Title:
PORTABLE ACCESSORY ORGANIZER PACK
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A portable accessory organizer pack for storing, organizing and transporting personal articles and accessories along with the pack is provided by an organizer pack having a pouch body with a pair of pouch walls hingedly coupled to a base section and a covering flap and that is configurable between a first position wherein a set of interior storage compartments in the pouch walls and covering flap may all be accessible at one time to facilitate packing and unpacking activities to a narrow profile, ready for transport configuration that further forms a central cavity selectively coverable by the covering flap and providing additional storage space to that already provided by the other internal storage compartments for maximizing storage space.



Inventors:
Landay, Lisa A. (San Clemente, CA, US)
Application Number:
12/253964
Publication Date:
05/07/2009
Filing Date:
10/18/2008
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
224/600, 224/581
International Classes:
A45F4/00; A45F3/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
BATTISTI, DEREK J
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
ADVANTAGE IP LAW FIRM (SEAL BEACH, CA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A portable accessory organizer pack for increasing storage capacity and facilitating assembly between unpacking/packing and transportation ready configurations comprising: a pouch body with a base section interposed between two pouch walls, each pouch wall being hingedly coupled to opposing spaced apart regions of the base section and having a storage surface with at least one pocket having an innermost surface, the pouch walls further being rotatable relative to the base section between a first position with the storage surfaces substantially opposing one another to a second position with the storage surface of each pouch wall disposed in substantially the same plane; a connective element constructed to releasably couple the pouch walls together into a transportation ready configuration with the pouch walls, the base section, and the connective element cooperating to maintain the spacing of the innermost surfaces of the pouch wall storage surfaces apart from one another to form a substantially enclosed pouch cavity while leaving at least one opening between the pouch walls providing access into the pouch cavity when the connective element is engaged, the connective element being further constructed to free the pouch walls to rotate about the base section into a substantially flat unpacking/packing configuration exposing and providing access to each of the storage surface pockets of the pouch walls; and a covering flap hingedly coupled to the pouch body and including an auxiliary storage surface with at least one interior facing flap pocket, the covering flap being constructed to rotate relative to the pouch body to extend from the pouch body positioning the interior facing flap pocket in substantially the same plane as the pouch wall pockets when the connective element is disengaged providing access to all interior facing pockets and further constructed to rotate relative to the pouch body so that a user may selectively cover and uncover at least a portion of the pouch cavity opening when the pouch body is in a transportation ready configuration.

2. The organizer pack as set forth in claim 1 further comprising: a carrying strap secured to the pouch body or covering flap and constructed to be exposed when the pack is in the transport configuration.

3. The organizer pack as set forth in claim 1 wherein: the connective element forms opposing side walls of the pouch cavity.

4. The organizer pack as set forth in claim 3 wherein: the connective element extends from the base section to a point proximate the uppermost extent of the pouch walls.

5. The organizer pack as set forth in claim 1 wherein: the pouch walls, the base section, and the covering flap include exterior surfaces that reside in substantially the same plane when the connective element is disengaged and the covering flap extended.

6. The organizer pack as set forth in claim 1 wherein: at least one of the pockets includes a substantially see-through pocket covering forming a viewing window.

7. The organizer pack as set forth in claim 1 wherein: the pouch body and covering flap are constructed of a substantially flexible material.

8. The organizer pack as set forth in claim 1 wherein: the connective element forms a side wall of the pouch cavity and further includes at least one auxiliary pocket.

9. The organizer pack as set forth in claim 1 wherein: the covering flap is constructed to cover the entire opening of the pouch cavity.

10. The organizer pack as set forth in claim 1 wherein: the pouch body includes a first covering flap fastener element; and the covering flap includes a complementary covering flap fastener operable to releasably secure the covering flap to the pouch body with the interior flap pocket abutting an exterior surface of one of the pouch walls.

11. The organizer pack as set forth in claim 1 further comprising: at least one pocket on an exterior surface of the pouch body or covering flap.

12. The organizer pack as set forth in claim 3 wherein: the connective element extends from the uppermost extent of the pouch walls toward the base section leaving at least one gap into the pouch cavity proximate the base section.

13. The organizer pack as set forth in claim 3 wherein: the connective element extends between the uppermost extent of the pouch walls and the base section leaving at least one upper gap opening and at least one lower gap opening into the pouch cavity.

14. The organizer pack as set forth in claim 3 wherein: the connective element includes a set of spaced apart connective strips operable to releasably secure the pouch walls together.

15. The organizer pack as set forth in claim 1 wherein: the pouch walls are substantially parallel to one another when the connective element is engaged.

16. The organizer pack as set forth in claim 1 further comprising: an accessory mat constructed to fold up within the profile of the pouch body when the pouch body is in the transport configuration; and an anchoring element on the interior surface of the pouch body constructed to releasably secure the accessory mat to the pouch body.

17. The organizer pack as set forth in claim 1 further comprising: a carrying strap coupled to the pouch body and having at least one separable section constructed to encircle and releasably engage a bar to suspend the pack therefrom.

18. The organizer pack as set forth in claim 2 wherein: the carrying strap is a single loop shoulder strap; an exterior surface of the pouch body or flap section includes a strap converter constructed to releasably capture a portion of the carrying strap to subdivide the single loop shoulder strap into a dual loop backpack strap.

19. A portable accessory organizer pack for increasing storage capacity and facilitating assembly between unpacking/packing and transportation ready configurations comprising: a pouch body with a base section interposed between and hingedly connected to an outer pouch wall with an outermost free edge and an inner pouch wall terminating in an uppermost hinge element, each of the pouch walls having an interior surface and an exterior surface and being independently rotatable through a substantially one hundred eighty degree arc relative to the base section; a strap retention section extending from the hinge element of the inner pouch wall and further extending into an elongated covering flap with an interior surface, the covering flap being constructed to pivot about the hinge element from a pouch cavity access position aligning the interior surfaces of the inner pouch wall and the covering flap in substantially the same plane to a covering position with the interior surface of the covering flap abutting the exterior surface of the outer pouch wall; at least one pocket on each of the interior surfaces of the pouch walls and covering flap; a pair of opposing connective elements projecting between the base section and a region proximate the top of each pouch wall, the connective elements being constructed to releasably secure the pouch walls together with the interior surfaces of the pouch walls opposing one another in a spaced apart, parallel relationship to form a pouch cavity with a top opening at least partially coverable by the covering flap, the connective elements further being constructed to free the pouch walls to rotate away from one another about the base section into a substantially flat configuration; and a carrying strap coupled at opposing ends to the strap retention section for suspending the pack during transport whereby a user may selectively engage the connective elements to couple the pouch walls together and pivot the covering flap over onto the pouch body to cover the top opening of the pouch cavity to form the pack into a transport configuration and also pivot the covering flap away from the pouch body into a position extending from the inner pouch wall and selectively disengage the connective elements to pivot the pouch walls away from one another to position the interior surfaces of the pouch walls and covering flap in substantially the same plane exposing all of the interior pockets in each of the pouch walls and covering flap.

20. A portable accessory organizer pack for increasing storage capacity and facilitating assembly between unpacking/packing and transportation ready configurations comprising: a pouch body with an inner pouch wall and an outer pouch wall hingedly coupled to opposing spaced apart regions of a base section interposed therebetween, each pouch wall having an interior facing storage surface with at least one pocket and being rotatable relative to the base section between a first position with the storage surfaces substantially opposing one another in a spaced apart relationship to a second position with the storage surface of each pouch wall disposed in substantially the same plane; a connective element on each side of the pouch body constructed to releasably couple the pouch walls together into a transportation ready configuration with the pouch walls, the base section, and the connective element forming a substantially enclosed pouch cavity while leaving at least one opening between the pouch walls when the connective element is fully engaged providing access into the pouch cavity, the connective element being further constructed to free the pouch walls to rotate about the base section into a substantially flat configuration exposing and providing access to each of the interior facing pockets of the pouch walls; a flap element hingedly coupled to the pouch body and including an auxiliary storage surface including at least one interior facing flap pocket, the flap being constructed to rotate relative to the pouch body to extend the flap element from the pouch body exposing the interior facing flap pocket when the pouch body is in the unpacking/packing configuration and further constructed to rotate relative to the pouch body to cover at least a portion of the pouch cavity opening when the pouch body is in a transportation ready configuration; an accessory mat with a first fastener element having an unfolded profile larger than the pouch body in at least one dimension and constructed to fold up to fit within the profile of the pouch body when the connective element is engaged; a complementary second fastener element disposed on the interior surface of the pouch body constructed to align with the first fastener element and releasably secure the accessory mat to the pouch body; a strap length reducer on the exterior surface of the pouch body; and a carrying strap having opposing ends coupled to the pouch body or covering flap and constructed to be selectively captured by the strap length reducer to bisect the carrying strap into two loops, the carrying strap further including at least one separable section constructed to encircle and releasably capture a support bar to suspend the pack therefrom.

Description:

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/981,103 filed on Oct. 18, 2007, entitled the same, and which is hereby by incorporated by reference in its entirety.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to portable packs for transporting, storing, and organizing personal gear and accessories and more specifically to portable packs that are convertible from one configuration to another.

2. Background Art

When conducting outdoor activities, traveling, going to a gym or exercise class, heading out to the beach or a picnic, or merely conducting local shopping activities or seeking out local entertainment, it is commonplace to carry around personal gear relating to the activity. Often the gear such as clothing, food and beverages, identification, toiletries, and the like is tailored to the event. In addition, if accompanied by small children or infants, there are additional gear needs as well such as diapers, extra clothes, changing mats, wipes, and snacks, for instance. Typically, the solution for transporting personal items is provided by personal carrying products such as purses, handbags, wallets, tote bags, shopping bags, backpacks, and messenger bags. Often more than one carrying product is required due to the amount of gear and needs of the user. Depending on the construction of the carrying product, the user typically supports the product on his or her shoulder, wears the item as a backpack, or merely carries the item using a handle or handles. Also, it is not uncommon to bring bulky items along as well such as umbrellas, sleeping bags, large beach towels, exercise mats, large bulky clothing such as jackets and the like which may need to be hand carried in some instances since the carrying item cannot accommodate the bulky nature of the goods. Thus, the user typically will have one or both hands occupied with carrying additional goods. This may also add multiple trips to and from a vehicle such as when going to the beach, picnic, or barbecue to fully transport all of the goods.

The general construction of many of these carrying products is usually of a sack like construction in that there is a large central pocket that may or may not have a covering flap and some sort of handle or strap for carrying the sack. Thus, the user merely dumps much of the gear into the sack without any organizational thought and is forced to search through the sack to find the desired gear. This drawback appears in many messenger style bags as well.

