Title:
Ambient Temperature Energy Generating System
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A system for generating energy which utilizes motive chemicals 40 with boiling point temperatures in the range of −5° C. to 45° C. These temperatures are within the typical range of temperatures found near or at the earth's surface. Heat is transferred from the surroundings to a boiling chamber 10 and then the motive chemical. Vapor pressure is generated which turns a gas turbine 14. The motive chemical passes through the turbine and condenses in the condensation chamber 14, at ambient air, ground or fluid temperatures using no supplemental energy source. The condensation chamber returns the motive chemical to its liquid state. Gravity acting on the motive chemical drives a fluid turbine 24. The fluid is returned to a holding chamber 26. When the motive chemical is depleted in the boiling chamber, the motive chemical is transferred from the holding chamber to the boiling chamber and the cycle begins again.



Inventors:
Collis, Matthew P. (Seven Valleys, PA, US)
Application Number:
11/949140
Publication Date:
06/04/2009
Filing Date:
12/03/2007
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F01K27/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
JETTON, CHRISTOPHER M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Matthew P. Collis (Thomasville, PA, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A method for generating energy, comprising the steps of: (a) providing a working fluid with a boiling point between −5° C. to 45° C., and (b) providing a boiling chamber substantially near the surface of the earth, the boiling chamber in an ambient environment, the ambient environment immediately surrounding the boiling chamber having an ambient temperature at or greater than the boiling point of the working fluid but not greater than 45° C., and (c) providing a condensation chamber substantially near the surface of the earth, the condensation chamber at a temperature less than the boiling point of the working fluid, and (d) placing the working fluid in a liquid state in the boiling chamber, and (e) transferring heat from the ambient environment surrounding the boiling chamber into the boiling chamber, the heat boiling the liquid working fluid in the boiling chamber to place at least a portion of said liquid working fluid in a gaseous state, said heat transfer driven by the difference in temperature between said ambient environment and the working fluid within the boiling chamber; (f) flowing the gaseous working fluid from the boiling chamber through a regulator valve to a means for generating electricity with said gaseous working fluid, and (g) flowing said gaseous working fluid from the means for generating electricity to the condensation chamber and condensing the gaseous working fluid back to a liquid working fluid, and (h) flowing the liquid working fluid from the condensation chamber to the boiling chamber to complete an energy cycle using the working fluid.

2. The method of claim 1 wherein said working fluid is selected from one of the following: ether, methyl bromide, methyl iodide, hydrogen cyanide, methylmercaptan, bromoethane, ethyl chloride, ethylamine, acetaldehyde, ethanethiol, methylene chloride, dimethyl sulfide, ethylene oxide, 2-chloropropane, 2-propylamine, vinylidene chloride, dichlorofluoromethane, phosgene, trimethylamine, dichloromethylsilane, propylene oxide, dibromodifluoromethane, tert-butylamine, trichloromonofluoromethane, tetramethylsilane, 1,1,1-trifluoro-2-chloroethane, dichlorotetrafluoroethane, isopentane, isoprene, 1-buten-3-yne, 2-methyl, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-difluoroethylene, chloropentafluoroacetone, butane, 1,3-butadiene, 1-butyne, 2-butene, vinyl methyl ether, methyl formate, pentane, 1-pentene, 2-pentene, dimethoxymethane, vinamar, vinyl ether, ethyl nitrite, furan, 2-methyoxprop-1-ene, dimethylamine, teflurane, cyclopentene, spiropentane, cyclobutane, HCFC 123, halon 1211, HCFC 123a, ethane, pentafluoroiodo-, decafluoroisobutane, perfluorobutane, trifluoroiodoethylene, perfluorobut-2-ene, bis(trifluoromethyl)disulfide, bromofluoromethane, 1,1-dichloro-1,2,2,2-tetrafluoroethane, butanoyl chloride, heptafluoro-, butane, 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluoro-, trifluoroacetic anhydride, cyanic acid, propane, 2,2-difluoro-, ethane, 2-bromo-1,1,1-trifluoro-, 2-propanone, 1,1,1-trifluoro-, trifluoromethanesulphonyl chloride, ethane, 1,1,2-trifluoro-, propanoyl fluoride, ethane, 1-chloro-1,2,2-trifluoro-, acetic acid, trifluoro-, methyl ester, 1,3-butadiyne, 1-fluoropropane, propane, 1,3-difluoro-, neopentane, 2-butyne, azomethane, 1,3-pentadiene, carbon suboxide, cyanogen chloride, amylene, cyclopropyl methyl ether, ethyl methyl ether, isopropyl nitrite, 1,3-cyclopentadiene, methyl propyl ether, 2-chloro-1-propene, acetyl fluoride, 1-butene, 3,3-dimethyl-, 3-methyl-1-butene, 2-methyl-1-butene, cis-2-butene, 1,2-butadiene, 1,4-pentadiene, penta-1,2-diene, arsine, methyl-, dimethylarsine, arsine, ethyl-, vinyl bromide, bromochlorofluoromethane, trimethyl phosphine, 1-methylcyclopropane, 3-methylbut-1-yne, 3-methylbuta-1,2-diene, ether, isopropyl methyl, N,N-dimethylethylamine, cyclobutane, methyl, bromotrifluoroethylene, 1,2-dichlor-1,2-difluoroethylene, trans-2-butene, 1,2-difluorethane, ethaneamine, N-methyl-, methyl isocyanate, 1-pentyne, cis-2-pentene, 1-propene, 3-methoxy-, trans-2-pentene, propane, 1,2-dichloro-1,1,2,3,3,3-hexfluoro, perfluoroisopropyl iodide, perflenapent, propane, 1,1,2,2,3-pentafluoro-, 1,3-butadiene, 1,1,2,3,4,4-hexafluor-, 1-buten-3-yne, peroxide, dimethyl, hexafluorocyclobutene, ethanamine, 2,2,2-trifluoro-, 1,1,2,2,3,3,3-heptafluoro-1-iodopropane, 3-fluoropropene, cyclobutene, 3,3-dimethylbutyne, cyclopropane, 1,2-dimethyl-, cis-, chloro(methyl)silane, silane, trimethyl, aziridine, 1-methyl-, cyclobutane, methylene-, cyclopropane, ethyl-, 3-penten-1-yne, (Z)-, cis-1,3-pentadiene, ethane, 1-chloro-fluoro-, 1,1-dimethylcyclopropane, HCFC 141b, chlorodimethylborane, trans-1,3-pentadiene, butane, 1-fluoro-, nonafluoro-tert-butanol, cyclopropane, 1,2-dimethyl-, trans-, disiloxane, 1,3-diethenyl-1,1,3,3-tetramethyl-, propene, 2-chloropentafluoro-, propane, 1,1,1,2,2,3,3-heptafluoro-3-(1,2,2,2-tetrafluorethoxy)-, borane, dimethoxy-, dichloroacetylene, propene, 1-chlor-(Z)-, propene, 1-chloro-(E)-, butylene, pentene, desflurane.

