Title:
OFF-RIDGE ROOF VENT
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An off-ridge vent for a roof may comprise a longitudinally-extending main body having an arcuate lateral cross-sectional shape with two ends, a front flange extending from one lateral side of the main body, and a rear flange extending the other lateral side of the main body; two end caps, each end cap attached to and closing one of the ends of the main body, each end cap including a face portion which attaches to the main body and a side flange extending from the face portion; wherein, at least one of the end caps comprises a vented portion. The rear flange of the main body and the side flanges of the end caps may comprise return flanges that assist in redirecting any water that contacts the flange. The vent may overlay an aperture in the roof such that air may flow through the aperture and out the axial vent ends.



Inventors:
Osborne, Daniel E. (Naples, FL, US)
Application Number:
11/934819
Publication Date:
05/07/2009
Filing Date:
11/05/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
454/367
International Classes:
E04B7/02; F24F7/02
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
IHEZIE, JOSHUA K
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
LIVINGSTON LOEFFLER, P.A. (NAPLES, FL, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. An off-ridge roof vent, comprising: a longitudinally-extending main body having an arcuate lateral cross-sectional shape with two ends, a front flange extending from one lateral side of the main body, and a rear flange extending the other lateral side of the main body; two end caps, each end cap attached to and closing one of the ends of the main body, each end cap including a face portion which attaches to the main body and a side flange extending from the face portion; wherein, at least one of the end caps comprises a vented portion.

2. The off-ridge vent of claim 1, wherein the main body comprises a continuously-curved cross-section.

3. The off-ridge vent of claim 1, wherein the main body does not comprise a vented portion.

4. The off-ridge vent of claim 1, wherein the end caps are mechanically fastened to the ends of the main body.

5. The off-ridge vent of claim 4, wherein the end caps are fastened to the ends of the main by an interlocking hem.

6. The off-ridge vent of claim 1, wherein the front flange and rear flange are substantially coplanar.

7. The off-ridge vent of claim 1, wherein the front flange, rear flange, and both side flanges are substantially coplanar.

8. The off-ridge vent of claim 1, wherein the rear flange further comprises a return flange, the return flange extending at an angle toward the main body.

9. The off-ridge vent of claim 8, wherein the side flanges each comprise a return flange, the return flange extending at an angle toward the main body.

10. The off-ridge vent of claim 1, wherein the side flanges each comprise a return flange, the return flange extending at an angle toward the main body.

11. The off-ridge vent of claim 1, wherein the main body, front flange, and rear flange are monolithic.

12. The off-ridge vent of claim 1, wherein at least one of the end caps includes an aperture therethrough, and wherein a vent insert is attached to the aperture.

13. The off-ridge vent of claim 11, wherein the vent insert is rotatably attached to the end cap aperture.

14. A roof assembly for use in high wind areas, comprising: a roof deck, the roof deck having an aperture therethrough; at least one underlayment layer attached to a top of the roof deck; a vent overlaying the roof deck aperture and attached to the roof deck, the vent comprising: a longitudinally-extending main body having two ends and an arcuate lateral cross-sectional shape, a front flange extending from one lateral side of the main body, and a rear flange extending the other lateral side of the main body; two end caps, each end cap attached to one of the ends of the main body, each end cap including a face portion which attaches to the main body and a side flange extending from the face portion; wherein at least one of the end caps comprises a vented portion.

15. The roof assembly of claim 14, wherein the front flange and rear flange of the main body are located under a portion of the underlayment layer.

16. The roof assembly of claim 14, wherein the front flange and rear flange of the main body are located on a top surface of the underlayment layer.

17. The roof assembly of claim 14, wherein a portion of at least one roof tile is installed over at least one of the front flange and rear flange.

18. The roof assembly of claim 14, wherein the vent is located on the roof assembly at a location other than the ridge of the roof.

19. The roof assembly of claim 14, wherein the rear flange of the vent further comprises a return flange, the return flange extending at an angle toward the main body.

20. A method of venting a tiled roof in a high wind area, comprising the steps of: providing a roof deck having an outer surface and an aperture therethrough; providing a vent having a longitudinally-extending main body with an arcuate lateral cross-sectional shape, front and rear lateral flanges, and two axial vented ends, the axial vented ends comprising the sole vented portion of the vent; optionally providing at least one underlayment layer attached to an outer surface of the roof deck; attaching the vent to the roof deck such that the vent main body overlays the aperture in the roof deck; and, attaching a tile to the roof such that a portion of the tile overlaps the rear lateral flange.

