Title:
Magnetic nock system
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An arrow nock system for holding an arrow and permitting true release from a bow wherein an arrow nock is positioned on an end of an arrow shaft and is magnetically engageable with a ball nock having an at least partially spherical outer surface attached to a bowstring.



Inventors:
Harwath, Frank A. (Naperville, IL, US)
Mizek, Robert S. (Downers Grove, IL, US)
Application Number:
11/998832
Publication Date:
06/04/2009
Filing Date:
11/30/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
473/578
International Classes:
F41B5/14
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
YOUNG, SCOTT E
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Kevin D. Erickson (Hoffman Estates, IL, US)
Claims:
We claim:

1. An arrow nock system for holding an arrow within a bow to permit a true release, the system comprising: an arrow shaft; an arrow nock positioned on an end of the arrow shaft, the arrow nock having a cavity; a magnet and two pole pieces positioned within the arrow nock, the magnet positioned between the two pole pieces; and a ball nock positioned on a bowstring of the bow, the ball nock magnetically engageable with the arrow nock.

2. The arrow nock system of claim 1 wherein the two pole pieces include generally semispherical recesses to direct polarity of the magnet through the ball nock.

3. The arrow nock system of claim 2 wherein a north pole of the magnet is aligned with one pole piece of the two pole pieces and a south pole of the magnet is aligned with an opposite pole piece of the two pole pieces.

4. The arrow nock system of claim 1 wherein the ball nock comprises a hemispherical shell fastened to the bowstring.

5. The arrow nock system of claim 4 further comprising a backing shell connected to the hemispherical shell around the bowstring.

6. The arrow nock system of claim 1 further comprising: an index mark positioned on the arrow nock.

7. The arrow nock system of claim 1 wherein the magnet and the pole pieces are positioned at least partially within the cavity of the arrow nock.

8. An arrow nock system for holding an arrow and permitting release from a bow, the system comprising: an arrow nock positioned on an end of an arrow shaft, the arrow nock having a cavity; a magnet and two pole pieces positioned within the arrow nock; and a ball nock positioned on a bowstring of the bow and the two pole pieces positioned around the magnet to direct polarity of the magnet through the ball nock to magnetically engage the ball nock with the arrow nock.

9. The arrow nock system of claim 8 wherein the magnet is positioned between the two pole pieces and a north pole of the magnet is aligned with one pole piece of the two pole pieces and a south pole of the magnet is aligned with an opposite pole piece of the two pole pieces.

10. The arrow nock system of claim 8 wherein the two pole pieces include generally semispherical recesses to direct the polarity of the magnet through the ball nock.

11. The arrow nock system of claim 8 wherein the ball nock comprises a hemispherical shell fastened to the bowstring.

12. The arrow nock system of claim 11 further comprising a backing shell connected to the hemispherical shell around the bowstring.

13. The arrow nock system of claim 8 further comprising: an index mark positioned on the arrow nock.

14. The arrow nock system of claim 8 further comprising: a secondary string connected to the bowstring on either side of the ball nock.

15. An arrow nock system for holding an arrow and permitting release from a bow, the system comprising: an arrow nock positioned on an end of an arrow shaft, the arrow nock having a cavity; a magnet and two pole pieces positioned within the arrow nock, the magnet positioned between the two pole pieces and each pole piece of the two pole pieces having a generally semispherical recess; and a ball nock having a generally hemispherical outer surface, the ball nock positioned on a bowstring of the bow and in magnetic contact with the two pole pieces to engage the ball nock with the arrow nock.

16. The arrow nock system of claim 15 wherein the ball nock comprises a hemispherical shell and a backing shell sandwiched around the bowstring.

17. The arrow nock system of claim 15 further comprising: an index mark positioned on the arrow nock.

18. The arrow nock system of claim 15 wherein a north pole of the magnet is aligned with one pole piece of the two pole pieces and a south pole of the magnet is aligned with an opposite pole piece of the two pole pieces.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1.Field of the Invention

This invention relates to a magnetic nock arrow release system.

2. Description of Prior Art

A variety of known arrow release systems use an arrow release in connection with a bow to grasp a bowstring and assist the archer in drawing the bowstring of the bow into a firing position. For example, Scott, U.S. Pat. No. 5,765,536 teaches a bowstring release device that engages the bowstring on either side of a nocked arrow and then releases the bowstring with a trigger mechanism.

