Title:
METHOD AND SYSTEM FOR AUTOMATICALLY GENERATING A MESSAGE FLOW DIAGRAM
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A method and system automatically generate entries for a campaign message flow. The method comprises, responsive to a customer request, initiating a campaign, wherein the campaign includes interacting with subscribers via messages. The method comprises receiving customer-inputted parameters defining the campaign. The method comprises automatically generating campaign message flow entries, wherein each campaign message flow entry corresponds to an interaction between a server and a subscriber. The method comprises displaying the campaign message flow entries to the customer.



Inventors:
Silk, Matthew (Santa Monica, CA, US)
Stoe, Craig (San Francisco, CA, US)
Holland, Britton Michael (San Francisco, CA, US)
Rhodes, Christopher (San Francisco, CA, US)
Application Number:
12/191580
Publication Date:
03/26/2009
Filing Date:
08/14/2008
Primary Class:
International Classes:
G06Q30/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
MUNSON, PATRICIA H
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
PERKINS COIE LLP - PAO General (SEATTLE, WA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A method for generating a campaign message flow, comprising: responsive to a customer request, initiating a campaign, wherein the campaign includes interacting with a subscriber via messages; responsive to receiving customer-inputted parameters defining the campaign, generating campaign message flow entries in substantially real time from the customer-inputted parameters, wherein each campaign message flow entry corresponds to an interaction with the subscriber; displaying each campaign message flow entry to the customer when generated.

2. The method of claim 1, further comprising: pre-populating the parameters and the campaign message flow from a template campaign.

3. The method of claim 1, further comprising: storing the parameters in an accessible storage medium.

4. The method of claim 1, further comprising: executing the campaign responsive to a subscriber request, wherein subscriber inputs and server outputs correspond to the campaign message flow.

5. The method of claim 1, wherein a campaign message flow entry is at least one of: subscriber-inputted keywords, subscriber-inputted short numbers, server-outputted menus, and server-outputted confirmations.

6. The method of claim 1, wherein the parameters include at least one of: a keyword, opt-in message, scheduling, content to be sent, confirmation message, menu items, and pointers to other sub-words.

7. The method of claim 1, wherein the customer request and parameters are received via a web interface and the campaign message flow is displayed via the web interface.

8. A system for generating a campaign message flow, comprising: a server in communication with a client over a network, the server configured to responsive to a customer request, initiate a campaign, wherein the campaign includes interacting with subscribers via messages, receive customer-inputted parameters defining the campaign, automatically generate campaign message flow entries, wherein each campaign message flow entry corresponds to an interaction between a server and a subscriber, display the campaign message flow entries to the customer.

9. The system of claim 8, wherein the server is further configured to pre-populate the parameters and the campaign message flow from a template campaign.

10. The system of claim 8, wherein the server is further configured to store the parameters in an accessible storage medium.

11. The system of claim 8, wherein the server is further configured to execute the campaign responsive to a subscriber request, wherein subscriber inputs and server outputs correspond to the campaign message flow.

12. The system of claim 8, wherein a campaign message flow entry is at least one of: subscriber-inputted keywords, subscriber-inputted short numbers, server-outputted menus, and server-outputted confirmations.

13. The system of claim 8, wherein the parameters include at least one of: a keyword, opt-in message, scheduling, content to be sent, confirmation message, menu items, and pointers to other sub-words.

14. The system of claim 8, wherein the customer request and parameters are received via a web interface and the campaign message flow is displayed via the web interface.

15. A computer-readable medium including instructions adapted to execute a method for generating a campaign message flow, the method comprising: responsive to a customer request, initiating a campaign, wherein the campaign includes interacting with subscribers via messages; receiving customer-inputted parameters defining the campaign; automatically generating campaign message flow entries, wherein each campaign message flow entry corresponds to an interaction between a server and a subscriber; displaying the campaign message flow entries to the customer.

16. The medium of claim 15, the method further comprising: pre-populating the parameters and the campaign message flow from a template campaign.

