Title:
PILL BOTTLE
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A child-resistant pill bottle combines the child resistance of a “push and turn” pill bottle and the compliance feature of a pill tray. The pill bottle includes a container for holding medication, a pill tray formed to fit either within the container or integrated into the container, and a lid, which traps the pill tray within the container.



Inventors:
Costa, Richard (Bedminster, NJ, US)
Tung, Mitchell (Basking Ridge, NJ, US)
Wu, Kun-chi (Princeton, NJ, US)
Application Number:
12/269166
Publication Date:
05/21/2009
Filing Date:
11/12/2008
Assignee:
ONE WORLD DESIGN & MANUFACTURING GROUP, LTD. (Warren, NJ, US)
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
206/538, 215/201, 215/329
International Classes:
B65D85/00; B65D41/04; B65D50/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
HICKS, ROBERT J
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
DUANE MORRIS LLP - Philadelphia (PHILADELPHIA, PA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A child-resistant pill bottle comprising: a lid; a container defining an interior compartment; and a pill tray located between said lid and said interior compartment.

2. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 1, wherein said pill tray is set upon a ledge defined in a portion of said container.

3. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 1, wherein said pill tray is set upon a lip located inside said container.

4. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 2 or 3, wherein said pill tray is removable from said container.

5. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 4, wherein said pill tray includes at least two compartments.

6. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 5, wherein said pill tray includes indicia corresponding to the at least two compartments.

7. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 6, wherein said pill tray includes a compartment with out a bottom wall.

8. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 7, wherein said pill tray rests upon said lip at an adequate height above the bottom of said container so as to allow a full prescription to be enclosed within said container below said pill tray.

9. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 8 wherein said lid further comprises a child-resistant feature.

10. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 9, wherein said container further comprises a child-resistant feature that complements a child-resistant feature of the lid.

11. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 10, further comprising a disc having an opening mounted to said tray so as to allow a user access to one of said compartments while blocking all others.

12. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 1, further comprising a housing surrounding said container.

13. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 12, wherein said lid further comprises a thread encircling an inner surface.

14. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 13, wherein said container further comprises a rim and a thread encircling the thread that complements the thread on the inner surface of said lid.

15. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 14, wherein said container includes a child resistant feature on a bottom wall.

16. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 15, wherein said housing includes a child-resistant feature on an upper surface that complements said child-resistant feature of said container.

17. A child-resistant pill bottle comprising; a lid with a child-resistant feature, a container having an enlarged neck with a complementing child-resistant feature to said child-resistant feature of said lid; and a pill tray with at least two compliance compartments having an arced outer surface that complements said enlarged neck of said container.

18. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 17, wherein said pill tray is removable from said container.

19. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 18, wherein said pill tray includes indicia corresponding with the at least two compartments.

20. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 19, wherein said pill tray includes a compartment without a bottom wall.

21. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 20 wherein said pill tray rests upon said lip at an adequate height above the bottom of said container as to allow a full prescription to be enclosed within said container below said pill tray.

22. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 21, further comprising a disc having an opening mounted to said tray as to allow a user access to one of said at least two compartments while blocking all others.

23. A child-resistant pill bottle comprising: a lid having a child-resistant feature; a container having an outer wall; and at least two compartments encircling said outer wall of said container.

24. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 23, further comprising a brim encircling said container.

25. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 24, wherein said brim further comprises a child-resistant feature that complements said child-resistant feature of said lid.

26. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 25, further comprising an indicia wall surrounding said at least two compartments of said container

27. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 26, wherein indicia are printing on said indicia wall corresponding with said at least two compartments.

28. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 27, wherein said outer wall forms an inner rim.

29. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 28, further comprising a disc set upon said inner rim.

30. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim of claim 29, wherein said disc rotates about said inner rim.

31. A child-resistant pill bottle comprising: a lid having an annular wall and in inner surface; a container having a rim and a bottom surface; and at least two compartments formed within said container.

32. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 31, wherein said inner surface of said lid further comprises a child-resistant feature.

33. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 32, wherein said rim of said container further comprises a child-resistant feature that complements said child-resistant feature of said lid.

34. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 33, wherein said container further comprises an outer annular wall, an inner annular wall, and a compartment wall.

35. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 34, further comprising an indicia wall between spanning between said inner annular wall and said compartments wall.

36. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 34, wherein indicia are printed upon said indicia wall.

37. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 35, further comprising a hub projecting from the bottom surface of said container.

38. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 36, further comprising a disc including a post, handle, and shield.

39. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 37, further comprising an opening in said shield.

40. The child-resistant pill bottle of claim 38, wherein said hub and said post are operatively engaged to rotate said disc.

Description:

This application claims priority from, and the benefit of U.S. provisional patent application Ser. No. 60/988,157, filed Nov. 15, 2007, and entitled Pill Bottle.

FIELD OF INVENTION

This invention generally relates to packaging suitable for dispensing medication and more specifically to child resistant pill bottles combined with a compliance pill tray to provide an easy means for a user to determine if a dose has been taken.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

It is well known that medications, such as pills, tablets, and capsules, must be administered over a dosing period. In many circumstances the medications can be harmful to children, so lawmakers have passed regulations concerning child resistant packaging. The use of child resistant packaging is well known throughout the art, and has been utilized for goods ranging from household items to pharmaceutical products. The pharmaceutical industry has settled on two main methods of dispensing medication, either loosely in a bottle or more discretely in a blister card.

The traditional child resistant “amber” pill bottle utilizes a “push and turn” cap wherein the person wishing to open the bottle must first press down to release a locking mechanism before turning the cap. These bottles are effective for mass distribution of a medication, but have significant drawbacks. For example, “amber” pill bottles are usually smaller in size and therefore do not provide a stable enough gripping surface to allow a user of limited dexterity, i.e. the elderly, to access easily the medication inside the bottle. Additionally, a traditional “amber” bottle includes no compliance feature that would provide a user with information as to whether or not a dose has been taken during that dosing period, be it a day, morning, or week. The advantage, however, of the “push and turn” bottle is that operation of the device is well known and accepted by the public.

The pill tray has also been utilized in the pharmaceutical field. A pill tray includes a series of compartments, usually assorted by day of the week, from which a patient will remove pills from an “amber” bottle or other container and place the medication within the compartments of the pill tray. Thus, the user is provided with a simple device and method to determine whether or not a dose of medication was taken that day. Once emptied of its allotment of pills, the user refills the pill tray and starts over again. Many times pill trays are used when the patient is taking multiple medications so the user does not need to constantly open numerous bottles repeatedly in order to gain access to the medication. A pill tray can be especially helpful to the elderly who may have limited dexterity making it difficult for them to regularly open a child-resistant container. In most cases, however, the pill tray does not address child-resistance. It would, therefore, be an advantage in the art to combine the child-resistance features available in an “amber” pill bottle with the compliance capabilities of a pill tray.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides a senior-friendly, child-resistant pill bottle comprises a circular housing that is significantly larger than a typical “amber” bottle, but utilizes the standard push and turn technology to open the bottle. This creates a familiar bottle in appearance, but with the added benefit of the increased size of the lid, making it easier for those with limited dexterity and hand strength to open. A ledge encircles the inner perimeter of the bottle so as to accept a separate and reversibly removable pill tray. The depth of the pill tray is relatively shallow when compared to the outer bottle housing, thereby creating an open space between the bottom of the bottle and the pill tray that is sufficient to contain an entire medication prescription. In this embodiment, the pharmacist would fill the bottle with the recommended dose and then place the tray on the ledge with the medication stored safely beneath it. The user would then be able to remove the tray and place the medication into the tray compartments and place it back onto the ledge of the bottle housing before putting the child-resistant lid back onto the bottle. The tray itself is also marked with indicia correlating the day of the week, time of day, or dosing regimen to a tray compartment.

In another embodiment of the present invention, the tray may or may not be removable from the top of the bottle. Optionally, a bottomless compartment may be formed in the tray to provide the user access to the medication stored within the bottle. In the present embodiment, the pharmacist would fill the prescription bottle and then snap the tray into the bottle opening. The pharmacist would then attach a childproof lid to the bottle. The user or patient then pours the pills through the bottomless compartment so that they would have the choice of taking the medication on an individual basis or pouring the medication through the open compartment to fill the remaining tray compartments. This aspect of the invention provides a patient with a well-known child-resistant bottle and an optional compliance feature, while protecting the pills from being over-handled.

In another embodiment of the invention, a rotating disk is assembled to the pill tray. The rotating disk often has a circumference and area that covers the entire pill tray, save one compartment. This provides the ability to uncover only one compartment at a time, so the user can pour the pill out of the tray rather than attempt to reach into the compartment and pick up the pill.