Description:

TECHNICAL FIELD

This application generally relates to roof vents. More specifically, this application relates to off-ridge roof vents that are wind resistant.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

There are many types of roof vents that are applicable to modern construction. In a house with a typical gable roof, the vents may be located on a ridge of the roof or at a non-ridge location. In particular, with tile roofs, a typical off-ridge vent comprises a goose-neck vent.

Goose-neck vents include a number of disadvantages. First, a typical goose-neck vent has a high profile. This high profile makes the vent more susceptible to the forces generated from high wind situations. Secondly, goose-neck vents include a serpentine path that air from the attic space must travel in order to exit the attic. In a forced air vent, the serpentine pathway may now provide a disadvantage. In a non-forced air vent, however, the air does not have a direct path to escape. The air first must go vertically upward, change direction and travel downward, and then change direction and travel back upward. As hot air tends to rise, the serpentine path may retard ideal venting.

As such, there is a need for a more efficient and wind resistant off-ridge vent. Accordingly, embodiments of the present invention are hereby submitted.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

An off-ridge roof vent may comprise a longitudinally-extending main body having an arcuate lateral cross-sectional shape with two ends, a front flange extending from one lateral side of the main body, and a rear flange extending the other lateral side of the main body; two end caps, each end cap attached to and closing one of the ends of the main body, each end cap including a face portion which attaches to the main body and a side flange extending from the face portion; wherein, at least one of the end caps comprises a vented portion.

In another embodiment, a roof assembly for use in high wind areas may comprise a roof deck, the roof deck having an aperture therethrough; at least one underlayment layer attached to a top of the roof deck; a vent overlaying the roof deck aperture and attached to the roof deck, the vent comprising a longitudinally-extending main body having two ends and an arcuate lateral cross-sectional shape, a front flange extending from one lateral side of the main body, and a rear flange extending the other lateral side of the main body; two end caps, each end cap attached to one of the ends of the main body, each end cap including a face portion which attaches to the main body and a side flange extending from the face portion; wherein at least one of the end caps comprises a vented portion.

A third embodiment may comprise a method of venting a tiled roof in a high wind area, comprising the steps of providing a roof deck having an outer surface and an aperture therethrough; providing a vent having a longitudinally-extending main body with an arcuate lateral cross-sectional shape, front and rear lateral flanges, and two axial vented ends, the axial vented ends comprising the sole vented portion of the vent; optionally providing at least one underlayment layer attached to an outer surface of the roof deck; attaching the vent to the roof deck such that the vent main body overlays the aperture in the roof deck; and attaching a tile to the roof such that a portion of the tile overlaps the rear lateral flange.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective exploded view of an embodiment of an off-ridge vent.

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the vent of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a front elevational view of the vent of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a side elevational view of the vent of FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a side elevational view of the vent of FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of an embodiment of a main body.

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of the main body of FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the vent of FIG. 1 installed over the underlayment of a roof.

FIG. 9 is a perspective exploded view of a second embodiment of an off-ridge vent.

FIG. 10 is a top plan view of the vent of FIG. 9.

FIG. 11 is a front elevational view of the vent of FIG. 9.

FIG. 12 is a side elevational view of the vent of FIG. 9.

FIG. 13 is a side elevational view of the vent of FIG. 9.

FIG. 14 is schematic perspective view of a vent, shown with portions of main body cut away, installed on a roof.

FIG. 15 is a close-up perspective view of the vent of FIGS. 9-13 illustrated installed on a roof with underlayment overlapping the flanges.

FIG. 16 is an end view of the vent of FIGS. 9-13 installed on a roof.

FIG. 17 is an end view of the vent of FIGS. 9-13 installed on a roof in an alternative configuration.

FIG. 18 is an end view of the vent of FIGS. 1-5 installed on a roof.

FIG. 19 is a perspective view of a third embodiment of an off-ridge vent having a shorter main body.

FIG. 20 is a perspective exploded view of a fourth embodiment of an off-ridge vent.

FIG. 21 is a perspective exploded view of a fifth embodiment of an off-ridge vent.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

An embodiment of an off-ridge vent, generally identified by reference number 10, is illustrated in FIGS. 1-5. Vent 10 comprises longitudinally extending main body 12, having front or lower flange 14 and rear or upper flange 16. Front flange 14 may be positioned near and facing the bottom of the roof, while rear flange 16 may be positioned nearer and facing the ridge of the roof. As illustrated in FIGS. 1-10, both front flange 14 and rear flange 16 may extend the entire longitudinal extent of main body 12, as illustrated in FIG. 6. Alternatively, front flange 14 and rear flange 16 may extend beyond the longitudinal extent of main body 12, as illustrated in FIG. 1.