3. The method of claim 1 wherein the ambient environment surrounding the boiling chamber is one of: air and ground.

4. The method of claim 1 wherein the condensate chamber is at a higher elevation than the boiling chamber whereby liquid working fluid flows downhill from the condensate chamber to the boiling chamber, and step (h) comprises the step of: (i) flowing the downhill flow of liquid working fluid through a means for generating electricity from said downhill flow.

6. The method of claim 1 wherein said condensation chamber is surrounded by air or ground having an ambient temperature less than the boiling point of the working fluid whereby heat transfer between such air or ground and the condensation chamber maintains the temperature of the condensation chamber below the boiling point of the working fluid.

7. The method of claim 1 wherein the gaseous working fluid is released from the boiling chamber at a pressure not greater than 10 atmospheres.

8. The method of claim 1 wherein the condensation chamber is surrounded by an ambient environment having a temperature of not less than −5° C.

9. The method of claim 1 wherein said boiling chamber is positioned in a body of water, said body of water comprising a naturally occurring body of water or a man-made body of water in fluid communication with a naturally occurring body of water.

10. The method of claim 1 wherein said condensation chamber is positioned in a body of water, said body of water comprising a naturally occurring body of water or a man-made body of water in fluid communication with a naturally occurring body of water.

11. The method of claim 1 wherein said boiling chamber comprises a plurality of chambers, each chamber connected to said means for generating electricity with said gaseous working fluid.

12. A method for generating energy, comprising the steps of: (a) providing a motive chemical with a boiling point of −5° C. to 45° C. and positioning said motive chemical in liquid form inside an expandable reaction chamber, and (b) positioning said expandable reaction chamber in an air tight boiling chamber casing and providing a boiling medium surrounding the reaction chamber and within the air tight boiling chamber casing, and (c) said boiling medium comprising a gas, gel, fluid or solid particulate exposed outside of the air tight boiling chamber casing to atmospheric air temperatures, ground temperatures or fluid temperatures at a location substantially near the surface of the earth and positioned irrespective of environmental conditions other than temperature, at a minimum temperature of said boiling point of said motive chemical and no higher in temperature than 45° C., and (d) transferring the boiling medium to the surrounding area around the boiling chamber, generating an increase in vapor pressure as said motive chemical comes to a boil, and increasing the volume of the reaction chamber and the amount of pressure on the boiling medium, and (e) forcing the medium through a boiling medium regulator valve with sufficient force to turn a turbine and an electrical generator linked to said boiling medium regulator valve, and (f) generating electrical energy and transferring said boiling medium from the turbine and when the pressure on said boiling medium has diminished substantially, removing any residual boiling medium within the confines of said boiling chamber casing through a boiling medium volume control valve, and (g) transferring a condensing medium through a condensing medium inlet valve through said boiling chamber casing to the area surrounding the reaction chamber, and (h) condensing the motive chemical inside the reaction chamber and reducing the volume of said reaction chamber, and (i) removing said condensing medium through the condensing medium outlet valve, and (j) transferring boiling medium through said boiling chamber volume control valve to the area surrounding said reaction chamber to complete an energy generation cycle.

