Title:
Scramble 500
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A board game comprised of arranging numerical tiles on a playing surface for the entertainment of a plurality of players. The game consists of a playing surface consisting of 260 square rectangles and a plurality of tile game pieces marked with a numerical and/or alphabetic inscription. The tiles are arranged on the playing surface in a line of tiles, not fewer than three and not more than eight. The tiles are arranged in a line of numerically matching numbers or numerically sequential numbers. The tiles inscribed with an alphabetical inscription are used as “wild” tiles. Each subsequent play must cross or add to an existing line of tiles already on the playing surface. Play is scored by adding the number of tiles played, then multiplied by “multipliers” inscribed on the tile. The play ends when the predetermined score is achieved, all tiles have been played or no player is able to make a play.



Inventors:
Douglas, Morey (Waconia, MN, US)
Application Number:
12/006045
Publication Date:
07/02/2009
Filing Date:
12/31/2007
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F3/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MENDIRATTA, VISHU K
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Douglas Scott Morey (Waconia, MN, US)
Claims:
1. A way in which to play a new tile board game wherein the playing surface is comprised of 260 square rectangles arranged in the shape of a cross.

2. A new board game wherein tiles are inscribed with numbers one through eight and arranged in line of tiles no few than three and no longer than eight. The line of tiles may be a line of numerically matching tiles or a line of numerically sequential tiles. The numerically sequential tiles may increase from right to left or from left to right in the horizontal line of tiles and the numerically sequential line of tiles may increase from top to bottom or bottom to top in the vertical line of tiles.

3. A new board game wherein, in addition to tiles inscribed with the numbers one through eight on them, a plurality of tiles are inscribed with the letter “S” on them. These tiles with the letter “S” inscribed on them act as “wild” tiles and may be substituted for any number, from one through eight, during play.

4. A new board game where in addition to the numbers one through eight or the letter “S” are inscribed on each tile, on a select number of these tiles there is an additional, smaller number inscribed which represents the “multiplier” used in scoring the game.

5. A new board game where the score is calculated by adding up the number of tiles in each new line played on the playing surface then multiplied by the sum of the new “multipliers” present in each new line of tiles on the playing surface.

Description:

REFERENCES CITED

U.S. Patent Documents

2,752,158June 1956Brunot273/135
4,017,080April 1977Severson273/135
4,126,315November 1978Tung273/271
4,283,058October 1981de Cadier273/236
4,565,374January 1986Pak273/272
4,659,085April 1987DeVries273/236
5,306,016April 1994McInnis273/258
5,314,190May 1994Lyons273/272
5,560,612October 1996Ippoliti273/272
6,508,468January 2003Challice273/272
2005/0093238May 2005Anderson273/258

International Patent Documents A63F 3/00

GB 2018606 AMarch 1979De Cadier
GB 2301043 AMay 1995Harwood
GB 9510314.9July 1996Unsworth
GB 2299949 AOctober 1996Sang Tse
WO 91/00129January 1991Fraser-Dacker
WO 96/19273December 1994Pavlovick

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This work of art represents a new board game that is to be used for the enjoyment of a plurality of players. The work relates to a specifically designed board that players may arrange tiles in either numerically matching order or numerically sequential order while trying to achieve the highest possible score using “multipliers” located on the tile.

Board games have been around for a long time and the field is full and diverse. Each of the previously identified works uses common elements to build their game. They often use a playing surface demarcated into a plurality of parts. They frequently have game pieces such as tiles, cubes or objects. The game pieces are often inscribed with identifying numbers, colors, shapes, letters or designs. Another common element may include the use of mathematical equations or arithmetic in playing and/or the scoring of the game. Some of these patents include U.S. Pat. Nos. 2,752,158; 4,565,374; 5,560,612 and 6,508,468. Each of these previous works uses common themes to build their piece of art. While these prior board games may provide for educational or enjoyment for the individuals playing them, the new board game disclosed in this application is dramatically different in its design and application.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The idea presented is to create a new and unique board game that places tiles on a unique board, the tile pieces being arranged in either numerically matching order or numerically sequential order then scoring by using “multipliers” present on the game pieces.

The playing surface is arranged in such a way as to provide for creative and strategic placement of the tiles when playing. This design is created by a pattern of 260 identical square rectangles arranged in the shape of a cross. This arrangement of the playing surface is specific to create a unique playing surface that provides greater enjoyment and strategy while playing.

In addition the game provides for the use of numerically inscribed tiles to be arranged either in numerically matching or numerically sequential order while playing. The lines of tiles may be played either horizontally or vertically.

Furthermore, the game is scored by adding the number of tiles played then multiplying by the number of “multipliers” present on each tile. This unique way of scoring allows for strategic play and challenges the play to arrange tiles as to achieve the highest score possible.

Further clarification and specification of the rules, play and pieces are discussed in greater detail below.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a top view of the game board.

FIG. 2 is a view of the tile pieces with the identifying inscriptions.