Another variety of arrow release uses a bowstring nock mounted directly on a bowstring. The bowstring nock is engaged with an arrow release and then released with a trigger mechanism. Such systems are taught by Summers, U.S. Pat. No. 5,685,286 and Summers, U.S. Pat. No. 5,685,286. Alternatively, Cook, U.S. Pat. No. 4,134,369, teaches a ball nock integrated directly with the arrow shaft that is engageable with a trigger mechanism.

There is a need, however, for an arrow nock and arrow release system using a reliable mechanism that permits a freely moveable, gimbaled engagement between the arrow release and the arrow thus ensuring a straight and predictable launch of the arrow.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is one object of this invention to provide a magnetic arrow nock that does not affect the flight of the arrow as the arrow discharges from the bow.

It is another object of this invention to provide an arrow nock that permits a gimbal action with or without a corresponding arrow release.

The above and other objects are accomplished with different preferred embodiments of an arrow nock and arrow release system according to this invention.

Arrows traditionally include a nock for engaging with a bow string. Traditional arrow nocks are generally cylindrical in shape, following the general shape of the arrow shaft. Such arrow nocks include a split center portion with a gap that is engageable with a bow string.

Arrow releases may be used in connection with launching arrows. A traditional arrow release includes a gripping or engagement mechanism that holds the bowstring or a bowstring nock prior to release from the bow. A well-launched arrow results from an archer that does not impart any torque or angular momentum to the arrow prior to launch thereby insuring that a rearward portion of the arrow follows a front portion in a predominantly straight path.

An arrow nock system according to this invention is preferably used to maintain an alignment of an arrow shaft in a fixed position prior to and during launch of the arrow. As described, the present invention includes a magnetic arrow nock positioned on one end of the arrow shaft and having an opening permitting engagement with an at least partially spherical ball nock. The ball nock engages a bowstring which thereby permits magnetic engagement of an arrow nock as described herein.

As a result of this engagement between the arrow nock and the ball nock, a gimbal or ball and socket arrangement is created that permits three axes of rotation of the arrow release relative to the ball nock. This permits that archer to draw the arrow while minimizing risk of misalignment of the arrow relative to a desired plane of flight.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The above-mentioned and other features and objects of this invention will be better understood from the following detailed description when taken in view of the drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side perspective view of a magnetic nock system according to one preferred embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a side view of a magnetic nock system according to one preferred embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 3 is a rear perspective view of the magnetic nock system shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an exploded rear perspective view of an magnetic nock system according to one preferred embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 5 is an exploded side view of the magnetic nock system shown in FIG. 4; and

FIG. 6 is a schematic view of a magnet-pole piece configuration according to one preferred embodiment of this invention.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

FIGS. 1-6 show an arrow nock system according to various preferred embodiments of this invention. As described, the arrow nock system is preferably used to maintain an alignment of arrow shaft 30 in a fixed position prior to and during launch of the arrow.

Referring to FIGS. 1-3, arrow nock system including arrow nock 10 and ball nock 50 is shown in a side views and a rear perspective view, respectively. A traditional arrow typically includes an arrow shaft, a tip and a nock. Arrow shaft 30 includes a tip (not shown) formed on a distal end of the arrow shaft 30 and arrow nock 10 formed on a proximal end of the arrow shaft 30.

As shown in FIGS. 1-3, arrow nock 10 may include an elongated body having cavity 20 formed therein. The outer surface of arrow nock 10 is preferably formed to fluidly connect with arrow shaft and is further joined with arrow shaft 30 at sleeve 35. Sleeve 35 may then be glued, press-fit, threadedly engaged or otherwise attached with respect to arrow shaft 30. As such, arrow nock 10 is preferably attached with respect to arrow shaft 30 in a manner known to those having ordinary skill in the art.

As described, arrow nock 10 is positioned on an end of arrow shaft 30 and preferably includes a central cavity 20. Cavity 20 is preferably formed within a proximal end of arrow shaft 30 following attachment of arrow nock 10 to arrow shaft 30.

According to a preferred embodiment of the arrow nock system described herein, ball nock 50 is positioned on bowstring 100 of the bow. Ball nock 50 preferably at least partially includes a metal such that ball nock 50 is magnetically engageable with arrow nock 10, as further described below.