Another embodiment of the invention includes a tray and child-resistant mechanism that are integrated with one another. In this embodiment, the tray is attached to the bottle, via a push and turn combination normally reserved for the lid and the bottle. A child-resistant lid also covers the child-resistant tray. With this arrangement the pharmacist attaches the reversibly removable child-resistant tray to the top of the amber bottle using the child-resistant structure provided, and then the lid of the bottle is attached to the child-resistant tray. This embodiment allows for lower manufacturing costs and shorter manufacturing time since the child-resistant tray is formed separately and the amber bottle does not require modification to provide a lip for supporting the pill tray. Additionally, the pill tray of the present invention also may be integrally formed with the top or bottom of the bottle. This embodiment would include a removable disk that provides the user access to the pills located inside the bottle.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

These and other feature of the present invention will be more fully disclosed in, or rendered more obvious by the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments of the invention, which are to be considered together with the accompanying drawings wherein like numbers refer to like parts and further wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a pill bottle formed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 1, with the lid removed for clarity of illustration;

FIG. 3 is a top view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 2, as taken along lines 100-100 in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a top perspective exploded view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a bottom perspective exploded view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 7 is a top perspective view of another pill bottle formed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 8 is a bottom perspective exploded view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 7, with the lid removed for clarity of illustration;

FIG. 9 is a top view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a cross-sectional view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 8, as taken along lines 200-200 in FIG. 9;

FIG. 11 is a top perspective exploded view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 8;

FIG. 12 is a bottom perspective exploded view of a pill bottle shown in FIG. 8;

FIG. 13 is a top perspective view of another pill bottle formed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 14 is a top perspective view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 13, with the lid removed for clarity of illustration;

FIG. 15 is a top perspective exploded view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 13;

FIG. 16 is a top perspective view of another pill bottle formed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 17 is a bottom perspective view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 16;

FIG. 18 is a top perspective view the pill bottle shown in FIG. 16, the lid removed for clarity of illustration;

FIG. 19 is a top view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 18;

FIG. 20 is a cross-sectional view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 18, as taken along lines 300-300 in FIG. 19;

FIG. 21 is a top perspective exploded view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 21;

FIG. 22 is a bottom perspective exploded view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 22;

FIG. 23 is a top perspective view of another pill bottle formed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 24 is top perspective view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 23 with the lid removed for clarity of illustration;

FIG. 25 is a top perspective exploded view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 23;

FIG. 26 is a top perspective view of another pill bottle formed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 27 is a top perspective view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 26 with the lid removed for clarity of illustration;

FIG. 28 is a to view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 27;

FIG. 29 is a cross-sectional view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 27, as taken along lines 400-400 in FIG. 28;

FIG. 30 is a top perspective exploded view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 26;

FIG. 31 is a bottom perspective exploded view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 26;

FIG. 32 is a top perspective view of another pill bottle formed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 33 is a bottom perspective view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 32;

FIG. 34 is a top view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 32;

FIG. 35 is a cross-sectional view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 32; as taken along like 500-500 in FIG. 34;

FIG. 36 is a front perspective exploded view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 32; and

FIG. 37 is a bottom perspective exploded view of the pill bottle shown in FIG. 32.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

This description of preferred embodiments is intended to be read in connection with the accompanying drawings, which are to be considered part of the entire written description of this invention. The drawing figures are not necessarily to scale and certain features of the invention may be shown exaggerated in scale or in somewhat schematic form in the interest of clarity and conciseness. In the description, relative terms such as “horizontal,” “vertical,” “up,” “down,” “top” and “bottom” as well as derivatives thereof (e.g., “horizontally,” “downwardly,” “upwardly,” etc.) should be construed to refer to the orientation as then described or as shown in the drawing figure under discussion. These relative terms are for convenience of description and normally are not intended to require a particular orientation. Terms including “inwardly” versus “outwardly,” “longitudinal” versus “lateral” and the like are to be interpreted relative to one another or relative to an axis of elongation, or an axis or center of rotation, as appropriate. Terms concerning attachments, coupling and the like, such as “connected” and “interconnected,” refer to a relationship wherein structures are secured or attached to one another either directly or indirectly through intervening structures, as well as both movable or rigid attachments or relationships, unless expressly described otherwise. The term “operatively connected” is such an attachment, coupling or connection that allows the pertinent structures to operate as intended by virtue of that relationship. In the claims, means-plus-function clauses, if used, are intended to cover the structures described, suggested, or rendered obvious by the written description or drawings for performing the recited function, including not only structural equivalents but also equivalent structures.

