Title:
Commercial dish washer equipped with an auxiliary rinsing water pipe and rinsing step
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A dish washer for commercial use is provided. The dishwasher according to current application is used for restaurants, hospital, school and military camp, etc. The dish washer of the current application has an auxiliary rinsing water pipe that is embedded inside of a washing water pipe. The rinsing water supplied to the washing water pipe drives the remaining soapy washing water out of an upper washing water impellor just after the washing step is finished. In rinsing step, rinsing water is supplied to an upper rinsing impellor via main rinsing water pipe. Rinsing water is sprayed to the bottom of the washing water impellor to remove the residual soapy washing water droplets. The dish washer of the current application removes a chance of contamination of dishes and cups by soapy washing water drops after washing is finished.



Inventors:
Kim, Byung Kwon (Shiheung City, KR)
Cho, Han T. (Franklin Lakes, NJ, US)
Application Number:
11/983509
Publication Date:
05/14/2009
Filing Date:
11/13/2007
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47L15/06
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20060130876Method for detecting the quantity of dishes in the washing container of a dishwasher and dishwasher for carrying out said methodJune, 2006Curtius et al.
20090020138PLEATED CAR WASH ELEMENT, METHOD OF MANUFACTURE AND METHOD OF ATTACHMENTJanuary, 2009Weyandt
20080006301Method of removing depositsJanuary, 2008Garry et al.
20090155437CONTINUOUS SYSTEM FOR PROCESSING PARTICLESJune, 2009Bohnert et al.
20070186964Extra Width DishwasherAugust, 2007Mason et al.
20080178912AGRICULTURAL STERILIZING AND DETOXIFYING ASSEMBLY FOR VEGETABLES AND FRUITJuly, 2008Chen
20030150478Dust mop handle method and apparatusAugust, 2003Biggs
20080302393WASH RING ASSEMBLY AND METHOD OF USEDecember, 2008Jafari et al.
20040107976Foot and toe scrubberJune, 2004Lawson et al.
20040040575Brush for cleaning/scrubbing a substrateMarch, 2004Alexander II et al.
20070131260Dishwasher with regulatable heat recoveryJune, 2007Scheringer et al.



Primary Examiner:
RIGGLEMAN, JASON PAUL
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Eugene OAK (Los Angeles, CA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A commercial purpose dish washer that is comprised of; a water tank that is divided into a washing water tank, and a rinsing water tank, and an upper washing impellor that locates above an upper rinsing water impellor, and a lower washing impellor, and an upper rinsing impellor that has two rows of rinsing water nozzles; one row of rinsing water nozzles are developed facing downward and another row of rinsing water nozzles are developed facing up ward, and a lower rinsing impellor, and a rack for holding dishes and bowls, and a washing water pump, and a rinsing water pump, and an auxiliary rinsing water pump, and a washing water pipe, and a rinsing water pipe, and a connection housing that connects; the rinsing water pipe that penetrates the connection housing from above and reaches the rinsing water impellor and the washing water from the side thereof and reaches the washing water impellor, and an auxiliary rinsing water pipe that is developed from the rinsing water tank and penetrates one side of wall of the washing water pipe and embedded inside of the washing water pipe along the length thereof and reaches the connection housing, and a check valve that is installed on the auxiliary rinsing water pipe, just before it meets the washing water pipe, to prevent reflux of the soapy washing water through the auxiliary rinsing water pipe to contaminate the rinsing water in the rinsing water tank, and another check valve is installed on the main rinsing water line to prevent reflux of the washing water.

2. A commercial purpose dish washer of claim 1, wherein the auxiliary rinsing water pump supply rinsing water to the auxiliary rinsing water pipe to allow the rinsing water comes out of the end of the auxiliary rinsing water pipe and drives out the washing water that was left inside of the housing and the washing impellor and comes out through the washing water nozzle.

3. A commercial purpose dish washer of claim 1, wherein the rinsing water comes out though the rinsing water nozzles, which face the bottom surface of the washing water impellor, cleans the soapy washing water droplets that are hang on underneath of the upper washing water impellor.

Description:

1. FIELD OF THE INVENTION

Current application relates to a commercial dish washer, especially to a dish washer that has an auxiliary rinsing water pipe separated from main rinsing water pipe to eliminate soapy washing water remains inside of a washing water impellor.

2. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Most of dish washers, both of commercial and home appliances, do not clean dishes or cups inside thereof cleanly. As a result, many kinds of detergents are developed to remove stains that remain even after washing. However, it causes another problem of using strong detergent and contaminating wasting water. The inventor focused on commercial dish washers, which have rinsing water impellors and washing water impellors inside of the dish water. He finds that the soapy washing water remained inside of the washing water impellor come out of the impellor later and drop on the dishes and cups during a drying step. Then the soapy washing water droplets are dried on the surface of the dishes and/or cups and remain stains of powdery soap. Since those stains are formed after washing step, those new detergent can not remove the stains. The inventor changed the inside structure of rinsing line and achieved a new commercial washing machine that does not leave any stains after washing.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART

U.S. Patent Application 20060130878 by Lee; Tae Hee; et al. illustrates a dish washer includes a sump communicated with a tub to accommodate water, a water supply pump for pumping the water in the sump, a filtering device for receiving a part of the water pumped through an auxiliary passageway to filter the pumped water and to supply the filtered water to the sump again, and a bypass for bypassing the water to be supplied to the filtering device to the tub or the sump when the filtering device is blocked by sewage. The bypass includes a first sensor detecting water passing there through and the filtering device being blocked and transmitting the detected result to a controller, and a second sensor detecting and informing the water pollution level to the controller when the filtering device is blocked. A controlling method thereof determines an algorithm of a cycle for washing or rinsing dishes over two times using information acquired from the first and the second sensors.

U.S. Patent Application 20040089029 and U.S. Pat. No. 7,216,514 by Sakita, Yoshiaki; et al. illustrates a dish washer-dryer and a control system, which facilitate establishing of a special operating program.

U.S. Patent Application 20030115682 by Gardner, Douglas W. illustrates a dryer that is programmed by receiving a washing mode selection associated with a washer, automatically creating a dryer mode selection from the washing mode selection, and applying the dryer mode selection to the dryer.

U.S. Patent Application 20020128729 by Blair, Jeffrey L.; et al. illustrates a laundry machine control system including various slates of cycles pre-programmed into a CPU which controls the machine.

U.S. Patent Application 20020040505 to Tanaka, Toshimasa; et al. illustrates a control device for a laundry appliance storing an operation program inputs information about washing and adjusts the operation program of the laundry appliance on the basis of the input washing information.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,983,628 to Cho illustrates a washing machine and a method provided for changing system data which allow a user may change/replace a pre-stored wash program to address specific problems encountered based on user preferences and wash history.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,318,084 to Scott, et al. illustrates a system for controlling the operation of an appliance of the type having a plurality of machine functions to be activated and deactivated in accordance with a control strategy includes a plurality of selectable cycles each made up of a series of events and an array of user actuatable membrane switching devices for selecting at least one cycle of operation for the appliance.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,195,498 to Pellerin illustrates a wholly automatic commercial laundry in which soiled laundry is automatically routed to available washing machines, is automatically unloaded, conveyed, and loaded into one of several dryers which is available, or is conveyed directly to a finishing station when drying is not required. A unique programmable selector permits selecting any of several preprogrammed washing cycles, and modifying these cycles in accordance with the laundry to be washed. The selector also provides the necessary information for routing of the batches of laundry from the washing machines to the dryers, for selecting one of several drying cycles, and for routing the laundry to a desired finishing station.

None of the prior art realized a dish washer that prevents contamination of dishes or cups on a rack inside of the dish washer by droplets of soap water that were hanged on the washing impellers.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Most of dish washers, both of commercial and home appliances, do not clean dishes or cups inside thereof cleanly. As a result, many kinds of detergents are developed to remove stains that remain even after washing. However, it causes another problem of using strong detergent and contaminating wasting water. The inventor focused on commercial dish washers, which have rinsing water impellors and washing water impellors inside of the dish water. He finds that the soapy washing water remained inside of the washing water impellor come out of the impellor later and drop on the dishes and cups during a drying step. Then the soapy washing water droplets are dried on the surface of the dishes and/or cups and remain stains of powdery soap. Since those stains are formed after washing step, those new detergent can not remove the stains. The inventor changed the inside structure of rinsing line and achieved a new commercial washing machine that does not leave any stains after washing. A dish washer for commercial use is provided. The dishwasher according to current application is used for restaurants, hospital, school and military camp, etc. The dish washer of the current application has an auxiliary rinsing water pipe that is embedded inside of a washing water pipe. The rinsing water supplied to the washing water pipe drives the remaining soapy washing water out of an upper washing water impellor just after the washing step is finished. In rinsing step, rinsing water is supplied to an upper rinsing impellor via main rinsing water pipe. Rinsing water is sprayed to the bottom of the washing water impellor to remove the residual soapy washing water droplets. The dish washer of the current application removes a chance of contamination of dishes and cups by soapy washing water drops after washing is finished.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a commercial use dish washer of prior art.

