Title:
Modular Testing Plant
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A modular testing plant comprising at least two building modules which are designed as transportable containers and which each have two side walls and two transverse walls connecting the side walls, wherein at least one building module having a length L2 and a width B2 and designed as a first testing module for receiving a test item is provided, and at least one building module having a length L4 and a width B4 and designed as a first supply module for receiving supply technology is provided, wherein the first supply module is arranged above the first testing module and the length L4 is less than the length L2. To complete the testing plant, at least a third building module designed as a first testing technology module for receiving testing technology is provided, wherein the first testing technology module has two side walls, two transverse walls connecting the side walls, a length L3 and a width B3, wherein the first testing technology module can be placed, in respect of the side wall, laterally next to the first testing module against the side wall, and the width B4 is at least 20% less than the width B2 or B3, which means that the ratio of B4/B2 or the ratio of B4/B3 is at most 2/2.5.



Inventors:
Ziegler, Peter (Wiesbaden, DE)
Schmidt, Christoph (Ober-Ramstadt, DE)
Application Number:
12/087648
Publication Date:
03/26/2009
Filing Date:
12/21/2006
Assignee:
AVL DEUTSCHLAND GMBH (MAINZ-KASTEL, DE)
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/745.13
International Classes:
E04H5/02; E04B1/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
KWIECINSKI, RYAN D
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Hudak, Shunk & Farine Co. LPA (Tallmadge, OH, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A modular testing facility, comprised of: at least two structural modules which are designed as transportable containers, each of which modules has two lateral walls and two transverse walls connecting said lateral walls, wherein at least one structural module having a length L2 and a width B2 and designed as a first testing module for accommodating a test item is provided, and at least one structural module having a length L4 and a width B4 and designed as a first supply module for accommodating technological supply means is provided, wherewith the first supply module is disposed above the first testing module, and the length L4 is less than the length L2; wherein at least one third building module is provided which supplements the modular testing facility, which third building module is designed as a first testing technology module for accommodating technological testing means; wherein said third building module has two lateral walls and two transverse walls which connect said lateral walls, and has a length L3 and a width B3; wherein said third building module is disposed with its lateral wall next to the lateral wall of the first testing module; and wherein the width B4 is at least 20% smaller than the width B2 or at least 20% smaller than the width B3.

2. A modular testing facility, comprised of: at least two structural modules which are designed as transportable containers, each of which modules has two lateral walls and two transverse walls connecting said lateral walls, wherein at least one structural module having a length L2 and a width B2 and designed as a first testing module for accommodating a test item is provided, and at least one structural module having a length L4 and a width B4 and designed as a first supply module for accommodating technological supply means is provided, wherewith the first supply module is disposed above the first testing module, and the length L4 is less than the length L2; wherein the width B2 is greater than 3 m, and the width B4 is at least 20% smaller than the width B2.

3. The modular testing facility according to claim 1; wherein the ratio B4/B2 or B4/B3 is at most 2/2.5.

4. The modular testing facility according to claim 1; wherein the ratio B4/B2 or B4/B3 is 2/3, 2/4, or 2/5.

5. The modular testing facility according to claim 1; wherein an overall width Bp of the testing module or the testing technology module or a combination thereof is equal to an overall width Bv of all of the supply modules disposed thereon.

6. The modular testing facility according to claim 1; wherein three, four, or five supply modules are disposed on the first testing technology module and the first testing module.

7. The modular testing facility according to claim 1; wherein the length L4 is at least 20% smaller than the length L2 or L3.

8. The modular testing facility according to claim 1; wherein the length L3 equals the length L2, and the width B3 equals the width B2.

9. 9-17. (canceled)

18. The modular testing facility according to claim 1; wherein the supply module and testing module, or the supply module and testing technology module or a combination thereof, are set back by a horizontal setback distance A with respect to a front transverse wall; or are set back with respect to, or are aligned with, a rear transverse wall or a combination thereof, whereby a deck is formed on the testing module or the testing technology module or a combination thereof in a region forwardly of or rearwardly of the supply module or a combination thereof.

19. The modular testing facility according to claim 1; wherein an additional structural module is provided which is in the form of a second testing module, which is disposed next to the first testing module at the lateral wall thereof, and wherein the first testing module and second testing module are in the form of a combined large testing module, wherewith lateral walls of the said first and second testing modules are at least partially removable or have a pass-through opening T or a combination thereof.

20. 20-23. (canceled)

24. A testing facility area comprised of at least one modular testing facility according to claim 1; wherein a plurality of modular testing facility sectors are disposed side by side in a row, at respective side walls, to form a row of testing aggregates.

25. 25-27. (canceled)

28. A testing facility hall having at least one opening in a wall of the hall, to admit incident light, and having at least one modular testing facility or a row of testing aggregates or a testing facility area or a combination thereof, according to claim 24; wherein a second lateral wall or a transverse wall or a combination thereof of the control room module has a window element which adjoins the aforesaid opening, such that external light is admitted into at least the control room module.

29. 29-36. (canceled)

37. A modular testing facility, testing facility hall, or testing facility sector or area, according to claim 1; wherein a supply module is disposed above the first testing module and its longer side is oriented at 90 E with respect to a longer side of said testing module.

38. The arrangement according to claim 37; wherein the width B4 is at least 20% greater than the width B2 or the width B3, and thus the ratio B4/B2 is at least 3/2.5 and the ratio B4/B3 is at least 3/2.5.

39. 39-42. (canceled)

43. The modular testing facility according to claim 2; wherein the ratio B4/B2 or B4/B3 is at most 2/2.5.

44. The modular testing facility according to claim 2; wherein the ratio B4/B2 or B4/B3 is 2/3, 2/4, or 2/5.

45. The modular testing facility according to claim 2; wherein an overall width Bp of the testing module or the testing technology module or a combination thereof is equal to an overall width Bv of all of the supply modules disposed thereon.

46. The modular testing facility according to claim 2; wherein three, four, or five supply modules are disposed on the first testing technology module and the first testing module.

47. The modular testing facility according to claim 2; wherein the length L4 is at least 20% smaller than the length L2 or L3.

48. The modular testing facility according to claim 2; wherein the supply module and testing module, or the supply module and testing technology module or a combination thereof, are set back by a horizontal setback distance A with respect to a front transverse wall; or are set back with respect to, or are aligned with, a rear transverse wall or a combination thereof, whereby a deck is formed on the testing module or the testing technology module or a combination thereof in a region forwardly of or rearwardly of the supply module or a combination thereof.

