Title:
Pool cue training device
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The present invention relates to a pool cue training device for assisting a player in determining cue movement so that the player can learn to control and minimize movement for better and more accurate shots. The invention comprises a laser capable of projecting a laser light in a dot or a line, attached to a mounting device for attaching the laser to a cue. The movement of the cue is determined by the difference between the initial position and final position after the striking motion.



Inventors:
Schulze, Ted Walter (Perry, UT, US)
Application Number:
11/999210
Publication Date:
06/04/2009
Filing Date:
12/03/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
473/2
International Classes:
A63D15/00; A63D15/08
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
GRAHAM, MARK S
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
TY UNG (ENCINO, CA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A pool cue training device comprising: A laser; A laser mount to which the laser is attached; The laser mount comprising a sleeve with a hole for fitting a cue stick.

2. The pool cue training device of claim 1, wherein the hole contains at least one O-ring in the interior portion of the hole.

3. The pool cue training device of claim 1, wherein the hole contains a soft material in the interior portion of the hole.

4. The pool cue training device of claim 3, wherein the soft material is rubber.

5. The pool cue training device of claim 3, wherein the soft material is cork.

6. The pool cue training device of claim 1, further comprising an adjustable lens cap that fits over the front end of the laser.

7. The pool cue training device of claim 6, wherein the adjustable lens cap further comprises at least one O-ring for a secure fit over the front end of the laser.

8. The pool cue training device of claim 6, wherein the adjustable lens cap further comprises a beam splitter for splitting the laser light from a dot to a line.

9. The pool cue training device of claim 6, wherein the adjustable lens cap further comprises a soft material on the inside wall of the lens cap.

10. The pool cue training device of claim 9, wherein the soft material is rubber.

11. The pool cue training device of claim 9, wherein the soft material is cork.

12. The pool cue training device of claim 1, wherein the laser is mounted parallel to the circumferential hole such that when the laser, laser mount, and cue are assembled, the laser is parallel to the length of the cue.

13. The pool cue training device of claim 1, further comprising a target for placement on a wall.

14. The pool cue training device of claim 1, further comprising an Allen wrench for adjusting laser light from the laser.

15. The pool cue training device of claim 1, wherein the laser comprises a male thread for attaching to a female thread on the laser mount.

16. The pool cue training device of claim 15, wherein the female thread is provided by a nut.

17. The pool cue training device of claim 15, wherein the hole is a circumferential hole.

18. A method for using the pool cue training device of the present invention comprising the step of: a. Inserting a cue stick through a circumferential hole in a laser mounting device wherein the laser mounting device has a laser attached to the laser mounting device until the laser mounting device is securely attached to the cue stick; b. Turning on the laser; c. Adjusting a laser light, from the laser, with an Allen wrench by moving the adjustment screws on the laser such that the laser light is on the center line of the cue stick when sighting down the shaft of the cue; d. Attaching an adjustable lens cap with a beam splitter; and e. Adjusting the adjustable lens cap such that the laser light is vertical.

19. The method of claim 18, further comprising the step of: f. Placing a target on a distant object for aligning the laser light with the distant object.

20. The method for using a pool cue training device of the present invention for determining the movement in the cue during a striking motion comprising: Measuring a distant between an initial position of a laser light on a distant object, such as a target on a wall, and a final position of a laser light after the striking motion.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

Not Applicable

FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH

Not Applicable

SEQUENCE LISTING

Not Applicable

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to a training aid used in conjunction with pool cue sticks for playing billiards or other games using such cue sticks, for assisting a player in learning to align pool shots and control movement of the cue stick.

Billiards and similar games using a cue stick is a popular among players both young and old, as well as novice and experienced players. While players enjoy these types of games, it is also very difficult for players to be very good or know whether they are performing the movement correctly as the tiniest of movement of the cue stick during a shot motion can cause a precisely aligned shot to deviate from its course. Therefore, there is a need to provide players using a cue stick or such devices a training aid that will teach them how to align their cue stick as well as train them to keep the movement of the cue stick at a minimum when preparing and shooting the cue stick.

While there are other alignment devices that have been developed for helping with the alignment of the cue stick, these prior arts have many shortcomings. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,554,075 to Glazer discloses a pool cue alignment device for pocket billiards which includes a laser mounted to the shaft of the pool cue. The laser beam is initially directed generally parallel to the pool cue, and at least a portion of such beam strikes the cue ball. A section of a mirror or glass, serving as a beam deflector, is mounted to the pool cue between the laser and the tip of the pool cue for diverting a portion of the laser beam at an acute angle upwardly away from the cue stick. While Glazer discloses a pool cue with a laser alignment device that is mounted on the pool cue, Glazer's use of a mirror or glass as a diverting device mounted between the laser and the tip encumbers the use of the stick as the mirror or glass would encumber the movement of the cue stick especially if a player uses a closed bridge (finger around cue shaft). Also, if a player uses a closed bridge, the light beam itself would be blocked by the finger.