FIG. 3 is a pictorial view of the tile pieces with the “multipliers” on them.

FIG. 4 is a depiction of numerically sequential play.

FIG. 5 is a pictorial depiction of the area in which the first play must take place.

FIG. 6 is an example of a correct numerically matching play crossing an existing line of tiles on the game board.

FIG. 7 is an example of a correct numerically sequential play crossing an existing line of tiles on the game board.

FIG. 8 is an example of a correct numerically matching play added on to the end of an existing line of tiles on the game board.

FIG. 9 is an example of a correct numerically sequential play added on to the end of an existing line of tiles on the game board.

FIG. 10 is an example of a correct numerically matching play crossing more than one line of existing line of tiles on the game board.

FIG. 11 is an example of a correct numerically sequential play added on to the end of more than one line of existing line of tiles on the game board.

FIG. 12 is an example of a correct use of the “S” tiles or the “wild” tiles.

FIG. 13 is an example of a correct play being played between two existing lines of tiles on the game board.

FIG. 14 is examples of an incorrect play were the tiles do not touch exiting tiles on the game board.

FIG. 15 is examples of an incorrect play were the tiles do not match the exiting line of tiles on the game board.

FIG. 16 is examples of an incorrect play were the tiles do not correctly move in the correct sequential order.

FIG. 17 is examples of an incorrect play were the new line of tiles does not contain a minimum of three tiles.

FIG. 18 is examples of an incorrect play when a new play is placed on two separate lines of tiles.

FIG. 19 is examples of an incorrect play when a line of tiles is longer than eight tiles.

FIG. 20 is a depiction of scoring a play.

FIG. 21 is a depiction of scoring a play.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The attached drawing figures depict in detail the game board, tile playing pieces, markings on the tiles, play and scoring of the invention.

The game board is a pattern of 260 square rectangles arranged in the shape of a cross.

FIG. 1 depicts the playing surface of the game board. The center of the game board is a square rectangular grid made up of ten horizontal rows of square rectangles and ten vertical rows of square rectangles totaling 100 square rectangles. Extending out from the top and bottom of the center grid of square rectangles is a rectangular grid made up of four horizontal rows of square rectangles and ten vertical rows of square rectangles. Extending to the right and left of the center grid of square rectangles is a rectangular grid made up of ten horizontal rows of square rectangles and four vertical rows of square rectangles. The ending grid of square rectangles is shaped like a cross and contains 160 square rectangles.

FIG. 2 depicts the tile playing pieces. The tile playing pieces are of the same approximate size as the square rectangles located on the surface of the game board. The tile pieces are to be placed on the playing surface so that they make up a line of tiles, either placed vertically or horizontally on the game board, so that no line of tiles will have fewer than three tiles in it nor exceed eight tiles. Inscribed on top of each tile is an either a numerical inscription, from one to eight, or the letter “S”. The numbers are to be used during play to arrange the tiles in a numerically matching line of tiles or a numerically sequential line of tiles. The tiles inscribed with the letter “S” represent “wild” tiles and may be substituted during play for any number in the line of tiles when it is played.

In addition to the one number or letter “S” inscribed on each tile, on a select few tiles there is an additional, smaller, number inscribed on the tile. This smaller number is called the “multiplier” and is used in the scoring of the game.

During play, the line of tiles placed on the game board may be placed either in a horizontal or vertical line. When making a horizontal numerically sequential line of tiles, see FIG. 4, the numerical sequence may increase from left to right or may increase from right to left. Also, in a vertical numerically sequential line of tiles, see FIG. 4, the numerical sequence may increase from top to bottom or may increase from bottom to top.

To begin play, each player draws eight tiles from the tiles without prior knowledge of which tiles he is drawing. A player is selected to go first and that first player must make his first play so that his tiles are placed in the center square rectangle grid. The first play must be a line of either numerically matching tiles or numerically sequential tiles of at least three tiles in length.

FIG. 5 depicts a play that would be correct.

After the first play, each subsequent player must either cross one or more existing line or lines of tiles on the game board or must add a tile to the end of one or more line or lines of tiles present on the game board. FIG. 6 illustrates a numerically matching line of tiles crossing over an existing line of tiles. The numerically matching line of tiles must cross over a tile on the game board that matches the line of tiles being played.

FIG. 7 illustrates a numerically sequential line of tiles crossing over an existing line of tiles. The numerically sequential line of tiles must cross over a tile on the game board that continues the numerical sequence of the tiles being played.

FIG. 8 illustrates a numerically matching line of tiles being placed at the end of an existing line of tiles. The numerically matching line of tiles being added to the end of an existing line of tiles already on the game board must match the number in a line of numerically matching line of tiles or must extend the numerical sequence of a numerically sequential line of tiles.

FIG. 9 illustrates a numerically sequential line of tiles being placed at the end of an existing line of tiles. The numerically sequential line of tiles being added to the end of an existing line of tiles already on the game board must match the numbers in a line of numerically matching line of tiles or must extend the numerical sequence of a numerically sequential line of tiles.