As illustrated in FIGS. 1, 6, and 7, main body 12 may comprise an arcuate or radiused shape extending from front flange 14 to rear flange 16. Such an arcuate shape enables the vent 10 to have a low profile and, therefore, be somewhat wind resistant. The vent 10 may therefore find particular use in areas susceptible to hurricanes or high winds. Additionally, as the main body 12 of vent 10 may not include vents, louvers, or other types of openings, vent 10 combines venting capability with rain and water resistance.

In one embodiment, main body 12 is formed from a single piece vent blank that is bent to form rear flange 16, longitudinally-extending arced portion, and front flange 14 portion. In such an embodiment, where main body 12 is bent from a single piece blank, the length, or longitudinal extent, can be readily adapted to desired lengths and may be selected based on the requirements of the particular roof to which it will attach. It is also contemplated that the main body 12 may be provided in one or more standard lengths that would be useful in the majority of roofs.

It is also contemplated that main body 12 may be formed from discrete portions. For example, the front flange 14, arcuate portion, and rear flange 16 may all be formed from separate pieces. Main body 12 may be formed from aluminum, aluminum alloys, stainless steel, or any of a plurality of other materials.

Vent 10 may further comprise end caps 20. End caps 20 may be formed from a single piece of appropriate material, or may be from a plurality of discrete elements. End caps 20 may include face portions 22 and side flange 24. As illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 8, the vertical face portions 22 may attach to an end of main body 12. Any means known in the art for attaching end caps 20 to main body 12 is contemplated. For example, end caps 20 may be attached to main body 12 via fasteners, via welding, or any other type of mechanical or interference engagement, such as Pittsburgh seams or interlocking hems. As illustrated in FIG. 1, the face portions 22 of end caps 20 may comprise a vented portion, such as vents or louvers 26. In a preferred embodiment of vent 10, both end caps 20 comprise vents 26. However, it is also contemplated that only one of the two end caps 20 may comprise vents 26. Vented portion 26 contained in one or both of the end caps 20 may provide the sole venting means for vent 10. In other words, and as illustrated in the figures and stated above, main body 12 may not comprise a vented portion.

FIG. 14 illustrates a schematic representation of one example of the flow of air that is vented in this instance from an attic of a building. The vent of FIG. 14 is illustrated with a portion of main body 12 cut away. As the arrows indicate, hot air that is present within, for example, an attic of a building may rise and escape from the attic via an aperture 42 in roof 30. As the main body 12 of the exemplary vent may not include venting portions, the air from the attic may be directed laterally such that it flows out the vented portion 26 of end caps 20 and into the ambient external environment.

The vents or louvers 26 in end caps 20 may be configured to minimize the influx of rain. For example, the upper edge of each vent or louver 26 may be spaced outwardly relative to the lower edge of each vent or louver 26. Alternatively, if, for example, a series of apertures were used as the vented portion, the apertures may be punched from the inner surface of face 22 so that the borders of the apertures extend outwardly.

Vent 10 may be useful when used in conjunction with tiled roofs. In the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1-5 and 16, the rear flange 16 and the two side flanges 24 of end caps 20 may have return flanges 18 and 28 extending from the respective flange. Return flanges 18, 28 may extend at least partially upward relative to its adjacent flange. As illustrated, return flanges 18, 28 may extend at an angle upward and toward main body 12. Such return flanges 30 may be useful when the vent 10 is installed over the underlayment 36 and/or 38 of the roof 30, to aid in directing any water present near the vent 10 around and away from the vent 10. FIG. 16 illustrates vent 10 installed over roof underlayment 36 and 38. Although two layers of underlayment 36, 38 are illustrated, any number of layers is contemplated. Vent 10 may be installed with adhesives and/or fasteners to attach it to the underlayment 36, 38 and roof deck 34. Vent 10 as illustrated in FIG. 16 installed over underlayment 36, 38 may receive shingles or tiles 40 that may overlap one or more of the flanges 14, 16, and 24. As illustrated in FIG. 16, rear flange 16 (not numbered in FIG. 16) may be located under shingles or tiles 40 and front flange 14 (not numbered in FIG. 16) may be installed over the adjacent shingle or tile 40.

Vent 10 may be manufactured from stainless steel, copper, aluminum, or other metals and metal alloys. Alternatively, vent 10 may be manufactured from a rigid polymer. If the vent 10 is manufactured from a rigid polymer, it is contemplated that the entire vent 10 may be molded as a single monolithic unit.