17. The medium of claim 15, the method further comprising: storing the parameters in an accessible storage medium.

18. The medium of claim 15, the method further comprising: executing the campaign responsive to a subscriber request, wherein subscriber inputs and server outputs correspond to the campaign message flow.

19. The medium of claim 15, wherein a campaign message flow entry is at least one of: subscriber-inputted keywords, subscriber-inputted short numbers, server-outputted menus, and server-outputted confirmations.

20. The medium of claim 15, wherein the parameters include at least one of: a keyword, opt-in message, scheduling, content to be sent, confirmation message, menu items, and pointers to other sub-words and the customer request and parameters are received via a web interface and the campaign message flow is displayed via the web interface.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is related to provisional application No. 60/973,842 entitled “MOBILE DOMAIN REGISTRY AND CONTENT PLATFORM”, filed Sep. 20, 2007, and which is incorporated herein by reference.

This application is related to provisional application No. 60/800,276 entitled “MESSAGING APPARATUS AND METHOD”, filed May 12, 2008, and which is incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND

Mobile device subscribers represent a large potential market for businesses. Businesses can market content, products, and services to mobile device subscribers. Such marketing efforts can include a Short Message Service (SMS) or Multimedia Message Service (MMS) message campaign.

A campaign begins with the business publicizing an activation step of the campaign. For example, the business can arrange for all messages received at a predetermined short code with a predetermined keyword to trigger a campaign message flow.

The campaign message flow can include an introductory message with a menu of options sent to the subscriber as a reply message. The subscriber can select one or more of the options in a message. Options can include subscribing to a list, purchasing media content (including video, pictures, software, and ring tones), participating in a poll, requesting a coupon, donating to charity, activating a mobile service, or similar options.

The business can configure a server in communications with the mobile devices over a wireless network to manage and administrate the campaign. The server replies to subscriber activation requests and also interacts with subscribers after the campaign is initiated.

The campaign is defined with parameters received from a customer, for example, a business or a media owner. Parameters can be inputted by the customer via a web interface at the server. It can be difficult for a customer to visualize a message flow between the subscriber and the server.

Thus, there is a need for automatically generating a message flow for a customer defining campaign.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 illustrates an example server for generating a message flow diagram.

FIG. 2A illustrates an example screenshot of a campaign management webpage.

FIG. 2B illustrates an example screenshot of a campaign setup webpage, including a message flow diagram of a campaign.

FIG. 3 illustrates an example procedure for generating a message flow diagram of a campaign.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A method and system automatically generate a campaign message flow for display to a customer creating a campaign. The campaign defines interactions between a server and a subscriber, where the server provides a product or service from the customer to the subscriber responsive to a subscriber request. The campaign message flow visually illustrates the interactions between the server and the subscriber for the customer during campaign creation, allowing the subscriber to easily visualize the campaign message flow.

A short code is a special telephone number accessible to mobile phones, fixed phones, SMS, and MMS messages. The short code can be shorter than a full telephone number and selected for ease of communication and memorization. The short code appears similar to a regular telephone number and is serviced by a telecommunications operator.

Keywords are collections of characters transmitted to the server by the subscriber. Each keyword can be associated with a campaign. Sub-words are collections of characters transmitted to the server by the subscriber, for example, to select a menu option from a menu. Each sub-word can be associated with a keyword.

FIG. 1 illustrates an example server 100 for generating a message flow diagram. The server 100 is configured to initiate and provide a campaign of interactions with subscribers. For example, the server 100 can be a standard computing server configured to communicate over a plurality of networks and execute a campaign manager module 116. Alternatively, the server 100 can be any computing device.

The server 100 includes a display 102. The display 104 can be equipment that displays viewable images, graphics, and text generated by the server 100 to a user. For example, the display 102 can be a cathode ray tube or a flat panel display such as a TFT LCD. The display 102 includes a display surface, circuitry to generate a viewable picture from electronic signals sent by the server 100, and an enclosure or case. The display 102 can interface with an input/output interface 108, which converts data from a central processor unit 112 to a format compatible with the display 102.

