Title:
GB and CA kit
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
FIG. 1, the Golf Ball and Club Alignment Kit, has two separate but necessary integral fixtures consisting of an indoor/outdoor carpet with a surface to simulate the ball action on a putting green, but laid out with a grid of contrasting color FIG. 2, the grid lines are laid out to be contiguous with any additional FIG. 2's forming a larger practice area, each square may match the size of a regulation golf hole making it multi-directional and multi-purpose, however, size of squares is not essential to its operation as a ball conveyor. A two-mode surface attaching non-diverting vertically or laterally for accurately putted balls receptacle FIG. 3, can be placed anywhere on or off the FIG. 2, along with any selected teeing spot known as a “tee box”.



Inventors:
Foster, Leslie Thomas (Stockton, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/986574
Publication Date:
05/21/2009
Filing Date:
11/21/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
473/257, 473/278
International Classes:
A63B69/36
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20050049092Ball Apparatus Having Adaptive Rotational InertiaMarch, 2005Lo
20040142759Golf swing practice platformJuly, 2004Gianfagna et al.
20080305895TRAINING BAT WITH VISUAL FEEDBACK OF PROPER SWINGDecember, 2008Gant
20080194362RESILIENT BASEBALL AND METHOD OF MANUFACTUREAugust, 2008Helmer et al.
20090124409METHOD OF APPLYING A COVER TO A GOLF CLUB SHAFTMay, 2009Greeves
20020039931Putter for golfApril, 2002Cynn
20020128090Golf putter with improved curved striking face, putter system, and method of making sameSeptember, 2002Slucker et al.
20040009829Golf club head with interchangeable striking face-platesJanuary, 2004Kapilow
20060178227Golf club shaft and method of manufactureAugust, 2006Barelmann et al.
20080248901PITCHING TARGETOctober, 2008Mosier et al.
20080274839Basketball Rim AttachmentNovember, 2008Krueger



Primary Examiner:
KLAYMAN, AMIR ARIE
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Leslie T. Foster (Stockton, CA, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. The golf ball and club alignment kit FIG. 1, is made up of rugged and inexpensive components which includes the mat FIG. 2, of Indoor/Outdoor carpet meeting all the manufacturers specifications, having an appropriately measured, and permanent contiguously lined grid imprinted on it, so more FIG. 2's can be laid alongside and/or end to end, having every square of similar width, but not necessarily so, to a regulation hole, for a golf ball to land and roll on, in any direction, and additionally, may be gently watered to provide some additional resistance found on some putting surfaces. It then can also be dried and properly rolled up for easy transportation or storage, immediately after which, it can be unrolled and will lay totally flat.

2. The target FIG. 3 has the equivalent width of a normal golf hole, and may be attached to the FIG. 2 using either its through tunnel or ball-stop mode, is easily attached by pressing firmly down on it such that its own weight of less than two kilograms, should maintain its position, because of the underside profiling, four adjustable spikes, or use up to four duplex nails for any putting green. The FIG. 3 offers no additional resistance to golf balls when entering inside its regulation ball size opening than would be received from any regular golf hole as it has no base or hill to slow, or obstruct a ball in the tunnel mode so that distance traveled past the hole can be measured, stopped only by the sliding door in the stop mode. There is a line marked through the center of the tunnel for convenience, when on a putting green.

3. A ball with two perpendicularly placed stripes passing over its center may be used for the purpose and ease to align with the grid lines is also desirable but not essential. Thumbtacks can be placed anywhere on the FIG. 2 to show swing arcs of both the club and the ball or temporary hole or tee box. FIG. 3 does not need to be used here, as the squares are indicators being the equivalent of a hole on the FIG. 2, making the hole appear much closer with the intent to inspire confidence in the ability to sink the putt.

4. Tee box and the FIG. 3 can be anywhere on or between lines, at any angle to the line of play, on the FIG. 2 for any club, if the club is a putter, this forces the golfer to walk to FIG. 3 to select the angle to place it to accept a ball, or not using the FIG. 3 and allow the ball to use any square. Using the driver or other clubs that may take a divot, a driving mat should be placed either in front of, or on top of FIG. 2.