Referring to FIGS. 1-6, a senior-friendly, child-resistant pill bottle 1 is provided that combines the benefits of a conventional “amber bottle” type child-resistant bottle and a compliance pill tray, and includes a cap 2, a housing 12, a tray 35, and a container 22. Cap 2 includes an annular wall 7 that projects downwardly from a peripheral rim 3 of cap wall 8. Fins 5 are formed radially on the outer surface of annular wall 7 in a circumferentially spaced relationship to one another. Each outwardly projecting fin often includes a curved, or rounded free edge. Large Fin 6 provides a gripping surface allow for more senior-friendly use of the lid, while fins 5 provide stability to cap 2. Brim 4 projects perpendicularly outwardly from an edge of annular wall 7 and engages each of fins 5. Top wall 8 includes a recess 9 that is sized and shaped to receive a label or other identifier of the type well known in the art. The inner surface of annular wall 7 often includes a thread or bayonet-type mount 10.

Housing 12 comprises an annular wall 14 that projects upwardly from a base wall 15, with stabilizers 13 projecting outwardly from the outer edges of base wall 15. A hub 17 projects upwardly from a central portion of base wall 15 so that annular wall 14 is located in radially spaced relation to the outer surface of hub 17. A plurality of slots 18 are defined by the free end portion of hub 17 that together define a resilient, curved cantilever catch-beam 16. Each such cantilever catch-beam 16 has an outwardly chamfered guide surface defined at the interior edge of its free end. Plurality of catch-beams 16 extend radially outwardly from a lower portion of the outer surface of hub 17 in spaced relation to one another on base wall 15 of housing 12. The end of each catch-beam 16 is supported adjacent to the interior surface of annular housing wall 14 by a collar 21.

Container 22 includes a mouth 23, an annular lip 28, an annular thread wall 25, an annular base wall 26, and a bottom wall 24. More particularly, mouth 23 is defined by annular thread wall 25 which has a rim 27, and often includes a thread or bayonet-type mount 29 that complements a thread or bayonet-type mount 10 on the inner surface of annular wall 7 of cap 2. A central annular wall 30 projects upwardly from a central portion of bottom wall 24. Annular base wall 26 projects upwardly from bottom wall 24 so as to form an annular lip 28 at an uppermost end. A plurality of ratchet lugs 34 are located on the outer surface of bottom wall 24. Plurality of ratchet lugs 34 are integrally formed with, and circularly disposed about the outer surface of bottom wall 24 in complementary relation to plurality of catch-beams 16 located on base wall 15 of housing 12. Post 32 projects outwardly from the bottom surface of central wall 31 so that central annular wall 30 is located in radially spaced relation to the outer surface of post 32. A free end portion of post 32 may include a plurality of ledges 33 defined in hub 17.

Referring to FIGS. 5-6, tray 35 includes compartments 42, an annular outer wall 36, and a central surface 38. More particularly, compartment 28 is defined by central annular wall 37 protruding downwardly from peripheral edge 41 of central surface 38. Curved wall 39 is attached to the lower end of central annular wall 25, and curves upwardly until reaching rounded edge 40 of outer annular wall 36. Outer annual wall 36 extends downwardly from rounded edge 40 to tray rim 45. A plurality of dividing walls 43 extend radially from central annular wall 37 in a spaced relation to one another along curved wall 39 of tray 35. Indicia 30 are printed upon the upper area of central surface 38 to coincide with each defined compartment 42. Tray 35 is positioned within mouth 23 of container 22 where it rests upon annular lip 28. Tray 35 is removable from its perch upon annular lip 28, so that a user can access the storage area underneath.

As a result of this construction, when cap 2 is compressed against rim 27 of container 22, which is positioned between cap 2 and housing 12, each of the plurality of catch-beams 16 engages a corresponding ratchet lug 34 that is disposed on the outer surface of central wall 30. Once in this position, thread 10 of cap 2 disengages thread 29 of container 22 allowing the removal of cap 2 and thus exposing tray 35.

Referring to FIGS. 7-12, in another embodiment of the present invention child-resistant, senior friendly pill bottle 50 includes a lid 51, a container 57, and a tray 64. Lid 51 includes an annular lid wall 52 that projects downwardly from a peripheral rim 53 of lid wall 54. Vertical ribs 56 are uniformly formed on the outside of annular lid wall 52 in equally spaced relation to one another. Vertical ribs 56 provide a gripping surface for those with decreased manual dexterity. Child-resistant feature 55 is attached to annular lid wall 52.