49. The modular testing facility according to claim 2; wherein an additional structural module is provided which is in the form of a second testing module, which is disposed next to the first testing module at the lateral wall thereof, and wherein the first testing module and second testing module are in the form of a combined large testing module, wherewith lateral walls of the said first and second testing modules are at least partially removable or have a pass-through opening T or a combination thereof.

50. A testing facility area comprised of at least one modular testing facility according to claim 2; wherein a plurality of modular testing facility sectors are disposed side by side in a row, at respective side walls, to form a row of testing aggregates.

51. A testing facility hall having at least one opening in a wall of the hall, to admit incident light, and having at least one modular testing facility or a row of testing aggregates or a testing facility area or a combination thereof, according to claim 50; wherein a second lateral wall or a transverse wall or a combination thereof of the control room module has a window element which adjoins the aforesaid opening, such that external light is admitted into at least the control room module.

52. A modular testing facility, testing facility hall, or testing facility sector or area, according to claim 2; wherein a supply module is disposed above the first testing module and its longer side is oriented at 90 E with respect to a longer side of said testing module.

53. The arrangement according to claim 52; wherein the width B4 is at least 20% greater than the width B2 or the width B3, and thus the ratio B4/B2 is at least 3/2.5 and the ratio B4/B3 is at least 3/2.5.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to a modular testing facility comprised of at least two structural modules (building modules) which are designed as transportable containers, each such module having two lateral walls and two transverse walls which connect said lateral walls, wherewith at least one of the modules has a length L2 and a width B2 and is designed as a first testing module for accommodating a test item, and at least one of the modules has a length L4 and a width B4 and is designed as a first supply module for accommodating technological supply means, wherewith the first supply module is disposed above the first testing module, and the length L4 is less than the length L2.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

A modular testing facility is disclosed in WO 2001/25745 A1, which facility is comprised of at least one testing module, and is further comprised of technological supply means, wherewith each testing module has a testing cell for accommodating items to be tested. The testing module is connected individually to specific technological supply means via a supply module which is disposed on the testing module itself and which has means of cooling. The testing module(s) is/are preferably dimensioned so as to be compatible with ocean freight container systems.

The underlying problem of the present invention was to devise a modular testing facility which affords an efficient structure and facilitates inexpensive shipping.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

This problem is solved according to the invention in that at least one third building module is provided which expands the capabilities of the modular testing facility, which third building module is designed as a first testing technology module for accommodating technological testing means, said third building module having two lateral walls and two transverse walls which connect said lateral walls, and having a length L3 and a width B3; wherewith:

    • said module (third building module aka first testing technology module) can be disposed with its lateral wall next to the lateral wall of the first testing module; and
    • the width B4 is smaller than the width B2 and is smaller than the width B3.

As a consequence of this arrangement, more than two supply modules can be disposed at least partially next to the testing module or the testing technology module, enabling efficient use of the relevant lateral walls of such supply modules. The ratios of the widths (B2, B4, B3) are chosen such that sufficient space is available in the testing module and testing technology module to accommodate various types of motors, drive trains, and/or exhaust gas conduit systems, and such that the technological testing means are conveniently available; and further such that the necessary number of smaller supply modules can be, positionally etc., adapted to a corresponding number of testing modules and testing technology modules. The supply modules may be shorter and/or narrower, so that at least the supply modules can be shipped faster and, particularly, less expensively.

The abovementioned underlying problem is also solved in that the width B2 is greater than 3 m and the width B4 is less than the width B2. Consequently, the testing module has an optimal width so as to afford sufficient space within the testing module to accommodate various types of test items; and the testing technology via the testing technology modules is positioned so as to be readily available; and the width relationships are such that more than one supply module can be at least partially disposed at the testing module. The ratio B2/B4 is selected such that the necessary number of smaller supply modules can be, positionally, adapted to a corresponding number of testing modules. The supply modules are narrower and/or shorter, so that at least the supply modules can be shipped faster and, particularly, less expensively.

In this connection, it is advantageous if the width B4 is at least 10% or 20% smaller than the width B2 or B3, thus the ratio B4/B2 or B4/B3 is at most 2/2.2 or 2/2.5. Consequently, at least 2.2 or 2.5 supply modules can be disposed at a testing module or at a testing technology module. Thus if one is employing 2 testing modules and 2 testing technology modules, a total of 4 testing-related modules, one can provide at least 4.4 or 5, or preferably 6, supply modules in proximity to these 4 testing-related modules.

It is further advantageous if the ratio B4/B2 or B4/B3 is 2/3 or 2/4 or 2/5, and if 2, 3, 4, or 5 supply modules can be located at the first testing technology module and at the first testing module. Neighboring supply modules can be positioned side by side in succession. Preferably, three supply modules are provided for two testing modules and/or testing technology modules. Depending on the relative widths, this ratio may be 3/2 or 4/2 or 5/2.

According to a refinement of the invention, it is also possible for the overall width Bp of the testing module and/or testing technology module to be equal to the overall width Bv of all of the supply modules disposed on or at said other modules. This facilitates a space-saving arrangement of rows of testing aggregates comprised of sequentially disposed testing facilities, with optimal utilization of the footprint of the individual testing facility, comprised of one or more testing modules, one or more testing technology modules, and the associated supply modules, and the overall testing facility. Interfaces may be provided which are optimally configured, wherewith there are no structural gaps between the interfaces of neighboring structural modules. The relationship between the positioning of the structural modules and the locations of the interfaces can be arranged such that the alignment of interfaces and the utilization of space are both optimized. Further, with due consideration of the load-bearing capability of the testing modules and of the testing technology modules, and with due consideration of the rigidity of the supply modules which are arranged with respect to said other modules, one can devise a suitable stable testing facility structure. For the case where the supply modules are disposed on top of the other modules, the weight forces of the supply modules are borne by the walls and wall supports of the said other modules, testing modules and testing technology modules, at predetermined loci of said walls and wall supports.

It is also advantageous if the length L4, of the supply modules, is at least 20% smaller than the length L2 and/or the length L3; and if the supply module and the testing module, and/or the supply module and the testing technology module, are set back by a horizontal setback distance A with respect to the front transverse wall; and/or are set back with respect to, or are aligned with, the rear transverse wall, whereby a deck or bridge is formed on the testing module and/or the testing technology module in a region or regions forwardly of and/or rearwardly of the supply module. If the rear transverse wall, i.e. of any remaining structural modules, is also slightly set back, a small deck or bridge is formed behind the supply module, for utility mains and the like. This will have the effect of slightly reducing the effective setback distance A, by the same amount. Because the supply modules are smaller, and particularly shorter, they can be shipped more economically.

