lie flat. A flat chain can be chosen instead.

4) A bronze gate ring, as the connector at the bottom of the chain, is an example of using a very small ring to add a minor adjustment of length. Connectors can come in a variety of shapes and sizes to add both functionality and interest to the overall bedding ensemble.

In the Mattress Wrap Bedding System, connectors have several uses. They provide connection of releasably connectable anchor ribbons to the main-part of a short-extent under-mattress anchor. Another use for connectors is to connect side ribbons to bedding and to anchors. Connectors are used for the bottom ends of side ribbons to connect the side ribbons to anchor connector holders. Connectors in these positions basically stay in place until the side ribbons are replaced. This may not be necessary for the life of the MWBS setup for a particular bed. And connectors are used in the MWBS to connect the top ends of side ribbons to sheets and other such bedding. This use of connectors requires disconnection and reconnection for each change of bedding. In general connectors should be easy to use in changing bedding. Prior art commercially available connectors can be used with the MWBS. The best prior art commercially available connectors for mattress wrap bedding seem to be carabiner rings and gate rings. Gate rings can be found in both oval and round shapes. For mattress wrap bedding, aluminum seems to be a more appropriate weight than heavy steel connectors. Aluminum carabiner rings can be made in any size and shape. Also they can be imprinted with labels for different bedding line annotations. The available rings vary in length from ¾″ to 3 inches. In addition to these connectors, peanut connectors and fasteners can be manufactured and used.

Part of the development of this MWBS was the development of MWBS peanut connectors and fasteners. They are named peanut connectors and fasteners because the first one looked like a peanut shell. Following are traits of peanut connectors and fasteners.

1) A peanut connector is distinguished from a peanut fastener. A peanut connector is primarily used to connect side ribbons to other MWBS components. A peanut fastener is primarily used to fasten one portion of a side ribbon to other portion of the same side ribbon. However, a peanut connector is a fastener in the general sense of the word. And a peanut fastener is a connector in the general sense of the word.

2) Peanut connectors and fasteners have the fundamental feature of lying flat so bulges don't show in blankets and other such top bedding.

3) Also important is that peanut connectors and fasteners do not have an opening-closing mechanism as do the gates in gate rings and carabiner rings. A peanut connector has a single opening so it can be inserted into and removed from connector holders, where the opening cannot be closed as in carabiner rings and gate rings.

4) Two types of openings are used in peanut connectors. The first type of opening is uncomplicated allowing easy insertion and removal during bedding changes. The second type of opening in peanut connectors is a more complicated shape that prevents the peanut connector from easily slipping out of a connector holder.

5) It is undesirable to have a peanut connector disconnect from an anchor during bedding changes. When a sheet is changed, the side ribbon is disconnected from the sheet. Then the side ribbon is relaxed waiting until a fresh sheet is put on the bed. While the side ribbon lies loose from the sheet, it is important that the relaxed side ribbon doesn't become disconnected from the anchor. Also while the side ribbon lies loose from the sheet, it is important that the bottom part of the top connector does not become disconnected from the top part of the side ribbon. The shape of the peanut connector openings can control this.

6) Although peanut connectors and fasteners are not carabiner rings because they don't have gates, they could still potentially be manufactured by the same source.

7) For fancy peanut connectors and fasteners, they can be made and decorated like jewelry pieces.

8) The use of peanut connectors and fasteners is not limited to the Mattress Wrap Bedding System. The sizes suggested in this description are for use of the peanut connectors and fasteners in the MWBS.

9) Variance in thickness allows for shapes which provide decoration, serve a functional purpose, or both. Thickness measurements include both the width and length measurements at all places of the non-straight line segment forming a peanut connector or a fastener. Thus, a peanut connector doesn't necessarily have the same width and depth throughout its shape, as well as being able to have bulges of whatever sort at its two ends. This is also true for a peanut fastener. The hearts on the fastener in FIG. 111 and the flowers on the fastener in FIG. 109 are examples of decorative shapes resulting from such variations in thickness.

10) Some decorative shapes on the ends of peanut connectors and fasteners also serve the useful purpose of being end encumbrances. One of the examples of end encumbrances is shown in FIG. 121.

11) Decorations and end encumbrances on peanut fasteners and connectors can be made either by variations in thickness of the primary substance making up the fastener or connector or by a variation in thickness caused by fastening parts. Use of fastening parts onto a peanut connector is shown in FIG. 124 where jewels have been fastened to a B peanut connector.

12) The left and right sides and the top and bottom ends of the M, G, B, and UT peanut connectors correspond to those positions of the letters of their names. Other peanut connectors have their left side on the side of their opening from the outside to the inside. The top of the truncated triangle peanut connector is the truncated end. The tops of the other peanut connectors correspond to the tops as shown in their drawings in the figures. The peanut connectors can be used in any position flipped over sideways, flipped over top to bottom, and flipped over sideways and top to bottom. The words left, right, top, and bottom are for naming purposes only.

Several peanut connectors have already been shown:

1) The M peanut connector is used in FIG. 54;

2) The G peanut connector is used in FIGS. 54 and 107;

3) The B peanut connector is used in FIGS. 60 and 80;

4) The truncated triangle peanut connector is used in FIG. 107;

5) The bracket peanut fastener is used in FIGS. 109 and 111; and

6) The UT peanut fastener is used in FIG. 112.