13. The method of claim 12 wherein said motive chemical is composed of ether, methyl bromide, methyl iodide, hydrogen cyanide, methylmercaptan, bromoethane, ethyl chloride, ethylamine, acetaldehyde, ethanethiol, methylene chloride, dimethyl sulfide, ethylene oxide, 2-chloropropane, 2-propylamine, vinylidene chloride, dichlorofluoromethane, phosgene, trimethylamine, dichloromethylsilane, propylene oxide, dibromodifluoromethane, tert-butylamine, trichloromonofluoromethane, tetramethylsilane, 1,1,1-trifluoro-2-chloroethane, dichlorotetrafluoroethane, isopentane, isoprene, 1-buten-3-yne, 2-methyl, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-difluoroethylene, chloropentafluoroacetone, butane, 1,3-butadiene, 1-butyne, 2-butene, vinyl methyl ether, methyl formate, pentane, 1-pentene, 2-pentene, dimethoxymethane, vinamar, vinyl ether, ethyl nitrite, furan, 2-methyoxprop-1-ene, dimethylamine, teflurane, cyclopentene, spiropentane, cyclobutane, HCFC 123, halon 1211, HCFC 123a, ethane, pentafluoroiodo-, decafluoroisobutane, perfluorobutane, trifluoroiodoethylene, perfluorobut-2-ene, bis(trifluoromethyl)disulfide, bromofluoromethane, 1,1-dichloro-1,2,2,2-tetrafluoroethane, butanoyl chloride, heptafluoro-, butane, 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluoro-, trifluoroacetic anhydride, cyanic acid, propane, 2,2-difluoro-, ethane, 2-bromo-1,1,1-trifluoro-, 2-propanone, 1,1,1-trifluoro-, trifluoromethanesulphonyl chloride, ethane, 1,1,2-trifluoro-, propanoyl fluoride, ethane, 1-chloro-1,2,2-trifluoro-, acetic acid, trifluoro-, methyl ester, 1,3-butadiyne, 1-fluoropropane, propane, 1,3-difluoro-, neopentane, 2-butyne, azomethane, 1,3-pentadiene, carbon suboxide, cyanogen chloride, amylene, cyclopropyl methyl ether, ethyl methyl ether, isopropyl nitrite, 1,3-cyclopentadiene, methyl propyl ether, 2-chloro-1-propene, acetyl fluoride, 1-butene, 3,3-dimethyl-, 3-methyl-1-butene, 2-methyl-1-butene, cis-2-butene, 1,2-butadiene, 1,4-pentadiene, penta-1,2-diene, arsine, methyl-, dimethylarsine, arsine, ethyl-, vinyl bromide, bromochlorofluoromethane, trimethyl phosphine, 1-methylcyclopropane, 3-methylbut-1-yne, 3-methylbuta-1,2-diene, ether, isopropyl methyl, N,N-dimethylethylamine, cyclobutane, methyl, bromotrifluoroethylene, 1,2-dichlor-1,2-difluoroethylene, trans-2-butene, 1,2-difluorethane, ethaneamine, N-methyl-, methyl isocyanate, 1-pentyne, cis-2-pentene, 1-propene, 3-methoxy-, trans-2-pentene, propane, 1,2-dichloro-1,1,2,3,3,3-hexfluoro, perfluoroisopropyl iodide, perflenapent, propane, 1,1,2,2,3-pentafluoro-, 1,3-butadiene, 1,1,2,3,4,4-hexafluor-, 1-buten-3-yne, peroxide, dimethyl, hexafluorocyclobutene, ethanamine, 2,2,2-trifluoro-, 1,1,2,2,3,3,3-heptafluoro-1-iodopropane, 3-fluoropropene, cyclobutene, 3,3-dimethylbutyne, cyclopropane, 1,2-dimethyl-, cis-, chloro(methyl)silane, silane, trimethyl, aziridine, 1-methyl-, cyclobutane, methylene-, cyclopropane, ethyl-, 3-penten-1-yne, (Z)-, cis-1,3-pentadiene, ethane, 1-chloro-fluoro-, 1,1-dimethylcyclopropane, HCFC 141b, chlorodimethylborane, trans-1,3-pentadiene, butane, 1-fluoro-, nonafluoro-tert-butanol, cyclopropane, 1,2-dimethyl-, trans-, disiloxane, 1,3-diethenyl-1,1,3,3-tetramethyl-, propene, 2-chloropentafluoro-, propane, 1,1,1,2,2,3,3-heptafluoro-3-(1,2,2,2-tetrafluorethoxy)-, borane, dimethoxy-, dichloroacetylene, propene, 1-chlor-(Z)-, propene, 1-chloro-(E)-, butylene, pentene, desflurane.

14. The method of claim 12 wherein said boiling medium is exposed to said location, irrespective of any environmental conditions other than air temperature and is exposed to said atmospheric air temperatures in the range of −5° C. and 45° C. to heat said reaction chamber.

15. The method of claim 12 wherein said boiling medium is positioned at said location, irrespective of any environmental conditions other than ground temperature and is exposed to ground temperatures in the range of −5° C. and 45° C. to heat said reaction chamber.