Their arrangement at or on the testing modules and testing technology modules is facilitated; and they can be more easily accessed with the aid of the aforementioned deck or bridge provided by roof members or cover elements of the testing modules and/or testing technology modules.

Advantageously, it is provided that the length L2 is equal to the length L3, and the width B2 is equal to the length B3, wherewith the footprint of the testing module is equal to that of the testing technology module. Together they, the testing module and the testing technology module, form a convenient unit for considerations of placement of the supply module(s).

According to an important feature of the invention, each structural module has a roof or top deck and a floor, wherewith at least one interface may be provided in the lateral wall and/or in the roof element and/or in the floor element, of such structural module, the position and/or type of which interface(s) is predetermined, and via which interface(s) various fuels and auxiliary materials, etc. can be passed from one structural module to a neighboring structural module; and such interface may comprise a closable opening or a flange connection or socket. The positions of the interfaces are chosen such that regardless of the optional arrangement of structural modules which is chosen the interfaces of neighboring structural modules will be satisfactorily aligned. This feature allows choice of the desired arrangement of structural modules and testing facility sectors without having to worry about the locations of interfaces which one may wish to utilize, e.g. later, because each pair of adjacent structural modules will have at least two such interfaces which are satisfactorily aligned. The interfaces may also be provided in transverse walls. Some of the interfaces may be devised and reserved for special purposes, such as exhaust gas removal, cooling water circulation, etc., wherewith the corresponding fittings and the like will be provided. These special purpose interfaces may also be combined with other interfaces; e.g., if an exhaust gas interface is provided in the roof of a testing module, it may be connected to a corresponding interface in the floor of a supply module configured to handle exhaust gases.

According to an advantageous feature of the invention, one transverse wall is a front wall and another transverse wall is a rear wall, wherewith the front wall has a loading double door and/or an access door, which latter also may be used for loading. The lateral walls of the module are free of door and/or window elements, because, and taking account the fact that, a given testing facility can be expanded laterally with other modules. All traffic relating to installation and operation may be carried out through the transverse walls, wherewith loading of the testing module is preferably through the front transverse wall, and access of personnel is through the rear transverse wall.

Advantageously, a structural module in the form of a control room module is disposed adjoining the rear wall of the first testing module and/or of the first testing technology module, such that a first lateral wall of the control room module adjoins the said rear wall, wherewith optionally a given such rear wall and the associated such first lateral wall each have at least one window opening and/or door opening for the purpose of visibility and/or access. Under these latter circumstances, the control room module is disposed adjoining the remaining free side, free rear transverse wall not having a window or door, in that the lateral surfaces are generally reserved for adding-on of neighboring modules, and the front transverse walls are generally reserved for loading. Depending on the external configuration of the structure, e.g. whether the testing facility is disposed in a closed or open hall, the control room module may be attached to the testing facility and may be heatable. As discussed infra, in a closed hall, a single control room zone may be provided which is disposed between a testing facility, or segment or sector or row comprised of testing facilities, and a wall of the hall.

In cases where hydrogen is employed in a testing facility, the control room module will not have windows or doors.

It is advantageous in general if the control room module does have a window and/or door, at least in a second lateral wall and/or a transverse wall, for the purpose of admitting external light and providing access by personnel. The admission of daylight may be advantageous from the standpoint of compliance with workplace regulations.

It is further advantageous if the structural module used as a supply module has width B4 2.438 m (8 ft), length L4 6.096 m (20 ft), and height H4 2.590 m (8 ft 6 in), with a tolerance +/−0.05 m. These dimensions are preferable in that they correspond to a standard 20-foot freight container, thereby enabling cost optimization if such dimensions can otherwise be made compatible with the overall space requirements for the entire testing facility.

In this connection, it is advantageous if the structural module used as a testing module and/or testing technology module has a width B2=B3 in the range 3.048-4.267 m (10-14 ft), a length L2=L3 in the range 7.0-9.0 m, and a height H2=H3 in the range 3.0-4.0 m. The width specification here corresponds to a multiple of the 20-foot length of the aforesaid freight containers, for combinatorial purposes in devising arrangements which will optimally satisfy the space requirements for a given overall testing facility.

It is also advantageous if the structural module employed as a testing module and/or a testing technology module is self-supporting over its entire length. It is ordinarily permissible to employ vehicles of height up to 4.00 m in road transport. Thus if a container is, e.g., 3.5 m high, only 0.5 m remains available to accommodate the transport means, undercarriage or trailer body. If necessary, axles and wheels can be mounted to the end surfaces of the container module without the need for an additional load-bearing surface to support the container.

Advantageously, an additional structural module may be provided which is in the form of a second testing module which may disposed next to the first testing module at the lateral wall of said first testing module. The first testing module and second testing module may be configured as a combined large testing module, wherewith lateral walls of the said first and second testing modules are at least partially removable and/or have a pass-through opening T. The second testing module thus expands the space available for performing testing, so as to enable accommodation of larger or more complex test items, e.g. with four-wheel drive and/or with their exhaust gas systems in place. Later it may be desired to break down the combined testing module into two testing modules, two structural modules, which breakdown can be performed easily and rapidly, e.g. to facilitate shipping of the modules, as discussed supra. For purposes of the combination, the second testing module may be disposed adjacent to the first testing module, on a side of said first testing module opposite to that of the first testing technology module. The neighboring lateral walls of the juxtaposed testing modules which form the expanded testing cell may be partially or completely removed, e.g. with the formation of a pass-through opening T, so as to allow moving of or incursion by a test item or, e.g., a part of a power take-off shaft or a part of the exhaust gas system.

It may also be advantageous if a structural module is provided which is in the form of a second testing technology module which is disposed, e.g., next to the second testing module at the lateral wall thereof which is opposite from the first testing module. This second testing technology module serves to provide means of testing technology to the second testing module. With this arrangement, two testing technology modules are associated with the double testing cell comprised of two testing modules. The second testing technology module may also serve another neighboring testing module, other than the described double testing cell. The number of supply modules associated with the described testing modules and testing technology modules will depend on the abovementioned ratios. If the space needed is less than that afforded by the said testing modules and testing technology modules, and their environs, as described, e.g. if only three supply modules are sufficient to serve this testing facility, the remaining footprint and roof space may be occupied by supply modules which serve neighboring testing facilities in the given row, as will be described in more detail hereinbelow.

