Title:
Simulated Mine
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
According to one embodiment, a simulated mine includes a multiple integrated laser engagement system (MILES) device and a pyrotechnic device disposed in a simulated mine housing that simulates the appearance of an actual mine. The multiple integrated laser engagement system device is operable to transmit a light signal representative of a blast from the actual mine. The pyrotechnic device is operable to detonate simultaneously with transmission of the light signal.



Inventors:
Jones, Giles D. (Vail, AZ, US)
Bian, Qingce (Corona, CA, US)
Huang, Bradley (Chino Hillls, CA, US)
Wallrich, Peter M. (San Jose, CA, US)
Price, William W. (Upland, CA, US)
Tomlinson, Christopher A. (Vail, AZ, US)
Decker, Jeffrey (Moreno Valley, CA, US)
Palmer, Curtis T. (Chino Hills, CA, US)
Application Number:
12/266175
Publication Date:
07/02/2009
Filing Date:
11/06/2008
Assignee:
Raytheon Company (Waltham, MA, US)
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
102/293, 102/356, 102/401
International Classes:
F42B8/28
View Patent Images:



Other References:
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, "TECHNICAL MANUAL OPERATOR'S MANUAL PYROTECHNIC SIMULATORS", March 31, 1991, pages 1 - 5
Primary Examiner:
YIP, JACK
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Renner, Otto, Boisselle & Sklar, LLP (Raytheon) (Cleveland, OH, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A simulated mine comprising: a simulated mine housing; a lighting system at least partially disposed within the simulated mine housing, the lighting system operable to transmit a light signal representative of a blast from an actual mine; and a pyrotechnic device disposed within the simulated mine housing and operable to detonate simultaneously with transmission of the light signal.

2. The simulated mine of claim 1, wherein the lighting system is a multiple integrated laser engagement system (MILES).

3. The simulated mine of claim 2, wherein the multiple integrated laser engagement system device is operable to transmit a light signal having a 60 degree horizontal pattern.

4. The simulated mine of claim 1, wherein the pyrotechnic device comprises a main gun simulation system (MGSS) cartridge.

5. The simulated mine of claim 1, wherein the light system comprises a laser.

6. The simulated mine of claim 1, wherein the light system comprises a light emitting diode.

7. The simulated mine of claim 6, wherein the light system further comprises a laser.

8. A simulated mine comprising: a simulated mine housing; and a light system at least partially disposed within the simulated mine housing, the light system operable to transmit a light signal representative of a blast from the actual mine.

9. The simulated mine of claim 8, wherein the light system comprises a laser.

10. The simulated mine of claim 8, wherein the light system comprises a light emitting diode.

11. The simulated mine of claim 10, wherein the light system further comprises a laser.

12. The simulated mine of claim 8, wherein the light system is a multiple integrated laser engagement system (MILES).

13. The simulated mine of claim 12, further comprising a pyrotechnic device operable to detonate simultaneously with transmission of the light signal.

14. The simulated mine of claim 13, wherein the pyrotechnic device comprises a main gun simulation system (MGSS) cartridge.

15. The simulated mine of claim 8, wherein the simulated mine housing emulates the appearance of an actual mine.

16. The simulated mine of claim 8, wherein the light signal representative of a blast from an actual mine is a light pattern showing the expected location of fragmentation from an actual mine.

17. A method comprising: providing a simulated mine housing; and at least partially disposing a light system within the housing, the light system operable to transmit a light signal representative of a blast from the actual mine.

18. The method of claim 17, wherein the light system is a multiple integrated laser engagement system (MILES).

19. The method of claim 17, wherein the light system includes at least one of a laser or a light emitting diode.

20. The method of claim 17, further comprising a pyrotechnic device operable to detonate simultaneously with transmission of the light signal.

21. The method of claim 17, wherein the simulated mine housing emulates the appearance of an actual mine.

22. The method of claim 17, wherein the light signal representative of a blast from an actual mine is a light pattern showing the expected location of fragmentation from an actual mine.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

Pursuant to 35 U.S.C. § 119 (e), this application claims priority from U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/986,070 entitled SIMULATED MINE, filed Nov. 7, 2007.