The M peanut connector in FIG. 116 is a connector of choice for connecting an anchor ribbon to an under-mattress anchor main-part. It is also a preferred connector to connect a side ribbon to an anchor ribbon. In addition, it can be used to directly connect a side ribbon to a full-extent under-mattress anchor.

1) The internal height (IH) is the same at the bottom and top of this peanut connector. The internal height is narrow because it is not expected that ribbons will be removed very often.

2) The M peanut connector has two lips with a length (LL) intended to keep the connector from slipping out of the connector holder. To further aid retention of the connector in the connector holder, the lip width (LW) is also narrow.

3) The opening height to the connector (OH) can also be narrow, but need not be. The opening width is indicated by the measurement OW.

4) The external height of the connector is indicated by EH. For use with the MWBS, the external width (EW) is determined by the width of the bedding ribbon to be accommodated and the structure of the M figure. The bedding ribbon width should be equal to or less than IW. A very small ribbon width will only need a small M connector with a small internal width IW.

5) The thickness (T) of the connector for use with the MWBS is based on preference, but ¼″ is usual for carabiner rings and could also be a good thickness for peanut connectors. If there are decorative shapes, the thickness will vary.

6) Note that the M peanut connectors shown in the figures have sharp corners. Instead the corners can be smoothed to give a softer look to the connector.

FIG. 115 shows the G peanut connector positioned for use by a right-handed person. It would be flipped over in the normal letter G position for use by a left-handed person.

1) For the MWBS, usually the G peanut connector would be used at the top of a side ribbon as in FIG. 54 rather than its use as shown in FIG. 107. In FIG. 107 it would be easy for the side ribbon to slip out of the G connector during bedding changes. The G peanut connector would typically be used with the top end connecting to a sheet connector holder. The bottom end of the G connector would commonly be used for connecting into a connector holder of a side ribbon.

2) For the MWBS, the thickness (T) of the connector could be ¼″ to ⅜″, or as the design would dictate.

3) For the MWBS, the inner width (IW) should be equal to or greater than the width of the side ribbons or anchor ribbons. A common ribbon width is 1½″.

4) The height of the lower inner enclosure (LIH) can be relatively small where ease of removal is undesirable. The lower inner height (LIH) should be equal to ¾″ or less for the MWBS.

5) For the MWBS, the height (OH) of the opening to the peanut connector could be ⅜″. Since this opening is expected to be used frequently, it needs to be fairly large for easy access.

6) The opening width (OW) into the lower area can be smaller because it should used infrequently. For the MWBS it should basically only be used when the side ribbon is changed.

7) The internal height (IH) of the connector can vary depending upon whether it is used as an extension component to a side ribbon or not.

FIG. 117 shows the B peanut connector. This is a general purpose connector. The amount of control at the top is the same as the amount of control at the bottom. Depending upon the size of the openings, the B peanut connector can give either strict or loose control.

1) For the MWBS, the internal width opening (OW) can be varied to make insertion and release of side ribbons vary in difficulty and thus vary in the ability to stay within the connector during bed changes.

2) Though not indicated in the figure the internal width opening for access to the top of the connector can be different than the internal width opening for access to the bottom of the connector. A large internal width opening for one end of the connector could be used to allow easy access, and a small internal width opening at the other end of the connector could be used to make access and removal difficult.

3) For the MWBS, the internal width (IW) of the B peanut connector should be sized to fit whatever side ribbons or anchor ribbons are used with it, such as 1½″. The IW at the top and bottom can be different to fit different sized components at each end such as differences in sizes of bedding ribbons and connector holders.

4) For the MWBS, the internal height (IH) should vary based upon whether it is also to be used as an extension component. Thus the external height (EH) could vary between 1 to 3 inches or more.

5) For a particular application, the opening height (OH) is meant to stay fixed regardless of the external height of the connector, but can vary.

FIG. 124 is a rounded B peanut connector. It illustrates that connectors can be decorated with designs and even gem stones of various shapes. The design shown is for someone who is right-handed. For the MWBS, if the bed maker is left-handed, then the B connector needs to be flipped over on its normal side and the design put on that side. As an alternative, both sides can have design detail.

FIG. 123 shows the one-turn hallway peanut connector. This connector is somewhat similar to the B peanut connector, but this one-turn connector is more difficult to enter and exit. The one-turn hallway peanut connector has an oblong shape which includes right-angled rectangular shapes and rounded rectangular shapes. The internal height (IH) is approximately equal on the top and bottom. The gap (G) is generous, but the opening height (OH) and width (OW) are narrower.

FIG. 121 shows the three-turn hallway peanut connector. The internal height (IH) of this connector can be the same at both ends. This connector also has an oblong shape which includes right-angled rectangular and rounded rectangular shapes. This connector can be used for side ribbon to anchor ribbon and anchor ribbon to anchor connections. Thus it can serve the same general purpose as the M peanut connector.

FIG. 122 shows the truncated triangle peanut connector. One end is narrower than the other end. The top of the triangle has been lopped off. The amount lopped off will determine the difference in the top and bottom widths of this peanut connector. This connector can be used to connect a small connector holder on a sheet to a wider connector holder on a side ribbon or vice versa. This peanut connector can also be used in connection of a dissimilar size of a connector holder on a side ribbon with a connector holder on an anchor. In addition it can be used in connecting a connector holder on an anchor ribbon with a different sized connector holder on the main-part of a short-extent under-mattress anchor. The width (WN) at the top is narrow. The width (WL) at the bottom of the truncated triangle peanut connector is wider.

