Title:
GOLF TOWEL
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A golf towel is provided which includes a single, composite towel article having a top end, bottom end and consists of a first inner sheet, a second outer sheet and a third sheet between the first inner and second outer sheets. The three sheets are bound together to form the single composite towel article. The towel article is folded in half to form a fold line and bound along the fold line so as to form a pair or towel flaps having facing interior sheeting surfaces of the first inner sheet, external sheeting surfaces of the second outer sheet, and a gap open at the bottom end of the towel article. The first inner sheet comprises bamboo.



Inventors:
Bohannon, Jeremiah (Emerald Hills, CA, US)
Staley, Darrell S. (Santa Clara, CA, US)
Application Number:
12/392653
Publication Date:
06/18/2009
Filing Date:
02/25/2009
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
15/209.1
International Classes:
A47K7/02
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
KARLS, SHAY LYNN
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
CHARTER IP, LLC (The Plains, VA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed:

1. A golf towel, comprising: a single, composite towel article having a top end, bottom end and consisting of a first inner sheet, a second outer sheet and a third sheet between the first inner and second outer sheets, the three sheets bound together to form the single composite towel article, the towel article folded in half to form a fold line and bound along the fold line so as to form a pair or towel flaps having facing interior sheeting surfaces of the first inner sheet, external sheeting surfaces of the second outer sheet, and a gap open at the bottom end of the towel article, and the first inner sheet comprising bamboo.

2. The golf towel of claim 1, wherein the first inner sheet is composed of a 100% bamboo material.

3. The golf towel of claim 1, wherein no anti-bacterial, anti-microbial or mildewicidal agents are added to any of the first, second and third sheets.

4. The golf towel of claim 1, wherein the third sheet serves as a moisture impervious barrier layer so that the interior sheeting surfaces of the bamboo inner sheet, when wetted, do not translate moisture to the external sheeting surfaces of the second sheet.

5. The golf towel of claim 1, further comprising attachment means provided at an upper corner of the top end for attaching the golf towel to an external article.

6. The golf towel of claim 5, wherein the attachment means further comprises: a webbing loop member stitched along the fold line at the upper corner of the one side where the three sheets are bound to form the folded towel article, and a carabiner secured to the webbing loop and releasably attachable to an external article to secure the golf towel to the external article.

7. The golf towel of claim 5, wherein the external article is one of a golf bag, a belt worn by a person and a belt loop of pants worn by a person.

8. The golf towel of claim 1, wherein the second outer sheet is composed of a material selected from a group consisting of terry cloth, terry cloth combined with filaments of one or more of cotton, polyester, polyimide, polyurethane, sponge, synthetic or natural chamois leather, and a microfiber.

9. The golf towel of claim 1, wherein the third sheet is composed of a flexible plastic sheet material selected from a group consisting of vinyl, polyethylene, polyurethane and polypropylene.

10. The golf towel of claim 1, further comprising a triangular pocket provided at the bottom corner of each outer sheeting surface where the two flaps of the folded towel article separate to facilitate grasping a flap to access the sheeting surfaces of the bamboo inner sheet.

11. The golf towel of claim 1, further comprising a strip of material extending across a lower end of each outer sheeting surface and bound at each end along a corresponding edge of the outer sheeting surface to form an opening permitting a club head to be extended there through to lift a flap for accessing the sheeting surfaces of the bamboo inner sheet.

12. The golf towel of claim 1, wherein the outer sheeting surfaces are coarser than the facing surfaces of the inner bamboo sheet.

13. A golf towel, comprising: a bamboo sheet, a terry cloth sheet, and a moisture impervious sheet interposed between the bamboo and terry cloth sheets so that when either the bamboo or terry cloth sheet is wetted, moisture is not translated to the other sheet.

14. The golf towel of claim 13, wherein the bamboo sheet is composed of a 100% bamboo material.

15. The golf towel of claim 13, wherein no anti-bacterial, anti-microbial or mildewicidal agents are included in any of the sheets.

16. The golf towel of claim 13, wherein the moisture impervious sheet is composed of a flexible plastic selected from a group consisting of vinyl, polyethylene, polyurethane and polypropylene.

17. The golf towel of claim 13, further comprising attachment means provided at an upper corner of a top end of the towel for attaching the golf towel to an external article.

18. The golf towel of claim 17, wherein the attachment means further comprises: a webbing loop member stitched along the fold line at the upper corner, and a carabiner secured to the webbing loop and releasably attachable to the external article.