Container 57 includes an annular wall 59 that projects upwardly from the outer peripheral edge of bottom wall 73. Expanded annular wall 61 rests at the upper end of annular wall 59, and often has a circumference that is greater than annular wall 59. Lip 62 includes rim 63 which projects vertically from the upper end of expanded annular wall 61 so as to form mouth 58. Child-resistant feature 60 is located on the outside of lip 62 so as to complement child-resistant feature 55 of lid 51.

Tray 64 includes a curved annular wall 65 that projects downwardly and inwardly from rim 66 toward a central axis. Inner annular wall 69 projects downwardly from central wall 67 until reaching the upper surface of curved annular wall 65. Dividing walls 70 project outwardly from the outer surface of inner annular wall 69 while the lower edge remains in contact with the inner surface of curved annular wall 65. Compartments 68 are formed by combining curved annular wall 65, inner annular wall 69 and dividers 70. Optionally, curved annular wall 65 may have a section left vacant thereby forming a compartment 72. Indicia 71 are printed on the upper surface of central wall 67.

Curved annular wall 65 of tray 64 nests within mouth 58 of container 57 and rests upon expanded annular wall 61. The smaller circumference of annular wall 59 prevents tray 64 from dropping into the lower portion of container 57. Tray 64 is removable from mouth 58 of container 57, so that the user is provided with an option of either removing tray 64 temporarily in order to gain access to the container 57 or pouring out any contents through compartment 72.

Referring to FIGS. 13-15, in another embodiment child-resistant pill bottle 80 includes an enlarged lid 81, a container 88, a tray 94 and a disc 104. Enlarged lid 81 includes an annular wall 83 that projects downwardly from a peripheral rim 83 of bottom wall 85 so as to form a brim 82 about the lower circumference of annular wall 83. Ribs 84 are arranged so as to be equally spaced about the outer perimeter of annular wall 83 thereby providing an enlarged gripping surface for those users with limited manual dexterity. The inner surface of annular wall 83 often includes child-resistant feature 86. Container 88 includes an annular wall 90 that projects upwardly from bottom wall 93, and includes a rim 91,which forms mouth 89. Child-resistant feature 92 complements and releasably engages child-resistant feature 86 on the inner surface of annular wall 90 of lid 81.

Tray 94 includes an outer annular wall 95 that projects upwardly from the outer perimeter edge of bottom wall 97 thereby forming a ledge 102 jutting outwardly from the upper perimeter edge of outer annular wall 95. Inner annular wall 96 projects downwardly from center wall 112 to bottom wall 97 in a coaxial relationship to outer annular wall 95. Dividing walls 99 span the distance between outer annular wall 95 and inner annular wall 96 creating compartments 98. Indicia 101 are printed on the upper surface of center wall 112 and correspond to compartments 98. Optionally, bottom wall 97 includes a vacant area equal to the area of a compartment 98 creating compartment 103 that permits the user to access container 88 without removing tray 94. Ledge 102 rests upon rim 91 which holds tray 94 above the inner area of container 88 to allow for storage.

Disk 104 includes a shield 105 having a top wall 106 and bottom wall 107 and rests upon the upper surface of center wall 112. Opening 108 is defined by omitting an area of shield 105 equal to the area of a compartment 98. Handle 109 is formed on upper wall 106 of shield 105, and is separated into two substantially similar halves, grip A 110 and grip B 111. Disk 104 rotates upon center wall 112 allowing access to only one compartment 98 at a time.

Referring to FIGS. 16-22, child resistant pill bottle 115 includes a lid 116, a container 122, and a tray 128. Lid 115 comprises an annular wall 118 that projects downwardly from a peripheral edge 120 of bottom wall 121. Ribs 119 protrude equidistantly from, and in an equally spaced manner around, the perimeter of the outer surface of annular wall 118. The inner surface of annular wall 118 often includes child-resistant feature 117. Container 122 includes an annular wall 124, an angled annular wall 126, a bottom wall 125 and a brim 127. Annular wall 124 extends upwardly from the perimeter of bottom wall 125 to form angled annular wall 126 that projects upwardly and outwardly from annular wall 125. Brim 127 is located atop the uppermost circumference of angled annular wall 126 which it encircles. The outer surface of brim 127 includes child-resistant feature 123 that complements child-resistant feature 117 of annular wall 118.