16. The method of claim 12 wherein said boiling medium is exposed to said location, irrespective of any environmental conditions other than fluid temperature and is exposed to said fluid temperatures in the range of −5° C. and 45° C. to heat said reaction chamber.

17. The method of claim 12 wherein said boiling medium is the same substance as said fluid to heat said boiling medium.

18. The method of claim 12 wherein said boiling medium is comprised of fluid from a river, stream, lake, ocean, sea or cold spring.

19. The method of claim 12 wherein said condensation medium is the same substance as said fluid to heat said boiling medium.

20. The method of claim 12 wherein said condensation medium is comprised of fluid from a river, stream, lake, ocean, sea or cold spring.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

Not Applicable

FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH

Not Applicable

SEQUENCE LISTING OR PROGRAM

Not Applicable

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Field of Invention

This invention relates to harnessing thermal energy to generate electrical or mechanical energy.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Prior Art

Energy generation systems commonly involve burning fossil fuels to increase the temperature of water to its vapor state in the form of steam. Harnessed steam pressure can then generate mechanical power, which in turn is converted to electrical energy. However, the burning of fossil fuels to generate steam can pollute the environment and the fuel once incinerated is not recoverable.

Solar energy relies on the transfer of energy from the sun to the solar panels typically outside a building structure. The solar panels transfer the energy from the sun to fluid circulating inside the solar panels. The fluid in turn can then be used to produce hot water or heat for the structure. The intensity of the solar energy is significantly reduced prior to sunset and after sundown. Therefore peak energy generation occurs only during daylight hours. Daylight hours are at a minimum when needed most, during cold winter months.

Geothermal energy relies on deep wells to heat fluids to a boiling point to drive turbines. The depth of the drill hole can be thousands of feet making the cost prohibitive to individual home owners. Alternative geothermal methods involve extracting the heat from water, which is near the surface of the earth. This method however requires a supplemental energy source to raise the temperature to room temperature. In addition, pumps and their associated energy costs are required to access the water.

Hot springs have been used to heat homes directly or to heat motive chemicals to their boiling point to drive turbines. However, the location and number of these hot springs prohibit wide spread use.

Wind energy relies on a constant supply of wind to drive turbines. During slack periods, little or no energy is produced.

Nuclear power generates radioactive waste which will have an environmental impact thousands of years from today.

Hydroelectric power relies on damming up rivers or streams thus having a negative environmental impact on fish migrations, wildlife and the topography of the land.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,149,385 to Sheinbaum (1979) discloses a method of using deep wells, a priming fluid, a working fluid, a heat exchanger or a power extracting device as an energy source: however, deep wells and two fluids are required to either extract heat or to generate energy.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,240,729 to Yoo et al. discloses a method of converting thermal energy to mechanical energy. The Yoo patent relies on a heat source above ambient temperature to heat fluid beyond its boiling point, which increases the vapor pressure within the heated chamber, thereby forcing fluid out of the chamber and into the flow circuit. The increased weight of the downstream chamber creates a torque about the axle, rotating the frame in an upstream direction. This method however relies on energy transfer of the heat source fluid to raise the temperature of the motive fluids to their boiling points. The heat source fluid needs to be brought in contact with the motive fluid and heat transfer needs to occur. Because of the need for this heat transfer step, energy is lost. Finally, the invention provides only a unidirectional flow of the gas and therefore energy generation is not maximized.

U.S. Pat. No. 7,089,740 to Ou discloses a method of boiling a liquid in a pressure vessel to generate a high pressure vapor that drives a motor. Heat energy is gathered from a remote high temperature heat source (such as solar or geothermal sources) and heats the vapor in the pressure vessel to a sufficiently high temperature to generate the high pressure vapor.

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

Objects and Advantages

Accordingly, besides the objects and advantages of the energy generating device described in my above patent, several objects and advantages of the present invention are:

    • (a) to provide a method and mechanisms for continuous, 24 hour/day energy generation.
    • (b) to provide a method of energy generation which is non-polluting and does not deplete valuable natural resources.
    • (c) to provide an energy source which is not location prohibitive.
    • (d) to provide an energy source which is not cost prohibitive.

Further objects and advantages are to use a motive chemical with boiling points within the typical air, fluid or ground temperatures near the surface of the earth to generate energy.

SUMMARY

In accordance with the present invention an ambient temperature energy generating system (ATEGS) comprises a method for continuous energy generation. The ATEGS utilizes a motive chemical contained within a boiling chamber. Possible motive chemicals have boiling points in the range of −5° C. to 45° C. The boiling chamber is exposed to outdoor temperatures found at or in close proximity to the surface of the earth. The majority of the surface area of the boiling chamber is found in the open air, in a fluid exposed to outdoor temperatures or the ground. The boiling chamber is exposed to no additional supplemental heat source. The ATEGS is not location limited and can use the ambient temperatures at any location on earth to generate energy. As the temperature of the motive chemical reaches the boiling point, vapor pressure increases. The vapor pressure causes a turbine to move and energy to be generated. The fluid is transferred to a condensation chamber using the ambient temperatures of the earth to condensate the motive chemical. No supplemental cooling system is required. Using gravity the condensed motive chemical can drive a fluid turbine and energy is produced. The condensed fluid is transferred to a holding tank and then back to the boiling chamber for the cycle to repeat.