19. The golf towel of claim 13, wherein the sheets are bound around a periphery thereof to form a composite towel article, folded and then bound along a fold line so as to form a pair of flaps having facing inner sheeting surfaces of the bamboo sheet and outer sheeting surfaces of the terry cloth sheet, the towel being open at the bottom.

20. The golf towel of claim 19, further comprising a triangular pocket provided at the bottom corner of each outer sheeting surface where the two flaps separate to facilitate grasping a flap to access the facing surfaces of the bamboo sheet.

21. The golf towel of claim 19, further comprising a strip of material extending across a lower end of each outer sheeting surface and bound at each end along a corresponding edge of the outer sheeting surface to permit a club head to be extended there through and lift a flap for accessing the sheeting surfaces of the bamboo inner sheet.

22. The golf towel of claim 19, wherein the outer sheeting surfaces of the terry cloth sheet are coarser than the facing inner surfaces of the bamboo sheet.

Description:

PRIORITY STATEMENT

This application is a continuation-in-part of and claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. §120 of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/694,085, filed Mar. 30, 2007 to the inventors and entitled “GOLF TOWEL AND GOLF TOWEL ASSEMBLY”, the entire contents of which is hereby incorporated by reference herein.

BACKGROUND

1. Field

Example embodiments relate generally to a golf towel for cleaning golf balls and golf equipment such as the heads and/or faces of golf clubs.

2. Related Art

While playing the game of golf, a golfer will typically encounter residual dirt, grass and other material on the golf ball, club faces and/or his hands as he traverses the golf course during his round. In an effort to have the cleanest contact between club face and ball, it is desirable for the golfer to continually maintain the faces of the club heads free of debris, dirt and/or grass. Although the golfer cannot remove the ball from the fairway or rough to clean the ball while playing shots to the green, once the ball lands on the green the golfer may mark the spot and clean the ball prior to taking his putt.

In an effort to maintain his clubs and balls in top rate, clean condition, a golfer will typically carry one or more golf towels either, attached to his belt or to a carabiner on his golf bag. Often, some golfers periodically desire to moisten the towel at a water cooler on the course or in a body of water traversing one or more holes at the course. This occasionally may be a distracting side trip during the round, as it is desirable for the golfer to maintain his tempo on the course so as to be able to concentrate on his swing and/or putt. In reality, most golfers do not wet their towel due to the fact that the moisture often transfers from the towel to their pant leg or other equipment as they are carrying it. The presents a nuisance due to the inadvertent contact between the wet towel and pant leg.

Some prior art golf towels include a dry, clean surface and a wet, moistened surface. Other prior art golf towels may include a pocket which may be configured to contain moisture, with the outside of the towel having a dry cleaning surface for wiping down the club face or ball.

SUMMARY

An example embodiment of the present invention is directed to a golf towel. The golf towel includes a single, composite towel article having a top end, bottom end and consists of a first inner sheet, a second outer sheet and a third sheet between the first inner and second outer sheets. The three sheets are bound together to form the single composite towel article. The towel article is folded in half to form a fold line and bound along the fold line so as to form a pair or towel flaps having facing interior sheeting surfaces of the first inner sheet, external sheeting surfaces of the second outer sheet, and a gap open at the bottom end of the towel article. The first inner sheet comprises bamboo.

Another example embodiment is directed to a golf towel. The golf towel includes a bamboo sheet, a terry cloth sheet, and a moisture impervious sheet interposed between the bamboo and terry cloth sheets so that when either the bamboo or terry cloth sheet is wetted, moisture is not translated to the other sheet.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Example embodiments will become more fully understood from the detailed description given herein below and the accompanying drawings, wherein like elements are represented by like reference numerals, which are given by way of illustration only and thus are not limitative of the example embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 1A is a perspective view of a golf towel in accordance with an example embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 1B is a cross-sectional top view of the one-piece towel shown in FIG. 1A spread out in a single horizontal plane.

FIG. 1C is a cross-sectional top down view illustrating the relationship of sheet layers in the towel of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 2 is a golf towel assembly in accordance with another example embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is an exploded view of a golf towel assembly in accordance with another example embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 4 is an exploded view of a golf towel assembly in accordance with another example embodiment of the present invention.