Other carrying items provide a number of pockets for organizing the gear somewhat but do not allow the user to access all or even most of the pockets at the same time. For example, backpacks are often top loaded and/or front panel loaded. However, when accessing one of the storage compartments, typically, another is covered up and the user is forced to flip back and forth or open and close different sections of the backpack to access another.

One such example may be found in U.S. Pat. No. 6,193,034 to Fournier. The Fournier sports bag includes a central section and two outer sections, each including a set of pockets. The outermost edges of the two outer sections may be brought together in an abutting relationship to form and seal off the top side of a generally bell-shaped cavity. The side walls may also be zipped up to fully enclose the cavity. A relatively short flap without any storage capacity may overlap and secure the top edges of the outer walls together. While providing a significant amount of storage, such pack fails to provide any additional storage capacity in the short flap section or quick access into the cavity formed when the bag is assembled for transport. In addition, the relatively bell-shaped cavity forms an enlarged profile of that of a conventional duffel bag and not a slimming profile creating a somewhat bulky bag to keep next to one's person during transport.

Yet another example of a carrying pack is provided in U.S. Pat. No. 5,002,401 to Blackman. The Blackman article holder and carrier includes a pack that opens flat with pockets throughout the interior. The pack may be folded up to form a central compartment and includes a side flap for coupling the sidewalls together with a hook and loop fastener and a bottom flap for closing off the bottom of the compartment. The top of the compartment may be sealed with a cinch top closure. When ready for transportation, the pack generally resembles a backpack or half milk carton in profile. The pocket openings run parallel to and face the top opening that is not covered by a flap so that smaller items falling out of the open pockets may fall out of the compartment through the cinch top closure if the pack is inverted. The dual flap closures also require a significant amount of effort on the part of the user to manipulate, align, and close up the pack as both flaps must be coupled to the main body of the pack to close off the compartment making this pack somewhat unwieldy. In addition, the lack of a covering flap for the cinch top opening allows environmental conditions such as rain to enter into the main compartment.

Another product sold under the brand Buxton Over The Shoulder Organizer Bag as available from www.buxtonbag.tv attempts to provide organizational capabilities in an over the shoulder style bag. While such a bag provides a relatively roomy pouch section thanks to an expandable pouch section and a flap section with interior pockets, the pouch section may only be widened for additional storage or zippered into a more narrow profile. The ability to expose the interior surface of the pouch cavity is not provided.

A Coach brand messenger bag is another attempt to satisfy consumers craving an organized messenger bag. The Coach brand bag includes a first openable clam-shell style section adjacent a pouch section with a flap section that covers the both the pouch section and the clam-shell style section. However, the Coach brand messenger style bag includes permanent pouch side walls such that interior surfaces of the opposing pouch walls may not be opened flat and exposed and the pouch remains hidden when the adjacent clam-shell style section is opened up. Thus, all of the interior surfaces of the Coach bag cannot be exposed at the same time. Moreover, the clam-shell halves are connected together by a narrow strip of material that projects upwardly into the clam-shell sections to interfere with the withdrawal of materials placed therein or the placement of mat and pads thereon.

Additional examples of more specific accessory focused packs include a tri-fold picnic pack available from www.picnicfun.com under the picnic pack category and sold under the product identification Bordeaux Picnic Set for 4. Such a tri-fold arrangement allows no room for an internal pouch cavity as each of the internal pockets abut one another when the wallet or pack is folded up for transport. In addition, the open side walls of such a pack encourage the loss of internal contents that are not securely fastened to the pack. Thus, loose items could not realistically be stored in such a pack.

Another example from the same web site is the Classico Deluxe Rose Picnic Pack for 2 or Classico Deluxe Riviera Pack for 2. These two packs provide some suitable features but do not include a covering flap and instead provide a two-section clam-shell pack that zips up all around the pack to seal off the interior completely. In addition, there is no internal cavity created as the internal contents abut one another when the pack is closed. Such packs clearly miss out on the incorporation of a covering flap with additional storage as well as an easily accessible internal cavity when folded up for transport.

In surveying these other pack solutions, a primary drawback of many of these carrying items is the loss of possible storage capacity since not all of the surface features contain storage compartments. Yet another frequent drawback is that there is no way to see into the contents of the storage compartments since the outer pocket coverings are usually opaque or the contents are concealed in some fashion even when available for access.

Given the drawbacks of conventional carrying products, there exists a need for an easy to use, portable organizer accessory pack that maximizes storage space while reducing the need for extra baggage and that provides superior organizational features in a relatively narrow profile configuration. Such an organizer pack would also preferably be capable of transporting travel gear and related accessories along with personal items so as to free the user's hands during transportation and further allow the user to access all of the interior storage compartments at the same time reducing the time required to both pack and unpack the travel pack.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention, a portable accessory organizer pack for increasing storage capacity and facilitating assembly between unpacking/packing and transportation ready configurations may be provided with a pouch body having a base section hingedly coupled between two pouch walls with each pouch wall having a storage surface with at least one interior facing pocket, the pouch walls further being rotatable relative to the base section between a first position with the storage surfaces substantially opposing one another to a second position with the storage surface of each pouch wall disposed in substantially the same plane. A connective element constructed to releasably couple the pouch walls together into a transportation ready configuration with the pouch walls, the base section, and the connective element cooperating to maintain the spacing of the innermost surfaces of the pouch walls apart from one another to form a substantially enclosed pouch cavity while leaving at least one opening between the pouch walls providing access into the pouch cavity when the connective element is fully engaged, the connective element being further constructed to free the pouch walls to rotate about the base section into a substantially flat unpacking/packing configuration exposing and providing access to each of the storage surface pockets of the pouch walls is also provided along with a flap element hingedly coupled to the pouch body and including an auxiliary storage surface including at least one interior facing flap pocket, the flap being constructed to rotate relative to the pouch body to extend the flap from the pouch body exposing the interior facing flap pocket when the pouch body is in the unpacking/packing configuration and further constructed to rotate relative to the pouch body so that a user may selectively cover and uncover at least a portion of the pouch cavity opening when the pouch body is in a transportation ready configuration.

In another aspect of the present invention, a carrying strap may be provided to facilitate the transportation of the pack and a strap length reducer may be used to convert the carrying strap from a single shoulder strap to a dual loop backpack style configuration, both carrying means offering hands free transport.

In yet another aspect of the present invention, the carrying strap may incorporate at least one separable region whereby a user may separate a portion of the carrying strap to encircle a support bar such as a stroller handle and suspend the pack therefrom.

Another feature of the present invention may be the incorporation of a pre-filled cavity with an accessory mat that may be anchored thereto and folded up to fit within the profile of the ready for transport configuration pack.

Other aspects of the present invention include providing connective elements that form the sidewalls of the pouch cavity and may incorporate additional auxiliary pockets or a covering flap that covers at least a portion of the pouch cavity opening and that also introduce additional gap openings for inserting items into the pouch cavity that are larger than the pouch cavity.

Other aspects of the present invention will become apparent with further reference to the following drawings and specification.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is an elevational view of an interior surface of an exemplary first embodiment of a portable accessory organizer pack in an unfolded, ready for packing configuration and in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an elevational view of an exterior surface of the organizer pack of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is the same view as in FIG. 1 and illustrating various articles being stored within the pockets of the organizer pack of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is an elevational view of the organizer pack of FIG. 1 with two pouch walls folded and coupled together to form a pouch;

FIG. 5 is a left hand side view of FIG. 4 with the flap folded back;

FIG. 6 is a left hand side view of FIG. 5 with the close connective element disengaged and peeled back to reveal the pouch cavity and the covering flap slightly repositioned;

FIG. 7 is a top view of the organizer pack of FIG. 1 with the flap section folded back;

FIG. 8 is the same view of the organizer pack of FIG. 4 rotated through 90 degrees illustrating a quick pouch access configuration;

FIG. 9 is a rear view of FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a left hand side view of the organizer pack of FIG. 1 with the flap section folded onto the pouch section illustrating the ready for transport configuration;

FIG. 11 is a top view of the organizer pack of FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is a bottom view of the organizer pack of FIG. 10;

FIG. 13 is a long side view of the pack of the unfolded organizer pack of FIG. 1;

FIG. 14 is the same view as FIG. 5 with an alternative sidewall construction;

FIG. 15 is the same view as FIG. 5 with another alternative sidewall construction;

FIG. 16 is the same view as FIG. 5 with yet another alternative sidewall construction;

FIG. 17 is the same view as FIG. 5 with yet another alternative sidewall construction;

FIG. 18 is the same view as in FIG. 1 with an alternative covering flap and carrying strap construction;

FIG. 19 is the same view as in FIG. 11 with the alternative covering flap and carrying strap construction of FIG. 18;

FIG. 20 is the same view as in FIG. 1 with an alternative interior storage construction;

FIG. 21 is the same view as in FIG. 20 with exemplary utensils and accessories inserted into the storage regions of the pack;

FIG. 22 is an elevational view of an interior surface of another exemplary embodiment of a portable accessory organizer pack in an unfolded, ready for packing configuration and in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 23 is an elevational view of an exterior surface of the organizer pack of FIG. 22;

FIG. 24 is the same view as in FIG. 22 and illustrating various articles being stored within the interior surface pockets of the organizer pack;

FIG. 25 is an elevational view of the organizer pack of FIG. 22 with two sections folded and coupled together to form a pouch;

FIG. 26 is a left hand side view of FIG. 25 with the flap folded back;

FIG. 27 is the same view as FIG. 26 with the nearest sidewall removed revealing the pouch cavity;

FIG. 28 is a top view of the organizer pack of FIG. 26 with the flap section folded back;

FIG. 29 is a left hand side view of the organizer pack of FIG. 26 with the flap section folded onto the pouch section illustrating the ready for transport configuration;

FIG. 30 is a top view of the organizer pack of FIG. 29 with the flap section folded onto the pouch section;

FIG. 31 is a front view of the organizer pack of FIG. 29 with the flap section folded onto the pouch section;

FIG. 32 is the same view as in FIG. 28 rotated through 90 degrees and with exemplary liquid containers being stored in the opened sidewall compartments;

FIG. 33 is rear view of the organizer pack of FIG. 32 illustrating an alternative carrying strap configuration;

FIG. 34 is an elevational view of an interior surface of another embodiment of the portable accessory organizer pack in an unfolded, ready for packing configuration in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 35 is an elevational view of an exterior surface of the organizer pack of FIG. 34;

FIG. 36 is a rear elevational view of an exemplary folding mat for use with the organizer pack of FIG. 34;

FIG. 37 is the same view as in FIG. 34 and illustrating the foldable mat of FIG. 36 being anchored to the pack in an unfolded state;