FIG. 2 is a side cross-sectional view of the conventional dish washer of prior art seen along the line A-A′ in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the section ‘B’ in the FIG. 2 to show the washing water and rinsing water distribution through the upper washing water impellor and the upper rinsing impellor of the prior art.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a commercial purpose dish washer according to current application.

FIG. 5 is a side cross-sectional view of a dish washer according to the current application seen along the line C-C′ in FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of the section ‘D’ in the FIG. 5 to show the washing water distribution line through the upper washing water impellor of the current application and shows washing water flow in washing step.

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of the section ‘D’ in the FIG. 5 to show the rinsing water distribution line through the upper washing water impellor of the current application and shows rinsing water flow in auxiliary rinsing step.

FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view of the section ‘D’ in the FIG. 5 to show the rinsing water distribution line through the upper rinsing impellor of the current application and shows rinsing water flow in rinsing step.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a commercial use dish washer (1) of prior art that was made and sold by the inventor in Korean Market. And FIG. 2 is a side cross-sectional view of the conventional dish washer (1) of prior art seen along the line A-A′ in FIG. 1. Conventional dish washers (1) currently used in a restaurant, hospital and military camp, etc., have typical structure as shown in the FIG. 1. The conventional dish washer (1) is comprised of a water tank (10) that is divided into a washing water tank (12) and a rinsing water tank (14), an upper washing impellor (20), a lower washing impellor (22), an upper rinsing impellor (30), a lower rinsing impellor (32), a rack (42) for holding dishes and bowls, a washing water pump (28), a rinsing water pump (38), a washing water pipe (24), a rinsing water pipe (34). Washing water (25) is stored in the washing water tank (12) mixed with detergents. The washing water pump (28) delivers the washing water (25) from the washing water tank (12) to the upper washing water impellor (20) and the lower washing water impellor (22) through the washing water pipe (24). The rinsing water pump (38) delivers the rinsing water (35) from the rinsing water tank (14) to the upper rinsing water impellor (30) and to the lower rinsing water impellor (32) through the rinsing water pipe (34).

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the section ‘B’ in the FIG. 2 to show the washing water (25) and rinsing water (35) distribution through the upper washing water impellor (20) and the upper rinsing impellor (30) of the prior art. Usually, the upper washing impellor (20) locates above the upper rinsing water impellor (30). A connection housing (36) connects the rinsing water pipe (34) and washing water pipe (24) to the rinsing water impellor (30) and washing water impellor (20) respectively. The rinsing water pipe (34) penetrates the housing (36) from above and reaches the rinsing water impellor (30). The washing water pipe (24) is connected to the housing (36) from the side thereof. So, the washing water (25) that contains soap pass outside of the rinsing water pipe (34) and flows to the upper washing water impellor (20). As the washing water (25) flows into the upper washing impellor (20) and sprayed on the lag (42) through the washing water nozzles (201), the upper washing water impellor (20) rotates by the reaction force. In the dish washer (1) of the prior art, the sequence of dish washing is comprised of water filling up step, washing step, waiting step, and rinsing step. In the water fill up step, tap water is heated by an external heater, such as flash heater, and stored in the washing water tank (12) and rinsing water tank (14). In this step, detergent is introduced to the washing water (25) to make soap water. The washing water (25) is recycled to the washing water tank (12) after pass through the screen net (121), which is located at the bottom of the washing bath, to remove left over particles comes from dishes. The rinsing water tank (14) is closed with a cover.

A waiting step is followed just after washing step. This waiting step is to allow the washing water (25), which contains soap, to drain out of the upper washing water impellor (20). However, there still remains soapy washing water in the upper washing water impellor (20) and some soapy water drops hang at the tip of the washing water nozzles (201).

In the rinsing step, the rinsing water (35) is sprayed to the rack (42) through rinsing water nozzles (301) that developed at the lower surface of the upper rinsing impellor (30) to rotate the impellor (30).

If such soapy water drops that were hang at the upper washing water impellor (20) or at the nozzles (201) remain throughout the rinsing step, they drop to the dishes or cups placed on the rack (42) and contaminate them. Even repeated rinsing can not eliminated the possibility of contamination by the soapy water as far as such structure is maintained.

It is the purpose of the current application to provide a dish washer that eliminates such defects of the prior arts forever by changing the structure of a dish washer.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a commercial purpose dish washer (1′) according to current application. Apparent shape of a dish washer (1′) of the current application is the same as the prior art. The only modification is done inside of the pipes.