A second embodiment of an off-ridge roof vent, generally identified by reference number 110, is illustrated in FIGS. 9-13 and 15-17. Vent 110 is similar to vent 10, in that it includes arcuate main body 112 having front flange 114 and rear flange 116, end caps 120 having face portions 122, vented portions 126, and side flange 124. However, vent 110 lacks return flanges 18 and 28. Vent 110 is better suited to be installed underneath the underlayment 36, 38. As illustrated in FIG. 16, vent 110 may be installed such that front flange 114, rear flange 116, and side flanges 124 extend under at least one layer of underlayment, which in this example is illustrated as secondary waterproofing layer 38. Alternatively, the flanges may be installed under both secondary waterproofing layer 38 and felt 36 and be attached directly to the roof decking 34.

Vent 110 may therefore be installed directly to the roof deck 32 via adhesives and/or fasteners, and underlayment 36, 38 may be installed such that it overlaps flanges 114, 116, and 124. Fasteners and/or adhesives may also be used to install underlayment 36, 38 to the flanges of vent 110. Shingles or tiles 40 may then be installed such that they overlap underlayment 36, 38. FIG. 17 illustrates yet a further installation, whereby vent 110 is installed over the underlayment 36, 38, yet front flange 114 and rear flange 116 are both installed such that they are located under respective shingles or tiles 40. Any other manner of installing vent 10 or vent 110 to the roof is contemplated and intended to be within the scope of one or more embodiments of the present invention.

After vent 10 or vent 110 is installed on a roof 30, air may flow from the attic space or through a pipe, through opening 42 in the roof deck and into the vent 10 or 110, as generally illustrated in FIG. 14. The airflow is then directed laterally toward the endcaps 20, 120 and out the vents 26, 126. Venting of air may be more efficient than gooseneck vents because the airflow does not have to travel through a circuitous or serpentine route. Moreover, as main body may be arcuate with no venting portions, vent 10, 110 may be wind resistant and water resistant.

It is contemplated that vents 10, 110 may have different lengths, heights, and radii of curvature based on different preferences, requirements, and building codes. In one exemplary embodiment, vent 10 may comprise front and rear flanges of seven inches, return flanges of one inch, a main body height of thirteen inches and a main body arc length, measured from front flange to rear flange, of approximately seventeen inches.

As stated above, the longitudinal extent of the exemplary vents 10 or 110 may also be any desired length. To that end, a third embodiment of vent 210 is illustrated in FIG. 19. Vent 210 may or may not include return flanges, as described above with reference to vent 10. As can be appreciated from the FIG. 19, vent 210 includes a main body 212, front flange 124, rear flange 216, end caps 220 having side flanges 224 and vented portion 226. However, in this embodiment, main body 212 is shorter in length or longitudinal extent.

A fourth embodiment of vent 310 is illustrated in FIG. 20. Vent 310 may also be similar to vents 10, 110, and 210 in that it may comprise a main body 312, front flange 314, rear flange 316, and end caps 320 having a side flange 324. However, in this embodiment, the end caps 320 of vent 310 may include a vertical face 322 having an aperture 326 formed therein. Aperture 326 may receive vent insert 328. Similar fastening means may be employed to fasten insert 328 to aperture 326, such as mechanical fasteners, welding, Pittsburgh seams, or interlocking hems. With one or more of the fastening means, the insert 328 may be rotatable relative to the aperture 326 such that the venting direction of insert 328 can be pre-selected and/or varied based upon the particular requirements or conditions of the vent location.

A fifth embodiment of vent 410 is illustrated in FIG. 21. Vent 410 is similar to vent 310 and includes a main body 412, flange 414, rear flange 416, end caps 420 having side flanges 424, and a vertical face 422 having an aperture 426 formed therein that receives insert 426. As is apparent from FIG. 21, the aperture 426 and insert 428 of vent 410 are rectangular rather than round. In addition to inserts 328 and 428, inserts of any other shape are contemplated for use in an embodiment of the present invention.

The principles, preferred embodiments and modes of operation of the present invention have been described in the forgoing application. The invention, which is intended to be protected herein should not, however, be construed as limited to the particular forms disclosed, as these are to be regarded as illustrative rather than restrictive. Variations and changes may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of the present invention. Accordingly, the foregoing detailed description should be considered exemplary in nature and not limiting the scope and spirit of the invention, as set forth in the appended claims.