5. FIG. 3 allows for arbitrary attachments and positions on both FIG. 2 and greens. In the stop or tunnel mode, an electronic signaling device could possibly be attached, but not supplied, for counting or to notify the player of holing-out a putt, a ball should not be observed until well after it leaves the putter, the brain should have recorded the distance and direction when lining up the putt.

6. FIG. 3 can be manufactured using different methods and materials in this case clear acrylic plastic is preferred which will allow light to pass through it to any natural surface beneath. The top has a locking notch and a hole along with a finger hole in the sliding door stop for the purpose of passing a wire tie, or the equivalent of, through them maybe preventing misplacing the stop door. More FIG. 2's can be added to sideways and lengthways inexpensively, is simple and exciting to use, requiring concentration and the desire to improve in all areas of play.

7. When using the FIG. 2 putting practice should start on a reasonably flat and level surface, close to the FIG. 3 using several balls, requiring the successful putting of all balls, and gradually moving away, as many short putts are missed by experts, or if any are missed, go back to the preceding spot to do it all again. When the ball and FIG. 3 are placed between the lines, the hole will appear to be directly in front of the ball, concentration becomes prime.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED PATENTS

U.S. Patent Documents
1328963May 1920Rolfe
1528056March 1925Herbert
1738265December 1929Scanlan
1823487September 1931Clear
1475763July 1949Vandal
2635879April 1953Rath
3048405August 1962McCaul
3342495September 1967Wasley
3512262May 1970Smyk et al.
3578333May 1971Elesh
3649029March 1972Worrell
3735988May 1973Palmer et al.
3843136October 1974Buenzle
3880432April 1975Coffey et al.
3934874January 1976Henderson
4017084April 1977Jeffrey
4108440August 1978Delaplaine
4114889September 1978Midana
4294450October 1981Gallic
4368888January 1983Ren
4429882February 1984Stanton
4805912February 1989Hickman
4826174May 1989Hoyt, Jr.
5100147March 1992Mull
4209172June 1980Yamamoto
4284276August 1981Worst
4441716April 1984Chen
4962931October 1990Jazdzyk, Jr.
4966370October 1990Morris
5004243April 1991Dlouhy
5131659July 1992Lindberg. Jr.
5205559April 1993Plopper
5261670November 1993Mull
5294124March 1994Florian
5319548June 1994Germain
5356133October 1994Bellagamba
5429368July 1995Adams
5443870August 1995Lurie et al.
5476258December 1995Frisone
5478071December 1995Barrs et al.
5529299June 1996Bellagamba
5542680August 1996Proudfit et al.
5630719May 1997Franklin
5630763May 1997Li-Tsan
6110053August 2000Sjoblom
6196929March 2001Erodes et al.
6338682January 2002Torchia et al.
6386995May 2002Jastram
6422949July 2002Byrne et al.
6450903September 2002Tate
6638173October 2003Robinson
6739980May 2004Scott et al.
6981921January 2006Scott et al.

Current U.S. ClassCurrent International Class
473/262; 473/257; 473/270;A63B 53/06 (20060101); A63B 53/16
(20060101);
473/182; 473/164; 473/280;A63B 69/36 (20060101); A63B 63/00
(20060101)
473/200; 473/205; 473/351;A63B 43/00 (20060101); A63B 37/00
(200660101)
473/251; 473/252;A63B 57/00 (20060101)

Field of Search:

473/161,200,201,205,236,238,251,252,257,261,262,265,266,267,268,270,278,280,285,313,35 1,378,406,407,176,

DESCRIPTION

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention is directed toward the field of devices, which golfers, of differing abilities, can with practice using regular clubs and golf balls, or air balls, and of varying swings and stroke skills, both indoors or outdoors with the FIG. 1, without the ball having any vertical or horizontal diverting influence on FIG. 2 between the teeing area and the hole FIG. 3, for any club, tending to force total concentration. The FIG. 2 alignment theory can be easily be recognized by taking a putter, standing over a squared patterned linoleum or tile, and moving the putter backwards and forwards over it.