FIG. 38 is the same view as in FIG. 37 and illustrating the foldable mat of FIG. 36 being folded up with the profile of the pack;

FIG. 39 is a front elevational view of the organizer pack of FIG. 34 shown in a ready for transport configuration;

FIG. 40 is a left forward perspective view of the pack in FIG. 39;

FIG. 41 is the same view as FIG. 39 with the separable regions of the carrying strap in an unbuckled configuration;

FIG. 42 is the same view as FIG. 39 with the carrying strap secured around and suspended from an exemplary stroller handle;

FIG. 43 is an elevational view of an interior surface of another embodiment of the portable accessory organizer pack in an unfolded, ready for packing configuration in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 44 is an elevational view of an exterior surface of the organizer pack of FIG. 43;

FIG. 45 is the same view as in FIG. 43 and illustrating the foldable mat of FIG. 36 being anchored to the pack in an unfolded state;

FIG. 46 is the same view as in FIG. 45 and illustrating the foldable mat of FIG. 36 folded up with the profile of the pack;

FIG. 47 is an elevational view of the organizer pack of FIG. 43 with two sections folded and coupled together to form a pouch with a folded mat inside; and

FIG. 48 is a front left perspective view of the pack of FIG. 47 with the side wall removed to show the folded up mat inside.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The following packs have features in common including a pouch body of a generally rectangular shape that may be configured between a closed, transportation ready, configuration that conceals most, if not all, of the storage compartments used for packing, storing, organizing, and transporting personal gear and accessories and an expanded, open, ready for packing and unpacking configuration with the pouch body and covering flap configured in a substantially flat position to expose the organizing compartments. The packing process transforms each pack from an elongated configuration presenting a large amount of packing space to a closed configuration having a relatively narrow profile generally resembling a messenger style bag or clam-shell style pack with or without a covering flap. In addition, for some of the packs, manipulating the pouch body into the closed configuration creates a central cavity for additional storage space. Exterior facing pockets may also be used on each of the packs to provide additional storage space on the outside surfaces of the packs that are not concealed when the packs are in the closed configuration.

Each of the packs may also include a carrying means such as a shoulder strap, dual backpack straps, one or more handles, or a combination thereof, and attached to various locations on the pouch body and/or covering flap as will be described below. Various closure devices and fasteners are used to close off and control access to the storage compartments and also to maintain the pack in the closed, ready for transport configuration. For example, throughout this description various fasteners or closure devices such as zippers, magnetic snaps and locks, buckles and clips, hook and loop, loose tie strings, straps, buttons, hooks and grommets, tongue and groove type closures, and other suitable fasteners are referred to, but are not meant to be limiting, unless otherwise noted. In addition, attachable accessories such as accessory mats and removable pockets may be used with each pack provided a suitable corresponding attachment structure is provided. The features of one pack are generally understood to be interchangeable with the features of other packs, except where noted.

The packs may also be used to secure and transport gear and accessories either in a fixed storage compartment or loose within the pack and be transported as a single unit with the pack. Other advantageous features and the versatility of the organizer packs will become apparent as this description continues.

Referring now to FIGS. 1-13, an exemplary first embodiment of a portable accessory organizer pack, generally designated 100, is illustrated. Referring specifically now to an interior surface view of the unfolded, pre-packing (or unpacked) organizer pack configuration in FIG. 1, the organizer pack 100 includes a pouch body, generally designated 102, with a substantially rectangular outer pouch wall, generally designated 104. The outer pouch wall includes a free outer edge 106 and an opposing innermost edge 108 hingedly connected to an outer pouch wall side edge 110 (edges 108 and 110 essentially coincide with one another) of a substantially rectangular base section 112. A pair of opposing long sides 113, 115 forms part of the periphery of the outer pouch wall as well.

The base section 112 further includes an inner pouch wall side edge 114 hingedly connected to an inner pouch wall, generally designated 116. Thus, the base section acts as a dual hinge with two spaced apart hinge lines (110, 114) about which each respective pouch wall 104, 116 may pivot independently. While generally only approximately ninety (90) degrees of rotation is useful for each pouch wall relative to the base section, such hinge may be constructed to enable each pouch wall to rotate through a substantially three hundred and sixty (360) degree arc. The upper and lower boundaries of the inner pouch wall as viewed in FIG. 1 is defined by long sides 121 and 123, respectively. At the opposing end of the pouch body from the outermost edge of the outer pouch, the inner pouch wall terminates in an upper edge 118 from which extends a covering flap 120 that may include an intermediate strap retention section 122. The covering flap is also hingedly connected to the pouch body about the upper edge 118 that forms another hinge line (axis of rotation) in the organizer pack. The covering flap may also be rotated about the upper edge pivot line through three hundred and sixty (360) degrees as shown in FIGS. 1, 5, and 10. Such flap is configurable between a covering position for transport as in FIG. 10, an unpacking/packing position as in FIG. 1, and a quick pouch access position as in FIGS. 5-6.

Taking advantage of the interior facing surface area of each pouch walls 104, 116 and the covering flap section 120 as shown in FIGS. 1 and 3 and to increase the storage capacity of the organizer pack 100, at least one pocket is preferably introduced into each wall or flap section with the pocket or pockets filling a significant portion of the entire span of each pouch wall and flap section. In this exemplary embodiment, the outer pouch wall 104 includes a set of three pockets: a main pocket 124 forming the innermost pocket and two smaller auxiliary pockets 126, and 128 overlapping a portion of the main pocket. The main pocket spans the width of the outer pouch wall from side to side (width being defined as top to bottom of the pouch wall as shown in FIG. 1) with a lower end coinciding with or terminating near the outer pouch wall side edge 110 and an upper end 130 terminating about two-thirds of the way to the outermost end 106 of the outer pouch wall 104. The smaller auxiliary pockets 126, 128 essentially subdivide the larger main pocket in width and have a lower edge in common with the lower edge of the main pocket 124 but terminate in a common outer edge 132 about half way across the outer pouch wall. The openings of each of the outer pouch wall pockets project in a parallel orientation to the closest long edge 110 of the base section 112 and the outermost edge 106 of the outer pouch wall. In this exemplary embodiment, the top edges of the pockets are only secured at the sides of each respective pockets allowing quick retrieval into the pockets. The pockets are also preferably constructed to lay substantially flat to provide a relatively thin pocket profile or, alternatively, may be of an accordion style, have a stretchable pocket covering material, or have pleated corners to enable further expansion. In addition, the pockets may be formed of a transparent or see-through mesh material to enable ready identification of the pocket contents or also of an opaque material if more privacy is required.

Similarly, the inner pouch wall 116 includes a set of three pockets as well: a main pocket 134 and two smaller auxiliary pockets 136 and 138, each with a common bottom edge terminating at or near the inner pouch wall side edge 114 of the base section 112. In this exemplary embodiment, the inner pouch wall main pocket 134 includes an upper edge 140 terminating at or near the top edge 118 of the inner pouch wall and including a zipper closure 142 for controlling access into the pocket. As with the corresponding auxiliary pockets on the outer pouch wall, the auxiliary pockets on the inner pouch wall generally subdivide the width of the inner pouch wall. Such auxiliary inner wall pouch pockets also include a common upper edge 144 terminating about one-half of the way between the wall side edge 114 and the outer edge 118 of the inner pouch wall providing a slightly different size configuration than their outer pouch wall counterpart. The common upper edge of the smaller auxiliary pockets does not include a fastener in this example. In addition, the pocket openings of the inner pouch wall face in the opposite direction to those of the outer pouch wall when the pack is unfolded as seen in FIG. 1. Thus, when the pouch walls 104, 116 of the pouch body 102 are folded up together for transport, as will be described below, the pocket openings of both the inner and outer pouch walls face the top of the pack during transport to facilitate both retrieval of items stored therein and to prevent items from spilling out during transport.

With continued reference to FIGS. 1 and 3, the covering flap section 120 extends outwardly from the uppermost edge 118 of the inner pouch wall 116. The interior surface of the covering flap section includes an enlarged storage pocket 146 providing an auxiliary flap storage area. This pocket includes a bottom edge coexistent with the outermost edge 119 of the strap retention section 122 and an upper edge 148 with a zipper closure 150 recessed about one-fifth of the length of the covering flap back from the outer edge 152 of the covering flap. The pocket covering or interior wall of the interior flap pocket 146 is constructed of a stretchable mesh material such as a vinyl coated mesh in this exemplary embodiment. Such see-through stretchable material facilitates both the ready identification of stored articles as well as providing some expandability of the pocket for enlarged items and extra capacity. Extending from the outer edge of the zipper closure is a bayonet style fastener 154 attached to a short length of webbed strapping 155 for use in releasably securing the flap 120 to the exterior surface 177 (FIG. 2) of the outer pouch wall 104 as will be described below

For releasably joining the two pouch walls 104, 116 together, a pair of connective elements 156 and 158 in the form of a pair of opposing zipper assembly closures (complementary toothed zipper walls with zipper pull) is provided in this exemplary embodiment. Each connective element 156, 158 includes one half of the zipper assembly that projects along the longer sides 113, 115 and 121, 123, respectively, of the opposing pouch walls 104, 116 from near their respective top edges 106, 118 to converge at opposing points 160, 162 (FIG. 2) on either side of the opposing short ends 164, 166 of the base section. This provides the pack with a slightly tapered appearance with the region of the outer pouch wall 104 nearest the base section 112 slightly narrower than the outermost edge 106 as best seen in FIG. 1. Such connective elements may project at right angles to their respective pouch walls and be constructed of a rigid or flexible material. It will be appreciated that a flexible material such as cloth or nylon may fall to one side or the other when unfastened. Preferred zipper materials include conventional metals or plastics such as nylon. Other suitable materials will occur to one of ordinary skill in the art.

Referring now to an exterior surface view of the organizer pack 100 in FIG. 2, the exterior surface 177 of the outer pouch wall 104 is a generally rectangular surface bordered by a piping or trim 170 sewn around the periphery of the pouch wall providing a finished border appearance. Projecting from the interior edge 172 of the exterior surface of the outer pouch wall is short webbed strap 174 terminating in a buckle 176 for receiving the bayonet fastener 154 of the covering flap 120. The exterior surface 178 of the inner pouch wall is also generally rectangularly shaped but extends to merge with the elongated rectangular exterior surface 179 of the flap section and both are finished with a separate piping material. On the exterior surface of the inner pouch wall is yet another pocket 180 with a bottom edge 182 adjacent the base section 112 and an upper edge 184 coexistent with the pouch side edge of the strap restraint section 122. A zipper closure 186 spaced a few inches from the strap restraint section 122 provide the access control for the inner pouch wall exterior pocket 180.