The server 100 includes one or more output devices 104. The output device 104 can be any hardware used to communicate outputs to the user. For example, the output device 104 can be audio speakers and printers or other devices for providing output.

The server 100 includes one or more input devices 106. The input device 106 can be any computer hardware used to receive inputs from the user. The input device 106 can include keyboards, mouse pointer devices, microphones, scanners, video and digital cameras, etc.

The server 100 includes an input/output interface 108. The input/output interface 108 can include logic and physical ports used to connect and control peripheral devices, such as output devices 104 and input devices 106. For example, the input/output interface 108 can allow input and output devices 104 and 106 to communicate with the server 100.

The server 100 includes a network interface 110. The network interface 110 includes logic and physical ports used to connect to one or more networks. For example, the network interface 110 can accept a physical network connection and interface between the network and the workstation by translating communications between the two. Example networks can include Ethernet, or other physical network infrastructure. Alternatively, the network interface 110 can be configured to interface with wireless network. Alternatively, the server 100 can include multiple network interfaces for interfacing with multiple networks.

As depicted, the network interface 110 communicates over a wired network and a cellular network. It will be appreciated that the server 100 can communicate over any combination of wired, wireless, or other networks.

The server 100 includes a central processing unit (CPU) 112. The CPU 112 can be an integrated circuit configured for mass-production and suited for a variety of computing applications. The CPU 112 can sit on a motherboard within the server 100 and control other workstation components. The CPU 112 can communicate with the other workstation components via a bus, a physical interchange, or other communication channel.

The server 100 includes memory 114. The memory 114 can include volatile and non-volatile memory accessible to the CPU 112. The memory can be random access and provide fast access for graphics-related or other calculations. In an alternative, the CPU 112 can include on-board cache memory for faster performance.

The server 100 includes a campaign manager module 116 stored in memory 114. For example, the campaign manager module 116 can be as discussed below and be configured to initiate, manage, and administrate campaigns on a wireless network. Campaigns involve interactions between the server 100 and subscribers of the wireless network.

The server 100 includes mass storage 118. The mass storage 118 can be volatile or non-volatile storage configured to store large amounts of data. The mass storage 118 can be accessible to the CPU 112 via a bus, a physical interchange, or other communication channel. For example, the mass storage 118 can be a hard drive, a RAID array, flash memory, CD-ROMs, DVDs, HD-DVD or Blu-Ray mediums.

The server 100 communicates with a network 120 via the network interface 112. The network 120 can be any network configured to carry digital information. For example, the network 114 can be an Ethernet network, the Internet, a wireless network, a cellular data network, or any Local Area Network or Wide Area Network.

A terminal 122 communicates with the server 100 over the network 120. The terminal 122 can be a computing device such as a workstation, a desktop computer, a laptop computer, or any other computing device. The terminal 122 can execute software applications configured to communicate with the server 100. Alternatively, the terminal 122 can execute a web browser, and communicate with the server 100 through a web-based interface.

The terminal 122 is accessible to a customer 124. The customer 124 can be an authorized administrator of a media owner or a party seeking to execute a message campaign to subscribers of a network. The customer 124 can be associated with a user account on the server 100. Each user account on the server 100 can be associated with sub-accounts.

The server 100 can also communicate with a cellular network 126 via the network interface 112. The cellular network 126 can include infrastructure supporting a wireless carrier's coverage area, including servers, communication trunks, cellular towers, etc. The cellular network 126 can be operated and maintained by a wireless carrier.

A subscriber 130 can access the cellular network 126 via a mobile device 128. For example, the mobile device 128 can be a cellular phone, a wireless personal digital assistant, or any other device configured to wirelessly communicate with the cellular network 126.

The customer 124 can initiate and manage a message campaign involving the subscriber 130 of a cellular network 126. In one example, the campaign can include an initial notification text message sent to the mobile device 128 with an offer to purchase a new ring tone. The subscriber 130 replies with an affirmative response, such as a text message with “Y” in the body. The server 100 receives the reply, processes a payment, and transmits the purchased ring tone to the mobile device 128.