FIGS. 5A and 5B are tri-fold and bi-fold golf towels in accordance with another example embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 6A is a perspective view of a golf towel assembly in accordance with another example embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 6B is a partial front view of the lower portion of the golf towel in FIG. 6A to illustrate the angled towel sheet.

FIG. 7 is a front view of a golf towel in accordance with another example embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 8A is a top view of the golf towel in FIG. 7 laid flat to illustrate the folds for binding the golf towel together.

FIG. 8B is a cross-section view taken across line A-A in FIG. 8A to illustrate the tri-layer construction of the towel article.

FIG. 8C is a perspective side view of the golf towel in FIG. 7 to illustrate an intermediate folding step for assembling the golf towel.

FIG. 8D is a side view of the golf towel in FIG. 7 to illustrate subsequent steps for binding the golf towel together at a top end thereof and to illustrate the fold-up panel.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a golf towel in accordance with another example embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 10 is a front view of a golf towel in accordance with another example embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 11 is a front view of a golf towel in accordance with another example embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE EXAMPLE EMBODIMENTS

FIG. 1A illustrates a perspective view of a golf towel in accordance with an example embodiment of the present invention. Referring to FIG. 1A, towel 100 may be embodied as a single composite towel having three layered sheets, and which is bent at bend 160 and secured via hole 150 with a suitable carabiner 180 attached through an inserted grommet 155 extending through aligned holes 150 of the towel 100. A grommet 155 is provided on both sides of the towel 100 as shown to facilitate removing the towel from an external article to reverse it inside out, such as in cases of inclement weather and/or to dry the towel 100, for example. Each of the front outside flap surface 110, front inside flap surface 120, rear inside flap surface 125 and rear outside flap surface 130 can be made of the same sheeting material or different materials. The towel 100 may be bound, such as stitched, sealed, fastened etc. with a suitable stitching 140 or other fastening means such as application of a heat sealing or bonding adhesive to secure the top horizontal surfaces 135 and 145 of the front and rear flap portions together, as shown in FIG. 1A. This creates an open cavity 165 between the inside flap surfaces 120 and 125.

The towel 100 may be made of a polyurethane-based material such as Narcote™ or equivalent material (such as other polypropylene) so that the outer surfaces 110 and 130 are smooth, to be used as a drying surface. The inside surfaces 120 and 125 may be wetted with a suitable liquid such as water, however, no moisture is translated to the outer surfaces 110 and 130 due to a moisture barrier layer sheet (not pictured in FIG. 1A) which is provided as a middle enclosed layer sheet of the towel 100. In an example, inner surfaces 120, 125 may have a rougher or coarser surface to assist in removing dirt or debris, as compared to the smoother outer surfaces 110, 130. Alternatively, the inner surfaces 120, 125 may be smoother as compared to the outer surfaces 110, 130.

In one example, the inner surfaces 120, 125 can be composed of a bamboo material. Alternatively, inner surfaces 120, 125 may be composed of a sponge-like material, or a synthetic or natural chamois leather.

FIG. 1B is a cross-sectional top view of the one-piece towel shown in FIG. 1A spread out in a single plane. FIG. 1C is a cross-sectional top down view illustrating the relationship of sheet layers in the towel of FIG. 1A. Referring to FIGS. 1B and 1C, and in particular, towel 100 may be comprised of two outer cloth layers 132 and 134 which may be bound or stitched together or fastened by other well-known textile combining means. Layers 132 and 134 may be made of a suitable cotton or terry cloth or combination of terry cloth made with filaments of one or more of cotton, polyester, polyimide, polyurethane, and a microfiber for example. Alternatively, layers 132 and 134 may have outer and/or inner surfaces 110, 120, 125 and 130 made of Narcote™, a microfiber, a sponge-like material, chamois or other equivalent type material.

In one example, layer 132 is composed of terry cloth and layer 134 is comprised of a bamboo material. As an example, the layer 134 (also referred to hereafter as a sheet) may be 100% bamboo. Alternatively, the bamboo material could be mixed, or blended with other filaments. The bamboo material has inherent anti-bacterial and anti-microbial properties. Thus, no anti-bacterial, anti-microbial or mildewicidal agents need be added to layer 134.

Moreover, use of bamboo for layer 134, instead of other materials such as terry cloth, microfiber or chamois, speeds drying time. Under the sun, the inventors tested a wetted bamboo towel against a terry cloth towel under identical conditions. The bamboo towel dried approximately three times faster than the terry cloth towel.