Ball nock 50 preferably comprises hemispherical shell 60 and backing shell 70 sandwiched around bowstring, as best shown in FIGS. 4 and 5. As used throughout, “hemispherical shell” is intended to include a shell having any suitable contour to permit a gimbaled engagement with arrow nock 10. Such contours may include semispherical, hemispherical, spherical or any combination thereof.

As best shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, backing shell 70 is preferably connected to hemispherical shell 60 and around bowstring 100 using one or more screws 75. Alternatively, ball nock 50 may be engaged with bowstring using any preferred method of attachment and may be unitary or comprise multi-components, such as shells 60, 70.

According to a preferred embodiment of this invention, and as best shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, magnet 40 and two pole pieces 45 are positioned within arrow nock 10. As shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, magnet 40 is preferably positioned between the two pole pieces 45.

Magnet 40, as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, includes a generally rectangular construction, however, any preferred configuration may be utilized while still permit the benefits of pole pieces 45 as described below. Additionally, in one preferred embodiment of this invention, each of the two pole pieces 45 include generally semispherical recesses 47 that preferably generally correspond in contour to an outer contour or surface of ball nock 50, in particular, hemispherical shell 60, for example.

As a result of this preferred embodiment of the invention, pole pieces 45 preferably direct polarity of magnet 40 through ball nock 50, thereby maintaining arrow nock 10 into magnetic engagement with ball nock 50. More particularly, semispherical recesses 47 or similar contours within pole pieces 47 preferably extend beyond a perimeter of magnet 40 to permit directional magnetic flow through pole pieces 47 and ball nock 50. As shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, magnet 40 and pole pieces 45 may be positioned at least partially within cavity 20 of arrow nock 10.

FIG. 6 shows one preferred embodiment of the invention wherein poles of magnet 40 are oriented so that one field, for instance north, shown as “N” in FIG. 6, is adjacent one pole piece 47 and the opposite field, for instance south, shown as “S” in FIG. 6, is adjacent the opposite pole piece 47. This effectively doubles the strength of the magnetic flux through ball nock 50 because both poles of magnet 40 are creating a magnetic force. FIG. 6 demonstrates a preferred flux field through pole pieces 47 and ball nock 50.

According to one preferred embodiment of this invention, ball nock 50 engages bowstring 100 in a manner that permits fixed placement of ball nock 50 along bowstring 100. Bowstring 100 is preferably nested within ball nock 50 to permit engagement between ball nock 50 and arrow nock 10 as described herein.

As shown in FIG. 1, secondary string 90 may be connected to bowstring 100 so that it is fastened to bowstring 100 on either side of ball nock 50. Secondary string 90, in part, permits the use of standard arrow releases in association with the arrow nock system described herein. As such, according to a preferred embodiment of this invention, and as best shown in FIGS. 1-5, the arrow nock system may be used with or without a traditional arrow release resulting in a desired system for holding and then releasing an arrow from a bow.

As a result of this engagement between arrow nock 10 and ball nock 50, a gimbal or ball and socket arrangement is created that permits three axes of rotation of arrow nock 10 relative to ball nock 50. This permits the archer to draw the arrow while minimizing risk of misalignment of the arrow relative to a desired plane of flight. According to one preferred embodiment of this invention, index mark 15 may be positioned on or in arrow nock 10 to indicate a preferred rotational alignment of arrow shaft 30 when properly nocked. As such, index mark 15, as shown in FIG. 1, may face upward to indicate to the archer that the arrow is properly nocked within the bow.

In operation, the archer nocks an arrow into the bow such that arrow nock 10 is magnetically engaged with ball nock 50. The archer then draws back bowstring 100 which necessarily draws back ball nock 50 and, magnetically, arrow nock 10 and arrow shaft 30. Once a target is acquired, the archer simply releases bowstring 100, with or without use of a mechanical release, and arrow shaft 30 and arrow nock 10 disengage from ball nock 50 and bowstring 10 in a smooth and generally linear manner.

While in the foregoing specification this invention has been described in relation to certain preferred embodiments thereof, and many details have been set forth for purpose of illustration, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that the invention is susceptible to additional embodiments and that certain of the details described can be varied considerably without departing from the basic principles of the invention.