In connection with the inventive arrangements, it may be advantageous to provide yet another structural module, in the form of an expansion module for expansion of a testing module or testing technology module, which expansion module has a width B32 such that the width B2 or B3 of a testing module or testing technology module together with the width B32 is two, three, or four times the width B4 of a supply module. The effect of this expansion module is to widen the overall width of the testing module(s) and/or testing technology module(s), to compensate for the possibility that the ratio B2/B4 or B3/B4 may not be an integer number. The width B32 will serve to rectify the situation, such that the overall width Bp of the testing modules and testing technology modules, as expanded by the expansion module, will equal the overall width Bv of the supply modules.

It is further advantageous if an additional structural module is provided which is in the form of a supplemental module which supplements an expansion module, described supra, which supplemental module has a width B34 such that the width B32 and the width B34 together approximately equal the width B2 of a testing module or the width B3 of a testing technology module. When an expansion module is provided, the supplemental module will make up any difference such that the sum is an integer number of widths of a testing module or testing technology module, so that successive testing facilities can be added to construct a row, employing the ratios described above, without giving rise to mismatches, surpluses or gaps.

It is also advantageous in connection with the inventive arrangements if a plurality of modular testing facility sectors are disposed side by side in a row, at respective side walls, to form a row of testing aggregates. Typically, a single testing facility having a single or double testing cell will not be sufficient to meet the testing needs at hand, thus it will be desirable to be able to readily arrange sequences of modular testing facilities, each comprised of, e.g., a testing module, a testing technology module, and a plurality of supply modules disposed over the testing module and testing technology module, in a row. Because with the described arrangement the outer lateral walls of a given testing facility are free, the sequencing of testing facilities to form a row does not require modification.

Further advantage is attained if a distance Z is provided between, e.g. a lateral wall of a testing module of one modular testing facility and the neighboring lateral wall of a testing technology module of the successive modular testing facility, providing an accessway to the control room module which control room module is disposed at or near the rear transverse wall(s). If the row of testing aggregates is quite long, such accessways may prove particularly advantageous.

Additional advantage is attained if at least two rows of testing, aggregate are provided, wherewith the front transverse walls of the testing modules of said rows are separated by a distance R of greater than 2 m, such that a maneuvering space is provided between the rows, to facilitate loading and unloading of the testing modules. In many cases, a single row comprised of a plurality of testing facilities may not be sufficient to meet the testing needs at hand, or may not be the optimum spatial configuration; accordingly, the testing facility segments may be arranged in two or more such rows, with intervening spaces.

It is advantageous if at least the testing module and the testing technology module have double floors, wherewith supporting elements for the testing facility, and/or supply conduits for utilities and the like, can be accommodated in the free space formed by said double floors or underneath said double floors; and if a double floor is also provided at least in the maneuvering space between the rows of testing aggregates, such that a flat floor surface is provided for essentially the entire facility area both inside and outside the testing modules and testing technology modules. A flat floor surface facilitates traffic of personnel and, particularly, materials, between testing facilities. Further, the access area to the entire facility area, e.g. a testing facility hall or other building, may have a ramp or the like to facilitate access from the surrounding grounds to the raised floor surface. It is conceivable that the hall will have other uses, wherewith e.g. the testing facility modules may be removed and replaced by means related to such other uses. Because of the appreciable free floor area in the hall, special means of bypassing any obstacles or depressions when the hall is used as a modular testing facility will not be necessary. Another possibility rather than raising the central maneuvering space is to have depressed floors in the hall where the double-floored testing facility modules are to be placed, wherewith the upper floor surfaces of said double-floored surfaces will be at the same height as the single floors in the rest of the hall; this can have the benefit of making a ramp unnecessary.

In a testing facility hall having at least one opening, e.g. window, in a wall of the hall, to admit incident light, and having at least one modular testing facility and/or a row of testing aggregates and/or a broad testing facility area, as described supra, it is advantageous if a second lateral wall and/or a transverse wall, of the control room module, has a window element which adjoins is generally aligned with the aforesaid opening in the hall wall, such that external light is admitted into at least the control room module. This provides a means of optimally utilizing the space available in the hall. The rear side of the testing facility, or testing facility row, near which rear side the control room module is disposed faces the wall of the hall, such that sufficient space is provided for the control room module and to admit daylight. This arrangement allows maximal use of the region between the front sides of the testing facilities or testing facility rows, as a maneuvering space.

In connection with the inventive arrangement, a second testing facility hall configuration similar to that described supra is also advantageous, in which second configuration a rear transverse wall of a testing module and/or testing technology module, which transverse wall contains a window element, for visibility, and/or door element, for access, is disposed near to or adjoins the aforesaid opening, window opening, of the aforesaid hall wall, such that the said transverse wall is disposed at a distance K from the hall wall, whereby a control room zone is created between the hall wall and said transverse wall. With certain configurations of the hall or other structure, such control room zones can take the place of distinct structural modules adapted as control room modules, wherewith the region rearward of the testing facilities will serve as a control room, to the extent needed, facilitating lighting by daylight. The means of air supply and air withdrawal in various modules in a testing facility are adapted such that noise levels in the hall are moderated or minimized.

A third testing facility hall configuration similar to the two described supra, comprised of at least one modular testing facility and/or a row of testing aggregates and/or a testing facility area, is also advantageous, in which third configuration the control room module and/or the control room zone is/are disposed in a middle region of the hall, FIG. 4b, such that the rear wall of the testing module and/or the rear wall of the testing technology module is/are disposed in the region of a hall wall, which hall wall has door elements for loading and unloading of the testing module and testing technology module. If necessary, skylights may be provided in the hall roof, to give rise to a central skylighted region. A control room module or control room region disposed in the said middle region of the hall may have central instrumentation and controls for all of the testing facilities in the hall.

It is advantageous if at least one second hall floor is provided in addition to the first hall floor, namely above the first testing facility area, such that a second testing facility area can be set up on said second hall floor, in a second story. Analogously, additional stories may be provided. Access to the upper stories may be provided by a ramp or the like in or in the vicinity of the hall.