DRAWINGS

Figures

FIG. 1 shows the ATEGS device with one boiling chamber.

FIG. 2 shows the ATEGS device with multiple boiling chambers.

FIG. 3 shows an alternative version of the ATEGS device.

DRAWINGS

Reference Numerals

10boiling chamber12boiling chamber regulator valve
14gas turbine16turbine drive shaft
18electric generator20condensation chamber
22condensation chamber24fluid turbine
regulator valve
26holding chamber28holding tank regulator valve
30boiling chamber one way32volume level sensor
inlet valve
34boiling medium36boiling chamber casing
38reaction chamber40motive chemical
42condensing medium44boiling medium volume control
valve
46boiling medium regulator48condensing medium inlet valve
valve
50condensing medium outlet
valve

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

FIG. 1

A preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIG. 1. The invention has a boiling chamber 10. Located within the boiling chamber at times during the process is a motive chemical 40 with boiling points in the range of −5° C. to 45° C. Some suitable motive chemicals 40 include, but are not necessarily limited to:

1. Ether

2. Methyl bromide

3. Methyl iodide

4. Hydrogen cyanide

5. Methylmercaptan

6. Bromoethane

7. Ethyl Chloride

8. Ethylamine

9. Acetaldehyde

10. Ethanethiol

11. Methylene Chloride

12. Dimethyl sulfide

13. Ethylene oxide

14. 2-Chloropropane

15. 2-Propylamine

16. Vinylidene Chloride

17. Dichlorofluoromethane

18. Phosgene

19. Trimethylamine

20. Dichloromethylsilane

21. Propylene oxide

22. Dibromodifluoromethane

23. tert-Butylamine

24. Trichloromonofluoromethane

25. Tetramethylsilane

26. 1,1,1-Trifluoro-2-chloroethane

27. Dichlorotetrafluoroethane

28. Isopentane

29. Isoprene

30. 1-Buten-3-yne, 2-methyl

31. 1,1-Dichloro-2,2-difluoroethylene

32. Chloropentafluoroacetone

33. Butane

34. 1,3-Butadiene

35. 1-Butyne

36. 2-Butene

37. Vinyl methyl ether

38. Methyl formate

39. Pentane

40. 1-Pentene

41. 2-Pentene

42. Dimethoxymethane

43. Vinamar

44. Vinyl ether

45. Ethyl nitrite

46. Furan

47. 2-Methyoxprop-1-ene

48. Dimethylamine

49. Teflurane

50. Cyclopentene

51. Spiropentane

52. Cyclobutane

53. HCFC 123

54. Halon 1211

55. HCFC 123a

56. Ethane, pentafluoroiodo-

57. Decafluoroisobutane

58. Perfluorobutane

59. Trifluoroiodoethylene

60. Perfluorobut-2-ene

61. Bis(trifluoromethyl)disulfide

62. Bromofluoromethane

63. 1,1-Dichloro-1,2,2,2-tetrafluoroethane

64. Butanoyl chloride, heptafluoro-

65. Butane, 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluoro-

66. Trifluoroacetic anhydride

67. Cyanic acid

68. Propane, 2,2-difluoro-

69. Ethane, 2-bromo-1,1,1-trifluoro-

70. 2-Propanone, 1,1,1-trifluoro-

71. Trifluoromethanesulphonyl chloride

72. Ethane, 1,1,2-trifluoro-

73. Propanoyl fluoride

74. Ethane, 1-chloro-1,2,2-trifluoro-

75. Acetic acid, trifluoro-, methyl ester

76. 1,3-Butadiyne

77. 1-Fluoropropane

78. Propane, 1,3-difluoro-

79. Neopentane

80. 2-Butyne

81. Azomethane

82. 1,3-Pentadiene

83. Carbon suboxide

84. Cyanogen chloride

85. Amylene

86. Cyclopropyl methyl ether

87. Ethyl methyl ether

88. Isopropyl nitrite

89. 1,3-Cyclopentadiene

90. Methyl propyl ether

91. 2-Chloro-1-propene

92. Acetyl fluoride

93. 1-Butene, 3,3-dimethyl-

94. 3-Methyl-1-butene

95. 2-Methyl-1-butene

96. cis-2-Butene

97. 1,2-Butadiene

98. 1,4-Pentadiene

99. Penta-1,2-diene

100. Arsine, methyl-

101. Dimethylarsine

102. Arsine, ethyl-

103. Vinyl bromide

104. Bromochlorofluoromethane

105. Trimethyl phosphine

106. 1-Methylcyclopropane

107. 3-Methylbut-1-yne

108. 3-Methylbuta-1,2-diene

109. Ether, isopropyl methyl

110. N,N-Dimethylethylamine

111. Cyclobutane, methyl

112. Bromotrifluoroethylene

113. 1,2-Dichlor-1,2-difluoroethylene

114. trans-2-Butene

115. 1,2-Difluorethane

116. Ethaneamine, N-methyl-

117. Methyl isocyanate

118. 1-Pentyne

119. cis-2-Pentene

120. 1-Propene, 3-methoxy-

121. trans-2-Pentene

122. Propane, 1,2-dichloro-1,1,2,3,3,3-hexfluoro

123. Perfluoroisopropyl iodide

124. Perflenapent

125. Propane, 1,1,2,2,3-pentafluoro-

126. 1,3-Butadiene, 1,1,2,3,4,4-hexafluor-

127. 1-Buten-3-yne

128. Peroxide, dimethyl

129. Hexafluorocyclobutene

130. Ethanamine, 2,2,2-trifluoro-

131. 1,1,2,2,3,3,3-Heptafluoro-1-iodopropane

132. 3-Fluoropropene

133. Cyclobutene

134. 3,3-Dimethylbutyne

135. Cyclopropane, 1,2-dimethyl-, cis-

136. chloro(methyl)silane

137. Silane, trimethyl

138. Aziridine, 1-methyl-

139. Cyclobutane, methylene-