A moisture barrier layer sheet 175 is provided between the outer towel layers 132 and 134. Any suitable impervious material may be used for the moisture barrier layer 175, such as a flexible plastic sheet material of vinyl or polyolefins such as polyurethane, polyethylene and polypropylene. In an example, a bactericidal or mildewicidal agent may be incorporated in one or more of the layers 132, 134 and/or 175 to prevent the growth of bacteria or mildew. The moisture barrier layer 175 may be stitched or bonded by adhesive to the towel layers 132 and 134 and as such would not be in contact with the outside environment or air. The plastic material utilized for moisture barrier layer 175 should be a material which is not damaged when the towel 100 is washed in conventional washing machines. As is known, materials such as polyolefins and vinyls typically resist temperatures up to about 212° F.

The towel 100 is attached via its grommet 155 to a golf bag using carabiner 180. In use, the golfer wets the interior surfaces with water and moisture barrier layer 175 preventing the outer surfaces 110 and 130 from contact with the entrained moisture. The golfer simply inserts his/her club face or ball into the open cavity 165, grasps the towel 100 and applies a vigorous wiping action. The can be done either by holding the towel 100 and moving the club face or ball, or holding the club face or ball still and massaging the club face or ball with the gripping action of the towel 100. Once the golf ball or club face is free of debris or grit, the golfer then dries the club face or golf ball on the outer surfaces 100 or 130 and resumes his or her next shot.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of golf towel assembly in accordance with another example embodiment of the present invention. Referring to FIG. 2, the golf towel assembly 200 includes a single foldable towel 205 and a separately attachable attachment flap 275. The attachment flap 275 may include a Velcro patch 280 on the lower portion thereof and a grommet 285 which is configured for attachment to a golf bag via suitable strap or carabiner, as is known. Alternatively, patch 280 may be made of 3M Hedlock material. The single towel 205 has a similar construction as shown in FIGS. 1B and 1C, including a moisture barrier layer between two outer cloth layers. Towel 205 also includes a corresponding Velcro patch 255 (or 3M Hedlock material) on a rear surface 230 thereof, such that towel 205 may be removably attached to Velcro patch 280 on the attachment flap 275. This permits a “grip and rip” function for the golfer to quickly remove the towel 205 from the attachment flap 275.

Velcro discs 240 (or 3M Hedlock material) are provided on inside surfaces 220 and 225 of the towel 205. When the towel 205 is attached to attachment flap 275, the Velcro disc 240 may be secured together to form an open-ended cavity 265 at a bottom of the towel 205 thereof. As in FIG. 1, the user wets the interior surfaces 220 and 225 and the outer surfaces 210 and 230 remain dry due to the moisture barrier there between. Accordingly, the function of cleaning debris, grit or grass off the club face or golf ball, may be similar to as described in FIG. 1 and can be done with the towel 205 attached to the attachment flap 275 on a golf bag, or removed from the attachment flap 275 and secured at a top end thereof via Velcro disc 240 to provide the open ended cavity 265 for cleaning the club face or golf ball, after which the club face or golf ball is dried on the outer surfaces 210 or 230 of towel 205.

In each of FIGS. 1A and 2 and as to be described in additional example embodiments hereafter, the inclusion of an interior moisture barrier layer between the front and back surfaces of the towel 100 or 205 may provide a reverse function in inclement weather. For example, in FIG. 2 if during a rainstorm the outer surfaces 210 and 230 of towel 205 become wet, the moisture barrier layer between the inner and outer surfaces 210, 230 and 220, 225 enable the interior surfaces 220 and 225 to remain dry. Accordingly, the golfer merely wipes his/her club face or ball on the outer surfaces 210 or 230 of the towel 205, and then utilizes one or both of the interior surfaces 220 or 225 to dry the cleaned golf club face or golf ball.

FIG. 3 is an exploded view of a golf towel assembly in accordance with another example embodiment of the present invention. Referring to FIG. 3, golf towel assembly 300 includes a rear support towel flap 310 and a detachable composite towel 305 which is releasably attached to rear support towel flap 310 via Velcro strips 319 and 324. Rear support towel flap 310 is generally rigid and provides support for the composite towel 305. In an example, the flap 310 can have a rigid member (plastic, woven fiber, etc.) between two towel sheets that are bound to form the flap 310 so as to provide some rigidity to the flap 310, and/or the flap 310 may be of a single tightly-woven fabric that is rigid. Rear support towel flap 310 includes a grommet 314 in an upper corner of the towel 310 through hole 312 to allow attachment of the towel assembly 300 to a golf bag with a suitable carabiner or strap, for example.