2. Description of Related Art

As is well recognized, the inconsistencies of the short game, which includes wedges through putter, is where most strokes are dropped by the average golfer, due to poor alignment of club face and sweet-spot, along with poor swing technique. Golfers have resorted to many different devices to enhance their games. Most devices use a target, with a base over which the ball has to travel, which collects, and may return such ball to the golfer, if it makes it this far, but does not offer a true sized target, nor can collect and return an acutely breaking ball, or provide a true target width on a level plane, thus it is not a meaningful way to improve any golf stroke, such as to Stanton U.S. Pat. No. 4,429,882, February 1984.

The mat or surface used for allowing a ball to move from tee box to “hole” is usually of a soft sponge-like foam or felt material which doesn't lend itself to outdoor use nor to being rolled up, stored or transported, and used immediately after it is unrolled as per Wasley U.S. Pat No. 3,342,495, September 1967. It is generally a vertical sloping, ball returning hole, sometimes directly attached to the surface mat leading from tee to hole. Many of these ball-returning “holes” cannot do so if the surface mat is at a side angle as it too can slide sideways, also they are not truly representative of an actual golf hole size.

Other types of “holes” require a strong shaped wall at the rear of the hole to return the ball as per U.S. Pat. No. 5,261,670 to Mull, November 1993.

Others cannot give a real indication as to the distance the ball would have traveled, if it has to climb a hill or bump over a base to reach it. A golfer has enough to remember with the art of swinging a club in a given direction and distance, along with a side and back, and every other spin with differing winds. This is why things go bad near the green and in sand traps. Many surface mats are covered with arrows, numbers, arcs and lines at varying distances requiring a fixed tee box as per U.S. Pat. No. 6,981,921 to Scott, January 2006, as this can greatly add to the confusion and frustration of a golfer.

Some inventors presume to tell how different strokes are made and what conditions to make them, which should be left to the local teaching professional, as conditions vary from course to course and State to State. It is difficult enough to understand the fundamentals of golf, not as per U.S. Pat. No. 6,739,980 to Scott, May 2004.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is a known fact that the leading edge of an iron can be open closed or perpendicular to the line to the hole therefore it simpler to describe the putting stroke to give some semblance of order when describing the advantages of this invention.

For ease of explanation of FIG. 1, a putter will be used. With the striped ball having one line directly in-line with any line leading directly to the hole FIG. 3 the perpendicular line set such that both it and any crossing line on the FIG. 2 can be seen parallel to each other. The putter can be stroked through either in a straight or curved line, ensuring the putter face stays parallel and perpendicular to the pre-selected crossing line while in contact with the ball, noting the length of “take-away” to distance of ball travel through the FIG. 3 in the tunnel mode, on a level and flat “tee to hole” surface, at one square deep it will house four balls, a three square deep tunnel will allow up to twelve balls be easily housed within it and so on, if the regulation entrance was followed by some wider shape, many more balls could be housed within, proving depth is arbitrary. It also has a ball stop mode but in either mode it has the same width as a regulation hole.

Both FIG. 3 and FIG. 2 can each be placed at different angles to each other to simulate a breaking ball, thumbtacks can also be used to mark a teeing area, a hole opening, and/or a ball path, forcing the golfer to study and note break angles and distances. The FIG. 2 may be lightly sprayed with water to slow ball action down. Dry it first, then it can be rolled-up for transportation or storage, unrolled, laid-down flat, to be used immediately. Any hitting mat may be placed in front of or on top of it to utilize all its alignment benefits.

FIG. 1 includes an indoor/outdoor High UV-Stabilized, continuous, filament olefin with Dura-Flex Marine backing or Polypropylene or similar carpet FIG. 2 to simulate a golf green even to the point of the pile offering more resistance in one direction than the other as would the grain of grass on a green, is marked with a squared grid pattern the squares being of a width equal to or different from than the diameter of a regulation golf hole, the contiguous lines set to allow other FIG. 2's to be added to either edges or ends, thumb tacks can be stuck into it to show swing arcs, ball directions, tee box or to mark an imagined hole, the grid will allow the measuring of back and forward swings, alignment of indicia and faces of a club.