FIG. 120 shows the peanut-shell peanut connector. The internal width (IW) is the same at the top and bottom of this connector. The gap (G) shown is generous and thus it can be just as easy to change the bottom connection as the top connection.

FIG. 118 shows the bracket peanut fastener which is shaped like the square bracket symbol, “[”. This fastener is useful in the MWBS to secure different parts of a side ribbon having multiple sets of two holes as an adjustment feature. The thickness (T) of the bracket fastener must not be greater than the hole size in the side ribbon. The external height (EH) of the bracket fastener should be about the width of the side ribbon. The internal width (IW) of this fastener needs to be somewhat wider than the side ribbon. The corners of this fastener can be rounded to allow it to slip into place easier. Decorative features can be added. Also, the ends of this fastener can be designed to provide an encumbrance to prevent the fastener from easily slipping out of place.

The UT peanut fastener as shown in FIG. 119 is shaped like a letter U which has the letter T on each end resulting in a U. Another way of saying this is that the U has bars put on its two ends, such as “U” with bars instead of “U” having no bars on its ends. For the MWBS, the UT fastener is not meant to connect side ribbons to sheets and anchors. It is useful for fastening the overlap of side ribbons of the type shown in FIGS. 109, 111, and 112. For the MWBS, the internal width (IW) of the UT fastener needs to be approximately the same as the distance between the sets of holes in the side ribbon. The thickness (T) of the UT peanut fastener cannot be greater than the diameter of the holes in the side ribbon. The UT can be made without any bars or other encumbrances on its ends. However for the MWBS, the encumbrances are important. Rather than using bars on the ends of this connector, the ends can have other designs which serve the purpose of preventing the fastener from easily slipping out of place. This completes the description of peanut connectors. Some MWBS miscellaneous topics follow.

As an alternative to side ribbons, bedding ties can be used in the MWBS. The basic principle for this is illustrated in FIG. 125. In this figure, a mattress topper 117 is lying on top of a mattress 03. The mattress topper is shown anchored in two entirely different ways. One of these ways is the use of bedding ties. In practice only one way would be used. One figure is serving a dual purpose of illustrating two different methods. The first method uses bedding ties. The mattress topper has bedding ties sewn on each side. One of the places where a bedding tie is sewn is shown as reference number 119. In the process of making a bed, bedding ties can be tied to any handy anchoring point. In FIG. 125 the bedding ties are tied to the leg of the bed frame or platform bed. On an actual bed, the ties would be taut rather than loose as shown in the figure.

FIG. 125 shows single bedding ties on each side of the mattress topper. Another option not shown is to have two bedding ties sewn at the same place in the corner of the mattress topper or other bedding item. Each tie could then extend to a different side of the bottom of the mattress and thus to two different anchoring points. The double bedding ties would come down from the corner top of the mattress topper in a manner similar to the arrangement in the middle of FIG. 125. However, in the middle of the figure, instead of bedding ties a side ribbon is used. A single side ribbon is inserted through a connector holder 118 on the corner of the mattress topper. The two ends of the side ribbon go to two different anchor points, one on each side of the mattress corner. The sample side ribbon shown could be made of elastic to provide adjustment of its length to fit the depth of the mattress. Note that the connector holder 118 could have a connector put in it. The side ribbon could then be inserted through the connector instead of directly through the connector holder. Also, instead of one side ribbon, two separate side ribbons could be used. In either case, having a single point connected to two points may be a helpful arrangement to help control shifting of the bedding.

Another type of bedding tie 121 is shown in FIGS. 126, 127 and 128. This releasably connectable bedding tie has a connector holder at only one end. The other end is a straight flexible tie which is fastened by interweaving it with two connectors. The first connector is depicted at reference number 122 and the second connector is depicted at reference number 123. The first step in securing the bedding tie 121 is to fold the tie through the first connector as shown in FIG. 127. The first fold is pointed out at reference number 124. Also depicted in FIG. 127 is the second step in securing the bedding tie by creating a second fold 125 in the tie. Next, this fold 125 is placed underneath the second connector 123 as shown in FIG. 128. Reference number 126 indicates the portion of the bedding tie now behind the second connector. The end of the bedding tie is brought up over the second connector. To tighten the tie and bring the two connectors together tightly, pull on the fold 125. When it is time to release the tie for a change in bedding, pull on the end of the tie 127.

FIG. 129 shows the five basic positions for side ribbons on the corner of a mattress. These side ribbon positions also apply to bedding ties. The side ribbons are attached to a single bottom sheet or other single item of bed clothing. Combinations of the side ribbon positions are used for anchoring multiple bed clothing items on a mattress. These combinations are not shown in FIG. 129. FIGS. 51, 54, and 125 show combinations of basic side ribbon positions. In FIG. 129 from left to right, the basic side ribbon positions are the I position, the double I position, the V position, the caret position, and the X position. Where the side ribbons are attached to the side, greater stability is added by going deeper into the side. An end and corner side-connector-holders should preferably be placed from 6 to 12 inches from the corner. The specific order of connecting side ribbons given below is just for illustrative purposes. In practice, they can be connected up in any useful order.