Velcro strip 319 may be affixed (by sealing means, stitching, etc.) in a diagonal fashion across the front surface 316 of towel flap 310. Towel flap 310 also has a pair of Velcro discs 318 stitched at opposite corners below a midway point 315 of towel flap 310, as shown in FIG. 3.

The composite towel 305 includes a first towel sheet 320, a moisture barrier sheet 330 and a second towel sheet 340. Each of these sheets 320, 330 and 340 may be secured together at an outer periphery thereof with suitable stitching 350, or alternatively bonded by heat or adhesive along outer edges thereof. Moisture barrier sheet 330 may be made of a suitable plastic such as a polyolefin or Gortex®, and first and second towel sheets 320 and 330 may be made of a suitable terry cloth or composite terry cloth material made of filaments of cotton, polyester and/or polyimide. Alternatively, towel sheets 320 and 330 may be made of suitable microfiber structure as is known in the art. In an example, inside surface 328 of first towel sheet 320 and inside surface 342 of second towel sheet 340 may be fabricated to have a rougher surface as compared to the outer surfaces 326 and 344, which may have a smoother surface. This is to assist in removing the debris or grit from the golf club face or a golf ball, for example. Conversely, the inner surfaces 328, 342 may be smoother as compared to the outer surfaces 326 and 344 for the same purpose.

First towel sheet 320 has a pair of Velcro discs 322 and 325 across a diagonal thereof to mate up with Velcro disc 318 on towel flap 310. When the composite towel 305 is removed from towel flap 310, Velcro disc 322 may be connected to Velcro disc 325 to form a generally triangular towel shape which allows insertion of the club face or golf ball into the wet, moistened interior, which would be formed by the rear surface 326 of the first towel sheet 320. The golfer can then dry the club face or ball on the outer surface 344 of second towel sheet 340. Once the round is finished, the composite golf towel 305 can be re-fastened in a non-foldout orientation via Velcro discs 318/320, 322/325.

FIG. 4 is an exploded view of a golf towel assembly in accordance with another example embodiment of the present invention. Referring to FIG. 4, golf towel assembly 400 includes a detachable, foldable towel 430 which may be attached to a rear support towel flap 410 via Velcro strips 419 and 424. Velcro strip 419 is attached to front surface 416 of towel flap 410 at a midpoint 415 of towel flap 410 by suitable stitching, for example, or adhesively bonded to towel flap 410 at the midpoint 415. As in FIG. 3, rear support towel flap 410 may be substantially rigid and includes a hole 412 at an upper corner thereof for insertion of a grommet 414 there through for attachment to a golf bag. Additionally, there are included a pair of Velcro discs 418A and 418B on front surface 416, as well as a Velcro disc 417 at a lower corner thereof. As previously noted, the flap 410 can have a rigid member (plastic, woven fiber, etc.) between two towel sheets that are bound to form the flap 410 so as to provide some rigidity to the flap 410, and/or the flap 410 may be of a single tightly-woven fabric that is rigid.

Detachable golf towel 430 may include a Velcro disc 432 on a rear surface 436 and Velcro discs 438A and 438B which may be attached to corresponding Velcro discs 418A and 418B on towel flap 410. Detachable golf towel 430 may also have the tri-layer sheet construction as shown in the previous example embodiments. Interior surfaces 433 and 435 can have a rough texture and may be moistened with water or suitable liquid, while rear surface 436 and front surface 434 may be made of a smooth Narcote™, terry cloth, microfiber or other equivalent material for drying the golf club face or golf ball after it has been cleaned within interior surfaces 433 and 435. As an alternative, a zipper may replace Velcro strips 419 and 424 for removably attaching towel 430 from rear support towel flap 410. In another alternative, 3M headlock material may be used in lieu of Velcro for each of the discs for 417, 418A, 418B, 438A and 438B. Additionally, the golfer may use the front surface 416 of towel flap 410 to dry a club face, golf ball or his hands after cleaning within interior surfaces 433 and 435 of the golf towel 430.