140. Cyclopropane, ethyl-

141. 3-Penten-1-yne, (Z)-

142. cis-1,3-Pentadiene

143. Ethane, 1-chloro-fluoro-

144. 1,1-Dimethylcyclopropane

145. HCFC 141b

146. Chlorodimethylborane

147. trans-1,3-Pentadiene

148. Butane, 1-fluoro-

149. Nonafluoro-tert-butanol

150. Cyclopropane, 1,2-dimethyl-, trans-

151. Disiloxane, 1,3-diethenyl-1,1,3,3-tetramethyl-

152. Propene, 2-chloropentafluoro-

153. Propane, 1,1,1,2,2,3,3-heptafluoro-3-(1,2,2,2-tetrafluorethoxy)-

154. Borane, dimethoxy-

155. Dichloroacetylene

156. Propene, 1-chlor-(Z)-

157. Propene, 1-chloro-(E)-

158. Butylene

159. Pentene

160. Desflurane

The boiling chamber is placed in a position so that the boiling chamber is exposed to the earth's atmospheric air temperatures, ground temperatures or fluid temperatures. The boiling chamber has an outlet regulator valve 12. The regulating valve is connected to a gas turbine 14. The turbine is linked to a drive shaft 16, which is linked to an electric generator 18. The turbine contains an outlet valve, which connects to a condensation chamber 20. The condensation chamber is placed in a position so that the boiling chamber is exposed to the earth's atmospheric air temperature, fluid temperature or ground temperature. The condensation chamber contains an outlet regulator valve 22. The outlet regulator valve connects to a fluid turbine 24. The fluid turbine connects to the top of a holding chamber 26. The holding chamber has an outlet regulator valve 28, which connects to a one way inlet valve 30 on the boiling chamber 10. The above system will have one or multiple boiling/condensation chambers linked to one or multiple turbine depending on space restrictions and the desired amount of energy to be generated. The above system will have the capacity to replace the motive chemical depending on the environmental temperatures encountered by the boiling or condensation chambers. The system will have the appropriate valves to channel the motive chemical to a holding tank and back to the ATEGS when needed. The turbines can be either impulse or reaction type.

OPERATION

FIGS. 1, 2

The manner of generating energy using an ambient temperature energy generating system (ATEGS) begins with radiant or conductive heat transfer from the air, ground or fluid to the air tight pressure vessel or boiling chamber 10. The surrounding temperature of the boiling chamber is in the range of −5° C. to 45° C. The working fluid or motive liquid inside the boiling chamber has a boiling point below the ambient temperature. The liquid inside the boiling chamber increases in temperature to the boiling point of the motive chemical. The vapor pressure inside the boiling chamber increases.

Preferably heat transfer from the ambient environment immediately surrounding the boiling chamber to the working fluid in the boiling chamber causes the liquid working fluid to boil or vaporize. This heat transfer is generated solely by the difference in temperature between the ambient environment and the temperature of the working fluid within the boiling chamber. No additional structure is necessary to form a high temperature heat source or to transfer heat from a heat source located away from the boiling chamber to the boiling chamber.

When sufficient pressure has built within the boiling chamber the gas is released through a regulator valve 12 with sufficient force to turn a gas turbine 14. As the turbine turns it causes a drive shaft 16 to rotate. The drive shaft linked to a generator rotates and electrical energy is generated. The gas flows from the gas turbine into a condensation chamber 20 higher in elevation than the boiling chamber. The condensation chamber is surrounded by temperatures in the range of −5° C. to 45° C. Radiant heat transfer cools the motive chemical in the condensing chamber to below the boiling point. The gas begins to condensate within the condensation chamber. When sufficient gas has condensed the fluid is released through the regulator valve 22 to a fluid turbine 24. Gravity forces the fluid through the turbine, the turbine turns and energy is generated. The fluid is returned to a holding tank 26. When the vapor pressure in the boiling chamber 10 is reduced sufficiently a regulator valve 28 releases the fluid back into the one way inlet valve 30 on the boiling chamber and the cycle repeats. Maximum energy generation is achieved by maximizing the fluid volume and the number of boiling and condensation steps which can be achieved in a fixed time period.