FIG. 3 weighs less than two kilograms, is easily moved and re-attached. It is made of six pieces of clear acrylic plastic although other materials may be used, to form a backless reversible direction tunnel with a line running through the top from front to rear in one mode and a ball stopping stop mode with a removable rear sliding door ball stop in the other, which can be detached, but has a wire tie or lock and chain through its finger hole and the hole and locking notch in the top, to avoid loss, offering an opening equivalent to a regulation diameter golf hole, it is attached to FIG. 2 by pressing it firmly down along with screwing down the four adjustable spikes, the two outside skirts taking up a total of two squares, having their undersides profiled to resist lateral movement in any direction, and holes for four duplex nails for easy attachment, or removal on grass or other surfaces, which will also aerate, adding weight on the top should not be a necessity. When finished practicing, return spikes to the up positions, then brush lightly on FIG. 2 to smooth it out.

With FIG. 3 in the tunnel mode and the sliding door stop open, so that its entrance center is at a grid crossing, the outsides of the skirts will be at grid lines, select a spot away from it to putt from on the FIG. 2 but before placing a ball down, make several practice strokes with a putter to observe and adjust both the backward and forward movement for alignment and expected ball travel distance. Place a ball on the FIG. 2 such that two crossing lines, grid crossing, and the two perpendicular lines on a ball are aligned with the perpendicular line of the ball is in front of the one on the FIG. 2 for observation of parallelism, a putter with its face and indicia are aligned can be then be moved in a backward then forward direction through the ball, waiting until the ball is well clear of the putter head before eyeing the line directional line on the ball to ensure there is no wobble caused by spin from the putting stroke. Move both the FIG. 3 and tee box with the ball to a place between the lines leading from the tee box to the FIG. 3 so that it would appear as though there is an avenue leading from one to the other, this will make the hole appear so much larger being directly in front of the ball

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 makes up a kit showing a ball and a putter in a position on a carpet, FIG. 2 and a FIG. 3 of different sizes so long as it will house a minimum of four balls, any size within reason, FIG. 3 can placed anywhere on FIG. 2 as there are no set positions for a hole or tee box.

FIG. 2 being an indoor/outdoor carpet permanently marked with contiguous lines forming a grid to allow for more FIG. 2's to be added on the sides or length, to be of a contrasting color and size similar to a standard golf hole diameter.

FIG. 3 is a surface mounting golf hole fixture whose entrance has the same width as a standard golf hole. It is made up of 6 pieces of clear acrylic plastic, two sides FIG. 3-B and FIG. 3-C, two identical skirts FIG. 3-E, and one top FIG. 3-D, all of which can be glued, and/or screwed using twelve of ten-twenty four by 1.6 cm machine screws, in tapped holes (11-22), and one up/down sliding ball stop door FIG. 3-A. FIG. 3-D has a locking notch (29) and a hole (24) along with the sliding door hole (23) for a wire tie or lock and chain to prevent losing (23), It also has an alignment line (30) through its center for use on a regular green. The hole in the sliding door (23) is large enough for a finger to easily move it. The skirts (2) FIG. 3-E each having two mounting holes (25-28) for 16 d of 7.62 cm long duplex nails for use as hold downs on greens, and two #4 of 1.28 cm long number four sheet metal screws with two number four flat washers under each screw (31-34), their undersides being profiled to impress upon FIG. 2 and prevent lateral movement. All edges are relieved except the profiled ones, and corners cut on the two sides and skirts to reduced profile offered to a struck ball.

When using the FIG. 2 putting practice should start on a reasonably flat and level surface, close to the FIG. 3 using several say three or four balls, requiring the successful putting of all balls, and gradually moving away, as many short putts are missed by experts, or if any are missed, go back to the preceding spot to do it all again. When the ball and FIG. 3 are placed between the lines, the hole will appear to be directly in front of the ball, concentration becomes prime.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

FIG. 1 shows the complete golf ball and club alignment kit, is made up rugged and inexpensive components which includes the first embodiment FIG. 2 of Indoor/Outdoor carpet meeting all the manufacturers specifications, having an appropriately measured, permanently impressed, contiguously lined grid, so more FIG. 2's can be laid alongside and/or end to end, having every square a similar width to, but not necessarily so, a regulation hole, for a golf ball to land on and roll in any direction, additionally it may be gently watered to provide some additional resistance found on some putting surfaces. It can also be dried then properly rolled up for easy transportation or storage, immediately after which, it can be unrolled and will lay totally flat.