1) The I position uses only one side ribbon at the center of the mattress corner for a given bedding item. Two of the examples of the I position are shown at reference number 05 in FIG. 1, and reference 24 in FIG. 54. The I position is preferred for bottom sheets which are changed frequently. There is only one side ribbon to detach and reattach for each corner. The I position is not suited for use when there is a strong, uneven tug on the corners of a sheet or mattress pad. Mattress pads are not changed very often so the effect of uneven tension can become prominent. On one of the corners, the single I position side ribbon can slip from the central position of the corner over to a side of the corner.

2) The double I position has two side ribbons, each one located on a different side of the mattress corner. First each side ribbon is attached to a corner side-connector-holder coming from an anchor. This side ribbon is then brought up vertically and attached to a corner side-connector-holder on a sheet or other bedding item. The double I position is a preferred side ribbon position for mattress pads and for other toppers which will be infrequently changed. The double I position is also a preferred side ribbon position for attaching bottom sheets if there is unusually strong tension on some of the corner positions of the sheet. And the double I position is a preferred choice when it is needed to tightly cinch down bedding using the adjustment features of the side ribbons.

3) The V position with two side ribbons connects each side ribbon to a different corner side-connector-holder on the sheet. However both side ribbons are connected to the same central connector holder from an anchor. The stability of the V position is greater than the I position, but less stable than the double I position.

4) The V position can also be just one side ribbon strung through a connector or a connector holder at the vertex.

5) Also in an extreme case, the I position and the V position can be combined into a single side ribbon with three ends to the side ribbon at either the top or bottom and just one end on the position of the vertex of the V. In this case, all four ends have a connector holder.

6) The V position can be a V shaped side ribbon having 3 ends to connect to external items with each end having at least one connector holder. First one of the two top ends connects to one of the corner side-connector-holders on the sheet. Second, the bottom of the side ribbon is connected to an anchor connector holder. Finally the other top end of the side ribbon is connected to the corner side-connector-holder on the other side of the sheet. The V position single side ribbon with three ends is preferred over the V position using two side ribbons for aesthetic reasons.

7) In general the V position is preferred over the single I position. However, the V position has only one anchor point at the bottom of the V so is less desirable than the double I position if the bedding needs to be cinched down.

8) The caret position with two side ribbons connects both side ribbons to the same central connector holder on the sheet. Each side ribbon is then separately connected to different corner side-connector-holders on the anchor or anchor ribbon. This is preferred when there is only one connector holder on a bottom sheet. The caret position is highly preferred since it is very stable with its two anchoring points.

9) The various versions of the V position also apply to the caret position in an upside down manner.

10) The X position with two side ribbons does not use the central connector holders on either the sheet or the anchor. One side ribbon is connected to a side anchor connector holder on the anchor. This same side ribbon is brought over the corner of the mattress to the other side of the mattress. It is then attached to the sheet corner side-connector-holder on the opposite side of the mattress. The same thing is done with a second side ribbon in reverse, thus creating an X over the corner of the mattress by the crossing of the side ribbons. This X position is a preferred choice for stability, but less preferable for ease in changing of bedding because with each bed clothing item change, two side ribbons have to be released and then reconnected.

Preferred choices for MWBS bottom sheets are discussed here. The flat sheet with connector holders sewn into its corners is the easiest to make and looks good on the bed, see FIG. 1. For these reasons it a preferred choice. The sheets with loose corners with either a single seam, FIG. 6, or two seams, FIG. 10, in each corner are a bit more difficult to make, but have a pleasing appearance on the bed. They are also easy to change when the bed is made. For these reasons they are also preferred choices. The sheets with short horizontal seams have more variety in appearance and are preferred for aesthetic reasons. However more fabric is required for them to achieve the long flowing piece of material at the center of the corner. And so they are more expensive to make, see FIGS. 12, 13 and 41. Any of these designs are preferred choices determined by personal taste. The sheet shown in FIG. 27 provides an odd choice of a flat sheet and a 2 seam sheet. The oddness is the placement of the connector holder which mimics a short horizontal seam sheet. Its use is purely based upon looks. However, the horizontal position of the connector holder on this sheet is less desirable for most side ribbon and connector options. A fitted bottom sheet may be preferred if it is desired to anchor the bottom end of a top sheet over the bottom sheet. In this case the bottom sheet can't hang over the connector holders from the bedding anchor. The top sheet needs access to these connector holders also. Otherwise, a sheet with tightly fitted corners as shown in FIG. 8 is a non preferred choice. Lifting the tight corners to insert and detach connectors is somewhat cumbersome. However, use of a fitted sheet with connector holders is not much different than using prior art fitted sheets with elastic perimeters. Another choice is the sheet with the horizontal seam on the bottom edge of the sheet corner. This sheet is shown in FIG. 11. This sheet does not cover the side of the mattress. Access to the side ribbon connection is easy for very frequent bed changes. This sheet can also be used with an anchored top sheet.

The criteria for preferential connector holders is that they allow easy insertion and removal of connectors. The preferred connector holders are the hour glass connector holder, FIG. 17; the V-shaped connector holder, FIG. 49; the variable sided connector holder where one side is narrower than the other, reference number 49 in FIGS. 60 and 61; the top to bottom connector holder, reference number 62 in FIG. 77; and the one side folded connector holder, reference number 66 in FIG. 79. These connector holders can be used on sheets, anchors, and side ribbons as desired. They aren't limited to the implementations shown in the figures. Though, depending on the type of connector holder, some implementations are more appropriate.