FIGS. 5A and 5B illustrate tri-fold and bi-fold example golf towels in accordance with an example embodiment of the present invention. In the tri-fold embodiment of FIG. 5A, a one-piece towel having the tri-layer construction as described in the previous embodiments may be folded in three folds and attached with a grommet 555 there through. The interior surface 520 of towel 500A may be of a rougher, coarser material than the outer surfaces 510 and 530. Similarly, in FIG. 5B, for the bi-fold, golf towel 500B, the interior surface 520 to be wetted may be of a coarser, rougher material than the outer surfaces 510 and 530 of towel 500B.

FIG. 6A is a perspective view of a golf towel assembly in accordance with another example embodiment of the present invention. According to FIG. 6A, golf towel assembly 600 includes a rear support towel flap 610 which may be generally rigid and which tapers into a generally triangular lower end and a generally triangular towel portion 620 which is removably attachable to towel flap 610 via suitable Velcro strips (not shown) or via a zipper 630. Each of the towel flap 610 and towel portion 620 may have the tri-layer construction as shown in the previous example embodiments, or just towel portion 620. An interior surface 625 of towel portion 620 and an interior surface 635 underneath towel portion 620 of towel flap 610 may be made of a coarser, rougher material such as Narcote™ or equivalent. Interior surfaces 625 and 638 may be moistened, with one or both of towel flap 610 and towel portion 620 having an inner moisture barrier layer sheet therein to prevent this moisture from being translated to outside surface 627 of towel portion 620 and rear surface 631 of towel flap 610.

FIG. 6B shows a front view of lower a portion of towel assembly 600 in FIG. 6A. As shown in FIG. 6B, once golfing is complete, the golfer may fold towel portion 620 such that Velcro disc 636 is fastened to Velcro disc 640 on the front surface 615 of the rear support towel flap 610. This facilitates drying of the interior surface 625 of towel portion 620. Likewise, as best shown in FIG. 6A, the bottom portion of rear support towel flap 610 can be folded backwards so that Velcro disc 635 is fastened to the rear Velcro disc 640 on the rear side of towel flap 610. It is of note that the lower end of rear support towel flap 610 may be angled to match the dimensions of towel portion 620, as shown in FIG. 6A, for example.

FIG. 7 is a front view of a golf towel in accordance with another example embodiment of the present invention. Golf towel 700 is formed of a single composite towel article 730 having a top end 735 and a bottom end 745. The towel article 730 has a multi-layer sheet construction, similar to as described in FIGS. 1B and 1C, for example, but does not utilize grommets 155 for attachment to an external article. The three layer sheets are bound together via suitable binding means such as sewing, heat-sealing, bonding, etc., as is known in the art to form the composite towel article 730. The towel article 730 is folded in half to form a fold line with a pair of facing interior sheeting surfaces 720 and 725, and a pair of external sheeting surfaces 710 and 715. A gap 760 is also formed along a side 762 and along the bottom end 745 of the towel article 730, as shown in FIG. 7.

An attachment means to an external article, shown as a webbing article 750, is provided in an upper corner 755 of the golf towel 700. The webbing article 750 includes loops 752 and 754 formed at either end. One loop 752 is secured within the folds of the towel article 730. Loop 754 is shown extended from the upper corner 755 for receiving a suitable attachment mechanism (i.e., carabiner) of an external article such as a golf bag, a belt worn by a person or a belt loop of pants worn by a person. In an alternative, the webbing article 750 may be replaced by the attachment means (grommet and carabiner) shown in FIG. 1A, for example.

Two panels 770 and 775 are formed by the folding of the composite towel article 730. The two panels 770 and 775 are bound only at the top end 735 of the towel article 730, shown generally by a horizontal binding line 740, for example. A corner of panel 770 can be pulled back and fixedly attached to the outer sheeting surface 710 so as to form a flap 790. In this configuration, it may be easier for a user to insert a club head of a golf club or his hand into the cavity or gap 760 formed between the panels 770 and 775. In an alternative, a pocket (not shown) may be affixed as part of the flap 790 to facilitate engagement of the accessory with the towel article 730.

FIG. 8A is a top view of the golf towel 700 to illustrate the folds for binding the golf towel together. The towel article 730 is lain flat to illustrate the inner sheeting surfaces 720 and 725 which when folded will be facing one another. To arrange the towel article 730 in its final form for binding along the top end 735, the towel article 730 is folded in half along first fold line 772. The towel article may then be folded along second fold line 774, and then folded along a third fold line 776 such that the fold overlaps the fold made at the second fold line 774. However, it would be evident to the skilled artisan to fold the towel article 730 in a different configuration or along different lines; the above is merely one example. This will be shown in further detail with regard to FIGS. 8C and 8D.