With continued reference to FIG. 2, the exterior surface 188 of the covering flap section 120 includes a pair of external flap pockets 190 and 192, together spanning the width of the flap section. The flap pockets have a common bottom edge coexistent with the outer edge 152 of the covering flap and a common top edge 194 spaced apart a few inches from the strap restraint section 122. The common top edge includes a common zipper element 196 that when pulled across the width of the flap section opens or closes both flap pockets. In this exemplary embodiment, the pockets bifurcate the exterior surface 188 of the covering flap 120 unequally with the top pocket 190, as viewed in FIG. 2, being slightly larger its counterpart pocket 192. The bottom pocket (as viewed in FIG. 2) also includes a mesh outer surface while the top pocket includes a solid/opaque outer surface. A lanyard 198 extends from one end of a strap having the other end sewn into zipper closure 196. Such a lanyard provides a convenient locating for releasably securing one's keys for example.

With continued reference to FIG. 2, a convenient elongated carrying strap 168 is coupled to the short ends 164, 166 (FIGS. 2 and 3) of the strap retention section 122. Alternatively, such strap may be attached to the pouch body, other region of the flap section, or a combination thereof. The carrying strap forms a shoulder strap from which the pack 100 may be carried or suspended and may include an adjustable shoulder pad (not shown here but described below in conjunction with other packs described herein) that may be slidably mounted on the strap and can be slid along a length of the strap so that a user can adjust the strap to increase the level of comfort. Furthermore, a quartet of conventional strap length adjusters 169, 171, 173, and 187 are placed along a length of the strap to enable a user to adjust the overall length of the carrying strap as would be understood by one of ordinary skill in the art. This strap is preferably long enough to form an elongated shoulder strap although a short carrying handle would be a suitable substitute. While the carrying strap is convenient, it will be appreciated that the pack could also be carried as a satchel without any carrying strap if desired.

As shown in FIGS. 1-2 in conjunction with the side view of the FIG. 13, with the organizer pack 100 in an unfolded configuration with the connective elements 156, 158 disengaged, the pouch walls 104, 116 are rotated relative to the base section 112 and the covering flap 120 is extended out from the inner pouch wall such that the exterior surfaces of the pouch walls, base section, and covering flap all reside in substantially the same horizontal plane. This hinging feature between the pouch walls and base section facilitates exposing all of the interior pockets 124, 126, 128, 134, 136, 138, and 146 all at once. In addition, the relatively low profile of the base section 112 provides a useful surface for attachments as will be described below and does not inhibit placing a mat or other enlarged pad across the interior surfaces of both pouch walls and further does not inhibit drawing articles from the pockets should the openings be placed parallel to and proximate the base section.

Referring now to FIGS. 5-7, the organizer pack 100 is illustrated in a ready for transport configuration except that the covering flap 120 is peeled back in FIG. 5 and the near side connective element 158 is unzipped to aid in the further description of the pouch body 102. Referring now specifically to FIG. 5, the connective elements 156 and 158 are shown in an engaged configuration. The zipper of each connective element has been drawn from its respective convergent point 160, 162 to the outermost edges 106, 118 of each pouch wall 104, 118 as the pouch walls are pivoted together about the base section 112. When the connective elements are fully engaged, the connective elements, pouch walls, and base section of the pouch body cooperate to form a pouch cavity 109 (FIG. 6) with an access opening 111 as in this exemplary embodiment as shown as the top of the pouch cavity as viewed in FIGS. 5-6. As shown in FIG. 6, the base section 112 introduces a space or gap between the interior surfaces (pocket coverings) of the interior surface pockets 124, 126, 128 and 134, 136, 138 of the respective outer and inner pouch walls to form an additional storage space for loose items that may be placed within the pouch cavity and still maintained within the organizer pack. Items such as picnic blankets, towels, mats, umbrellas, and other items too large from the interior storage pockets may be placed within the pouch cavity for storage and transportation. Even with the interior pockets stuffed to capacity, sufficient spacing will remain to form a central cavity to provide such additional storage. The connective elements provide the side walls that extend in a ninety (90) degree angle from the respective inner and outer pouch walls and prevent loose items from falling out during transportation as well. It will be appreciated that such configuration maintains the upper edges 106 and 118 of the outer and inner pouch walls, 104, 116, respectively in a spaced apart configuration providing quick access to the pouch cavity through the top opening 111 when the covering flap 120 is peeled back as shown in FIG. 5. FIG. 7 provides a top view of the pouch body folded up with the top opening into the pouch cavity.

Referring back to FIGS. 1-2, to construct the organizer pack 100, a base sheet of material may be cut to form the generally rectangular shape of the outer pouch wall 104 and a second base sheet of material may be cut to the elongated rectangular shape of the inner pouch wall 116 and flap section 120 as best seen in FIG. 2. Sheets of selected material forming the pocket coverings such as a mesh material, transparent material such as plastic, or opaque material are then cut to form and overlaid onto the base sheet. The pockets sheets and base sheets may be sewn together and the edges finished off with a piping material forming the border of each section (outer pouch wall and inner pouch wall/flap section). The pockets may be finished off with the zipper closures are desired or attractive trim pieces. The ends of the carrying strap 120 may also be sewn into the pack body on opposing sides of the strap restraint section 122. The base section 112 that forms an enlarged connecting strip between the outer pouch wall 104 and inner pouch wall 116 may then be sewn onto the respective bottom edges of the outer pouch wall and inner pouch wall to connect the two walls together. The connective elements 156, 158 may then be sewn onto the sides of the pouch walls with a convergence point on or near the short ends of the base section 112. One end of the webbed strapping 155 of the flap bayonet fastener 154 on the covering flap 120 may be sewn into the zipper closure 148 while one end of the webbed strapped connected to the complementary buckle fastener 176 may be sewn into the interior piping edge 172 of the outer pouch wall 104 to secure the fastener there. The key ring clip 198 also includes a short length of strapping that may be sewn into the zipper closure 196 of the external flap pockets 190, 192. Other finishing lines may be added to the pack body. The exterior pockets are formed similarly to the interior pockets by sewing a pocket covering onto the exterior surface of the base sheets.

Alternatively, a second interior sheet of material may be cut into a complementary shape to the exterior sheets and placed over the exterior base sheets. The pocket coverings and piping are then sewn onto and around the multi-sheet assembly. In addition, a rigid insert or insert or other stiffening materials may be inserted between the exterior and interior sheets of material or attached directly to the exterior sheet of material in any one of the sections including the outer pouch wall 104, inner pouch wall 116, base section 112, strap restraint section 122, and covering flap section 120, and/or connective elements 156, 158 to lend additional rigidity to the pack during transport. In addition to or in lieu of a rigid insert, a padding element may also be inserted between the pack sheets in the same sections.

The materials used may be of any suitable textile or flexible plastic although metallic and elastomeric materials are not out of the question. Non-limiting examples of materials found to be suitable include soft or hard plastics such as nylon and polyester as well as textiles like corduroy and canvas. Buckles and zippers may also be formed of hard plastic materials or constructed of metallic materials. Materials may be mixed and matched as well throughout the pack body. While the preferable means of assembly is primarily via stitching sheets of material, piping, and fasteners together, other means of securing the pack together such as adhesives, welding, stapling, riveting, and other suitable methods of manufacture may be used as well.

The materials selected for the pocket covering may be opaque, transparent, or semi-opaque, and clear plastic materials so that one may readily ascertain the contents of the pockets when the pack is in the open configuration. If more privacy is required, then an opaque material may be used as well.

In order to ready the organizer pack 100 for transport, referring now to FIGS. 1 and 3-6 and assuming the organizer is empty and unfolded as in FIG. 1, the user may unzip the enlarged pockets 134 and 146 in the inner pouch wall 116 and covering flap sections 120, respectively, by grasping the corresponding zipper 142, 150 and drawing such zipper across the width of the pack. With the enlarged pockets open, the user may select various articles for storing in the enlarged pockets or auxiliary pockets 126, 128, 136, and 138 such as those articles illustrated in FIG. 3: a notebook 195a, a box of crayons 195b, a small box of Kleenex 195c, a wallet 195d, a camera 195e, a shirt 195f, and a folder 195g. Each of the items may be placed into a suitable pocket as determined by the user. The zipper closures 142, 150 may then be drawn conventionally across the respective enlarged pockets to close off access to the corresponding pocket.

With reference now to FIG. 4, the user may then flip the outer pouch wall 104 over onto the inner pouch wall 116 by pivoting the outer pouch wall about the base section 112 to resemble the configuration shown in FIG. 4. The user may then stand the organizer pack upright as shown in FIGS. 5 and 8 with the top opening 111 facing upwards. If desired the user may stuff more items into the pouch cavity 109 to maximize the carrying capacity of the organizer pack 100. In this exemplary embodiment, the inner and outer pouch walls are substantially parallel to one another and at right angles to the base section when the connective elements are engaged forming a relatively slim profile pack with considerable storage capacity.

Once the pouch cavity 109 is filled as desired by the user, the user may grasp the outer edge 152 of the covering flap 120 and flip the covering flap to pivot the flap about the top edge 118 of the inner pouch wall 116 and over onto the pouch body 102 to cover the top opening 111 and effectively seal off the pouch cavity 109. In this exemplary embodiment, the strap retention section 122 of the covering flap actually covers the top opening with the remainder of the covering flap positioned so that the pocket covering (generally 146) or interior surface of the covering flap is adjacent or even abutting the exterior surface 177 of the outer pouch wall 104. The user may further secure the free end of the covering flap to the pouch body by engaging the bayonet fastener 154 with the complementary buckle 176. The organizer pack is packed and organized as determined by the user and ready for transport. The pack may be suspended via the shoulder strap to allow hands free transport.

To quickly access the contents of the pouch cavity 109, the user may simply unbuckle the bayonet and buckle fasteners 154, 176, respectively and peel back the covering flap 120 to expose the top opening 111 of the pouch cavity as shown in FIGS. 5 and 7. This can be accomplished while the pack 100 is being carried or set down. To continue into an unpacking configuration such as that shown in FIGS. 1 and 3, the user may set the pack 100 down and disengage the connective elements 156, 158 on either side of the pouch cavity. Once the connective elements are disengaged, the user may pivot the outer pouch wall 104 about the base section 112 and away from the inner pouch wall 116. Any articles previously placed within the interior pockets may then be removed as desired. It will be appreciated that such an unpacking configuration exposes each of the interior pockets all at once. There are no concealed hidden interior pockets wherein the user must flip the pack around or back and forth to access. Likewise, the user may simply flip the entire pack over to access the exterior pockets if desired all at once.