FIG. 2A illustrates an example screenshot of a campaign management webpage. A campaign manager module, as discussed above, can provide a web-accessible interface. The campaign management webpage can be displayed to a customer, displaying information on existing campaigns. The customer, as discussed above, can be any party wishing to initiate and manage a message campaign to wireless subscribers.

The screen shot includes a title 200. The title 200 can reflect the campaign management webpage and include text, graphics, or other visible portions.

The screen shot includes menu tabs 202. The menu tabs 202 allow the customer to navigate functionality offered by the campaign manager module. Example functionality includes campaign manager, subscribers & messaging management, premium content management, and reporting management. Other functionality includes browsing available support and account information. The campaign manager, as depicted in FIG. 2A, allows the customer to manage existing campaigns and create new campaigns.

The screen shot includes sub-menu choices 204. The sub-menu choices 204 offer additional functionality associated with the selected menu tab. Example functionality offered by the sub-menu choices 204 includes managing campaigns, widgets, and pages.

The screen shot includes a campaign section 206. The campaign section includes existing campaigns and groups.

The screen shot includes campaign options 208. Campaign options 208 include functionality related to campaigns, such as creating a new campaign and creating a new group.

The screen shot includes a campaign column 210. The campaign column 210 lists all current campaigns accessible by the user. For example, current campaigns can be created by the user or another user. Each campaign involves a campaign message flow corresponding to messages and interactions between the server and the subscriber. FIG. 2A illustrates a campaign named “At Concert.”

The screen shot includes a campaign type 212. For example, campaign type 212 can be one of: subscribing to a list, purchasing media content (including video, pictures, software, and ring tones), participating in a poll, requesting a coupon, donating to charity, activating a mobile service, or similar options. For example, campaign type 212 can be depicted as an icon.

The screen shot includes a campaign keyword 214. The campaign keyword 214 can be the keyword that is monitored by the server. As discussed above, in response to an invitation message, the subscriber can reply with a keyword included in the invitation message. The keyword is sent to a predetermined short code. The server monitors the short code for messages from the subscriber, and activates the campaign corresponding to the keyword.

The screen shot includes campaign actions 216. Campaign actions 216 include functionality available to individual campaigns. For example, campaign actions 216 can include viewing the campaign, editing the campaign, displaying campaign reports, initiating the campaign, and deleting the campaign. The campaign is initiated by the user or at a predetermined trigger after it has been created, as discussed below. After initiation, the campaign is executed by the server and the initial invitation message is transmitted to subscribers. The server monitors the associated short code for the associated keyword, and processes any further interactions with the subscribers pursuant to campaign parameters.

The screen shot includes groups 218. For example, groups include one or more related subscribers of a wireless carrier. Subscribers can be related if they have opted into a subscriber list related to an interest or hobby. Subscriber lists can relate to music groups, a geographical location, a particular product or service, a club or other affiliated subscribers, or any other logical relation. Groups facilitate management of subscribers in creating and administrating a message campaign by defining the recipients of the message campaign.

The screen shot includes a group hierarchy 220. Each group in groups 218 can be associated with a group hierarchy 220 that is displayed on customer-request. The group hierarchy 220 displays content and other options associated with each group. The group hierarchy 220 includes a group name of the associated group, any media or content associated with the group, a subscription fee charged to each subscriber, an edit button and a delete button.

It will be appreciated that additional fields and information can be displayed under any of the above headings. Additional headings can also be used to convey other information to the customer. Additional functionality can be added to improve the customer experience in managing campaigns.

FIG. 2B illustrates an example screenshot of a campaign setup webpage, including a message flow diagram of a campaign. A campaign manager module, as discussed above, can provide a web-accessible interface to set up a new message campaign. The campaign setup webpage can be displayed to a customer responsive to a customer desire to create a new message campaign. The customer, as discussed above, can be any party wishing to initiate and manage a campaign to wireless subscribers.

The screen shot includes a title 250. The title 250 can reflect the campaign setup webpage and include text, graphics, or other visible portions.