FIG. 8B is a cross-section view taken across line A-A in FIG. 8A to illustrate the tri-layer construction of the towel article 730. The towel article 730 has a tri-layer construction, including a first towel sheet layer 728, a second towel sheet layer 734 and a moisture barrier layer 732 interposed therebetween. As previously discussed, the three layer sheets 728, 732 and 734 are bound together (such as by stitching, sealing, bonding, etc.) around an outer periphery thereof to form the single, multi-layered towel article 730.

As the towel article is folded at the first fold line 772, the inner sheeting surfaces 720 and 725 of the first layer 728 will face each other, with the outer sheeting surfaces 710 and 715 forming the exterior surfaces of the golf towel 700, as shown in FIG. 7. The first towel sheet layer 728 (inner sheet) comprises bamboo material. In an example, the first towel sheet layer 728 is 100% bamboo. Since bamboo material has inherent anti-bacterial and anti-microbial properties, using 100% bamboo thus eliminates the need to add anti-bacterial, anti-microbial or mildewicidal agents to the first towel sheet layer 728. Additionally, the bamboo towel sheet layer 728 dries substantially faster than other materials such as terry cloth, microfiber or chamois, as previously noted.

The second towel sheet layer 734 (outer sheet) may be composed of materials such as terry cloth, terry cloth combined with filaments of cotton, polyester and/or polyimide, a Narcote™, a microfiber or equivalent material. As previously described in the above example embodiments, the third moisture barrier sheet is embodied as a flexible plastic sheet material. Examples of suitable materials include vinyl, polyurethane, polyethylene and polypropylene.

The different shadings between the first towel sheet 728 and second towel sheet 734 are provided to reflect that the facing inner sheet surfaces 720 or 725 of the first towel sheet 728 can have a coarser surface or made of a different material such as a sponge-like material or chamois, for example, as compared to the outer sheeting surfaces 710 and 715 of the second towel sheet 734. Alternatively, in an example where the first towel sheet 728 is bamboo and the second towel sheet 734 is terry cloth, the inner surfaces 720, 725 are smoother as compared to the outer surfaces 710, 715.

Similar to as previously described above, the inclusion of an interior moisture barrier layer 732 between the front and back surfaces of the towel 700 may provide a reverse function in inclement weather. If during a rainstorm the outer surfaces 710 and 725 become wet, the moisture barrier layer 732 between the inner and outer surfaces enable the interior surfaces 720 and 725 to remain dry. Accordingly, the golfer merely wipes his/her club face or ball on the outer surfaces 710 or 715 of the towel 700, and then utilizes one or both of the interior surfaces 720, 725 to dry the cleaned golf club face or golf ball.

FIG. 8C is a perspective side view of the golf towel in FIG. 7 to illustrate an intermediate folding step for assembling the golf towel. FIG. 8C illustrates in particular how an upper portion of the golf towel 700 is folded at the top end 735 thereof in preparation for binding the two panels 775 and 770 together. The towel 700 shows a first fold 782 which provides two roughly equal size panels 770 and 775. FIG. 8C also better illustrates the facing interior sheeting surfaces 720 and 725 of the corresponding panels 770 and 775. Further, a second fold 784 is made along the second fold line 774 in FIG. 8A and then the third fold 786 is made along the third fold line 776 in FIG. 8A. Alternatively, instead of folds, the towel configuration for towel 700 may be effected through other means such as bonding, heat sealing, etc.