It is also advantageous if elements of a supply network are provided, for simultaneous technical supply and circulation of, e.g., utilities such as air, coolants, cooling water, electric power, and/or exhaust gas removal capabilities electric power and/or auxiliary materials, to/for the various structural modules. In a hall or the like accommodating a plurality of testing facilities, the supply networks, e.g. of cooling water and cold tap water may be configured so as to be centralized.

The supply networks for various purposes may have different availability criteria, e.g. expressed by a simultaneity factor, GZ to ensure normal operation of the entire testing facility, e.g. in the given hall.

It is further advantageous if the supply network has a plurality of segments and branches which are integrated into the various structural modules of the testing facilities, wherewith together such segments and branches comprise the overall supply network. Accordingly, the supply network elements do not require extra installation in the individual structural modules, but are built into said structural modules and are hooked up in the course of installation of said modules. The supply network allows individual modification and expansion of its components in the individual structural modules as relates to supply units and consumption units, with operation as with a central network. E.g., a central exhaust gas module may be provided which receives exhaust gases from individual testing modules via an exhaust gas conduit system, part of which is integrated into each individual testing module.

It is additionally advantageous if necessary technical fixtures and means, for supplying fuels and auxiliary materials for proper operation of the testing facility, are integrated into the various structural modules associated with the testing facility and/or testing facility area. In this way, the said technical fixtures and means are readily assembled at the time that the structural modules are assembled together to form the testing facility. Disassembly is similarly facilitated, wherewith said technical fixtures and means do not require appreciable additional work or de-installation. All infrastructure elements of the supply network are designed so as to be readily reusable at a later time at a different location.

Advantageously, at least one electric power supply unit is provided which has one or more transformers and one or more connections for connection to various international power nets, such that the desired voltage will be supplied to the testing facility despite different voltages being operative in the different power nets.

In the context of the bus system for the electric power net, and taking into account the simultaneity factor GZ, one common transformer may be provided to serve five to ten individual testing facilities; with corresponding numbers of additional transformers for additional individual testing facilities, with a single common bus for the mains.

According to a different embodiment, advantageously the supply module is disposed above the first testing module, and its longer side is oriented at 90 E, in its skew horizontal plane, with respect to the longer side of said testing module. The inventive dimensional ratios allow for this arrangement by variation of the widths of the respective modules, wherewith, with this arrangement, supply modules are arranged successively in a row with respect to their length dimension rather than with respect to their width dimension. The claimed matter does not include a prescription that the length of a supply module must exceed its width. Additional adjustments may be needed to provide for convenient access spaces and doors, with the doors being preferably in the transverse walls.

It should also be noted that with this arrangement supply modules of different widths may be disposed next to each other, in the width direction, given that the widths of the testing modules in a given testing facility may vary.

It is also advantageous if the width B4 of the supply module is at least 20% greater than the width B2 of the testing module or the width B3 of the testing technology module, and thus the ratio B4/B2 is at least 3/2.5 and the ratio B4/B3 is at least 3/2.5. With this formula, two or more testing modules will be at least partly covered widthwise by the supply module, with appreciable advantages according to the invention. Expansion modules and/or supplemental modules may also or alternatively be employed, to achieve the desired covering.

It is particularly advantageous if the ratio B4/B2 is at least 1/1 or 5/4 or 3/2 or 2/1, or the ratio B4/B3 is at least 1/1 or 5/4 or 3/2 or 2/1. In variance with the width ratios for the first variant embodiment, according to which the supply module is narrower than the testing module, the width ratios for the second variant embodiment allow the supply module to be wider than the testing module, with resulting advantages according to the invention. Other possible ratios other than those given above for B4/B2 and B4/B3 are, e.g., 9/8, 11/8, and 7/4. Based on the general concept of the structure of the entire testing facility area, it is advantageous if the combined width Bp of the testing module(s) and/or testing technology module(s) is equal to the width B4 of the supply module disposed above said testing module(s) and/or testing technology module(s).

It is further advantageous if the length L2 of the testing module and/or the length L3 of the testing technology module is equal to the overall length Lv of all of the supply modules disposed above said testing module and/or testing technology module; or the overall length Lv of all of the supply modules disposed one behind the other above said testing module and/or testing technology module is at least 20% less than the length L2 of the testing module and/or the length L3 of the testing technology module. This constraint provides the above-described advantages relating to the ratio L3/L4 and L3/Lv.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Additional advantages and features of the invention are described in the claims and in the following description, and are illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

FIG. 1a is a perspective view of an expanded testing facility;

FIG. 1b is a perspective view of an expanded testing facility with a different alignment;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a testing facility with two testing modules;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view from above, of a testing facility sector with two rows of testing aggregates;

FIG. 4a is a testing facility hall, with a testing facility sector according to FIG. 3;

FIG. 4b is a testing facility hall, with a testing facility sector and a central control room;

FIG. 5a is a lateral view of a testing facility hall according to FIG. 4a;

FIG. 5b is a lateral view of the testing facility hall having two levels instead of one;

FIG. 6 is a testing module with a test item undergoing testing;

FIG. 7a is an expanded testing module with a test item;

FIG. 7b is an expanded testing module with a test item and a dividing wall;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a supply module with an exhaust gas conduit system;

FIG. 9 is a basic schematic of a cooling water utility network;

FIG. 10 is a basic schematic of a low voltage utility network;

FIG. 11 is a basic schematic showing certain aspects of a testing facility hall;