The screen shot includes menu tabs 252. The menu tabs 252 allow the customer to navigate functionality offered by the campaign manager module. Example functionality includes campaign manager, subscribers & messaging management, premium content management, and reporting management. Other functionality includes browsing available support and account information. The campaign setup webpage, as depicted in FIG. 2B, allows the customer create a new campaign.

The screen shot includes sub-menu choices 254. The sub-menu choices 254 offer additional functionality associated with the selected menu tab. Example functionality offered by the sub-menu choices 254 includes managing campaigns, widgets, and pages.

The screen shot includes an edit campaign section 256. The edit campaign section 256 includes functionality to display input fields to receive customer-specified parameters defining a new campaign. For example, the input fields can be as discussed below.

The screen shot includes a campaign name 258. The campaign name 258 can be a text field for receiving a name of the campaign to be created.

The screen shot includes a campaign description 260. The campaign description 260 can be a text field for receiving a description of the campaign to be created.

The screen shot includes a campaign structure 262. The campaign structure 262 can be a hierarchical view of the campaign. For example, each campaign can be associated with a keyword, which activates a campaign message flow when received by the server. Each campaign can also be associated with one or more subwords. Subwords can initiate other campaign message flows, for example, by offering other campaigns. As discussed above, a campaign can offer content such as files for a mobile device, a poll, or other services.

The screen shot includes campaign controls 264. The campaign controls 264 include customer-specified parameters associated with the campaign, keyword, or subword.

The screen shot includes a campaign keyword 266. The campaign keyword 266 is associated with the new campaign set up by the customer.

The screen shot includes a subscription 268. The subscription 268 is an option set by the customer defining whether a subscriber can subscribe to a group in response to the campaign. In one example, the subscription option forces users to opt-in to a campaign for future mobile messaging. A subscriber must reply to an opt-in message to be added to a group or list.

The screen shot includes an opt-in message 270. The opt-in message 270 is displayed to a subscriber if the campaign allows subscription to a group or list, as defined by subscription 268 above. The opt-in message can describe the group and display subscription information. For example, a subscriber can reply with a text message including “Y” in the body.

The screen shot includes settings 272. The settings 272 further specify parameters that define the new campaign. The settings 272 can include a checkbox that specifies no content is sent when a subscriber opts-in to the group or list. The settings 272 can include a limit on a number of subscribers that will be accepted into the group or list.

The screen shot includes a schedule 274. The schedule 274 allows the customer to specify when content of the campaign will be sent. For example, the content can include a text message, multimedia files (backgrounds, ring tones, mobile device applications, etc.), or any other file that can be sent to the user's mobile device.

The screen shot includes a content type 276. The content type 276 can be a drop down box with possible content types. For example, a campaign can provide an interactive menu responsive to a subscriber opt-in. Alternatively, the campaign can provide media content or a set of poll questions responsive to a subscriber opt-in.

The screen shot includes a welcome message 278. If the subscriber has opted-in to a group, the welcome message 278 can include information on the group.

The screen shot includes a number of menu items 280. If the campaign includes a menu, as specified in 276, the campaign will transmit an interactive menu to the subscriber responsive to an opt-in. The number of menu items 280 allows the customer to specify a quantity of menu items in the interactive menu transmitted to the subscriber.

The screen shot includes a menu 282. For each item in the menu, specified by 280, a menu item and a menu keyword is specified. For example, the menu item can be a title of content such as ring tones, audio files, graphics, or other files. For example, the menu keyword can be transmitted to the server by the subscriber to select the associated menu item. The menu keyword can be automatically generated from the campaign keyword and the menu item name.

The screen shot includes a campaign message flow 284. The campaign message flow 284 visually depicts interactions between the server and the subscriber during the campaign.

The screen shot includes a campaign message flow entry 286. Entry 386 states that a subscriber transmits the campaign keyword to a predetermined short code. Entry 286 can be generated from the campaign keyword 266, discussed above.

It will be appreciated that a campaign can be initiated by other actions. For example, the subscriber can call a predefined phone number that is configured to capture the subscriber's cellular phone number and an initiation request.