It will be appreciated that such a pack provides significant interior storage and organizational capabilities on the interior surface of the pack. The entire interior surface may be quickly accessed by quickly unbuckling the front flap and unzipping the two pack sections from one another. The cavity provides an area for even quicker access since only the flap must be moved out of the way. However, when in a packed, ready for transport configuration, the pack assumes a relatively narrow profile and conceals the interior storage compartments, including the cavity.

Referring now to FIGS. 14-19, several alternative modifications to the organizer pack 100 described above are presented concerning the connective element, covering flap, and carrying means. As most of the elements are similar to those described above in FIGS. 1-13, like reference numerals will be used for like components.

Referring now to FIG. 14, a modified organizer pack, generally designated 100a, includes a modified connective element 158a (opposing side 156a constructed similarly but only partially shown) that forms the side wall of the pouch cavity 109a but extends from the base section 112 to a point lower than the uppermost edges 106 and 118 of the respective pouch walls 104, 116. In the exemplary embodiment illustrated in FIG. 13, the side walls terminate about the midpoint of the pouch body 102a. This embodiment leaves an enlarged gap opening 163a into the pouch cavity 109a from the side wall area between the top edge 161a of the connective element 158a and the covering flap 120.

In FIG. 15, another modified organizer pack, generally designated 100b, includes a modified connective element 158b (opposing side 156b constructed similarly but only partially shown) that forms the side wall of the pouch cavity 109b but extends from the uppermost edges 106 and 118 of the pouch walls 104 and 116, respectively, toward the base section 112 but terminates about the midpoint of the pouch body 102b. This configuration leaves an enlarged lower gap opening 165b into the pouch cavity 109b between the bottom edge 167b of the connective element 158b and the base section 112.

Referring now to FIG. 16, another modified organizer pack, generally designated 100c, includes a modified connective element 158c (opposing side connective element 156c constructed similarly but only partially shown) that forms the side wall of the pouch cavity 109c but extends from the approximate midpoint of the pouch body 102c toward both the uppermost edges 106, 118 of the pouch walls 104, 116, respectively, and the base section 112 but stops short of reaching them leaving an upper gap opening 163c into the pouch cavity 109c between the uppermost edge 161c of the connective element 158c and the top edges 106, 118 of the respective pouch walls 104, 116, and thus the flap covering 120 when engaged in a covering relationship and a second lower gap opening 167c into the pouch cavity 109c between the lowermost edge 165c of the connective element 158c and the base section 112.

As shown in FIG. 17, more than one connective element may used on each side of the pouch cavity as shown on the modified organizer pack, generally designated 100d. More specifically, the modified pack 100d includes a pair of spaced apart connective elements 158d, each consisting of a strap constructed of a webbed material extending from the opposing pouch walls 104, 116 and terminating in a complementary buckle elements as described above for securing the covering flap 120 in FIG. 1 to secure the pouch walls together. Using such a configuration, much of the side wall is removed from the pouch body but sufficient support remains to maintain the pouch walls in a generally parallel alignment and maintain items within the pouch cavity to facilitate their transportation. In this exemplary embodiment, there are three gap openings: upper 163d, lower 165d, and intermediate 181d into the pouch cavity 109d.

It will be appreciated that the provision of such gap openings 163, 163a, 165b, 163c, 165c, 163d, 165d, and 175d provided in the organizer pack 100 and modified organizer packs 100a-d as illustrated in FIGS. 10, and 14-17 may facilitate the transportation of objects having dimensions wider than the pouch cavity width such as towels, yoga mats, blankets umbrellas, and other elongated or bulky. Such gap openings may also facilitate removal from and insertion into the pouch cavity eliminating the need to open the covering flap in some instances.

Referring now to FIGS. 18-19, yet another modified organizer pack, generally designated 100e, includes a modified covering flap 120e of a shorter width than the covering flap 120 shown in FIG. 1. The modified covering flap also includes a storage section 146e in the form of a pocket with a zipper closure 150e extending substantially across the width of the covering flap. The covering flap also includes a fastening element 154 in the form of a buckle for securing the covering flap to the exterior surface (not shown) of the outer pouch wall 104 as described above in connection with organizer pack 100. In this embodiment, however, the covering flap covers less than the entire top opening 111 of the pouch cavity 109e. In this instance, an upper gap opening 179e as viewed in FIG. 19 located between the upper outer edge 183e of the flap covering and the upper connective element 156. Similarly, a lower gap opening 181e located between the lower outer edge 185e of the flap covering and the lower connective element 158. These two gap openings 179e, 181e provide a means for storing objects taller than the depth of the pouch cavity 109e such as a rolled up mat, umbrella, or similar items as well as a quick retrieval of other items stored in the pouch cavity while still serving to maintain the top edges of the pouch walls in a spaced apart configuration.

In addition, an alternative carrying means in the form of a dual handle carrying or shoulder strap 168e is shown. One of the handles is sewn onto the exterior surface of the outer pouch wall 104 while the opposing complementary handle is sewn onto the exterior surface of the inner pouch wall 116. As shown in FIG. 18, the handles 168e extend from their respective pouch walls and do not interfere with the use of the covering flap 120e. In use, the handles may be brought together and slung over a shoulder to support the pack 100e therefrom or simply handheld to transport the pack.

FIGS. 20-21 depict additional views of yet another modified organizer pack, generally designated 100f. As with the first pack, organizational and convenient packing features are present while allowing the user to manipulate the pack into a reduced profile configuration when ready for transport. With many of the components being the same or similar to those described above for organizer pack 100, like components are like numbered for the pack 100f as shown in FIGS. 20-21.

With continued reference to FIGS. 20-21, the organizer pack 100f includes all the same components as with the organizer pack 100 illustrated in FIGS. 1-13 except for a modification to the interior surface of the inner pouch wall 116e. While other components remain the same, as a substitute for the inner pouch wall pockets 136 and 138 of organizer pack 100, the inner pouch wall includes a set of utensil restraints 136f and 138f covering a portion of the main inner pouch wall pocket 134. The utensil restraints are adhered to the large pocket covering 134 and the edges of each restraint may also be sewn into the sides of the large pocket. The restraints are arranged in two spaced apart rows of loops formed of an elastic material with corresponding loops from each restraint aligned vertically as viewed in FIGS. 20-21 for receipt of a common utensil to arrange such utensil to project along the height of the enlarged pocket 134 as viewed from left to right in FIG. 21. Such a modification shows the versatility of the organizer pack described herein. In this exemplary embodiment, the user may pack such articles as a corkscrew 195h, set of utensils such as the forks 195i shown in FIG. 21, a dinner plate 195j, a napkin 195k, a knife 195l, and a small picnic blanket or mat 195m. Such articles are meant to be exemplary to demonstrate the versatility of the organizer pack and not meant to be limiting in any manner. In packing the utensils 195i, the user may insert the forks through the aligned loops of the dual rows of utensil restraints 136f, 138f to releasably secured to the main pocket 134 of the inner pouch wall 116. In this example, such an organizer pack 100f is particularly suited for taking on a picnic. However, other utensils or accessories will occur to one of ordinary skill to support other activities.

It will be appreciated that the configuring for unpacking and also for transport are similar to the organizer pack 100 described above exposing all internal pockets and the utensil restraints when the pack 100f is in the unpacking/packing configuration as shown in FIGS. 20-21 as well as leaving an internal cavity for storing additional items in the pack as generally shown in FIGS. 5-7, for example, when the pack is configured in a ready for transport configuration.

FIGS. 22-33 depict the various views of a second exemplary embodiment of a portable accessory organizer pack, generally designated 200. While other uses will occur to one of ordinary skill in the art, this pack 200 may be particularly suited for transporting picnic, beach, camping, or barbecue related gear due. This pack is also constructed with similar features compared to the first pack 100 described above and like components are numbered alike.

Referring specifically now to an interior surface view of the unfolded, pre-packing (or unpacked) organizer pack configuration in FIG. 22, the organizer pack 200 includes a pouch body, generally designated 202, with a substantially rectangular outer pouch wall, generally designated 204. The outer pouch wall includes a free outer edge 206 and an opposing innermost edge 208 hingedly connected to an outer pouch wall side edge 210 (edges 208 and 210 essentially coincide with one another) of a substantially rectangular base section 212. A pair of opposing long sides 213, 215 forms part of the periphery of the outer pouch wall as well.

The base section 212 further includes an inner pouch wall side edge 214 hingedly connected to an inner pouch wall, generally designated 216. Thus, the base section acts a dual hinge with two spaced apart hinge lines about which each respective pouch wall may pivot. While generally only approximately ninety (90) degrees of rotation is useful for each pouch wall relative to the base section, such hinge may be constructed to enable each pouch wall to rotate through a substantially three hundred and sixty (360) degree arc. The upper and lower boundaries of the inner pouch wall as viewed in FIG. 22 is defined by long sides 221 and 223, respectively.

At the opposing end of the pouch body 202 from the outermost edge 206 of the outer pouch wall 204, the inner pouch wall 216 terminates in an upper edge 218 from which extends a covering flap, generally designated 220, that may include an intermediate strap retention section 222. The covering flap is also hingedly connected to the pouch body about the upper edge 218 that forms another pivot line in the organizer pack. The covering flap may also be rotated about the upper edge pivot line 218 through three hundred and sixty (360) degrees as shown in FIGS. 22, 26, and 29, for example. Such flap is configurable between a covering position for transport as in FIG. 29 and an unpacking/packing position as in FIGS. 22-24 to a pouch cavity access position as in FIG. 26.

Taking advantage of the interior facing surface area of each pouch walls 204, 216 and the flap section 220 as shown in FIG. 22 and to increase the storage capacity of the organizer pack 200, at least one pocket is preferably introduced into each wall or section with the pocket or pockets filling a significant portion of the entire span of each pouch wall and flap section. In this exemplary embodiment, the outer pouch wall 204 is constructed similarly to its counterpart outer pouch wall 104 as in the prior described embodiment. As such, the outer pouch wall includes a set of three pockets: a main pocket 224 forming the innermost pocket and two smaller auxiliary pockets 226, and 228 overlapping a portion of the main pocket. The main pocket spans the width of the outer pouch wall from side to side (width defined as top to bottom of the pouch wall as shown in FIG. 22) with a lower end coinciding with or terminating near the outer pouch wall side edge 210 and an upper end 230 terminating about two-thirds of the way to the outermost end 206 of the outer pouch wall 204. The smaller auxiliary pockets 226, 228 essentially subdivide the larger main pocket in width and have a lower edge in common with the lower edge of the main pocket 224 but terminate in a common outer edge 232 about half way across the outer pouch wall. The openings of each of the outer pouch wall pockets project in a parallel orientation to the closest long edge 210 of the base section 212 and the outermost edge 206 of the outer pouch wall. In this exemplary embodiment, the top edges of the pockets are only secured at the sides of each respective pockets allowing quick retrieval into the pockets. The pockets are also preferably constructed to lay substantially flat to provide a relatively thin pocket profile or, alternatively, be of an accordion style or have pleated corners to enable further expansion. In addition, the pockets may be formed of a transparent or mesh material to enable ready identification of the pocket contents or opaque if more privacy is required.