FIG. 12 is a basic schematic showing certain width ratios; and

FIG. 13 is a basic schematic according to FIGS. 1a and 1b, showing supply modules disposed adjacent to each other in the longitudinal direction.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The row of testing aggregates illustrated in FIG. 1a is comprised of two modular testing facilities (1, 1′). Each of the testing aggregates, testing facilities, illustrated is comprised of a testing module (2, 2′) for accommodating a test item, a testing technology module (3, 3′) for accommodating testing technology means, and three supply modules (4, 4′; 5, 5′; 6, 6′) for supplying necessary utilities and the like, such as cooling media, combustion air, waste gas exhaust means, etc. Each combination of a testing module and a testing technology module has a width Bp which corresponds to, approximately equals, the combined width Bv of the three associated supply modules (4, 5, 6; or 4′, 5′, 6′), so that the second testing facility 1′ may be readily put in place to expand the first testing facility 1, at the lateral walls (2.1, 4.1) of said testing facility 1. The supply modules (4, 5, 6; 4′, 5′, 6′) are not only narrower but also shorter than the testing modules and testing technology modules (2, 2′; 3, 3′). In the exemplary embodiment illustrated, the rear walls (e.g. 6.4) of the supply modules (4, 5, 6; 4′, 5′, 6′) are aligned with the rear walls (e.g. 3.4) of the corresponding testing modules and testing technology modules (2, 2′; 3, 3′); and thus a setback of length A is present by which the front sides (4.3, 5.3, 6.3) of the supply modules are set back from the front sides (2.3, 3.3) of the other modules. This distance A provides a deck 14 which affords access to the entrance doors (e.g. 4.5, 5.5, 6.5) of the supply modules (4, 4′; 5, 5′; 6, 6′). In order to facilitate technical connections between the supply modules (e.g. 4, 5, 6) on the one hand and the other modules (e.g. 2, 3) on the other hand, interfaces (e.g. 15.1 to 15.6) are provided in various lateral and bottom walls, e.g. 6.1, 6.9, via which interfaces in addition to various networks 11, various fuels and auxiliary materials, etc., are exchanged between individual modules. The individual interfaces (15.1-15.6) are disposed at predetermined locations of the given modules, so as to facilitate activation of said interfaces after the system is assembled.

According to the exemplary embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1b, the setback distance A is shorter, such that the rear walls, e.g. 6.4, of the supply modules (4, 5, 6; 4′, 5′, 6′) are disposed a certain distance forwardly of the rear walls (e.g. 3.4) of the other modules (2, 2′; 3, 3′), namely a length A1, which provides a deck which may be used for, e.g., disposition or storage of utility elements such as, e.g., exhaust gas conduits 11.3. The various supply modules (4, 5, 6; 4′, 5′, 6′) are interconnected by one or more networks 11, shown schematically, which serve to supply various fuels and auxiliary materials and the like which are required for the testing facilities.

FIG. 2 illustrates a row of testing aggregates 23, with an expanded testing facility comprised of two testing modules (2, 2′) disposed next to each other, so as to provide a double-wide testing cell to accommodate larger test items. This combination of two testing modules is adjoined on its left and right side, respectively, by two testing technology modules (3, 3′). Similarly to the configuration in FIGS. 1a and 1b, the four other modules (2, 2′; 3, 3′) have associated with them six supply modules (4, 5, 6; 4′, 5′, 6′), wherewith the overall width Bv of three supply modules, e.g. 4, 5, 6, corresponds to, i.e. is approximately equal, the overall width Bp of the two associated other modules (e.g. 2, 3).

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a testing facility hall 10 comprised of two rows of testing aggregates (23, 23′). Each of such rows is comprised of a plurality of modules of which a testing facility is comprised, viz. testing modules (2, 2″) and testing technology modules (3, 3″) and the associated supply modules (e.g. 4, 4″), in a specific arrangement analogous to FIGS. 1a, 1b, and 2. The two rows of testing aggregates (23, 23′) are disposed at a distance R in the hall 10, thereby providing a maneuvering space 9 for installing and removing individual testing modules and testing technology modules. As seen in the plan view according to FIG. 4a, the various segments or sectors of a row of testing aggregates (23, 23′) are separated at a distance (Z, Z′), providing an access way (18, 18′) from the maneuvering space 9 rearward to the rear side of the given testing aggregate (23, 23′). Also shown (FIG. 3) is a distance K by which the rows (23, 23′) are recessed from the respective lateral walls (e.g. 10.1) of the hall, thereby providing space for installation of a respective control room module (8, 8″) which in this exemplary embodiment is disposed in the front half, viz. left half, of the depiction. The exemplary embodiment illustrated also has a space in the rear half, i.e. right half, of the depiction, within the region freed by the recess distance K which space may be employed as a control room zone 8′″, which can be set off from the hall region by movable walls with associated light roof elements, walls and roof elements not shown. The various individual testing facilities can be accessed from this alleyway region via rear doors (e.g. 2.6′, 3.6′) (see also, e.g., 3.6, 3.6″ in the front view, described infra); and the control room modules can be accessed from their respective doors (8.9, 8.9″). The deck 14 at the front part of each row of testing aggregates (e.g. 23) is accessible via a staircase (e.g. 25).

Also (FIG. 5a) a door (3.6, 3.6″) is provided between the control room module (8, 8″) and the corresponding testing facility. The wall (e.g. 10.1) of the hall has one or more windows 10.2 which furnish daylight to the rear side of the given testing facility and the local control room module (8, 8″) or control room zone (8′, 8′″). The end walls of the hall (e.g. 10.1′) also have window elements (e.g. 10.4, 10.4′) and doors with window elements (e.g. 10.3) which allow introduction and removal of test items and parts.

The entire facility has a double floor 9.7 at the same altitude as the double floors, not shown, in the individual testing modules and testing technology modules (2, 2″; 3, 3″). The interior region in the double floor 9.7, between the floor surface of the double floor 9.7 and the true floor 10.6 of the hall, can also be utilized for accommodating additional utility mains and the like or may comprise part of the abovementioned utilities network conduit 11. The utilities conduit 11 illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3 accommodates all apt means of furnishing fuels and auxiliary materials.

FIG. 4a is a plan view of the testing facility hall which comprises the entire testing facility of this particular exemplary embodiment. The two rows of testing aggregates (23, 23′) have interior separations (Z, Z′) (described supra) which create accessways (18, 18′) to the rear side of the given testing aggregate. The control room modules (8, 8″) are disposed in the region between the hall walls 10.1 and 10.5 and the respective rows (23, 23′) of testing aggregates, on the left end in the figures; whereas in the exemplary embodiment illustrated, the control room zones (8′, 8′″) are provided in the corresponding space afforded by the distance K on the right end.

FIG. 4b illustrates a testing facility hall with a testing facility sector similar to that illustrated in FIG. 4a, but with the difference that the control room modules (8, 8″) and control room zones (8′, 8′″) are disposed in the central space (10.8), with the rear walls (e.g. 2.3, 3.3) of the testing modules and testing technology modules (e.g. 2, 3), respectively, which modules are visible only in part, being disposed close to the corresponding walls (10.5′, 10.5) of the hall. Preferably these walls (10.5′, 10.5) have doors (10.9′, 10.9) which permit introduction and removal of testing modules and testing technology modules from and to the exterior.