The screen shot includes a campaign message flow entry 288. Entry 288 states that the server transmits the opt-in message to the subscriber responsive to receiving the campaign keyword discussed in entry 286. Entry 288 can be generated from the opt-in message 270, discussed above.

The screen shot includes a campaign message flow entry 290. Entry 290 states that the server transmits an interactive menu to the subscriber after transmitting the opt-in message. Entry 290 can be generated from the welcome message 278, the number of menu items 280, and the menu 282.

The screen shot includes a campaign message flow entry 292. Entry 292 states that the subscriber replies with a menu item selection after receiving the interactive menu from the server, discussed above. Entry 292 can be generated from the menu 282.

The screen shot includes a campaign message flow entry 294. Entry 294 states that the server transmits a confirmation message with the subscriber's selection and any pricing information. Entry 294 can be generated from the subscriber's selection in 292 and subscription pricing information.

The screen shot includes a campaign message flow entry 296. Entry 296 states that the subscriber replies with a text message with “Y” in the body. The subscriber thus confirms the selection and accepts the charges.

The screen shot includes a campaign message flow entry 298. Entry 298 states that the selected content is transmitted to the subscriber's mobile device.

The screen shot includes a campaign message flow entry 299. Entry 299 states that a confirmation of the charges associated with the selected content is transmitted to the subscriber.

FIG. 3 illustrates an example procedure for generating a message flow diagram of a campaign. The procedure can execute on a server as depicted in FIG. 1. The procedure can execute in real-time responsive to a customer creating or setting up a new campaign and display a visual representation of a campaign message flow, including campaign message flow entries to the customer. The campaign message flow can be as depicted in FIG. 2B.

In 300, the server determines whether a customer request was received to set up or create a new campaign. The server provides a web interface to a campaign manager module via a network to the customer. For example, the web interface can be initiated when the customer logs into the web interface and selects an option to create a new campaign.

If the request was received, the server proceeds to 302. If no request was received, the procedure remains at 300 to wait.

In 302, the server optionally pre-populates the new campaign from a template campaign. The customer can select a provided template campaign from which the new campaign will be created. For example, template campaigns can include frequently-used campaigns such as an offer to sell a ring tone or other media content, a poll or survey, a notification of a new product or service, a coupon offer, or any other potential campaigns.

In 304, the server initiates the new campaign. The new campaign is created in memory accessible to the server and the campaign parameters are initialized.

In 306, the server determines whether parameters were received from the customer. The customer is prompted for campaign parameters via the web interface from the server. The customer inputs campaign parameters via the web interface.

The template campaigns from above can be associated with campaign parameters that are copied into the new campaign. The customer can then customize the new campaign by modifying the campaign parameters.

Alternatively, a campaign parameter can be a predefined default value when the new campaign is initiated. The customer can modify the default campaign parameter.

If parameters were received, the server proceeds to 308. If parameters were not received, the server remains at 306 to wait.

In 308, the server generates campaign message flow entries responsive to parameters entered by the customer. As discussed above, a campaign message flow visually depicts the campaign interactions with subscribers. Each campaign message flow entry is generated from a default or from customer-inputted parameters as discussed above.

In 310, the server displays the campaign message flow entries to the customer. The campaign flow entries are displayed via the web interface. For example, the web interface can be a Java applet, and dynamically display new campaign message flow entries are the entries are generated responsive to customer-inputted parameters.

In one embodiment, the campaign message flow entries can be automatically generated as campaign parameters are entered. Each campaign message flow entry can be generated in real-time as parameters are received from the customer.

Thus, the entries can be displayed substantially in real time responsive to the customer inputs. This allows the campaign message flow to evolve as the customer adds steps, deletes steps, or otherwise edits the campaign. The campaign message flow thus changes in real time responsive to customer-inputs.

In another embodiment, the campaign message flow entries can be generated responsive to a customer submission of campaign parameters.

In 312, the server optionally stores the campaign parameters in an accessible storage medium. The campaign parameters define the new campaign and can be saved to volatile and non-volatile memory. The campaign parameters can further be backed up for redundancy.