The second embodiment target FIG. 3 has the equivalent width of a normal golf hole, and may be attached to the FIG. 2 using either its through tunnel or ball-stop mode, is attached by pressing firmly down on it then its own weight, less than two kilograms, to maintain its position, because of the underside profiling, four adjustable spikes, or use up to four duplex nails for any putting green. The FIG. 3 offers no additional resistance to golf balls when entering inside its four inch opening than would be received from any regular golf hole as it offers no base or hill to slow or obstruct a ball in the tunnel mode, slide door up or out, so that distance traveled past the hole can be measured, there is a line marked through the center of the tunnel for convenience, on a putting green. The second mode is the ball stopping one with the slide door down, getting many balls to stay inside for counting, to remove them simply lift it up.

To use FIG. 1, place a striped ball with the two stripes passing over the center of the ball perpendicular to each other for the purpose and ease of alignment, ball striping is desirable but not essential. Thumbtacks may be placed temporarily anywhere on the FIG. 2 to show swing arcs of both the club and the ball or a temporary hole or tee box. A FIG. 3 does not need to be used here, as the four-inch square squares are indicators, being the equivalent of a hole on the FIG. 2, making the hole appear to be close.

Tee box and FIG. 3 can be located anywhere on FIG. 2 on or between lines, at any flat or side hill angle to the line of play, using any club, if the club is a putter, it will force the golfer to walk to the FIG. 3 to select the angle to place it to accept a ball. The ball may be placed Three centimeters from the edge and FIG. 3 placed at the same side on or just off the edge, with any reasonable length of FIG. 2 between them, a break of one and a half times the width of FIG. 2, could be holed out. Using the driver or other clubs that may take a divot, a driving mat should be placed either in front of, or on top of FIG. 2.

FIG. 3 allows for arbitrary attachments and positions on both FIG. 2 and greens. In the stop or tunnel mode, an electronic signaling device could possibly be attached, but not supplied, for counting or notify the player of holing-out a putt, the travel of a putted ball should not be observed until well after it leaves the putter, the brain should have recorded the distance and direction when lining up the putt. FIG. 3 can be manufactured using different methods and materials in this case clear acrylic plastic is preferred which will allow light to pass through it to any natural surface beneath. The top has a locking notch and a hole along with a finger hole in the sliding door stop for the purpose of passing a wire tie, or the equivalent of, through them to maybe preventing misplacing the door. More FIG. 2's can be added to sideways and lengthways inexpensively, is simple and exciting to use, requiring concentration and the desire to improve in all areas of play.

The FIG. 2 could be sold or rented to golfers, replacing putting in some practice areas on and around driving ranges and golf courses, making it a profitable operation. Some practice greens could be replaced with concrete strips, set at various angles. Maintenance could be reduced to near zero and profit is increased to a maximum, as nothing was being charged before.

The FIG. 3 could be sold or rented for use on a normal putting green, using up to four duplex nails or spikes to retain its position, these will help with aeration, never needing a dug hole and have its position moved. When tournaments are being played many golfers are using the only practice putting green, and there is never enough space for all, using the set-up holes.

Competitions could be started of local, national or even of international levels, with singles, two man or four man teams being held using a given number of balls in a large FIG. 3 in the stop mode. In the tunnel mode a fun game can be had, for if players were positioned at opposite ends of and using one or two FIG. 2's end to end with the same FIG. 3 at the junction, taking turns to putt a different a given number of colored balls into it, all of which can be counted without lifting up the transparent FIG. 3, the one having the most balls housed inside would be the winner. Handicapping could be applied with players putting from different distances by moving FIG. 3 or tee boxes, this also tends to enforce total concentration by the players, like lawn bowling or curling, recognizing that if a ball is more than 50% inside the entrance, or less than thirty centimeters past the entrance to FIG. 3 and did not rattle around to get in, it should be regarded as “in the hole”. Putting distance is more important than direction, players do not need to be able to drive a ball 300 meters or have a handicap, age will not matter, even “not so good” eyesight need not be a big factor, just learning the art of putting chipping or pitching a golf ball.





 
Previous Patent: PARLOR GAME

Next Patent: APPARATUS FOR TRAINING A GOLF SWING