Preference for a particular anchor type depends upon the importance of the different features of each type of anchor to a particular implementation. Some factors include the difficulty in making the anchor, the expense involved, and the ease of installation.

1) A zippered mattress cover is preferred for its simplicity and ease in installation. However, each zippered mattress cover must exactly fit the mattress on which it goes. Zippered mattress covers are difficult to make for someone building a small business at home.

2) Under-mattress anchors are inexpensive and easy to make. However, they require a platform under the mattress, unless one wants to deal with a dual under-mattress anchor assembly. Of the under-mattress anchors, the full-extent anchors are preferred because they are easy to position under the mattress. However, they require more fabric and thus are more expensive to make than a smaller under-mattress anchor.

3) Anchor loops and other connector holders on mattresses, platform beds, and bed frames could be extremely useful, but difficult if not impossible for the small business owner to provide. So unless these become readily available, mattress anchors, platform bed anchors, and bed frame anchors are not preferable choices. However use of fabric connector holders which can be attached to bed frames or platform beds could be considered.

Two of the preferred features in side ribbons are an ability to be taut when connected up, and an ability to fit a wide range of mattress depths. These two features are based upon the adjustment capabilities of the side ribbon. The third most important feature of a side ribbon is that it be pretty. Preferred side ribbons which have these features are shown in FIGS. 109, 111, and 112. Other side ribbon choices are also highly desirable allowing customization and other beneficial features. There is a great variety of good choices for side ribbons.

The preferred choice for connectors in the MWBS are peanut connectors and fasteners. Peanut connectors and fasteners can be prettier than prior art commercially available connectors. Also the peanut connectors and fasteners don't have any opening and closing mechanism to deal with. Peanut fasteners are preferred for securing one part of a side ribbon to another part of a side ribbon.

The releasably connectable bedding tie in FIGS. 126, 127, and 128 is the preferred choice when it is necessary to super tightly cinch down bedding. But it requires some practice to learn how to use it. It also requires two connectors at the loose end of the releasably connectable bedding tie.

The basic components of the MWBS have been described. Next a set of formulas is given to determine the length of releasably connectable anchor ribbons going to the corners of a mattress. These are called corner anchor ribbons. Thus a single sized main-part of a short-extent under-mattress anchor can have different sets of releasably connectable corner anchor ribbons for each standard sized mattress. Note that these formulas also apply to the construction of some full-extent anchors which have permanently attached anchor ribbons. After the formulas, there is some general information completing the description of the MWBS.

If the main-part of a short-extent under-mattress anchor is a small such as a single O-ring, then basically the length of an anchor ribbon going to a corner is half the length of the diagonal of the mattress. The diagonal length of the top of the mattress can be calculated using the Pythagorean Theorem which is c2=a2+b2. Where c=√(a2+b2)=√(a*a+b*b).

Side c is the diagonal (D) length of the mattress.

Side a will be the length LM and side b will be the width WM.

Thus, a mattress size of WM×LM has a diagonal length


D=√(WM2+LM2).

In this case of a very small main-part, the length of an anchor ribbon is about ½ the length of the entire diagonal length of the mattress.
A standard sized full (double or standard) mattress having dimensions of 54×75 has a diagonal


D=√(54*54+75*75)=√(2916+5625)=√(8541)=92.41 inches.

If we divide this by 2, each corner anchor ribbon should be approximately 46 inches. For the O-ring, half the diameter of the O-ring can be subtracted from the 46 inches to take in consideration the size of the O-ring, giving a more accurate length for each corner anchor ribbon.

Next is a formula for the length of corner anchor ribbons where the size of the main-part deliberately taken into consideration. This formula for determining the length of anchor bedding ribbons is based upon the main-part of the anchor being a square or a rectangle, and the mattress also having a square or rectangular shape. A trapezoid is formed by the area enclosed by a side of the main-part, the two corner anchor ribbons of that side of the main-part, and the corresponding side of the mattress. This is shown in FIG. 130. (Note that the mattress and anchor references which correspond to the mathematical references below are shown in FIG. 131. Indicated are the corner anchor ribbons 02, side anchor ribbons 06, the anchor main-part 01, and the mattress 03. These references in FIG. 131 can be compared to the mathematical references in FIG. 130.) Going back to FIG. 130, a formula for the length of corner anchor ribbons can be developed.

1) Points A, B1, C and D form a trapezoid.

2) The height of the trapezoid is h.

3) The side of the trapezoid is r. This is also a corner anchor ribbon.

4) The angle AE1B1 is a right angle.

5) The Pythagorean Theorem can be used to determine the length of the corner anchor ribbon r, because h, q, and r form a right triangle.


r2=h2+q2

r=√(h2+q2)

6) The main-part of the anchor is centrally located on the mattress. So B1E1=B2E2.

7) h=(mattress width−anchor main-part width)÷2=(WM−WA)÷2.

8) q=(mattress length−anchor main-part length)÷2=(LM−LA)÷2

9) And the length of a corner anchor ribbon is r=√(h2+q2).

10) Adjustment to this length needs to take into consideration the length of connector holders, length of connectors, and position of connector holders on the anchor main-part.

11) Following is an example of the use of the formula. The example is based on a queen sized bed with dimensions of 60×80 and an under-mattress anchor main-part with dimensions 2 feet by 3 feet or 24 inches by 36 inches.