Furthermore, because the light beam is focused on the cue ball and the deflected light from the glass mirror focuses on the target ball, it is difficult to determine whether there is movement as a result of the striking motion because the cue ball and target ball are close to the light beam. The present invention overcomes the shortcomings of this invention by allowing for the addition of a light splitter which converts the light beam to a line of light. This line of light when adjusted to be perpendicular to the cue stick can bend over objects in its path. Additionally, since the light beam in line form can bend over objects and targeted on a distant object, such as a wall, which is further from the cue stick and laser, the slightest of movement in the player's shot is reflected in a large movement of the light beam on the distant object. The use of the beam in line form therefore makes it easier for the player to see movements in the cue stick.

Glazer's disclosure and use of the materials disclosed also ruins the cue stick as the mirror or glass is glued onto the stick and the mechanism for holding the laser to the cue stick requires the use of clamps. The present invention uses a sleeve with a cylindrical hole and a soft material, such as O-rings, that does not damage the cue stick. It also makes assembly and removal of the laser and laser mount easy because a player only needs to slide the cue stick in and out of the cylindrical hole.

Other prior arts such as Compton (U.S. Pat. No. 5,275,398), Chipman (U.S. Pat. No. 6,155,929), Carney (U.S. Pat. No. 5,738,595), Wright (U.S. Pat. No. 4,688,796), Davis (U.S. Pat. No. 6,827,651), Domulevicz et al (U.S. Pat. No. 6,769,992), and Evers (U.S. Pat. No. 7,118,486) faces the similar shortcomings as those discussed above. Therefore, the present invention discloses a pool cue training device which allows a player to learn to align pool shots and control the movement of the cue stick when the pool cue training device is used in conjunction with a cue stick. Additionally, the present invention allows for the quick installation and removal of the pool cue training device.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a pool cue training device for assisting a player in determining cue stick movement so that a player can learn to control and minimize movement for better and more accurate shots. The pool cue training device comprises a laser mount wherein the laser mount contains a sleeve with a circumferential hole for fitment onto the cue stick. The circumferential hole further contains a soft material to provide a secure fit of the laser mount on the cue stick without damaging the cue stick.

The pool cue training device also comprises a laser mounted onto the laser mount with various attachment means. The laser may also contain a removable adjustable lens cap which may contain a soft material, such as an O-ring, for fitment of the lens cap onto the front end of the laser. On the inside of the lens cap, a beam splitter may be added to split the beam from the laser into a perpendicular line of light which is capable bending over objects in its path.

The pool cue training device is mounted onto the cue stick and adjustments are made such that the light beam runs down the center of the cue stick. Additionally, a target such as standard reinforced labels or stickers which may be attached to a distant wall to align the line of light so that movement can be determined. The amount of deflection or movement can be determined by measuring the distance between the initial position and the final position of the laser light.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

FIG. 1 is a view of the pool cue training device mounted onto a cue stick.

FIG. 2 are components of the pool cue training device of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a front view of the pool cue training device of the present invention.

FIG. 4 is a rear view of the pool cue training device of the present invention.

FIG. 5 is a rear view of the lens cap.

FIG. 6 is the pool cue training aid of the present invention mounted on a cue with the laser light projected onto a wall.

FIGURE REFERENCES

  • 100 . . . Pool Cue Training Device
  • 110 . . . Cue
  • 200 . . . Laser Mount
  • 210 . . . Sleeve
  • 220 . . . O-ring
  • 230 . . . Adjustment screw
  • 240 . . . Beam Splitter
  • 250 . . . Lens Cap
  • 260 . . . Allen wrench
  • 270 . . . Laser
  • 280 . . . On/Off switch
  • 290 . . . Nut
  • 600 . . . Laser light
  • 610 . . . Target point

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Referring to FIGS. 1 through 6, a detailed description of the present invention is discussed. In FIG. 1, the pool cue training device 100 of the present invention is shown mounted on a cue 110. A cue 110 is a device used for striking an object such as a cue ball in games such as billiards.

Referring to FIG. 2, a breakdown of the components of the pool cue training device 100 of the present invention is shown. The pool cue training device 100 comprises a laser mount 200, a sleeve 210, O-rings 220, adjustment screw 230, beam splitter 240, lens cap 250, Allen wrench 260, laser 270, on/off switch 280, nut 290. The components of the pool cue training device 100 is laid out in the general location to which the components would be assembled.

