Title:
SAFEWALL STORM ROOM SUITE
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Building a storm room suite within an existing home or existing building including methods and procedures to install are disclosed. The storm room suite is capable of being built within any existing room without regard to size, shape including room size, height, and roof spans. The uniqueness of said structure is that it is capable of being installed directly against existing walls and ceiling with minimal clearance between existing structure and new storm room. The storm room can include provisions for window shutters, specialty doors, mechanical, electrical, and ventilation.



Inventors:
Krantz, Kenneth Roger (Orange Park, FL, US)
Application Number:
11/868486
Publication Date:
04/23/2009
Filing Date:
10/06/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/745.05, 52/745.15, 52/745.21
International Classes:
E04H9/14
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
BARLOW, ADAM G
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
KENNETH ROGER KRANTZ (Fleming Island, FL, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A method comprising of building a storm room within a home or building including a poured in place concrete system with minimal wall and ceiling clearance between existing structure and storm room suite including procedures to anchor storm room invention to the ground, and the capability of building storm room within any room without regard to size, shape, including room size, height and ceiling span's.

2. A method comprising of building a storm room of claim 1, wherein minimal wall and ceiling clearance means that my storm room can be built directly against any existing walls of the home or building without any substantial spacing or gaps.

3. A method comprising of building a storm room of claim 1, wherein anchoring of the storm room to ground will enhance the integrity of my invention in regards to up-lift in the event of any catastrophic damages that occur from hurricanes and tornadoes.

4. A method comprising of building a storm room of claim 3, wherein the anchoring consist of cutting holes into the existing concrete floor slab and excavating existing fill and replacing excavated space with concrete.

5. A method comprising of building a storm room of claim 4, wherein the concrete is reinforced with reinforcing steel.

6. A method comprising of building a storm room of claim 3, wherein the anchoring also consist of drilling holes into the existing concrete floor and installing anchors to connect the existing foundation to the storm room suite.

7. A method comprising of building a storm room of claim 1, wherein the storm room is not restricted to size, shape, and room height because it is conventionally built in place and not dependant on being set into place prior to building the home or building.

8. A method comprising of building a storm room of claim 1, wherein the storm room is not restricted to size, shape, and room height because it is substantially built in place and not dependant on being set into place through existing doors and other openings within home or building.

9. A method comprising of building a storm room suite within a home or building including a poured in place concrete system with minimal wall and ceiling clearance between existing structure and storm room suite including procedures to anchor storm room invention to the ground, and the capability of building storm room within any room without regard to size, shape, including room size, height and ceiling span's.

10. A method comprising of building a storm room suite of claim 9, wherein means that the invention may contain more than one room and be accessed to each room by a common walk through opening and to include one opening as entrance to or exit from the invention.

11. A method comprising of building a storm room suite of claim 9, wherein the storm room is made of wallboard, tie rods, reinforcing steel, and concrete.

12. A method comprising of building a storm room suite of claim 11, wherein the wallboard is made of a durable grade material.

13. A method comprising of building a storm room suite of claim 12, wherein the durable grade material is magnesium oxide board.

14. A method comprising of building a storm room suite of claim 12, wherein the durable grade material has openings to receive the tie rods for holding the fluid concrete together.

15. A method comprising of building a storm room suite of claim 14, wherein the tie rods has an attached round or square flat disk to one end of the tie rod.

16. A method comprising of building a storm room suite of claim 15, wherein the attached round or square flat disk is anchored to the durable grade material.

17. A method comprising of building a storm room of claim 15, wherein the tie rods has an attached form to the other end of the tie rod.

18. A method comprising of building a storm room of claim 17, wherein the attached form is made of Z-panel, wood, or aluminum.

19. A method comprising of building a storm room of claim 11, wherein the wallboard is installed against existing walls.

20. A method comprising of building a storm room suite of claim 19, wherein the wallboard is attached with anchors.

21. A method comprising of building a storm room suite of claim 20, wherein the anchors are nails or screws.

22. A method comprising of building a storm room within a home or building including a poured in place concrete system, air assembly system, with minimal wall and ceiling clearance between existing structure and storm room including procedures to anchor storm room invention to the ground, and the capability of building storm room within any room without regard to size, shape, including room size, height and ceiling span's.

23. A method comprising of building a storm room of claim 22, wherein the air assembly system is used to circulate air in and out of the invention.

24. A method comprising of building a storm room of claim 22, wherein the air assembly system is used to pump fluid concrete into the invention.