The mattress length is 80 inches, so LM=80.
The mattress width is 60 inches, so WM=60.
The anchor main-part length is 36 inches, so LA=36.
The anchor main-part width is 24 inches, so WA=24.
Therefore h=(WM−WA)÷2=(60−24)÷2=36÷2=18.
And q=(LM−LA)÷2=(80−36)÷2=44÷2=22.
The corner anchor ribbon length is r=√(h2+q2).
r=√(18*18+22*22)=(324+484)
r=√808=28.42 inches.
Therefore each of the four corner anchor ribbons should be approximately 28½ inches take or minus a connector or two.

MWBS REFERENCE NUMBERS, LETTERS, AND POINT DESIGNATIONS

  • 01 Under-Mattress Anchor Main-part Non-descript
  • 02 Anchor Ribbon Non-descript
  • 03 Mattress Non-descript
  • 04 Sheet Non-descript
  • 05 Side Ribbon with Connectors on Both Ends Non-descript
  • 06 Side Ribbon Non-descript
  • 07 Connector Non-descript
  • 08 Connector Holder Non-descript
  • 09 Anchor Main-Part Connector Holder
  • 10 Moisture topper Non-descript
  • 11 Mattress Pad Non-descript
  • 12 Zippered Mattress Cover with Sewn-In Jewelry Box Anchor Corner Pieces
  • 13 Jewelry Box Anchor Corner Piece
  • 14 Zipper on Zippered Mattress Cover
  • 15 Triple Single-Loop Anchor Corner Piece
  • 16 Foundation or Platform, i.e., a place to put an under-mattress anchor
  • 17 Single-Loop Connector Holder
  • 18 Directional Arrow indicating placing unused connector holder down under the mattress
  • 19 Distance that the Anchor Corner piece basic structure falls short of the mattress edge
  • 20 Sheet Triangular Corner Piece
  • 21 Place of Stitching to Attach Connector Holder and Side Ribbon Cover
  • 22 Side Ribbon Cover
  • 23 Broad Single Loop Connector Holder
  • 24 Stretch Lace Side Ribbon
  • 25 G Peanut Connector
  • 26 M Peanut Connector
  • 27 Reinforcement Sheet Corner Side Panel for Connector Holder
  • 28 Connector Holder with Two Square Holes
  • 29 Carabiner Ring Connector with Imprint Label
  • 30 Side Ribbon Comprising of a Bra/Garter/Suspender Adjustment Strap
  • 31 Single loop Connector Holder as Part of Side Ribbon Adjustment Strap
  • 32 Oval Carabiner Ring Connector
  • 33 Made Bed with Platform, O-Ring Anchor, Bottom Sheet, Side Ribbons & Connectors
  • 34 O-Ring Anchor
  • 35 Anchor Ribbon with Single Loop, Variable Side Connector Holder
  • 36 Line of Multiple Connector Holders with Two Holes Each
  • 37 Six Sided Fabric Piece Anchor
  • 38 Corner Connector Holders on Anchor Main-Part
  • 39 Side-connector-holders on Anchor Main-Part
  • 40 Example of a Polygonal Under-Mattress Anchor Main-Part
  • 41 Full-extent Full-Piece Under-Mattress Anchor
  • 42 Full-extent X-cross Under-Mattress Anchor
  • 43 Under-Mattress Anchor Mesh Main-Part
  • 44 Extension Ribbon & Connectors
  • 45 Mesh Main-part Anchor Corner
  • 46 Mesh Anchor Corner Piece
  • 47 Solid Side Anchor Corner Piece with Middle X-cross Connector Holder
  • 48 Triple Single-Loop Anchor Corner Piece
  • 49 Single Loop, Variable Side Connector Holder
  • 50 Triple Double-Loop Anchor Corner Piece
  • 51 Tag Connector holder with Two Holes
  • 52 B Peanut Connector
  • 53 Square Carabiner Ring Connector
  • 54 Double-Loop Connector holder
  • 55 Middle Part of Bow Connector Holder
  • 56 Hem Tape Strip for Bow Connector Holder
  • 57 Bottom Edge of Anchor Corner Piece
  • 58 Loop Connector holders from Separate Anchor Ribbons
  • 59 Square Hole of Connector Holder Used for More than One Connector
  • 60 Layered, Multiple Anchor Ribbons from Same Corner of Anchor Main-Part
  • 61 Multiple Connector Holders in Anchor Main-Part Placed in a Vertical Position
  • 62 Vertical One-Opening Connector Holders
  • 63 Folded Strip of Ribbon to Form Multiple Connector Holders
  • 64 Corner of Under-Mattress Anchor or Corner of Under-Mattress Main-Part
  • 65 Reinforced Square Hole of Connector Holder
  • 66 Cloth Connector Holder with One Side Folded in Half
  • 67 Gate Ring Connector
  • 68 Gate of Gate Ring Connector
  • 69 Split Ring Connector (Often Used in Key Chains)
  • 70 Rectangular Carabiner Ring Connector
  • 71 Square Penciled on Fabric
  • 72 Square Folded in Half with Snip Lines
  • 73 Square Refolded in Half in Opposite Direction with New Snip Lines
  • 74 Circle and Diameter Penciled on Fabric
  • 75 Circle Folded in Half
  • 76 Circle Folded in Fourth with Snip Line
  • 77 Diamond and Enclosing Rectangle Penciled on Fabric
  • 78 Diamond Rectangle Folded in Half
  • 79 Diamond Rectangle Folded in Fourth with Snip Line
  • 80 Slit Penciled on Fabric
  • 81 Slit Folded Down with Snip Lines
  • 82 Slit Refolded Across in Opposite Direction with New Snip Lines
  • 83 Full-extent Under-Mattress Anchor
  • 84 Side Ribbon Used to Connect a Top Anchor to a Bottom Anchor
  • 85 A Top Full-Extent “Under-Mattress” Anchor
  • 86 Side-connector-holder
  • 87 Double Duty Connector
  • 88 Opposing Corner Connector Holders
  • 89 Illustrates Lack of a Connector Holder
  • 90 Protruding Part of Anchor Corner Piece
  • 91 Connector Holder of Bridge between Two Holes, Not Used for Top Anchor Connection
  • 92 Double Duty Connector Holders
  • 93 Jewelry Box Corner Piece on Anchor Ribbon of Under-Mattress Top Anchor
  • 94 Jewelry Box Corner Piece with No Bottom Because Sewn Directly into the Mattress
  • 95 Loop Connector holders Sewn Directly into the Mattress