TECHNICAL FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE

This disclosure generally relates to military training devices, and more particularly, to a simulated mine.

BACKGROUND OF THE DISCLOSURE

Training generally serves to enhance the skill of individuals by developing appropriate responses to various situations that may be encountered. Soldiers may conduct training exercises in order to prepare for scenarios that may be encountered in an actual combat situation.

SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE

According to one embodiment, a simulated mine includes a multiple integrated laser engagement system (MILES) device and a pyrotechnic device disposed in a simulated mine housing that simulates the appearance of an actual mine. The multiple integrated laser engagement system device is operable to transmit a light signal representative of a blast from the actual mine. The pyrotechnic device is operable to detonate simultaneously with transmission of the light signal.

Certain embodiments of the invention may provide numerous technical advantages. For example, a technical advantage of one embodiment may include the capability to simulate the blast pattern of an actual mine using a viewable light signal. Other technical advantages of other embodiments may include the capability to simultaneously provide a blast pattern from a light signal along with audio/visual effects from a pyrotechnic device to further simulate an actual mine. Yet other technical advantages of other embodiments may include the capability to emulate the actual physical appearance of a mine in addition to providing a blast pattern from a light along with audio/visual effects from a pyrotechnic device.

Although specific advantages have been enumerated above, various embodiments may include all, some, or none of the enumerated advantages. Additionally, other technical advantages may become readily apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art after review of the following figures and description.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

A more complete understanding of embodiments of the disclosure will be apparent from the detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is one embodiment of a simulated mine according to the teachings of the present disclosure;

FIG. 2A is a front perspective view of an actual mine that is simulated by the simulated mine of FIG. 1;

FIG. 2B is a rear elevational view of the actual mine of FIG. 2A;

FIG. 2C is a partial rear elevational view of the actual mine of FIG. 2A;

FIG. 2D is a graphical representation of a pattern that may be generated by an explosion of the actual mine of FIG. 2A;

FIG. 3 is a front perspective view of the simulated mine of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a rear perspective view of the simulated mine of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a rear elevational view of the simulated mine of FIG. 1 shown with its rear cover removed;

FIG. 6 is a an embodiment of a prototype of the simulated mine of FIG. 1 shown with its rear cover removed;

FIGS. 7A and 7B are photographs of prototype multiple integrated laser engagement system circuit boards that may be implemented with the simulated mine of FIG. 1;

FIG. 8 is a top view of a graphical representation of a light pattern that may be generated by the simulated mine of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 9 is a side view of a graphical representation of a light pattern that may be generated by the simulated mine of FIG. 1.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EXAMPLE EMBODIMENTS

It should be understood at the outset that, although example implementations of embodiments of the invention are illustrated below, the present invention (as defined by the claims) may be implemented using any number of techniques, whether currently known or not. The present invention (as defined by the claims) should in no way be limited to the example implementations, drawings, and techniques illustrated below. Additionally, the drawings are not necessarily drawn to scale.

The multiple integrated laser engagement system (MILES) was developed to provide realistic training scenarios for soldiers. A soldier may use a MILES device implemented in a weapon, such as a firearm. The MILES device may emit a generally harmless line-of-sight type signal from a light emitting diode (LED) or laser. Other soldiers may wear detectors that can detect these signals in order to simulate an actual impact from the firearm.

A “mine” is a type of explosive device that may be placed in or on the ground and configured to explode upon receipt of a trigger signal from a switch. Attempts at simulating mines do not adequately simulate the appearance and/or functionality of mines. Thus, soldiers may not be adequately trained to recognize certain types of mines that may be used by enemy combatants. Accordingly, teachings of certain embodiments of the invention recognize that a MILES device may be implemented to simulate the functionality of a mine. Additionally, teachings of certain embodiments of the invention recognize that audio/visual enhancement may be added to a MILES device to further simulate the appearance and/or functionality of a mine.

FIG. 1 shows one embodiment of a simulated mine 100. In this embodiment, simulated mine 100 generally includes simulated mine housing 120 having one or more light transmitters 130 for transmitting a MILES light signal (such as an infrared signal) or other type of light signal that simulates a blast (e.g., a blast pattern) representative of an actual mine 200 (shown in FIG. 2). Other embodiments of the disclosed invention may be configured to simulate a blast representative of mines other than the example actual mine 200 illustrated in FIG. 2.