25. A method comprising of building a storm room of claim 22, wherein the air assembly system is made of durable material.

26. A method comprising of building a storm room of claim 25, wherein the durable material is made of either steel or PVC.

27. A method comprising of building a storm room within a home or building including a poured in place concrete system with minimal wall and ceiling clearance between structure and storm room suite including procedures to install anchoring system to connect storm room invention to the ground, window storm shutter, and the capability of being installed within any room without regard to size, or shape.

28. A method comprising of building a storm room of claim 27, wherein the window storm shutter is mounted on the exterior of the invention.

29. A method comprising of building a storm room of claim 27, wherein the window storm shutter is operated from within the invention.

30. A method comprising of building a storm room of claim 27, wherein the window storm shutter is made of durable materials.

31. A method comprising of building a storm room of claim 30, wherein the durable materials consist of a frame, nailing fin and window material encasement, and window cover.

32. A method comprising of building a storm room of claim 31, wherein the window frame is made of durable materials with durable anchors installed.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF MY INVENTION

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is encouraging people to place their families in a safe room, also referred to as storm room, or in shelters. Evacuation that takes place in densely populated areas themselves can be dangerous due to traffic and weather.

It is desired to have a shelter that is incorporated into the construction of a home and able to withstand significant wind velocities and other catastrophic damages that occur from hurricanes and tornadoes.

The majority of new homes being built in the United States are constructed of wood and no considerations or provisions are being taken to construct any type of safe room or storm room within said new housing. Furthermore there are millions of homes built within the last 30 plus years that have no provisions to take shelter from any type of storms such as a tornado or a hurricane.

Limitations and disadvantages of building a concrete prefabricated, pre-cast, or concrete panelized shelter within an existing home or building using methods available today make it impractical to construct any type of retrofit safe shelter. The following presentation of my invention of designing and building a storm room, as referenced by the drawings will become evident in comparison to traditional, and prior proposed approaches that have been available within the marketplace.

Finishes to interior walls and ceiling of my storm room such as drywall and decorative options can be added as required by others. Optional or secondary functional uses for my completed storm room are; media home theater, bedroom, bedroom and bathroom suite, craft room, office suite, panic room, and disaster recovery suite.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF MY INVENTION

The scope of my invention comprises of the preparation of any existing room within a new or existing structure and the installation by following written procedures to build a new cast-in-place reinforced concrete storm room against an existing wood, block or other wall, floor, and ceiling structures. The procedures include the preparation and modification of the existing structure by removing any required doors, windows, trim, fixtures, and miscellaneous dividers such as closets, partitions, etc. The connection and anchoring of my invention to minimize uplift and enhance anchorage to existing ground and existing concrete floor is done by first; drilling and anchoring reinforcing steel into the existing concrete floor, second; by core boring openings at specific locations through existing concrete floor and then excavate to a specific level below the concrete floor for the purpose of interrogating a poured-in-place concrete column with reinforcing steel into the new concrete reinforced walls and ceiling of storm room. Reinforced concrete columns along with anchoring reinforcing steel into the existing concrete floor will then act as an anchor to keep storm room suite from uplift and destruction when storm events are happening.

Lightweight angles will be installed in all 90-degree interior corners to add to integrity and support of high impact resistant wallboard, which becomes part of the cast-in-place concrete wall system. High impact resistant wallboard properties are mold and fungus free, water resistant, fire resistant, insect resistant, and has high structural impact resistance qualities.

All existing walls next to new storm room system will be covered with high impact resistant wallboard. Wallboard panels will have pre-installed metal tie rod plates at specific locations in accordance to prescribed wall pressure of concrete that will be poured to complete the cast-in-place concrete wall system. High impact resistant wallboard will be non-structurally secured to existing walls by screws or other anchors to complete the fasting to the wood or block wall system.

Window and door openings will then be framed to accept finish storm room safety door and optional exterior mounted window shutter. Electrical boxes and any special fixture mounts will then be mounted and secured at proper locations. All joints including walls, ties, electrical, window and door openings will be sealed with a sealant to prevent any liquid from penetrating into existing walls from fluid concrete prior to concrete hardening.

Wall and ceiling reinforcing steel is installed and window support shutter frame is mounted and secured prior to installing inside forming panel system.

Interior removable Z-Panel, wood, or aluminum forms will be connected to metal tie rod plates. All hardware and bracing equipment will be installed and secured on or against forms in accordance with best engineering system practices. Ceiling forming to consist of either high impact wallboard, Z-panels, wood, or aluminum type forms, and shoring as per best engineering practices.