  • 96 Another Example of an Anchor Corner Piece Sewn Directly into the Corner of the Mattress
  • 97 Tags Sewn into the Top of the Mattress
  • 98 Bed Frame Rail or Side of Platform Bed
  • 99 Flat Edge of Bed Frame to Support a Foundation or Mattress
  • 100 Flat Slat across Middle of Bed Frame to add support to the Bed Frame Structure
  • 101 Nothing, Just Empty Space
  • 102 Cloth Attachment with Slot for use with Ridged Connector Holder
  • 103 Snaps and Clasping Devices for Cloth Attachment with Slot
  • 104 Metal Clasp like used on Suspenders and Hockey Garter Straps—Clasp Closed
  • 105 Metal Clasp like used on Suspenders and Hockey Garter Straps—Clasp Open
  • 106 Adjustment Part used on Brazier Straps and Lingerie Garter Straps
  • 107 Side Release Buckle
  • 108 Non Stretch Satin Used for Side Ribbon
  • 109 Top Connection Point of Elastic Insert
  • 110 Bottom Connection Point of Elastic Insert
  • 111 Decorative Feature with No Other Purpose
  • 112 Bracket Peanut Fastener with Flower Design
  • 113 Extension Ribbon
  • 114 Gold Oval Gate Ring
  • 115 Filigree Gold Chain for use as Extension Ribbon or Side Ribbon
  • 116 Chain Link
  • 117 Mattress Topper with Bedding Ties
  • 118 A Connector Holder Used by a Side Ribbon without the Benefit of a Connector
  • 119 Single Bedding Tie Sewn into Mattress Topper
  • 120 Bow Illustrating Any Choice of Securing Bedding Ties
  • 121 Type of Bedding Tie with Only One End Having a Connector Holder
  • 122 First Rectangular Connector Used in Securing a Bedding Tie
  • 123 Second Rectangular Connector Used in Securing a Bedding Tie
  • 124 First Fold of Bedding Tie over First Connector
  • 125 Second Fold of Bedding Tie in Preparation for Next Step
  • 126 Movement of Second Fold under the Second Rectangular Connector
  • 127 End of Bedding Tie Noted as Place to Pull to Release the Bedding Tie
  • D1 Inside Vertex of Sheet Corner Rectangle
  • D2 Corner Tip Vertex of Sheet Corner Rectangle
  • L1 Left Vertex of Sheet Corner Rectangle
  • R1 Right Vertex of Sheet Corner Rectangle
  • A First Point of Object
  • B Second Point of Object
  • C Third Point of Object
  • D Fourth Point of Object
  • L2 Left Vertex of Sheet Corner Triangle
  • R2 Right Vertex of Sheet Corner Triangle
  • D3 Midpoint Vertex of Sheet Corner Triangle
  • L3 to L8 Left Vertices for Making Bottom Horizontal Seam
  • R3 to R8 Right Vertices for Making Bottom Horizontal Seam
  • D4 Top Vertex of Sheet Corner Triangle
  • D5 Midpoint of Bottom Horizontal Seam Triangle
  • L9 to L10 Left Vertices for Making Bottom Horizontal Seam
  • R9 to R10 Right Vertices for Making Bottom Horizontal Seam
  • WM×LM Width and Length of a Non-descript Mattress
  • WS×LS Width and Length of a Non-descript Sheet
  • HMS The amount of sheet that hangs down from either side of the mattress
  • HME The amount of sheet that hangs down from both the top and bottom end of the mattress
  • CCH Center-Connector-Holder
  • ECH End-connector-holder
  • SCH Side-connector-holder
  • IS Inches from the side of the sheet to come in for placement of a connector holder
  • IE Inches from the top and bottom of the sheet to come in for placement of a connector holder
  • ISE Inches from the side to place an end-connector-holder
  • IES Inches from the top and bottom end to place a corner side-connector-holder
  • HCH Distance that the connector holder hangs from the top edge of the mattress
  • DTC Distance from a side or end connector holder to the center of the corner
  • a Jewelry Box Anchor Corner Piece Left Perpendicular Angle
  • b Jewelry Box Anchor Corner Piece Middle 40° Angle
  • c Jewelry Box Anchor Corner Piece Right Perpendicular Angle
  • d Jewelry Box Anchor Corner Piece 20° Angle
  • e Jewelry Box Anchor Corner Piece 50° Angle
  • f Jewelry Box Anchor Corner Piece 70° Angle
  • T Thickness of Connector or Fastener
  • IW Internal width of Connector or Fastener
  • IH Internal height of Connector or Fastener
  • SL Length of Rectangular Slit on Bed Platform
  • SW Width of Rectangular Slit on Bed Platform
  • SD Distance between Slits on Bed Platform
  • SR Side Ribbon
  • BW Width of Side Release Buckle
  • EL Length of Extension Ribbon
  • OH Height of opening on Peanut Connector
  • OW Width of opening on Peanut Connector
  • LIH Internal Height of lower part of Peanut Connector
  • EH External height of Peanut Connector or Fastener
  • EW External width of Peanut Connector or Fastener
  • LW Width of Lip opening in M Peanut Connector
  • LL Length of Lip in M Peanut Connector
  • G Gap between upper and lower parts of peanut connectors
  • WN The width of the narrow end of a Truncated Triangle Peanut Connector
  • WL The wider length end of a Truncated Triangle Peanut Connector
  • WA×LA Width and Length of a Non-descript Anchor
  • r side of trapezoid and length of anchor ribbon
  • h height of trapezoid
  • q distance from mattress corner to point E1
  • E1 point where h meets the bottom of the trapezoid at a right angle
  • B1 Corner of Anchor Main-Part corresponding to corner A of Mattress
  • B2 Adjacent Anchor Main-Part corner to point B1 on a line with line segment B1E1
  • E2 Point on opposite side of mattress corresponding to point E1