Preferably the gas is released from the boiling chamber when the pressure is less than 10 atmospheres. The key therefore to maximize energy production is rapid heating and cooling of the working fluid.

In order to provide continuous energy production it is beneficial to have multiple boiling chambers 10 in operation as shown in FIG. 2. When the vapor pressure in one boiling chamber has dropped to the point when it no longer assists in driving the turbine a second or multiple boiling chambers connected to the system will drive the turbine. The additional boiling chambers require a volume level sensor 32. When the fluid is sufficiently depleted in the boiling chamber, an electrical impulse is sent to the holding chamber regulator valve 28 on the holding tank, which releases fluid from the holding tank to the boiling tank. When the boiling tank volume is sufficiently full an electrical impulse is sent to shut the valve on the holding tank.

In order to adapt to changing ambient temperatures, fluids with different boiling points may be used. For example, a working fluid having a higher boiling point could be used in summer and a working fluid having a lower boiling point could be used in winter. The fluids with different boiling points can be used in independent boiling/condensation chambers and linked to the turbine or one fluid can replace another fluid in the same system depending on the ambient temperature for the boiling and condensation chambers. Therefore, by using this method, a continuous flow of energy is generated.

If one fluid replaces another fluid in the same system, the system components should be made of materials compatible for use with either fluid.

The boiling chamber may be exposed to ambient air temperature and the condensation chamber may be exposed to either ambient air temperature, fluid temperature or ground temperature. The boiling chamber may be exposed to fluid temperature and the condensation chamber may be exposed to either ambient air temperature, fluid temperature or ground temperature. The boiling chamber may be exposed to ground temperature and the condensation chamber may be exposed to either ambient air temperature, fluid temperature or ground temperature.

A working fluid may be selected for use within an expected range of ambient temperature. For example, one working fluid may be selected for use in summer when the ambient air temperature is relatively high, and another working fluid selected for use in winter when the ambient air temperature is relatively low. Additionally, a working fluid may be selected on the basis of its environmental friendliness, toxicity, availability, cost, and the like.

A table of my preferred working fluid for different temperature ranges is given in below. My selections are based on environmental friendliness, but others may select different fluids based on other criteria.

Temperature
rangeFirst choiceSecond choiceThird choice
−5° C. to 0° C.  butanebutylene1,3-Butadiene
0° C. to 5° C.TrimethylamineMethyl bromide1-Methylcyclopropane
 5° C. to 10° C.Ethyl methyl etherNeopentaneVinyl methyl ether
10° C. to 15° C.Cyclobutane1,2-ButadieneEthylene oxide
15° C. to 20° C.EthylamineVinyl bromideEthyl nitrite
20° C. to 25° C.1,1-Acetaldehyde3-Methyl-1-butene
Dimethylcyclopropane
25° C. to 30° C.IsopentaneVinyl etherTetramethylsilane
30° C. to 35° C.Isoprene2-PropylamineMethyl formate
35° C. to 40° C.PentaneMethyl propyl etherVinamar
40° C. to 45° C.1,3-PentadieneCyclopropyl methylDimethoxymethane
ether

ADDITIONAL EMBODIMENT FIG.-3a, 3b

An additional embodiment is shown in FIG. 3a; a reaction chamber 38 containing motive chemical 40 is expandable and is surrounded by air, gel, fluid or solid particulates (medium). Both the reaction chamber and medium are encased in an air tight boiling chamber casing 36. The medium can be further divided into a boiling medium 34 or a condensing medium 42. Both the boiling and condensing media have a temperature range of −5° C. to 45° C. and are brought to these temperatures by being exposed to ambient air temperature, fluid temperature or ground temperature at or near the surface of the earth. Boiling medium is added through the boiling chamber casing using a boiling medium volume control valve 44. The boiling medium may be the same material that is used repetitively and is constantly recycled through the system. Alternatively, the boiling medium may be a continuous supply of new material which runs through the system, for example; running water from a stream. The temperature of the boiling medium is above the boiling point of the motive chemical. The temperature of the motive chemical increases and vapor pressure within the reaction chamber is increased. The reaction chamber expands and pressure is applied to the surrounding medium. The pressure forces the air, fluid or solid medium through a boiling medium regulator valve 46 in a directed manner so that it can drive for example a water turbine 24 or energy generating device. Movement of the turbine forces a generator 18 to rotate and electricity is produced. When the reaction chamber has fully expanded and the pressure on the boiling medium has been reduced substantially, the boiling medium is removed through a boiling medium volume control valve 44. Condensing medium is transferred through the boiling chamber casing using a condensing medium inlet valve 48, connected to the boiling chamber casing, to the area surrounding the reaction chamber in FIG. 3b. The condensing medium may be the same material that is used repetitively and is constantly recycled within the system. Alternatively, the condensing medium may be a continuous supply of new material which runs through the system, for example; running water from a stream. The condensing medium will cause the motive chemical to condense, reducing the size of the reaction chamber. The condensing medium is removed through a condensing medium outlet valve 50. This process of adding boiling medium, then condensing medium is repeated to generate continuous energy.