Concrete specialty pumping valves will be installed either in the window frames, doorframes, or the wall forms themselves prior to placing the concrete within the cast-in-place wall system. The ceiling shall incorporate my combination air and concrete pumping assembly system. The infill of structural concrete shall be pumped and controlled by an industry standard concrete pump.

Temporary installed forms on the interior of the cast-in-place storm room system walls and ceiling upon sufficient setting and curing of the concrete are removed and all fixtures including window shutter and door installation assembly then will be installed. High impact wallboard if used, as interior form may remain in place and be used as a finished wall-covering product. Finishes to interior walls and ceiling of my storm room such as drywall and decorative options can be added as required by others. Secondary functional uses for my completed storm room suite are; closets, storage, media theater rooms, bedrooms, bedroom and bathroom suites, office suites, craft room suites, panic rooms, and disaster recovery suites.

The advantages and novel features of my invention, as well as details of illustrated embodiments thereof, will be more fully understood from the following description and drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 EXISTING ROOM DEMOLITION PROCEDURES.

FIG. 2 CONCRETE FOUNDATION PIER AND REINFORCING STEEL ANCHORING PROCEDURES.

FIG. 3 HIGH IMPACT RESISTANT WALLBOARD INSTALLATION DRAWING.

FIG. 4 HIGH IMPACT RESISTANT WALLBOARD DETAILS AND DRAWINGS.

FIG. 5 HIGH IMPACT RESISTANT WALLBOARD DETAILS AND DRAWINGS. PAGE

FIG. 6 REINFORCING STEEL WALL DETAILS.

FIG. 6a REINFORCING STEEL WALL DETAILS.

FIG. 7 REINFORCING STEEL CEILING LAYOUT WITH AIR AND CONCRETE PUMPING ASSEMBLY AND ELECTRICAL BOX.

FIG. 8 INTERIOR OF STORM ROOM FORM AND SHORING DESIGN LAYOUT INCLUDING VIEW OF AIR AND CONCRETE PUMPING ASSEMBLY.

FIG. 9 STORM ROOM WALL DETAIL CROSS SECTION USING Z-PANELS, WOOD, STEEL, OR ALUMINUM FORMS.

FIG. 10 WALLBOARD CONNECTION BRACKETS DETAILS.

FIG. 10a WALLBOARD CONNECTION BRACKETS DETAILS.

FIG. 11 THROUGH WALL CONNECTION BRACKETS DETAILS.

FIG. 12 AIR AND CONCRETE PUMPING ASSEMBLY DETAIL DRAWINGS.

FIG. 13 EXTERIOR MOUNT (INTERIOR OPERATED) WINDOW SHUTTER.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF MY INVENTION

With reference now to the drawings in which like elements are denoted with the same numeral throughout the several views. The uniqueness of my invention is that the structural cast-in-place concrete wall system can be built directly against any existing wall and ceiling within a home or building. The high impact wallboard, cast-in-place concrete including all attachments to wall assemblies comprises the complete poured-in-place explained wall system invention. Additional system elements, which are described within the FIG. Drawings 1 through 13 are included.

Prior to the installation of my invention, demolition procedures may be required. FIG. 1 depicts a sample room layout and the following is required prior to building storm room. Remove 10 closet doors and all closet 20 stud walls. Remove 30 existing entrance door and expand 40 width of opening to match new storm room door and frame. Remove 50 all base and 51 ceiling molding materials. Remove 60 window trim as required. Remove 70 wall plug and switch 80 plate covers and light fixtures. Tape and secure electrical ends. Complete all room modifications and/or additions as required.

Core bore holes in existing concrete 90 as shown in FIG. 2 next to existing walls and directly beneath new storm room wall system. Continue to excavate FIG. 3 into ground 100 until firm ground is established or to an acceptable depth below the top of existing concrete floor. Install reinforcing steel 110 into new pier and extend up into the new cast-in-place wall system. Piers may be monolithic poured at same time upper structural concrete walls are poured creating a complete attached pier and wall structural system.

Drill holes 120 in existing concrete floor as shown in FIG. 2 to a depth not to exceed 75% of depth of floor. Size of drilled holes to correspond and match reinforcing steel that is to be installed. Anchor either reinforcing steel dowel with sufficient bar lap or sized reinforcing steel to exact height as required and include a 90 degree hook on top to extend into the roof structure of my invention.