Unlike the earlier packs described above, the inner pouch wall 216 of this organizer pack 200 includes a single main pocket 234 having a bottom edge terminating at or near the inner pouch wall side edge 214 of the base section 212. The enlarged main pocket includes a set of reinforcing strips around three sides and a mesh central section for viewing contents placed therein. This inner pouch wall main pocket 234 further includes an upper edge 240 terminating at or near the top edge 218 of the inner pouch wall and including a zipper closure 242 for controlling access into the pocket. The pocket opening of the main pocket of the inner pouch wall faces in the opposite direction to those of the outer pouch wall when the pack is unfolded as seen in FIG. 22. Then, when the pouch walls 204, 216 of the pouch body 202 are folded up together for transport, as will be described below, the pocket openings of both the inner and outer pouch walls face the top of the pack during transport to facilitate both retrieval of items stored therein and to prevent items from spilling out during transport.

With reference to FIGS. 22-25, the covering flap section 220 extends outwardly from the uppermost edge 218 of the inner pouch wall 216. The interior surface of the covering flap section includes an enlarged storage pocket 246 providing an auxiliary flap storage area. This pocket includes a bottom edge coexistent with the outermost edge 219 of the strap retention section 222 and an upper edge 248 with a zipper closure 250 recessed about one-fifth of the length of the covering flap back from the outer edge 252 of the covering flap. The pocket covering or interior wall of the interior flap pocket 246 is constructed of a mesh material such as a vinyl coated mesh in this exemplary embodiment. Such see-through material facilitates both the ready identification of stored articles as well as providing some expandability of the pocket for enlarged items and extra capacity. Extending from the outer edge of the zipper closure is a bayonet style fastener 254 attached to an elongated length of webbed strapping 255 for use in releasably securing the flap 220 to the exterior surface 277 (FIG. 23) of the outer pouch wall 204 as will be described below.

With continued reference to FIGS. 22-25, for releasably joining the two pouch walls 204, 216 together, a pair of connective elements 256 and 258 (FIG. 24) in the form of a pair of opposing zipper assembly closures is provided in this exemplary embodiment. Such connective elements are modified from those described earlier for prior described packs although some elements are common to each of the packs. In this exemplary embodiment, each connective element 256, 258 includes a first leg of the zipper assembly that projects along the longer sides 213, 215 from the outermost points 259, 261, respectively, on the outer pouch wall 204 to the innermost wall 214 of the base section 212 on its corresponding side. The other legs 291, 297 of the zipper assembly of the connective elements run in an L-shaped pattern from the innermost wall 214 of the base section along modified cylindrical sidewalls 247, 257 to uppermost ends that incorporate auxiliary pockets 236, 238, respectively. With the zipper element of each zipper assembly positioned at or near the base section, the pouch walls may be fully separated and placed flat as in FIG. 22. With the zipper element of each zipper assembly positioned at or near the uppermost extents of each zipper leg 259, 225 and 261, 227 and engaging the zipper legs, the pouch walls may be maintained in a folded up configuration as in FIGS. 25-26 and 28. Both zipper legs of each connective element of the opposing pouch walls 204, 216 converge at a point 260, 262 (FIGS. 22-24) on either side of the opposing short ends 264, 266 of the base section. Such connective elements may project at right angles to their respective pouch walls and be constructed of a rigid or flexible material. It will be appreciated that a flexible material such as cloth or nylon may fall to one side or the other when unfastened. Preferred zipper materials includes conventional metals or plastics such as nylon. Other suitable materials will occur to one of ordinary skill in the art.

In this exemplary embodiments, the modified sidewalls 247, 257 are substantially semi-circular in profile as viewed from the top (FIG. 28) and incorporate an auxiliary pocket 236, 238, respectively as best seen in FIG. 32, capped by a lid 237, 239 held in place by a zipper fastener 249, 251, respectively. This provides a flush profile on the sides of the pack although other suitable sidewall shapes will occur to those of ordinary skill in the art including those with circular, oval, square, triangular, rectangular and other polygonal cross sections. Such sidewalls provide additional storage for the organizer pack 200 and may also lend additional rigidity to the pack when articles are placed therein. If desired, the auxiliary pockets may be lined with an insulating material to keep beverages and other goods more resistant to the external environment.

Referring now to exterior surface view of the organizer pack 200 in FIG. 23, the outer pouch wall 204 is a generally rectangular surface adjacent to the base section 212 that is in turn adjacent to the rectangular inner pouch wall 216 that extends into the rectangular covering flap 220. All four sections are bordered by a piping or trim 270 sewn around the periphery of the pack providing a finished border appearance. Projecting from the interior edge 272 of the exterior surface 277 of the outer pouch wall is short webbed strap 274 terminating in a buckle 276 for receiving the bayonet fastener 254 of the covering flap 220. The exterior surface 278 of the inner pouch wall is also generally rectangularly shaped but extends to merge with the elongated rectangular exterior surface 288 of the flap section. On the exterior surface of the inner pouch wall is yet another pocket 280 with a bottom edge 282 adjacent the base section 212 and an upper edge 284 coexistent with the pouch side edge of the strap restraint section 222. A zipper closure 286 spaced a few inches from the strap restraint section 222 provides the access control for the inner pouch wall exterior pocket 280.

With continued reference to FIG. 23, the exterior surface 288 of the covering flap section 220 includes a pair of external flap pockets 290 and 292, together spanning the width of the flap section. The flap pockets have a common bottom edge coexistent with the outer edge 252 of the covering flap and a common top edge 294 spaced apart a few inches from the strap restraint section 222. The common top edge includes a common zipper element 296 that when pulled across the width of the flap section opens or closes both flap pockets. In this exemplary embodiment, the pockets bifurcate the exterior surface 288 of the covering flap 220 equally. The bottom pocket (as viewed in FIG. 24) also includes a mesh outer surface while the top pocket includes a solid/opaque outer surface. One end of the strap 255 is sewn into the zipper closure 296 and may be secured to additional locations along the exterior surface 288 of the covering flap 220.

A convenient elongated carrying strap 268 is coupled to the long side outer walls of the sidewalls 247, 257 and reinforced on each side with a short length of webbed strapping spaced apart along the respective sidewalls. As an alternative carrying source, a short handle 289 is riveted, adhered, sewn into, or otherwise suitably secured to the strap restraint section 222. Alternatively, such straps may be attached to other areas of the pouch body, sidewalls, other region of the flap section, or a combination thereof. The carrying strap 289 forms a shoulder strap from which the pack 200 may be carried or suspended and may include an adjustable shoulder pad (not shown) that may be slidably mounted on the strap and can be slid along a length of the strap so that a user can adjust the strap to increase the level of comfort. Furthermore, a quartet of conventional strap length adjusters as with the pack described above are placed along a length of the strap to enable a user to adjust the overall length of the carrying strap as would be understood by one of ordinary skill in the art. This strap is preferably long enough to form an elongated shoulder strap although a short carrying handle would be a suitable substitute. While the carrying strap is convenient, it will be appreciated that the pack could also be carried as a satchel without any carrying strap if desired.

Referring the rear view in FIGS. 23 and 33, the shoulder strap 268 is convertible between a single shoulder strap 268 (as best seen in FIGS. 23 and 31) and a dual loop shoulder strap as best shown in FIG. 33 so that the pack may be worn as a backpack to more evenly distribute the weight. To accomplish this, a two-piece reduction strap 299 with a buckle and bayonet style fastener is located in the middle top portion of the exterior surface 278 of the inner pouch wall 216 of the pouch body 202 above the zipper closure 286. By passing a portion of the shoulder strap 268 through the unbuckled reduction strap, and then fastening the reduction strap around the shoulder strap, the single shoulder loop is provided with a central anchor point to form the dual shoulder strap construction (FIG. 33). By unbuckling the reduction strap from the strap, the shoulder strap may again assume a single strap configuration.

It will be appreciated that, as with the organizer pack 100 and as shown the unfolded configuration with the connective elements disengaged as in FIG. 3, the pouch walls 204, 216 of the organizer pack 200 may likewise be rotated relative to the base section 212 and the covering flap 220 disposed to extend out from the inner pouch wall such that the exterior surfaces of the pouch walls, base section, and covering flap all reside in substantially the same horizontal plane. This hinging feature between the pouch walls and base section would also facilitate exposure of all of the interior pockets 224, 226, 228, 234, and 246 all at once. In addition, the relatively low profile of the base section 212 provides a useful surface for attachments as will be described below and does not inhibit placing a mat or other enlarged pad across the interior surfaces of both pouch walls.

Referring now to FIGS. 26-28, the organizer pack 200 is illustrated in a ready for transport configuration except that the covering flap 220 is peeled back and the near side connective element 258 is removed in FIG. 27 to aid in the further description of the pouch body 202. Referring now specifically to FIG. 26-28, the connective elements 256 and 258 are shown in an engaged configuration. The zipper of each connective element has been drawn from its respective convergent point 260, 262 toward the outermost edges 206, 218 of each pouch wall 204, 216 as the pouch walls are pivoted together about the base section 212. When the connective elements are fully engaged, the connective elements with pockets 236, 238, pouch walls, and base section of the pouch body cooperate to form a pouch cavity 209 (FIGS. 28-29) with an access opening 211, in this exemplary embodiment, the top of the pouch cavity as viewed in FIGS. 27-28. As shown in FIG. 28, the base section 212 introduces a space or gap between the interior surfaces (pocket coverings) of the interior surface pockets 224 and 234 of the respective outer and inner pouch walls to form an additional storage space for loose items that may be placed within the pouch cavity and still maintained within the organizer pack. Items such as picnic blankets, towels, mats, camping stoves, umbrellas, and other items too large from the interior storage pockets may be shoved into the pouch cavity for storage and transportation. Even with the interior pockets stuffed to capacity, a central cavity will remain to provide such additional storage. The outer wall of the connective elements provide the side walls that extend in a ninety (90) degree angle from the respective inner and outer pouch walls while the semi-circular pockets 236, 238 project into the cavity slightly. Such sidewalls prevent loose items from falling out during transportation as well. It will be appreciated that such configuration maintains the upper edges 206 and 218 of the outer and inner pouch walls 204, 216, respectively in a spaced apart configuration providing quick access to the pouch cavity through the top opening 211 when the covering flap 220 is peeled back as shown in FIGS. 27-28. FIG. 28 provides a top view of the pouch body folded up with the top opening into the pouch cavity.