FIG. 5 is a side cross-sectional view of a dish washer according to the current application seen along the line C-C′ in FIG. 4. The commercial dish washer (1′) of the current application is also comprised of a water tank (10′) that is divided into a washing water tank (12′) and a rinsing water tank (14′), an upper washing impellor (20′), a lower washing impellor (22′), an upper rinsing impellor (30′), a lower rinsing impellor (32′), a rack (42′) for holding dishes and bowls, a washing water pump (28′), a rinsing water pump (38′), a washing water pipe (24′), a rinsing water pipe (34′). One auxiliary rinsing water pipe (50) is developed from the rinsing water tank (14′) and penetrates one side of wall of the washing water pipe (24′) and embedded inside of the washing water pipe (24′) along the length thereof and reaches a connection housing (36″).

Since the washing water (25′) is supplied with a pressure, one check valve (54) is installed on the auxiliary rinsing water pipe (50), just before it meets the washing water pipe (24′), to prevent reflux of the washing water (25′), which contains soap, through the auxiliary rinsing water pipe (50) and contaminates the rinsing water (35′) in the rinsing water tank (14′). Another check valve (39) is installed on the main rinsing water line (34′) to prevent reflux of the washing water.

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of the section ‘D’ in the FIG. 5 to show the washing water (25′) distribution line through the upper washing water impellor (20′) of the current application and shows washing water (25′) flow in washing step.

The upper washing impellor (20′) locates above the upper rinsing water impellor (30′). A housing (36′) connects the rinsing water pipe (34′) and washing water pipe (24′) to the rinsing water impellor (30′) and washing water impellor (20′) respectively. The rinsing water pipe (34′) penetrates the housing (36′) from above and reaches the rinsing water impellor (30′). In addition to the rinsing water pipe (34′), another auxiliary rinsing water pipe (50) is installed inside of the washing water pipe (24′) along the length of the washing water pipe (24′). The washing water pipe (24′) is connected to the housing (36′) from the side thereof. So, the washing water (25′) that contains soap pass outside of the rinsing water pipe (34′) and flows to the upper washing water impellor (20′). As the washing water (25′) flows into the upper washing impellor (20′) and sprayed on the lag (42′) through the nozzle (201′), the upper washing water impellor (20′) rotates by the reaction force. The rinsing water impellor (30′) has two rows of rinsing water nozzles of (301′) and (302). One row of rinsing water nozzles (301′) is developed facing downward as in the prior art. Another row of rinsing water nozzles (302) is developed facing up ward.

In the dish washer (1′) of the current application, the sequence of dish washing is comprised of water filling up step, washing step, preliminary rinsing step, and rinsing step. So as to washing step, the sequence is the same as the prior art.

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of the section ‘D’ in the FIG. 5 to show the rinsing water (35′) distribution line through the upper washing water impellor (20′) of the current application and shows rinsing water (35′) flow in auxiliary rinsing step. Just after washing step is finished, i.e., washing water (25′) is cut, an auxiliary rinsing water pump (52) supply rinsing water (35′) to the auxiliary rinsing water pipe (50). Then the rinsing water (35′) comes out of the end of the auxiliary rinsing water pipe (50) and drives out the washing water (25′) that was left inside of the housing (36″) and the washing impellor (20′). In the auxiliary rinsing step, the rinsing water (35′) comes out through the washing water nozzle (201′). The rinsing water (35′) additionally washes upper surface of the rinsing water impellor (35′) to remove soapy washing water (25′) that might sprayed thereon during the washing step and remain on the upper surface of the rinsing water impellor (35′). Even though the residual soapy washing water (25′) is driven out of the washing water impellor (20′), some washing water (25′) droplets (25″) may hang on underneath of the upper washing water impellor (20′). Such droplets (25″) are washed out during the following rinsing step due to the special structure of the rinsing water impellor (30′) and nozzles (301′) (302).

FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view of the section ‘D’ in the FIG. 5 to show the rinsing water (35′) distribution line through the upper rinsing impellor of the current application and shows rinsing water (35′) flow in rinsing step. In rinsing step, the rinsing water (35′) is supplied through the rinsing water pipe (34′) and introduced to inside of the rinsing water impellor (30′). As the rinsing water (35′) comes out of the rinsing water impellor (30′) through the rinsing water nozzles (301′) (302), part of the rinsing water (35′) that comes out though the rinsing water nozzle of (302), which face the bottom surface of the washing water impellor (20′), clean the washing water droplets (25″).

By the mechanism described above, all the soapy washing water (25′) is removed and the chances of contaminating the dishes or cups are eliminated.