This specification is not restrictive in its application.

1) The description above in some cases has been given for specific mattress and bedding types. But the description equally applies to all mattress and bedding types. The word mattress includes in its meaning any pad over which bedding is to be anchored. The word mattress also includes in its meaning foundations including box springs and box foundations. The word mattress also includes in its meaning any item needing to have at least one covering releasably held in place over the item. The word mattress also includes in its meaning a packaged item and a package of items. The word bedding and the term bed clothing item include in their meaning any covering to be put over a mattress.

2) The word bed is not restrictive in its meaning. It can mean anything suitable to the context.

3) The word foundation, when used as support for a mattress with an under-mattress anchor, includes in its meaning any supporting surface including a platform bed with a solid bottom area, a metal platform in a truck cab, a floor, and the ground. In this same context, the word foundation also includes in its meaning any sufficient non-solid support including a platform bed with slats.

4) The term bed frame includes in its meaning any somewhat open supportive structure of a mattress or foundation, as appropriate to the context. The term platform bed includes in its meaning any solid or somewhat solid supportive structure of a mattress or foundation, as appropriate to the context.

5) The words cloth and fabric include in their meanings any appropriate material including textiles, leathers, vinyl, flexible plastics, hard plastics, and metal. The word fabric also includes in its meaning any usable composite of fabrics. The word cloth also includes in its meaning multiple cloths sewn together.

6) The term bottom sheet includes in its meaning bottom sheets in the usual sense, mattress toppers, and any other such bed coverings. A MWBS bottom sheet includes in its meaning a bottom sheet in the usual sense, a mattress topper, and any other bed covering with at least 4 corner connector holders. Depending upon the context, the term top sheet includes in its meaning blankets, coverlets, quilts, comforters, any bed coverings not secured at all, and any bed coverings only secured (e.g., tucked in) at one end. A MWBS top sheet includes in its meaning a top sheet in the usual sense, a blanket, a coverlet, a quilt, a comforter, and any other bed covering wherein all of the included items just listed have connector holders only at the bottom end.

7) The mattress cover anchor with connector holders is described as having a zipper. The word zipper is not restrictive and includes in its meaning any apparatus and any method to either fully or partially enclose a mattress.

8) The forms of the verb sew are not restrictive in their meaning, but include in their meaning any other method of fastening as appropriate.

9) Peanut connectors and fasteners can be used for any suitable application and made to any size accordingly.

10) A connectable bed clothing item is releasably connectable. Only some things that are fastened are releasably fastened. And in some cases things that are fastened can optionally be permanently fastened or releasably fastened.

11) All oblong shapes include both basic right-angled rectangular shapes and basic rounded rectangular shapes being further inclusive of decorative and functional features that result in variations in the widths and depths of the basic shapes.

12) Use of individual components and subsystems of components of the MWBS is not restricted to the MWBS application. CSA is the name of a system having three major components of the MWBS including a connectable bed clothing item, a side ribbon, and a bedding anchor. CS is the name of a subsystem having two major components of the MWBS including a connectable bed clothing item and a side ribbon. CA is the name of a subsystem having two major components of the MWBS including a connectable bed clothing item and a bedding anchor. SA is the name of a subsystem having two major components of the MWBS including a side ribbon and a bedding anchor. The CSA system and the subsystems use the fourth major component of the MWBS being connectors.

13) It is recognized that a square is one form of a rectangle. For word picture purposes both words have sometimes been used together.

14) The word seam includes in its meaning a gathering stitch wherein the material has been gathered and sewn fast in the gathered condition.

15) Other statements of non-restrictiveness throughout this specification also apply.





 
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