Install corner angle steel 130 FIG. 2 by securing into existing walls with screw or anchors. Attach wall tie hardware to wallboard as shown in FIGS. 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 10a, and 11. There are two types of anchor pressure plates shown that can be used to connect the exterior wallboard of the cast-in-place wall system to the tie rod that connects to the interior forms of wall system. The first type of anchor pressure plate 400 is shown on FIG. 5, and FIG. 10 that is rectangular in sharp with female fittings 411 to accept threaded tie rod end 441. The second type of anchor pressure plate 410 round and flat and is shown on FIG. 4, FIG. 9, FIG. 10a, and FIG. 11 with female fittings 411 to accept threaded tie rod end 441. There are three types of tie rods shown that can be used to connect the anchor pressure plates on the exterior wallboard to the interior form of the concrete cast-in-place wall system and all tie rods are interchangeable with each other depending on type on interior form type used. The first type of tie rod 420 FIG. 11 has a threaded 421 end that can be used with any wood form. The end portion of 420 that the wood form is attached to is considered standard within the industry and many accessories are available for wood form to tie end. The second type of tie rod 430 FIG. 11 has 431 a threaded end and a threaded end adapter 432 that is attached to Z-panel form type. The Z-panel form system is made of high-density grade fiberglass with attachments to secure form to tie end. The third type of tie rod 440 FIG. 11 has 441a threaded end and a attached flat tie with a pin 442 hole to anchor metal or aluminum forms. The end portion of 440 that the metal or aluminum form is attached to is considered standard within the industry and many accessories are available secure metal or aluminum form to tie end.

Install impact resistant wallboard 140 FIG. 3 to existing walls. High impact resistant wallboard panels to be secured to FIG. 9 existing wall studs 141 and drywall 142 if walls are wood or structural secured into block walls if required. Seal all joints to avoid leaching of concrete while in the fluid state.

Install window 150 FIG. 6 and door FIG. 6a edge form 160 framing FIG. 6a to a dept as required for wall thickness. Both door and window forms to include concrete pump hose inlet connections as required to complete concrete pour operation. The next step is to install my special FIG. 13 mount interior operated secured window shutter frame directly over window edge form and secure as required. The summary of my secured shutter is the angle side mount frames 331 anchored with anchor studs 332. The top angle is a lightweight anchor nailing fin 333 attached to a metal encasement 330 which contains the shutter 334 material. The shutter becomes mounted on the exterior side of my invention and can be operated from within the interior of my invention. My secured window shutter becomes encased into FIG. 9 the cast-in-place concrete wall system 335 for securement.

Install necessary electrical extensions, new electrical conduit, and mechanical sleeves and secure against leakage of fluid concrete fill. Install wall reinforcing steel FIGS. 6 and 6a and ceiling FIG. 7 reinforcing steel 110 as detailed. Mount in ceiling FIG. 7, FIG. 8 and FIG. 12 air and concrete pumping assembly 170 and anchor 180 as FIG. 12 required. The top part of the assembly FIG. 12 is made of ā€œUā€ shaped piping attached to a threaded sleeve 200. The top of the sleeve has a plate 210 attached for anchoring to reinforcing steel for support. Pipe 220 and then is attached to a fitting 230 that will accept a concrete pumping hose.

Install interior wall Z-Panel, wood, or aluminum forms complete with all bracing and accessories as shown on FIG. 8 and FIG. 9. Install Z-panels, wood, or aluminum Structural ceiling panels and FIG. 8 shoring 250, 260, 270 to complete forming system. Pour structural designed concrete 280 through concrete pumping assemblies FIG. 12 into storm room wall and ceiling and vibrate as required. Upon proper curing, remove interior forms and ceiling re-shoring from new cast-in-place wall and ceiling system. Install fixtures and wall finish coverings over invention as per design and specifications. Finishes to interior walls and ceiling of my new storm room such as drywall and decorative options can be added as required by others. Secondary functional uses for my completed storm room suite are; closets, storage, media theater suites, bedroom suites, office suites, bathroom suites, panic room suites, and disaster recovery suites.

While my invention has been described with reference to certain embodiments, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various changes may be made and equivalents may be substituted without departing from the scope of the invention. In addition, many modifications may be made to adapt a particular situation or material to the teachings of my invention without departing from its scope. Therefore, it is intended that my invention not be limited to the particular embodiment disclosed, but that my invention will include all embodiments falling within the scope of the appended claims and their legal equivalents.