In order to ready the organizer pack 200 for transport, referring now to FIGS. 22, and 24-32 and assuming the organizer is empty and unfolded as in FIG. 23, the user may unzip the enlarged pockets 234 and 246 in the inner pouch wall 216 and covering flap sections 220, respectively, by grasping the corresponding zipper 242, 250 and drawing such zipper across the width of the pack. With the enlarged pockets open, the user may select various articles for storing in the enlarged pockets or the main pocket 224 or auxiliary pockets 226 and 228 such as those articles illustrated in FIG. 24: a cutting board and knife 295a, a lighter and can opener set 295b, a spoon, knife, and condiment set 295c, a portable stove 295d, a pair of water bottle 295e, a compartmentalized dinner plate 295f, and a frying pan 295g. Each of the items may be placed into a suitable pockets as determined by the user. The zipper closures 242, 250 may then be drawn conventionally across the respective enlarged pockets to close off access to the corresponding pocket.

With reference now to FIG. 25, the user may then flip the outer pouch wall 204 over onto the inner pouch wall 216 by pivoting the outer pouch wall about the base section 212 and rotate the sidewalls 247, 257 inwardly about the long sides 221, 223 of the inner pouch wall 216 and zip up the connective element zipper assemblies 256, 258, respectively, to assemble the configuration shown in FIGS. 25-26. The user may then stand the organizer pack upright as shown in FIGS. 28 and 32, for example, with the top opening 211 facing upwards. If desired the user may stuff more items into the pouch cavity 209 to maximize the carrying capacity of the organizer pack 200. In this exemplary embodiment, the inner and outer pouch walls are substantially parallel to one another and at right angles to the base section when the connective elements are engaged forming a relatively slim profile pack with considerable storage capacity.

Then, in addition to storing articles in the interior pockets of the pouch walls 204, 216 and covering flap 220, the user may also unzip the sidewall auxiliary pocket coverings 237, 239, respectively to expose the auxiliary sidewall pockets 236, 238. The user may select to store additional accessories and goods such as the water bottle 295h and beverage can 295i illustrated as examples in FIG. 32. Depending on the width and depth of these sleeves 236, 238, the user may be able to store multiple items. Once finished stuffing the sidewall auxiliary pockets, the user may zip the covers 237, 247 shut to seal off the sleeve compartments.

Once the pouch cavity 209, sidewall pockets 236, 238, and interior pockets 224, 226, 226, 234, and 246 are filled as desired by the user, the user may then fill the exterior pocket 280 by unzipping the zipper element 286 prior to flipping the covering flap 220 over onto the pouch body. Then, the user may grasp the outer edge 252 of the covering flap 220 and flip the covering flap to pivot the flap about the top edge 218 of the inner pouch wall 216 and over onto the pouch body 202 to cover the top opening 211 and effectively seal off the pouch cavity 209 (FIGS. 29-31). In this exemplary embodiment, the strap retention section 222 of the covering flap actually covers the top opening with the remainder of the covering flap positioned so that the pocket covering (generally 246) or interior surface of the covering flap is adjacent the exterior surface 277 of the outer pouch wall 204. The user may further secure the free end of the covering flap to the pouch body by engaging the bayonet fastener 254 with the complementary buckle 276. The organizer pack is pack and organized as determined by the user and ready for transport. The pack may be suspended via the shoulder strap to allow hands free transport. The exterior pockets 290, 292 and lanyard also become accessible in this configuration for additional storage.

To quickly access the contents of the pouch cavity 209, the user may simply unbuckle the bayonet and buckle fasteners 254, 276, respectively and peel back the covering flap 220 to expose the top opening 211 of the pouch cavity as shown in FIGS. 27 and 28. This can be accomplished while the pack 200 is being carried or set down. To continue into an unpacking configuration such as that shown in FIGS. 22 and 24, the user may set the pack 200 down and disengage the connective elements 256, 258 on either side of the pouch cavity. Once the connective elements are disengaged, the user may pivot the outer pouch wall 204 about the base section 212 and away from the inner pouch wall 216. Any articles previously placed within the interior pockets or auxiliary sidewall pockets may then be removed as desired. It will be appreciated that such an unpacking configuration exposes each of the interior pockets all at once. There are no concealed hidden interior pockets wherein the user must flip the pack around to access. Likewise, the user may simply flip the entire pack over to access the exterior pockets if desired all at once.

It will be appreciated that such a pack provides significant interior storage and organizational capabilities on the interior surface of the pack. The entire interior surface may be quickly accessed by quickly unbuckling the front flap and unzipping the two pack sections from one another. The cavity provides an area for even quicker access since only the flap must be moved out of the way. However, when in a packed, ready for transport configuration, the pack assumes a relatively narrow profile and conceals the interior storage compartments, including the cavity.

FIGS. 34-42 depict several views of a third exemplary embodiment of a portable accessory organizer pack, generally designated 300. This pack shares some of the same features with the prior described packs and like components are like numbered. More specifically, the organizer pack 300 is constructed in a similar manner to the previous packs 100, 200 and includes a pouch body, generally designated 302, with a substantially rectangular outer pouch wall 304. The outer pouch wall includes a free outer edge 306 and an opposing innermost edge 308 hingedly connected to a outer pouch wall side edge 310 (edges 308 and 310 essentially coincide with one another) of a substantially rectangular narrow base section 212. A pair of opposing long sides 313, 315 forms part of the periphery of the outer pouch wall as well.

The base section 312 further includes an inner pouch wall side edge 314 hingedly connected to an inner pouch wall, generally designated 316. Thus, the base section acts a dual hinge with two spaced apart hinge lines about which each respective pouch wall may pivot. While generally only approximately ninety (90) degrees of rotation is useful for each pouch wall relative to the base section, such hinge may be constructed to enable each pouch wall to rotate through a substantially three hundred and sixty (360) degree arc. The upper and lower boundaries of the inner pouch wall as viewed in FIG. 34 is defined by long sides 321 and 323, respectively. At the opposing end of the pouch body from the outermost edge of the outer pouch, the inner pouch wall terminates in an upper edge 318 from which extends a covering flap 320 that may include an intermediate strap retention section 122. The covering flap is also hingedly connected to the pouch body about the upper edge that forms another pivot line in the organizer pack. The covering flap may also be rotated about the upper edge pivot line through three hundred and sixty (360) degrees with two of the positions shown in FIGS. 34 and 40. Such flap is configurable between a covering position for transport as in FIG. 40 and an unpacking/packing position as in FIG. 34 to a pouch access position, not shown here but similar to prior described packs above.

Taking advantage of the interior facing surface area of each pouch wall 304, 316 and the flap section 320 as shown in FIG. 34 and to increase the storage capacity of the organizer pack 300, at least one pocket is preferably introduced into each wall or section with the pocket or pockets filling a significant portion of the entire span of each pouch wall and flap section. In this exemplary embodiment, the outer pouch wall 304 includes a main pocket 324 spanning practically the entire interior surface of the outer pouch wall. The opening of the outer pouch wall pocket projected in a parallel orientation to the closest long edge 310 of the base section 312 and the outermost edge 306 of the outer pouch wall. Access control is provided via a zipper closure 330.

Similarly, the inner pouch wall 316 includes a main pocket 334 spanning practically the entire interior surface of the inner pouch wall as well. In this exemplary embodiment, the inner pouch wall main pocket 334 includes an upper edge 340 terminating at or near the top edge 318 of the inner pouch wall and including a zipper closure 342 for controlling access into the pocket. In addition, the pocket opening of the inner pouch wall faces in the opposite direction to those of the outer pouch wall when the pack is unfolded as seen in FIG. 34. Then, when the pouch walls 304, 316 of the pouch body 302 are folded up together for transport, as will be described below, the pocket openings of both the inner and outer pouch walls face the top of the pack during transport to facilitate both retrieval of items stored therein and to prevent items from spilling out during transport.

With continued reference to FIG. 34, the covering flap section 320 extends outwardly from the uppermost edge 318 of the inner pouch wall 316. The interior surface of the covering flap section includes an enlarged storage pocket 346 providing an auxiliary flap storage area. This pocket includes a bottom edge coexistent with the outermost edge 319 of the strap retention section 322 and an upper edge 348 with a zipper closure 350 recessed about one-fifth of the length of the covering flap back from the outer edge 352 of the covering flap. Extending from the outer edge of the zipper closure is a hook portion 354 of a hook and loop fastener for use in releasably securing the flap 320 to the exterior surface 377 (FIG. 35) of the outer pouch wall 304 as will be described below.

Each of the pockets in this exemplary pack 300 are also preferably constructed to lay substantially flat to provide a relatively thin pocket profile or, alternatively, be of an accordion style or have pleated corners to enable further expansion. In addition, the pockets may be formed of a transparent or mesh material to enable ready identification of the pocket contents or opaque if more privacy is required. The pocket coverings may be constructed of a see-through material such as a vinyl coated mesh or clear plastic material. Such see-through material facilitates both the ready identification of stored articles as well as providing some expandability of the pocket for enlarged items and extra capacity. The transparent viewing windows provided by the see-through materials save the user search time when looking for particular contents and also may facilitate airport security screening efforts. However, it will be appreciated that opaque materials may be used if more privacy is desired to conceal the contents of a pocket or pockets.

Referring now to exterior surface view of the organizer pack 300 in FIG. 35, the exterior surface 377 of the outer pouch wall 304, inner pouch wall 316, and covering flap 320 is a generally rectangular surface bordered by a piping or trim 370 sewn around the periphery to provide a finished border appearance. Projecting across the exterior surface on the back side of the outer pouch wall is a complementary strip 376 of the hook and loop fastener 354 attached to the interior of the covering flap.

A convenient elongated carrying strap 368 is coupled to the short ends 364, 366 of the strap retention section 322. Alternatively, such strap may be attached to the pouch body, other region of the flap section, or a combination thereof. The carrying strap forms a shoulder strap from which the pack 300 may be carried or suspended and may include an adjustable shoulder pad 368a that may be slidably mounted on the strap and can be slid along a length of the strap so that a user can adjust the strap to increase the level of comfort. The strap 368 also includes a set of conventional length adjustment devices placed along a length of the strap to enable a user to adjust the overall length of the carrying strap as would be understood by one of ordinary skill in the art. The strap is preferably long enough to form an elongated shoulder strap although a short carrying handle would be a suitable substitute. While the carrying strap is convenient, it will be appreciated that the pack could also be carried as a satchel without any carrying strap if desired.