FIG. 8D is a side view of the golf towel in FIG. 7 to illustrate subsequent folding steps for binding the golf towel 700 together at a top end 735 thereof and to illustrate the fold-up flap 790. FIG. 8D more clearly shows how the two folds 784 and 786 are bound together. In particular, fold 786 overlaps fold 784 and then the towel 700 is bound along the top surface 735, such as shown in FIG. 7 at binding line 740. Accordingly, the panels 770 and 775 are bound only to each other across one side of the towel article 730. Once the towel article 730 is bound at the top surface 735, the flap 790 can be formed and suitably attached to the outer sheeting surface 710 of panel 770 by a suitable affixing means such as a stitches, corresponding pieces of Velcro or 3M Hedlock, or thermally bound through a sealing means as is well known in the art.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a golf towel in accordance with another example embodiment of the present invention. The golf towel 900 of FIG. 9 is slightly different from the previous embodiments in that it is bound along sides 935 and 945, as generally indicated by binding lines 940 and 942. Similar to the embodiments in FIGS. 1A and 7, the composite towel article 930 has the tri-layer construction as shown in any of FIGS. 1B, 1C and/or 8B, shown at a first fold 982 which vertically bisects the towel into two panels 970 and 975. The panel 970 formed by the fold 982 may have slightly longer edges so as to enable subsequent folds 984 and 986 to wrap over the edges of panel 975. Accordingly, once these folds are bound along binding lines 940 and 942 so as to attach panels 970 and 975 together at sides 935 and 945, a cavity or gap 960 is formed between opposing inner sheeting surfaces 920 and 925 of the first (inner) towel sheet in the tri-layer construction of towel article 930. As each of the layers may be configured as previously described; a detailed explanation is omitted for purposes of brevity.

FIG. 10 is a front view of a golf towel in accordance with another example embodiment of the present invention. As towel 1000 is substantially similar in construction to towel 700, only differences are discussed in detail. A single small material strip or loop 1054 is stitched into the binding line that binds the three sheets together along a periphery thereof; there is no loop within the top corner of the interior facing bamboo sheeting surfaces (not shown). The carabiner 1080 is fastened to loop 1054 so as to attach towel 1000 to an external article. Unlike the fold flap 790 of FIG. 7, a triangular corner pocket 1090 may be bound along two sides to the outer sheeting surface 1010 (a similar pocket 1090 can be stitched on the other surface 1015 (not shown). The user can insert a club grip end or finger into the pocket 1090 to lift one flap of the towel 1000. Additionally, a pair of small fabric extensions 1092 (only one shown) may be attached to the corner ends of the outer sheeting surfaces 1010, 1015 to provide another way to lift a towel flap.

FIG. 11 is a front view of a golf towel in accordance with another example embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 11 is identical to FIG. 10, with the exception that a wide material strip 1190 replaces the corner pocket 1090. The strip 1190 has been bound at its ends to two sides of the outer sheeting surfaces 1010, 1015 (only one side is shown). The use of strips 1190 on both outer surfaces 1010, 1015 enables a user to insert the club head of his club through the strip 1190 so as to lift the towel flap.

In each of the above embodiments, a gap may be formed at the bottom end of the golf towel so as to permit the facing interior sheeting surfaces to remain dry when the towel is subjected to precipitation or moisture in the environment. Thus, in a dry environment, the interior sheeting surfaces within the gap can be wetted to facilitate leaning golf club faces, golf balls and/or hands of the golfer, and the outer sheeting surfaces can be used to dry the accessory or hands. Alternatively on a rainy day, the outer surfaces may be used to clean a golf club face, golf ball or hand and the inner sheeting surfaces, which remain dry due to the moisture barrier layer provided in the tri-layer construction, may be used to dry the accessory or hands. Further in each of the above embodiments, the example golf towels can be flipped inside out to dry after use.

Accordingly, the example embodiments are directed to golf towels used on the golf course and which provide an easier mechanism by which to clean a golf ball, the golfer's hands and/or golf equipment for removing grass stains, dirt and other debris. In some example embodiments, an open cavity is formed at the bottom of the golf towel rather than an actual pocket to facilitate ease of insertion of the golf club head face, golf ball or handle up into the cavity.

Each of the example embodiments has a generally large cleaning surface and a generally large drying surface using, for example, conventional terry cloth sheeting materials or the like on the external sheeting surfaces and a bamboo material for the inner sheet. Each example embodiment includes a moisture barrier layer interposed between inner and outer sheets and hence not exposed to the environment or air; preventing moisture from translating from one side surface to the other side surface of the towel sheets. In several of the example embodiments, there is provided an attachable or removable towel portion which can be removed by the golfer for use on the putting green to clean their dirty golf balls.

Additionally, several example embodiments provide attachment means which allow portions of the golf towel to efficiently dry once the golfer's round is complete, so as to avoid any bacteria or mildew from forming on surfaces thereof. Therefore, the example golf towel may improve the ease and efficiency by which a golfer may clean their golf club faces, golf balls and/or hands.

The example embodiments being thus described, it will be obvious that the same may be varied in many ways. Such variations are not to be regarded as departure from the spirit and scope of the example embodiments, and all such modifications as would be obvious to one skilled in the art are intended to be included within the scope of the following claims.