In 314, the server optionally executes the campaign for a subscriber responsive to subscriber input. The customer can activate the new campaign for execution by the server. The server interacts with the subscriber in a manner defined by the campaign parameters, for example, by beginning with an opt-in or introductory text message, as discussed above. The subscriber can respond with a request to subscribe, and the server will service the request.

In 316, the server exits the procedure.

As discussed above, one embodiment of the present invention can be a method for generating a campaign message flow. The method comprises, responsive to a customer request, initiating a campaign, wherein the campaign includes interacting with a subscriber via messages. The method comprises, responsive to receiving customer-inputted parameters defining the campaign, generating campaign message flow entries in substantially real time from the customer-inputted parameters, wherein each campaign message flow entry corresponds to an interaction with the subscriber. The method comprises displaying each campaign message flow entry to the customer when generated. The method comprises pre-populating the parameters and the campaign message flow from a template campaign. The method comprises storing the parameters in an accessible storage medium. The method comprises executing the campaign responsive to a subscriber request, wherein subscriber inputs and server outputs correspond to the campaign message flow. The campaign message flow entry can be at least one of: subscriber-inputted keywords, subscriber-inputted short numbers, server-outputted menus, and server-outputted confirmations. The parameters can include at least one of: a keyword, opt-in message, scheduling, content to be sent, confirmation message, menu items, and pointers to other sub-words. The customer request and parameters can be received via a web interface and the campaign message flow is displayed via the web interface.

Another embodiment of the present invention can be a system for generating a campaign message flow. The system can include a server in communication with a client over a network. The server can be configured to, responsive to a customer request, initiate a campaign, wherein the campaign includes interacting with subscribers via messages. The server can be configured to receive customer-inputted parameters defining the campaign. The server can be configured to automatically generate campaign message flow entries, wherein each campaign message flow entry corresponds to an interaction between a server and a subscriber. The server can be configured to display the campaign message flow entries to the customer. The server can be configured to pre-populate the parameters and the campaign message flow from a template campaign. The server can be configured to store the parameters in an accessible storage medium. The server can be configured to execute the campaign responsive to a subscriber request, wherein subscriber inputs and server outputs correspond to the campaign message flow. A campaign message flow entry can be at least one of: subscriber-inputted keywords, subscriber-inputted short numbers, server-outputted menus, and server-outputted confirmations. The parameters include at least one of: a keyword, opt-in message, scheduling, content to be sent, confirmation message, menu items, and pointers to other sub-words. The customer request and parameters can be received via a web interface and the campaign message flow is displayed via the web interface.

Another embodiment of the present invention can be a computer-readable medium including instructions adapted to execute a method for generating a campaign message flow. The method comprises, responsive to a customer request, initiating a campaign, wherein the campaign includes interacting with subscribers via messages. The method comprises receiving customer-inputted parameters defining the campaign. The method comprises automatically generating campaign message flow entries, wherein each campaign message flow entry corresponds to an interaction between a server and a subscriber. The method comprises displaying the campaign message flow entries to the customer. The method comprises pre-populating the parameters and the campaign message flow from a template campaign. The method comprises storing the parameters in an accessible storage medium. The method comprises executing the campaign responsive to a subscriber request, wherein subscriber inputs and server outputs correspond to the campaign message flow. The campaign message flow entry can be at least one of: subscriber-inputted keywords, subscriber-inputted short numbers, server-outputted menus, and server-outputted confirmations. The parameters can include at least one of: a keyword, opt-in message, scheduling, content to be sent, confirmation message, menu items, and pointers to other sub-words. The customer request and parameters can be received via a web interface and the campaign message flow is displayed via the web interface.

It will be appreciated to those skilled in the art that the preceding examples and embodiments are exemplary and not limiting to the scope of the present invention. It is intended that all permutations, enhancements, equivalents, combinations, and improvements thereto that are apparent to those skilled in the art upon a reading of the specification and a study of the drawings are included within the true spirit and scope of the present invention. It is therefore intended that the following appended claims include all such modifications, permutations and equivalents as fall within the true spirit and scope of the present invention.