Furthermore, referring to FIGS. 35, 39, and 41-42, the carrying strap is modified with a pair of intermediate stroller loops 369, 371 to either side of a midpoint line of the elongated shoulder strap 368. Each loop includes a buckle and bayonet clip assembly 373, 387 that may be released from one another to form a pair of breaks 373a, 387a (as best seen in FIG. 41) in the shoulder strap. The stroller loops are passed through a pair of opposing slide clips 369a, 369b, and 371a, 371b on the shoulder strap 368. The lower slide clips 369a, 371a are coupled to a pair of strap loops 373a, 373b connected to the pouch body 302, strap restraint section 322, or elsewhere on the pack 300. The upper slide clips are coupled to the free ends or free end loops of the remainder of the shoulder strap 368.

In addition, referring now to FIGS. 34 and 36, a generally rectangular accessory mat 333 may also be included with this pack 300 and may be secured to the pouch body using a hook and loop strip 331 placed over the base section 312 (FIG. 34) and a complementary anchor strip 335 (FIG. 36). Exemplary accessory mats include diaper changing mats, picnic blankets, children accessory mats, coloring mats, game board mats, and other suitable mats. Such mat examples are not meant to be limiting in any manner. If desired, the mat may be constructed of a washable or wipeable fabric, material, textile, or plastic, and may be larger than the pack when unfolded but is preferably constructed to fold up and fit within the profile of the pack during transport as will be described below.

When ready for use, the user may unfold the pack 300 into the configuration shown in FIG. 34, pack the pockets as desired and then fold the pack up into a narrow profile ready for transport configuration with or without the accessory mat. It will be appreciated that any pouch cavity 309 (FIG. 40) will be relatively narrow for such a slim profile pack but still sufficient to accommodate the accessory mat if desired. If transportation of the mat 333 is desired, the mat may be placed on top of the base section 312 to align the pouch anchoring strip 331 with the mat anchoring strip 335 and releasably secure the mat to the pouch body 302 (FIG. 37). At this point, depending on the mat size, the outer edges may extend beyond the periphery of the pouch body. If so, the mat may conveniently be folded up to a profile the same size or smaller than the pouch body profile as best seen in FIG. 38. In such manner, it will be appreciated that the mat may be sized to be larger than the pouch body but still folded up to fall within the confines of the pouch body when ready for transport.

With continued reference to FIG. 38, the outer pouch wall 304 may be folded over onto the inner pouch wall 316 (FIG. 34) and then the covering flap 320 folded over onto the exterior surface 377 of the outer pouch wall 304 to engage the flap fastener 354 with the outer pouch wall fastener 376 (FIGS. 34-35) to assume the configuration shown in FIGS. 39-42. The pack may then be transported via the shoulder strap. Alternatively, the pack may be suspended from a stroller handle 500 or similar hanger. To accomplish this, the user may form a pair of breaks in the shoulder strap by disengaging the buckle and clip assemblies 373, 387 on both sides of the shoulder strap. Once the free ends of the stroller loops 369, 371 are engaged around the stroller handle or like hanger, the buckle and clip assemblies may be re-engaged and the pack suspended from the stroller handle. It will be appreciated that such stroller straps being built right into the shoulder strap facilitate the quick attachment to a stroller handle and suspend the pack 300 in a convenient location for the user. While a single stroller loop may be acceptable, the dual stroller loops have been found to orient the hanging pack in a preferable orientation.

It will also be appreciated the pad attachment anchor 331 and accessory mat 333 with fastener 335 may be incorporated into any other organizer pack described herein and placement, while preferred on the base section is not limited thereto and other locations of such anchoring element such as on the strap restraint section, for example, will occur to one of ordinary skill in the art. Moreover, the modified straps are particularly useful for suspending the pack from a bar support such as on a stroller. Such straps may also be incorporated into the other packs described herein as well.

FIGS. 43-48 depict the various views of a fourth exemplary embodiment of a portable accessory organizer pack, generally designated 400. Where components are similar to previously described packs, like components will be like numbered. Referring now to FIGS. 43-44, the organizer pack 400 includes a pouch body 402 with a left hand pouch wall 404 hingedly coupled to one edge 410 of a base section 412 which is in turn hingedly coupled at an opposing edge 414 to a right hand pouch wall 416 as viewed in FIG. 43. The left hand pouch wall includes a main pocket 424 with a zipper closure 424a recessed from the free end 406 of the left hand pouch wall. The pocket projects across the width of the left hand pouch wall.

With continued reference to FIG. 43, the right hand pouch wall also includes a similarly constructed main pocket 434 with a zipper closure 442 facing in the opposite direction to the left hand pouch wall zipper closure 424a. Both zipper closures are aligned in a parallel orientation to the long sides of the base section 412 and outer ends 406, 418 of the respective pouch walls 406, 416. An anchoring strip 431 for receiving an accessory mat 433 (FIG. 45) is positioned on the base section 412 as well.

Turning now to FIG. 44, the exterior surface 477 of the left hand pouch wall includes an auxiliary exterior pocket 480 with a zipper closure 486 proximate the base section 412 of the pouch body 402. On the other hand, the exterior surface 478 of the right hand pouch wall 416 includes a pair of auxiliary pockets 490, 492, each having a closure flap 490a, 492a for sealing off the pockets.

To secure the pouch walls 404, 416 together, a connective element 456 is provided in the form of a three-sided zipper assembly runs the periphery of the pouch walls on each side but the base section side. By engaging the zipper pull all around the pouch walls, the pouch wall may be brought together and releasably secured forming a pouch cavity 409 (FIG. 48).

The construction and use of the shoulder strap with modified stroller strap loops 468 is identical to the shoulder strap 368 described above for the organizer pack designated 300 and such description will not be repeated here. The accessory mat 433 is also constructed in a similar manner to the accessory mat 333 described above.

In use, assuming the unfolded, pre-packing configuration of FIG. 43, the user may open the zipper closures 424a, 442 of each pouch wall pocket 424, 434, respectively, and place selected articles within. The pockets may be sealed off by pulling the zipper closures to the closed position. The accessory mat 433 may then be placed onto the base section anchoring strip 431 to align the mat and pouch body fasteners as best seen in FIG. 45. The mat may then be folded up into a profile of equal to or less than the profile of the pouch body 402 as best seen in FIG. 46. The two pouch wall 404, 416 may then be brought together and the connective element 456 engaged around the periphery of the pouch body to secure the pouch walls together and position the mat in the pouch cavity 409 as best seen in FIG. 48. The user may then carry the pack 400 around supported by the shoulder strap 468 or suspended from a stroller handle or similar hanger as described above for the organizer pack designated 300.

Each of the packs described above may be constructed of materials that render the pack bodies substantially flexible throughout or include one or more stiffening elements inserted at strategic locations to give the packs more form when folded into the transport configuration. More rigid materials may also be used to impart more rigidity into the packs. While the flexibility of the packs provides certain advantages, hard plastic or leather materials may be used in constructing the pack. Fold wells, fold lines, seams, hinges and the like are provided between sections to accommodate the folding and packing process.

The pack bodies are generally constructed of an outer layer of fabric sewn to a similarly dimensioned inner layer of fabric forming an exterior bag body surface and interior bag body surface. The outer edges of the bag bodies may be finished off with conventional ΒΌ inch filled piping circumscribing the perimeter of the bag body if desired or plastic piping. The packs may be constructed of nylon, polyester, cloth, canvas, hard leather, soft leather, denim, and other suitable textiles. For some applications, the selected material may be selected from a substantially waterproof or water resistant material or treated with a waterproof material. This prevents personal articles that may leak from spreading to other compartments in the pack body. In addition, a wet towel may be placed in one the pockets without concern of dampening the other articles. By providing a waterproof exterior surface, the items in the pockets are further protected from exterior moisture.

The pockets of each pack may be formed by sewing, adhering, welding or using other suitable joining techniques to join the three sides of a substantially rectangular sheet or sheets to the interior surface of the respective bag body. A fourth edge of the sheet forms an opening into the respective pocket compartments that may be closed using conventional closure devices such as plastic or metal zippers, hook and loop closures, buttons, snaps, magnetic snaps, and other suitable closure devices. It is not necessary to use a closure device however. In some instances, it is preferable to use clear plastic sheets or a see-through mesh material to form a viewing window or a portion of a viewing window so that the contents of the pocket may be easily ascertained without having to open the pocket and remove the contents one at a time until the desired article is retrieved.

To maximize the storage capacity of the bag body, it is also preferable to provide pockets across the entire width and height of the bag body with fold well or pivotal connections at intermediate locations to facilitate folding of the bag body even when the pockets are full but smaller pocket configurations may also be used. In addition, the pockets openings are generally configured parallel to the outer edges of the rectangular bag body. In addition, the vertical and inwardly facing openings of each pocket reduce the likelihood of any articles falling out of a pocket during transport even if the closures are left open. The interior facing pockets also reduce the likelihood of theft of important articles during transport. It will further be appreciated that the interior facing pockets and changing pads cooperate to cushion the articles stored in the organizer packs during transportation.

The pockets are constructed primarily to received flattened, substantially flattened, compressible, or relatively non-bulky items. The pockets may include gussets, expandable fabric, or be constructed with accordion-like side walls to provide for more capacity if desired. Other pocket configurations and opening positions and orientations will occur to one of ordinary skill in the art. The use of an all plastic sealable pocket may also allow the user to compress the pocket to drive the air out and then seal the pocket to reduce the profile of the pocket even more. While several exemplary embodiments have been described above, other suitable pocket, pocket openings, and fold well configurations may be used.

While certain fasteners, retainers, connective elements, or closure devices such as hooks and loop type fasteners, buckles and bayonet clips, zippers, lanyards, and elastic restraining bands have been described herein, it will be appreciated that snaps, ties, buttons, magnets, releasable adhesives or other suitable complementary fasteners may be used in place of or in combination with those fasteners. Also, where a sewn article is indicated, adhesion, welding, and other suitable joining techniques including those mentioned herein may be used. Also, the dimensions discussed herein are not meant to be limiting in any manner or other suitable dimensions will occur to one of ordinary skill in the art.

In addition, a removable pocket releasably attached to the anchor strip for transporting toiletries, for example, may be substituted for or in addition to the accessory mat. Such removable pocket may be clipped onto or otherwise releasably secured to the interior surface of the pouch body as with the accessory mat and removed by the user as desired thus providing additional interior storage and facilitating removal of a single pocket for short trips instead of the entire pack. Such removable pocket as with the accessory should ideally be constructed to fit within the confines of the pack during transport.

While the present invention has been described herein in terms of a number of preferred embodiments, it will be appreciated that various changes, uses, and improvements may also be made to the invention without departing from the scope and spirit thereof.