Tray 128 includes compartments 133, a curved annular surface 129, a rim 130, an inner annular wall 131, a compartment wall 138, and dividing walls 134. Annular compartment wall 133 projects downwardly from a peripheral edge 139 of central wall 132. Inner annular wall 131 projects downwardly from the inner edge of central wall 132 in coaxial relation to inner annular wall 131. Curved annular surface 129 projects downwardly and inwardly from rim 130, and is connected to the bottom edges of annular compartment wall 138 and inner annular wall 131. Dividing walls 134 project from the outer surface of compartment wall 138 along the upper surface of curved annular surface 129. Compartments 133 are formed by the upper surface of curved annular surface 129, the outer surface of compartment wall 138, and two surfaces of dividing walls 134. Indicia 135 are printed on the upper surface of central wall 132 so as to coincide with compartments 133. Chimney 137 is formed in central wall 132, which provides the user access to the storage area of container 122 without removing tray 128.

Referring to FIGS. 23-25, child-resistant pill bottle 140 includes a lid 141, a container 147, a tray 152, and a disk 165. Lid 141 includes an annular wall 143 that projects downwardly from a peripheral edge 144 of bottom wall 146. Brim 145 projects outwardly from the lower edge of annular wall 143. The inner surface of annular wall 143 includes child-resistant feature 142.

Container 147 includes an annular wall 149, a base wall 150, a rim 151, and a child-resistant feature 148. Annular wall 149 projects upwardly from base wall 150 to form rim 151 which encircles the perimeter of the upper end of annular wall 149. The outer surface of rim 151 often includes child-resistant feature 148. Tray 152 includes an annular wall 154, an inner annular wall 158, a base wall 155, compartments 161, an upper child-resistant feature 153, and a lower child-resistant feature 160. Annular wall 154 projects upwardly from base wall 155 to form rim 173. The outer surface of rim 173 includes upper child-resistant feature 153, which complements child-resistant feature 142 on the inner surface of annular wall 143 of lid 141. Beams 157 are radially spaced about the bottom edge of annular wall 154 so as to protrude outwardly and thereby attach brim 156 to annular wall 154. The inner surface of brim 156 often includes a lower child-resistant feature (not shown) that complements child-resistant feature 148 on the outer surface rim 151 of container 147. Inner annular wall 158 projects downwardly in radially-spaced, coaxial relation to annular wall 154 from the peripheral edge of central surface 159 before connecting with base wall 155. Dividing walls 163 project radially outwardly from the outer face of inner annular wall 158,and extend to the inner surface of annular wall 154. Dividing walls 163 separate the space above base wall 155 thereby forming compartments 161. In some embodiments, base wall 155 is missing a section equal to the area of one compartment 161, thereby forming compartment 164. The upper face of central surface 159 includes indicia 162, which correspond to compartments 161.

Disk 165 includes shield 166 having a top surface 167 and a bottom surface 168 that rests upon central wall 159. Opening 169 is formed in shield 166 so as to permit the user access to only one of compartments 161 or compartment 164. This structure allows the user to pour medication from compartments 161 without concern for medication in the other compartments 161 falling out. Handle 170 includes grip A 171 and grip B 172 that protrude from the upper surface of shield 166 so as to permit the user to rotate the disk 165.

Referring to FIGS. 26-31, child-resistant bottle 175 includes a lid 176, a container 184, and a disk 195. More particularly, lid 176 includes a collar 203 having an annular wall 178 projecting outwardly from a peripheral edge 181 of a bottom wall 180. Notches 179 are radially spaced about the perimeter of the outer surface of annular wall 178. Child-resistant feature 177 includes a protrusion 183 and an inner annular wall 182. Inner annular wall 182 projects downwardly from bottom wall 180 in radially-spaced coaxial relation with annular wall 178. Protrusions 183 are formed on the inner surface of inner annular wall 178 in a complementary location to notches 179.