FIG. 5a is a lateral view of the testing facility hall 10, showing the two rows of testing aggregates (23, 23′) wherewith the front sides (e.g. 3.3, 3.3″) of the testing modules (2, 2″) and testing technology modules (3, 3″) are separated by the distance R. The double floor 9.7 of the hall is continued at the same height by double floors (3.7, 3.7) in the testing modules and testing technology modules (e.g. 3, 3″). The control room modules (8, 8″) are disposed in the regions behind the two rows of testing aggregate, namely between said rows and the corresponding walls (10.5′, 10.5) of the hall. Each control room module (8, 8″) is accessible through a door (8.9, 8.9″); and a door (e.g. 3.6″) to the respective testing module and/or testing technology module is provided in each control room module (e.g. 8″).

The exemplary embodiment illustrated in FIG. 5b is a two-storey version, with testing facilities (24, 24′) disposed one above the other, with hall floors 10.6 and 10.7.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a structural module 2 which may be used as a testing module or a testing technology module. The module 2 has two lateral walls (2.2, 2.2), two transverse walls (2.3, 2.4), a floor 2.9, and a roof or top wall 2.10. The width B2 of the module 2 is 3.657 m (12 ft), the length L2 is 9 m, and the height H2 is 3.50 m. A loading and unloading door, or double door or the like, 7.2 is provided in the front transverse wall 2.3. A second door, for access 2.6, and a window, for visibility from the control zone 8′ or control room module 8, neither shown, 2.5 are disposed in the rear transverse wall 2.4. As mentioned, the module 2 has a double floor 2.7, wherewith a free space 2.8 is provided between the upper floor surface 2.7 and the bottom floor 2.9, which space can accommodate utility mains and the like. The module 2 illustrated is configured as a testing module, which accommodates a test item 16, a power take-off device 16.1, and an exhaust gas system 16.2. The exhaust gas system 16.2, or an exhaust gas line therefrom, is connected via a link 15.2 to a supply module 4 which serves as an exhaust gas module; or to a conduit leading to an exhaust gas module.

FIG. 7a illustrates an expanded testing module comprised of two structural modules which have been combined to form a double-wide testing cell, wherewith a lateral wall (2.2, 2.1′) (not shown) of each of said structural modules has been removed, thus providing double the floor surface. The test item 16 which has been installed has four power take-off units (16.1, 16.1′, 16.1″, 16.1′″), and an exhaust gas unit 16.2. The expanded testing module 2 has two loading doors (7.2, 7.2′), two access doors (2.6, 2.6′), and two windows (2.5, 2.5′).

FIG. 7b illustrates an expanded testing module wherein the lateral walls (2.2, 2.1′) have not been removed. Each such lateral wall has a pass-through opening (T, T) for accommodating an exhaust gas pipe or power take-off shaft from the test item, which pipe or shaft extends from one test cell to the neighboring test cell.

FIG. 8 illustrates a structural module 4 comprising an ocean shipping container or other freight container having two lateral walls (4.1, 4.2), two transverse walls (4.3, 4.4), a floor 4.9, and a roof or the like 4.10. The size of this unit is such that it is suitable for use as, e.g., a supply module, (here an exhaust gas module); namely it has width B4 2.438 m (8 ft), length L4 6.096 m (20 ft), and height H4 2.590 m (8 ft 6 in). This exhaust gas module 4 accommodates an exhaust gas apparatus 17, and bears on its roof 4.10 an exhaust gas conduit 17.1 for withdrawal of exhaust gases, which conduit has a flange connection 17.2, not shown, whereby it is mounted to the roof. An access door 7.4 is provided in the front wall 4.3, which door is accessible via the deck 14, not shown.

FIG. 9 is a basic schematic illustrating a cooling system or cooling water system 11. The circulating mains (11.1, 11.2) serve four testing facilities (1, 1′, 1″, 1′″), each of which has two consuming units (13.4, 13.5; 13.6, 13.7; 13.8, 13.9; 13.4′, 13.5′). Three cooling units or cooling towers (13.1, 13.2, 13.3) are provided for preparation and cooling of the cooling medium. The three cooling units (13.1, 13.2, 13.3) and the six consuming units (13.4, 13.5; 13.6, 13.7; 13.8, 13.9; 13.4′, 13.5′) are all interconnected by the circulating mains, comprising supply mains 11.1 and return mains 11.2. The cooling capability supplied by the cooling units (13.1, 13.2, 13.3) is drawn upon by all of the testing facilities (1, 1′, 1″, 1′″), thus there are fewer cooling units than testing facilities, which is reasonable because in practice it is likely that at a given time the aggregate cooling demand of all of the testing facilities will be less than 100% of the cooling capability from all three cooling units.

FIG. 10 is a basic schematic illustrating a low voltage utility network, comprised of two transformers (12, 12′) and ten consuming units (12.1-12.5; 12.1′-12.5′). The arrangement is such that one such transformer (e.g. 12) is sufficient to serve four consuming units (12.1, 12.2, 12.4, 12.5), see the solid lines, wherewith, from consideration of the likely power demand at a given time, the networking of the two transformers should allow them to serve not just eight but all ten consuming units.

FIG. 11 is a basic schematic showing certain aspects of a testing facility hall 10 according to FIG. 5a, wherewith the hall structure with its roof 26 encompasses only the maneuvering space 9 and a part of the rows (23, 23′) of testing aggregates, rather than encompassing the entire facility area 24.

Accordingly, the structural modules (e.g. 3, 3″, 4, 4″) also provide building walls, and need to be designed as structurally exterior containers. The testing modules (e.g. 2) (not shown) and testing technology modules (e.g. 3) according to FIG. 5a may have control room modules associated with them on their rear regions (distal from the maneuvering space 9). The decks, at the front ends (14, 14′), have respective railings (14.1, 14.1′).

FIG. 12 is a basic schematic showing certain width ratios (B3/B2, B4/B2) (=3/2), and resulting ratios. The testing module 2 with width B2 has next to it an expansion module 32 with width B32, giving rise to an overall width for the expanded testing module of Bp′, which is equal to the width Bv of two supply modules 4. An additional module, supplemental module 34, with width B34 is disposed next to the expansion module 32, wherewith the effective width of the basic testing module is increased from B2 to (B2+B32+B34)=Bp, which approximately equals the combined width of the three supply modules (4, 4, 4), namely Bp˜=Bv.