FIG. 10 illustrates a numerically matching line of tiles crossing over more than one existing line of tiles on the game board. When crossing over more than one line of tiles, the new line must match the existing numbers being crossed over in a numerically matching line of tiles or must continue the numerical sequence in a numerically sequential line of tiles.

FIG. 11 illustrates a numerically sequential line of tiles being added to the end of more than one existing line of tiles on the game board. When being added to the end of more than one line of tiles, the new line must match the existing numbers in a numerically matching line of tiles or must continue the numerical sequence in a numerically sequential line of tiles.

When playing, some of the tiles are inscribed with the letter “S” on them. These tiles are “wild” tiles and may be used as any number in a line of tiles. When playing a numerically matching line of tiles, the tiles marked with the letter “S” will represent the matching line of numbers. When playing a numerically sequential line of tiles, as depicted in FIG. 12, the tiles marked with the letter “S” will depict the appropriate number in the numerical sequence.

New tiles may be placed on the board as long as they add to or cross over an existing line of tiles on the board and the line or lines of tiles on the board are at least three tiles long but no longer than eight tiles long.

FIG. 13 depicts a new line of tiles being placed between two existing lines of tiles on the board. This new line is permissible because each line of tiles represented on the board is either a numerically matching line of tiles or a numerically sequential line of tiles not fewer than three tiles long and not longer than eight tiles.

To further clarify the playing directions, illustrated in FIGS. 14 through 19 are incorrect plays that would not be allowed.

FIG. 14 illustrates that new plays must either cross over existing line or lines of tiles on the board or must extend existing line or lines of tiles on the game board. It is not permitted to place a line of tiles on the game board that does not touch existing lines of tiles, with the exception of the first play of the game when there are no tiles present on the game board.

FIG. 15 illustrates that new plays must match the existing line or lines of tiles on the game board. It is not permitted to place a line of tiles on the end of an existing line if that new line does not match the line of a numerically matching line or extends the sequence in a numerically sequential line of tiles.

FIG. 16 illustrates that in a numerically sequential line of tiles, the numerical sequence must either increase or decrease. It is not permitted for the numerical sequence to increase then decrease in the same line of tiles.

FIG. 17 illustrates that each line of tiles on the game board must be at minimum, three tiles long. In each place were tiles touch, the line of tiles must extend at least three tiles.

FIG. 18 illustrates that you must you're your tiles in a single line of tiles. You are not permitted to play in more than one line of tiles in any given play, unless a single line of tiles connects your tiles.

FIG. 19 illustrates that no line of tiles may exceed eight tiles in length.

Each play is scored by counting the number of tiles in each new line of tiles created when play is made. Each tile in the new line is counted as one point, and then multiplied by the new multipliers present in the new line of tiles on the game board. The first play of the game receives a ten-point bonus.

FIG. 5 illustrates the first play of the game. This first play, represented by a line of tiles: 4, 5, 6, 7, would score a total of 14. There are four tiles in the line of tiles, each tile counting one point, plus a ten-point bonus for being the first play, adding up to 14 points.

The second play is illustrated in FIG. 20. This second play creates only one new line, represented by a line of six numerically matching number 7's. This second play would score twelve points. There are six 7's in the line, each counting one point, then multiplied by the multiplier, which is the little number two. Six times the multiplier of two would be twelve.

FIG. 21 illustrates the third play of the game. The third play creates two new lines of tiles on the game board. The numerically matching line of 7's is increased to seven tiles and there is also a new numerically sequential line of tiles going from 7 down to 1. This new play would score 91 points. To arrive at this score you must first score each new line of tiles separately then add them together to arrive at the final score. The first new line of tiles is the numerically matching line of 7's, which increased from six tiles to seven tiles after the play. This line of tiles would score 21. There are seven tiles in the line multiplied by the new multiplier added to the board. The new multiplier is three; therefore, you take the seven tiles in the line multiplied by the multiplier of three to arrive at 21. The existing multiplier already on the board is not counted in scoring the new play. Only new multipliers placed on the board are used in calculating the new score. The second line of tiles, represented by the numerically sequential line of tiles from 7 to 1, scores 70. To arrive at this score you count the tiles in the new line of tiles, which is seven, multiply by the new multipliers present in that line of tiles. If there is more than one multiplier, you add the multipliers together first, then multiply by the number of tiles in the line.

In FIG. 21, the new line of tiles, represented by the numerically sequential line of tiles 7 to 1, has three new multipliers in it. There is a three multiplier, a five multiplier and a two multiplier in the line. Adding all of these together you arrive at ten, which is then multiplied by the number of tiles in the line, which is seven. Seven multiplied by ten equals 70 for the score for the second new line of tiles. Adding the two lines of tiles together, 21 plus 70, adds up to the final score of 91 for the third play of the game, depicted in FIG. 21.

Play ends when the predetermined score is achieved, all tiles have been played or no player is able to make a play.





 
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