Container 184 includes a mouth 189, an annular wall 185, compartments 191, a rounded annular wall 194, an upper annular wall 187 and a brim 188. More particularly, mouth 189 is defined by annular wall 185 which includes an inner rim 200 that projects upwardly from the peripheral edges of circular bottom wall 186. Rounded annular wall 194 projects outwardly and upwardly in coaxial relation with the outer surface of annular wall 185 and often includes brim 188 encircling rounded annular wall 194. Upper annular wall 187 includes rim 241 that projects upwardly from the upper surface of brim 188 in coaxial relation to rounded annular wall 194. Dividing walls 190 project radially outwardly from inner rim 200 of annular wall 185 thereby contacting along the length of the inner surface of rounded annular wall 194 thus creating compartments 191. Indicia 192 are imprinted on the upper surface of brim 188 and arranged to correspond to each compartment 191. The outer surface of upper annular wall 187 includes child-resistant feature 193 that complements child-resistant feature 177 of lid 176.

Disc 195 includes an annular wall 196, a shield 197, a lower annular wall 199, an opening 201, a lower wall 198 and a handle 202. Annular wall 196 projects upwardly from the peripheral edges of lower wall 198. Shield 197 defines opening 201 and projects radially outwardly from the upper edge of annular wall 196. Lower annular wall 199 projects downwardly from the bottom surface of lower wall 198 in radially coaxial relation to annular wall 196 creating ledge 242. Handle 202 projects upwardly across the diameter of lower wall 198 so that its distal edges contact the inner surface of annular wall 196.

As a result of construction, lower wall 198 of shield 195 is received in mouth 189 causing ledge 242 to sit upon inner rim 200 of annular wall 185. Shield 197 of disc 195 covers compartments 191 allowing the user access to medication 204 through opening 201. The user can rotate opening 201, via handle 202, in order to gain access to the next sequential compartment 191. After the medication 204 in compartments 191 has been administered, disc 195 is removed from mouth 189 of container 184 so the user can gain access to any other medication.

Referring to FIGS. 32-37, child-resistant pill bottle 205 includes a lid 206, a container 214, and a disc 226. Lid 206 includes an annular wall 208, notches 209, an inner annular wall 212, and a child-resistant feature 207. Lid 206 includes an annular wall 208, notches 209, a central wall 210, a collar 238 and a child-resistant feature 207. Annular wall 208, having a collar 238 at its bottom edge, projecting downwardly from peripheral edge 211 of central wall 210. Notches 209 are radially spaced about the perimeter of the outer surface of annular wall 208. Child-resistant feature 207 includes protrusion 213 and inner annular wall 212. Inner annular wall 212 projects downwardly from the bottom surface of central wall 210 in radially spaced, coaxial relation to annular wall 208. Protrusions 213 are radially spaced about the inside surface of annular wall 208 so as to correspond to notches 209 on the outer surface of annular wall 208.

Container 214 includes a mouth 246, a child-resistant feature 215, an outer annular wall 216, an inner annular wall 245, an annular compartment wall 217, compartments 220 and a hub 223. More particularly, mouth 245 is defined by outer annular wall 216 with rim 247 encircling center wall 218. The outer surface of rim 247 includes child-resistant feature 215 that complements child-resistant feature 207 on the inside surface of annular wall 208 of lid 206. Compartment annular wall 245 projects downwardly from the bottom surface of center surface 218 in radially coaxial relation to outer annular wall 216. Indicia wall 248 projects inwardly from the upper peripheral edges of annular compartment wall 217 and projects downwardly to become inner annular wall 245 that is in radially coaxial relation with compartment wall 217. Center wall 219 spans the area at the lower peripheral edge of inner annular wall 245. Hub 223 projects from the central area of center wall 219 and includes slots 224 at a fee end separating hub 223 vertically and ledges 225 protruding radially outwardly about the peripheral end of hub 223. Disc 226 includes a post 234 and a shield 227, and includes along the peripheral edge an opening 230 that is equal to the size of a compartment 220. Handle 231 includes grip A 232 and grip B 233 that projects upwardly from the top surface of shield 227. Post 234 includes an inner annular wall 235, an outer annular wall 236 and catches 237. Inner annular wall 235 and outer annular wall project downwardly from shield 227 to form chimney 249. As a result of construction, post 234 engages hub 224 by pressing on the peripheral edges of ledges 225 thus pressing hub 224 together by closing slots 224 until catches 237 slip past ledges 225 and expand hub 224 and slots 224 to their original width. Disc 226 rotates about hub 223 uncovering one of compartments 220 and allowing the user access to medication 240.

It is to be understood that the present invention is by no means limited to the particular constructions herein disclosed and shown in the drawings, but also comprises any modifications or equivalents within the scope of the claims.