FIG. 13 illustrates an exemplary embodiment in which a number of supply modules (4, 5, 6, 4′) have length L4 and are disposed side by side in the length direction, reckoned from the other modules, with the overall length Lv of the group of supply modules approximately equaling the length L2 of the testing module 2, and approximately equaling the length L3 of the testing technology module. Thus Lv˜=L2=L3. Adjustments in the length Lv may be made by changing the length L4 of any or all of the supply modules (4, 5, 6, 4′), and/or changing the number of such supply modules.

The inventive ratios of the widths of the testing modules 2 and testing technology module 3, on the one hand, with respect to the widths of the supply modules (4, 5, 6, 4′) on the other hand, are functions of the individual widths (B4, B5, B6, B4′) of the supply modules. FIG. 13 illustrates the various such ratios. In this connection, a ruler scale 19 has been applied to the front sides (2.3, 3.3) of the modules 2 and 3, the gradation of which ruler scale is in units of 1/5 the width (B2 or B3) of a given said front side (2.3, 3.3). Accordingly, the width ratios illustrated are: B4/B2=2/1, B5/B2=8/5, B6/B2=7/5, and B4/B2=1/1. Optionally any desired width ratio can be determined from FIG. 13; and, in the event of different dimensions of, e.g. the available supply modules, one can readily determine the desired step size for the scale in order to accommodate various combinations of supply module, testing modules, and testing technology modules.

To take optimum advantage of free space in access, the access door 5.5 for the supply module 5 is in the transverse wall 5.4.

LIST OF REFERENCE NUMERALS

  • 1, 1′ Modular testing facility
  • 1″, 1′″ Testing facility.
  • 2 First testing module.
  • 2′, Second testing module.
  • 2″ Testing module.
  • 2.1, 2.1′, 2.2, 2.2′ Lateral wall.
  • 2.3, 2.3′ Front transverse wall.
  • 2.4, 2.4′ Rear transverse wall.
  • 2.5, 2.5′ Window opening or window element.
  • 2.6, 2.6′ Door opening or door element.
  • 2.7 Double floor.
  • 2.8 Free space.
  • 2.9 Floor (bottom wall).
  • 2.10 Roof (top wall).
  • 3 First testing technology module.
  • 3′ Second testing technology module.
  • 3″ Testing technology module
  • 3.1, 3.2, 3.2′ Lateral wall.
  • 3.3, 3.3″ Front transverse wall.
  • 3.4, Rear transverse wall.
  • 3.4′ Transverse wall.
  • 3.5 Window opening or window element.
  • 3.6, 3.6′, 3.6″ Door opening or door element.
  • 3.7 Double floor.
  • 3.8 Free space.
  • 3.9 Floor (bottom wall).
  • 3.10 Roof (top wall).
  • 4, 4′, 4″ First supply module.
  • 4.1, 4.2 Lateral wall.
  • 4.3 Transverse wall, e.g. front transverse wall.
  • 4.4 Transverse wall.
  • 4.5 Door element.
  • 4.9 Floor (bottom wall).
  • 4.10 Roof (top wall).
  • 5, Second supply module.
  • 5′ Supply module.
  • 5.1, 5.2 Lateral wall.
  • 5.3 Transverse wall, e.g. front transverse wall.
  • 5.4 Transverse wall.
  • 5.5 Door element.
  • 6, 6′ Second supply module.
  • 6.1, 6.2 Lateral wall.
  • 6.3 Transverse wall, e.g. front transverse wall.
  • 6.4 Transverse wall, e.g. rear transverse wall.
  • 6.5 Door element.
  • 6.9 Floor (bottom wall).
  • 7.2, 7.2′, Loading and unloading door (or double door or the like).
  • 7.3 Loading
  • 7.4, 7.5, 7.6 Door.
  • 8 Control room module (a structural module configured as a control room module); or a control room zone.
  • 8′ Control room zone.
  • 8″, 8′″ Control room module.
  • 8.1, 8.2 Lateral wall.
  • 8.3, 8.4 Transverse wall.
  • 8.5 Window opening or window element.
  • 8.6 Door opening or door element.
  • 8.8 Window element.
  • 8.9, 8.9″ Access door (e.g. for personnel).
  • 9 Maneuvering space.
  • 9.1 Floor.
  • 9.7 Double floor.
  • 10 Testing facility hall.
  • 10.1, 10.1′ Wall of the hall.
  • 10.2 Opening (e.g. window opening or window element).
  • 10.3, 10.3′ Door of the hall
  • 10.4, 10.4′, 10.4″, 10.4′″ Window element.
  • 10.5 Wall of the hall.
  • 10.5′ Wall of the hall (FIG. 4b).
  • 10.6 First storey floor of the hall.
  • 10.7 Second storey floor on the hall; or deck of the hall.
  • 10.8 Middle region of the hall.
  • 10.9, 10.9′ Door element.
  • 11 Supply network or element such as a bus element of the supply network; or more specifically element of the cooling water network; or element of the low voltage network.
  • 11.1 Supply mains.
  • 11.2 Return mains.
  • 11.3 Exhaust gas conduit or line.
  • 12, 12′ Voltage transformer.
  • 12.1, 12.2, 12.3, Consuming unit.
  • 12.4, 12.5; 12.1′,
  • 12.2′, 12.3′, 12.4′, 12.5
  • 13.1, 13.2, 13.3 Cooling unit.
  • 13.4, 13.4′, 13.5, Consuming unit.
  • 13.5′, 13.6, 13.7,
  • 13.8, 13.9
  • 14, 14′ Deck (or bridge structure).
  • 15.1, 15.2, 15.3, Interface.
  • 15.4, 15.5, 15.6
  • 16 Test item (being subjected to testing).
  • 16.1, 16.1′, 16.1″, 16.1′″ Power take-off.
  • 17 Exhaust gas system (or exhaust gas system element).
  • 17.1 Exhaust gas conduit.
  • 17.2 Exhaust gas flange connection.
  • 18, 18′ Accessway.
  • 19 Rule scale.
  • 23, 23′ Row of testing aggregates.
  • 24, 24′ Testing facility sector or testing facility area or entire testing facility area.
  • 25, 25′ Staircase.
  • 26 Roof.
  • 32 Expansion module.
  • 34 Supplemental module.
  • A, A1 Setback distance.
  • Bp, Bp′ Overall width.
  • Bv, Bv′ Overall width.
  • B2, B3, B4, Width.
  • B32, B34
  • H2, H3, H4 Height.
  • K Distance.
  • L2, L3, L4 Length.
  • Lv Overall length.
  • R Distance.
  • T Pass-through opening.
  • Z, Z′ Distance.