According to the teachings of the present disclosure, simulated mine 100 may also include a pyrotechnic device 140 for placement in simulated mine housing 120 and operable to detonate when the light transmitters 130 emit a MILES light signal. In certain embodiments of a simulated mine 100, the pyrotechnic device 140 may provide enhanced simulation of the actual mine 200. When detonated, the pyrotechnic device 140 may emit a relatively loud audible blast and/or a visible flash. Soldiers may be therefore trained to recognize the type and nature of the simulated mine 100 based upon audio and/or visual signals provided by the pyrotechnic device 140.

Pyrotechnic device 140 may be any suitable type. In one embodiment, pyrotechnic device 140 may be a M30/main gun simulation system (M30/MGSS) device. The M30/MGSS device is a commercial off the shelf (COTS) component that may be available and relatively inexpensive. In other embodiments, the pyrotechnic device 140 may be other devices, including non-COTS components.

A manual switch 150 and an firing wire 160 may also be provided to detonate the simulated mine 100. In one embodiment, manual switch 150 is configured to be manually triggered. In another embodiment, manual switch 150 is an M57 firing device. In other embodiments, the simulated 100 mine may be triggered in other manners, which may not use a firing wire 160.

FIGS. 2A, 2B, and 2C show a front perspective view, a rear elevational view, and a rear elevational partial view, respectively, of an actual mine 200.

In one embodiment, the actual mine 200 is a M18 claymore anti-personnel mine, featuring a shipping plug priming adapter 210, arrows 212, plastic matrix 214, detonator well 216, explosives 218, and legs 220. The M18 claymore anti-personnel mine is a directional fragmentation mine. The dimensions of the example mine 200 are approximately 8.5 inches long, 1.375 inches wide, and 3.25 inches high, and the mine 200 weighs approximately 3.5 pounds. The example M18 claymore anti-personnel mine includes approximately 700 steel spheres (10.5 grains) and a 1.5 pound layer of composition C-4 explosive (element 218 in FIG. 2A) stored in the detonator well 216 that may be initiated by a No. 2 electric blasting cap. A plastic matrix 214 briefly contains the charge from the No. 2 electric blasting cap from the explosives 218.

The example M18 claymore anti-personnel mine may be implemented with obstacles or on the approaches, forward edges, flanks and rear edges of protective minefields as close-in protection against an infantry attack.

The example M18 claymore anti-personnel mine projects a fan-shaped pattern of steel balls in an approximately 60-degree horizontal arc, at a height of approximately 2 meters, and covers a casualty radius of approximately 100 meters. The effective range is the range at which the most desirable balance between lethality and area coverage is achieved. The effective range for the example mine is 50 meters.

The forward danger radius is 250 meters. The backblast area is unsafe 16 meters to the rear and sides of the M18 claymore anti-personnel mine. Friendly personnel within 100 meters to the rear and sides of the M18 claymore anti-personnel mine on should be in a covered position.

FIG. 2D is a graphical diagram of a pattern 240 generated by an explosion of the actual mine 200, which in this particular case is the above-described M18 claymore anti-personnel mine. The M18 claymore anti-personnel mine may also generate scatter patterns 260 around its periphery during detonation.

Although one example actual mine has been shown and described with reference to FIG. 2, it should be understood that the simulated mine may emulate characteristic (e.g., blast patterns and the like) of other mines. The discussion above of a particular mine for actual mine 200 is for illustrative purposes only.

FIG. 3 is a front perspective view of the simulated mine 100 of FIG. 1. Simulated mine 100 may include one or more connectors 310 for coupling manual switch 150 to the simulated mine 100 through the firing wire 160. In one embodiment, a first connector 310 may be coupled to the manual switch 150 and a second connector 310 may coupled to another simulated mine 100 such that two or more simulated mines 100 may be detonated by manual switch 150 in a daisy-chain-like fashion.

In this embodiment, the light transmitters 130 may be any suitable device that transmits light compliant with the MILES. In other embodiments, the light transmitters may be not be compliant with the MILES. In some embodiments, simulated mine 100 may include one or more light emitting diodes (LEDs) 320 for simulating the scatter pattern 260 of the actual mine 200.