ALTERNATIVE EMBODIMENTS

There are a number of possible embodiments for the system for continuous energy generation. One possible embodiment is to have two or more separate boiling chambers connected to the same system with the capacity to switch fluid flow from and to the first or second boiling chamber. One boiling chamber immersed in the fluid, the air or the ground and a separate boiling chamber in the fluid, the air or the ground. This configuration would be advantageous if the air, the fluid or the ground temperature is lowered sufficiently so that it becomes more energy efficient to switch to the second boiling chamber type. It is possible to have separate condensation chambers connected to the same system with the capacity to switch fluid flow from and to the first or second condensation chamber. One condensation chamber immersed in the fluid, the air or the ground and a separate condensation chamber immersed in the fluid, the air or the ground. This configuration would be advantageous if the air, the fluid or the ground temperature is raised sufficiently, so that it becomes more energy efficient to switch to the second condensation chamber type.

Another possible embodiment of the invention is to have the gas and fluid turbines not linked mechanically to generate electricity. This autonomy may be required for space requirements or orientation of the system.

Another possible embodiment is to not utilize the condensate to generate electricity. This embodiment may be elected to reduce the size or complexity of the system.

Another possible embodiment is to generate mechanical energy rather than electrical energy. Direct generation of mechanical energy would be useful to drive pumps or manufacturing equipment.

Another embodiment is to place both the boiling chamber and condensation chamber in the same environment at different elevations. Associated temperature differences at the different elevations could be sufficient to allow the ATEGS to generate energy.

ADVANTAGES

From the description above, a number of advantages of the ATEGS become evident:

  • (a) The energy produced using the ATEGS will be generated utilizing the free ambient temperature around the surface of the earth and by the vapor pressure generated by motive chemicals with boiling points in the range of −5° C. to 45° C. Importantly, the condensation of the motive chemical can also be achieved utilizing the ambient temperature without requiring the use of additional input energy. The energy produced by the ATEGS will therefore be very inexpensive. The ATEGS will also benefit by using the power of gravity to drive a second stage fluid turbine.
  • (b) The ATEGS will produce round the clock non-stop energy without disruption.
  • (c) Energy produced with the ATEGS will be produced without utilizing costly fossil fuels or destroying natural resources.
  • (d) Energy produced with the ATGES will be produced without generating hazardous waste. Energy is produced without generating air, chemical, radioactive or solid pollutants.
  • (e) Energy produced with ATEGS will not be restricted to daylight hours to produce. The energy does not require the direct power of the sun which can be restrictive due to the time of the year and by the amount of cloud cover.
  • (f) The energy produced with ATEGS will not require the damming of streams or rivers which disrupts fish migrations and the interaction of wildlife with their natural surroundings.
  • (g) The energy produced with ATEGS will not be restricted to the quantity or the strength of wind blowing on a given day.
  • (h) The ATEGS device can be used for large scale energy production for multiple families or it can be scaled down to be used for single family homes.
  • (i) The ATEGS can be used at the Arctic/Antarctic or at the equator and all locations in-between dependent on the boiling point of the chemical used to drive the system.
  • (j) The ATEGS can be used in different geographically areas and can be adapted to different geological areas. The ATEGS can be built at the edge of a valley or a mountain. In this manner the ATEGS will take advantage of the different ambient temperatures of the region or the ability to condensate fluid and utilize gravity to its greatest effect.
  • (k) The ATEGS may be used with boiling chamber and condensation chambers both immersed in a single type of environment at different elevations. The temperature differences at the different elevations may be significant enough to allow ATEGS to generate energy.

CONCLUSION, RAMIFICATIONS, AND SCOPE

Accordingly, the reader will see that the ATEGS invention is useful in energy generation. The ATEGS harnesses the energy created when motive chemicals with boiling points in the range of −5° C. to 45° C. are heated to or above the boiling points. This heating is accomplished by using the air, ground or fluid temperatures near the surface of the earth. The vapor pressure generated drives a turbine which can produce electricity or mechanical energy. The ATEGS has the added advantage of a second stage energy production step which condensates the motive chemical using the air, ground or fluid temperatures near the surface of the earth. Using the power of gravity, the condensed fluid is channeled through a fluid turbine and generates energy. The condensed fluid can then generate additional energy in this second stage. Furthermore, the ATEGS has the additional advantages in that

    • it produces a continuous and inexpensive supply of energy.
    • it produces energy in a self contained, non-polluting system.
    • it produces energy in most geographical areas.
    • it produces energy in most climates regardless of weather conditions.

Although the description above contains many specifications, these should not be construed as limiting the scope of the invention but as merely providing illustrations of some of the presently preferred embodiments of this invention. For example, the ATEGS device could be miniaturized so that it could be used on individuals to generate energy. The motive chemical could be heated by human body temperature and condensed by air temperature. The energy produced by this process could drive a pacemaker, artificial hearts or more mundane objects like radios or wristwatches.

The boiling or condensation chambers of the ATEGS may be linked to non-turbine type machines to produce linear or radial motion rather than circular motion to generate energy.

Thus the scope of the invention should be determined by the appended claims and their legal equivalents, rather than by the examples given.