Referring to FIG. 1 through 7, the assembled pool cue training device 100 is discussed. The pool cue training device 100 comprises a laser mount 200 to which laser 270 is mounted. Laser mount 200 comprises an attachment means which can comprise a female thread for receiving the male thread at the back of laser 270. The female thread may be supplied by a nut 290 that is provided on the laser mount 200. Alternative attachment means may be used for securing laser 270 to laser mount 200 without deviating from the present invention.

Laser mount 200 further comprises a sleeve 210 with a hole shaped to receive cue 110. In the preferred embodiment, the hole in sleeve 210 is a circumferential hole. Within the hole in sleeve 210, sleeve 210 may further contain O-rings 220 near each end of sleeve 210. O-rings 220 are used to provide a tight fit when cue 110 is passed through the hole in sleeve 210. O-rings 220 also minimize or prevent damages to cue 110 when the pool cue training device 100 is mounted onto cue 110. Alternatively, a soft material such as cork or rubber may be used to cover the inside wall of the hole in sleeve 210 without deviating from the present invention.

Laser 270 of pool cue training device 100 is a laser device with adjustment screw 230 which can be adjusted by Allen wrench 260 for focusing and aligning. Laser 270 further comprises an on/off switch 280 for turning laser 270 on and off. Furthermore, laser 270 comprises a male threading at the end opposite the front, or the opening to where the laser light would exit, for attaching laser 270 to female threads on laser mount 200. This female thread can be supplied by nut 290. Other alternative means for attaching laser 270 to laser mount 200 may be used without deviating from the present invention.

Additionally, laser 270 may further comprise lens cap 250 which contains an opening for fitment over the front of laser 270. Lens cap 250 contains a beam splitter 240 which splits the laser light 700 from laser 270 into a line. Lens cap 250 also contains an O-ring on the inner wall of lens cap 250 for securely attaching lens cap 250 to laser 270. Alternatively, a soft material such as cork or rubber may be used on the inside wall of lens cap 250 without deviating from the present invention.

The pool cue training device 100 of the present invention therefore comprises a laser 270 mounted on a laser mount 200 by screwing the male thread of laser 270 to the female thread of laser mount 200. The female thread may be provided by nut 290. A lens cap 250 which comprises a beam splitter 240 is fitted over the front end of laser 270 such that the laser light exiting from laser 270 is transformed from a spot into a line when projected onto a surface. Lens cap 250 further comprises a soft material such as cork, rubber or an O-ring that provides a secure fit over laser 270.

A cue 110 is passed through the hole in sleeve 240 of laser mount 200 until laser mount 200 is securely fitted to cue 110. Cue 110 is inserted such that the front end of laser 270 faces the smaller diameter end of cue 110.

Referring to FIGS. 1 through 6, once laser mount 200 is securely fitted onto cue 110, laser 270 is turned on by pressing on/off switch 280. If laser light 600 exiting laser 270 needs to be centered on cue 110, lens cap 250 is removed. Allen wrench 260 is then used to adjust adjustment screws 230 which are located on several sides of laser 270. Adjustment screws 230 is adjusted with Allen wrench 260 until laser light 600 is centered. Alternatively, lens cap 250 can be removed prior to the mounting of laser mount 200 to cue 110.

Once adjustments have been made to center laser light 600, lens cap 250 can be fitted back onto the front of laser 270. Lens cap 250 is then rotated until laser light 600 in lined form is perpendicular to cue 110.

To use pool cue training device 100 of the present invention, a user aims cue 110 and laser light 600 onto the object to be struck by cue 110. As laser light 600 is in lined form, laser light 600 is projected onto the object to be struck and objects behind the object to be struck such as a wall. A target point 610 may be placed on the wall such that the laser light 600 will align with the target point. When a striking motion or stroke is made, the user will notice a movement in the laser light 600 that is projected on the wall. This movement in laser light 600 in its final position and initial position can be determined by measuring the distance between the initial position and the final position. The greater the distance between the initial position and final position of laser light 600 will provide the user with a sense of how much movement has occurred when they moved the cue 110 in a striking motion. Therefore, by using the pool cue training device 100 of the present invention, the user can learn to control the movement of their stroke.

All the features disclosed in this specification, including any accompanying abstract and drawings, may be replaced by alternative features serving the same, equivalent or similar purpose, unless expressly stated otherwise. Thus, unless expressly stated otherwise, each feature disclosed is one example only of a generic series of equivalent or similar features.

While specific systems and methods have been disclosed in the preceding description, it should be understood that these specifics have been given for the purpose of disclosing the principles of the present invention and that many variations thereof will become apparent to those who are versed in the art.