FIG. 4 is a rear perspective view of the simulated mine 100 of FIG. 1. Simulated mine 100 includes a pyrotechnic device base 360 for housing the pyrotechnic device 140 and a pyrotechnic device holder 380 that is selectively removable for allowing placement of pyrotechnic device 140 in pyrotechnic device base 360. In one embodiment, one or more light emitting diodes 320 may be disposed on the rear cover 410 of the simulated mine housing 120. In this manner, the light emitting diodes 320 may simulate the actual scatter pattern 260 to the rear of the simulated mine 100.

FIG. 5 is a rear elevational view of the simulated mine 100 shown with the rear cover 410 removed in order to reveal several components of the simulated mine 100. The simulated mine 100 may incorporate one or more pyrotechnic batteries 420 that provide electrical power for detonating the pyrotechnic device 140. In this particular embodiment in which pyrotechnic device 140 is a M30/MGSS device, two 9-volt pyrotechnic batteries 42 may provide electrical power for detonating the pyrotechnic device 140. Simulated mine 100 may also rely on other power sources in place of or in conjunction with pyrotechnic batteries 420.

Simulated mine 100 also includes one or more MILES circuit boards 460 that include various electronic components for implementing the MILES light signal in response to a trigger from the manual switch 150. In this particular embodiment, two MILES circuit boards 460 are used; however, it should be appreciated that the MILES system may be implemented using any suitable quantity of circuit boards. A MILES battery 480 may be included for providing electrical power to the MILES electrical circuit boards 460.

FIG. 6 is a an embodiment of a prototype of the simulated mine of FIG. 1 shown with its rear cover removed. The rear cover 410 has been removed to reveal the components described with respect to FIG. 5.

FIGS. 7A and 7B are photographs showing a top view of a prototype of the MILES circuit boards 460 that may be implemented with simulated mine 100. Circuit boards 460 may include any suitable arrangement of components operable to perform the operations of simulated mine 100, and may comprise logic, an interface, memory, other components, or any suitable combination of the preceding. “Logic” may refer to hardware, software, other logic, or any suitable combination of the preceding that may be used to provide information or instructions. Certain logic may manage the operation of a device, and may comprise, for example, a processor. “Processor” may refer to any suitable device operable to execute instructions and manipulate data to perform operations.

“Interface” may refer to logic of a device operable to receive input for the device, send output from the device, perform suitable processing of the input or output or both, or any combination of the preceding, and may comprise one or more ports, conversion software, or both. “Memory” may refer to logic operable to store and facilitate retrieval of information, and may comprise Random Access Memory (RAM), Read Only Memory (ROM), a magnetic drive, a disk drive, a Compact Disk (CD) drive, a Digital Video Disk (DVD) drive, removable media storage, any other suitable data storage medium, or a combination of any of the preceding.

FIG. 8 is a graphical diagram showing one embodiment of a light pattern 500 that may be generated by the light transmitters 130 when detonated. In this particular embodiment, light transmitters 130 may have sufficient intensity to simulate lethal coverage that extends 50 meters away from the front of the simulated mine 100. That is, the light transmitters 130 may have sufficient light intensity to simulate a lethal strike to MILES receivers (not specifically shown) configured on soldiers in training. In another embodiment, light pattern 500 may have a 60 degree beamwidth that simulates the firing pattern of an actual mine 200, such as a M18 claymore anti-personnel mine.

Scatter patterns 510 may also be generated by light emitting diodes 320 configured on the simulated mine 100. During detonation, the light emitting diodes 320 may simulate side and rear scatter patterns 510 of the actual mine 200. Comparing FIG. 8 with FIG. 2D shows that the simulated mine 100 simulates the pattern 240 and scatter pattern 260 of the actual mine 200 in a relatively accurate manner.

FIG. 9 is a graphical diagram showing side view of the light pattern 500 and scatter pattern 510 generated by the light transmitters 130 and light emitting diodes 320.

Although several embodiments have been illustrated and described in detail, it will be recognized that substitutions and alterations are possible without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention, as defined by the following claims.