Title:
Weight whack
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A sheath (40) is formed with weighted portions (90) and attaching members (80) for attaching the sheath to the blade portion of a cricket bat. The weighted portions can be formed using receiving sections to accept weighted objects which are held in the receiving sections using weighted objects.



Inventors:
Merchant, Hamir (Keller, TX, US)
Application Number:
11/796693
Publication Date:
03/12/2009
Filing Date:
04/30/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
473/451
International Classes:
A63B69/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
GRAHAM, MARK S
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Hamir Merchant (Keller, TX, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A bat training apparatus, comprising: a sheath formed with an opening therein with a first surface and a second surface; one or more weighted portions attached to said second surface of said sheath; and attaching members formed on said weighted sheath in proximity to said opening.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said weighted portions comprise a receiving portion.

3. The apparatus of claim 2 further comprising a weighted object for placing in said receiving portion.

4. The apparatus of claim 3 further comprising an attaching portion for holding said weighted object in said receiving portion.

5. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said weighted portions are between approximately 2 ounces and 16 ounces.

6. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein said weighted object is approximately between 2 ounces and 16 ounces.

7. The apparatus of claim 6 wherein said attaching members are used to attach said bat in said sheath

8. A training apparatus, comprising: a sheath formed with a first surface and a second surface with an opening therein to receive a cricket bat; one or more weighted portions attached to said second surface of said sheath; and attaching members formed on said sheath for securing a blade of said cricket bat in said sheath.

9. The apparatus of claim 8 wherein said weighted portions comprise a receiving portion.

10. The apparatus of claim 9 further comprising a weighted object for placing in said receiving portion.

11. The apparatus of claim 10 further comprising an attaching portion for holding said weighted object in said receiving portion.

12. The apparatus of claim 8 wherein said weighted portions are between approximately 2 ounces and 16 ounces.

13. The apparatus of claim 11 wherein said weighted object is approximately between 2 ounces and 16 ounces.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to exercise equipment, and more specifically to an apparatus and method for strengthening and conditioning the muscles used to rapidly maneuver a cricket bat

BACKGROUND

In the sport of cricket a cricket bat is held by a batsman and used to strike a ball released by a bowler. Bowlers can release the ball at speeds in excess of ninety miles per hour and the batsman must be able to maneuver the bat in a rapid manner to strike a ball approaching at these high speeds. The cricket bat can weigh between two pounds and about three and a half pounds and maneuvering it in a rapid manner requires the use of certain muscles in the arms, shoulders and back. To successfully play the game of cricket it is therefore necessary to strengthen and condition the muscles necessary to rapidly maneuver the cricket bat. The currently available apparatus for strengthening and conditioning do not specifically target those muscles necessary for rapidly maneuvering the cricket bat. There is therefore a great need for apparatus that specifically targets the muscles used to rapidly maneuver the cricket bat. The instant invention addresses this need.

SUMMARY

The present invention provides a sheath for attaching to the blade portion of a cricket bat. The sheath is formed using a number of weighted portions along a surface of the sheath. If necessary multiple weighted portions can be formed on various and differing surfaces of the sheath. Any number of weighted portions can be formed on the sheath in varying weights and positions along the sheath. The weighted portions can comprise a receiving portion in which a weighted object is placed. The weighted objects can be between approximately 2 ounces and 16 ounces. In use, a cricket bat on which a weighted sheath is placed is swung to simulate the movement of the bat during actual use in a game. This movement will serve to condition and strengthen the muscles necessary for using the cricket bat.

BRIEF DESCRIPTIONS OF THE DRAWINGS

The foregoing features of the present invention may be more fully understood from the following detailed description, read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1(a) is an exemplary drawing of the front view of a cricket bat.

FIG. 1(b) is an exemplary drawing of the side view of a cricket bat.

FIG. 2(a) is a drawing showing the front of a weighted bat sheath according to an embodiment of the instant invention.

FIG. 2(b) is a drawing showing the back of a weighted bat sheath according to an embodiment of the instant invention.

FIG. 3 is a drawing of a portion of the back of the weighted bat sheath showing the attachment of a weight according to an embodiment of the instant invention.

FIG. 4 is a drawing showing the cricket bat enclosed in the weighted bat sheath according to an embodiment of the instant invention.

FIG. 5 is a drawing showing the cricket bat enclosed in the weighted bat sheath according to a further embodiment of the instant invention.

FIG. 6 is a drawing showing the cricket bat enclosed in the weighted bat sheath according to a further embodiment of the instant invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Shown in FIG. 1(a) and FIG. 1(b) are drawings illustrating a cricket bat 10. The cricket bat comprises a blade portion 30, usually made of a wood such as willow, and a handle portion 20. In using the cricket bat 10 the bat is held by the handle portion 20 and the blade portion 30 is used to strike a cricket ball (not shown for clarity). Shown in FIG. 1(a) is a front view of a cricket bat. As shown in FIG. 1(a) the blade portion comprises a front surface 33 and a rear surface 37 (not shown in the Figure) and it is the front surface 33 of the blade portion 30 that is used to strike the cricket ball. Shown in FIG. 1(b) is an illustration of a side view of the cricket shown in FIG. 1(a). The side view illustrates the relatively flat front surface 33 and the ridged rear surface 37. Current cricket bats weigh between about 2 pounds to about 4 pounds. The length and width of the cricket bat 10 is regulated by the existing rules governing the sport and could possibly change as the game evolves. The instant invention is not limited to the current form of the cricket bat but will be applicable to any future cricket bats allowed by the governing body of the sport.

Shown in FIG. 2(a) is a weighted sheath 40 according to an embodiment of the instant invention. The weighted sheath 40 is formed using any suitable material. Suitable materials for forming the weighted sheath include various plastics, carbon fiber material, canvas based materials, etc. The weighted sheath comprises an opening 70, a front surface 50, a rear surface 60 and portions 80 for attaching the weighted sheath 40 to the blade portion 30 of the cricket bat 10. Shown in FIG. 2(b) is the rear surface 60 of the weighted sheath 40. On the rear surface 60 are a plurality of weighted portions 90 attached to the rear surface of the weighted sheath 40. The instant invention is not to be limited to the five weighted portions 90 shown in FIG. 2(b). Any number of weighted portions 90 can be used within the scope of the instant invention. In a further embodiment of the instant invention three or less weighted portions 90 can be used. In a further embodiment of the instant invention 3 of more weighted portions 90 can be used. In yet a further embodiment of the instant invention six or more weighted portions 90 can be used. In an embodiment of the instant invention the weighted portions 90 can be any suitable weight. In a further embodiment of the instant invention the weighted portions 90 are between two ounces and sixteen ounces. In yet a further embodiment the weighted portions are between seventeen ounces and 32 ounces. The weighted portions 90 can all be of equal weight or of various weights. In a further embodiment the weighted portions 90 are of differing weights. The weighted portions 90 can be affixed to the rear surface of the weighted sheath 40 in any suitable manner. In an embodiment the weighted portion 90 is permanently attached to the rear surface 60 of the weighted sheath 40.

Shown in FIG. 3 is an embodiment for attaching the weighted portions 90 to the rear surface 60 of the weighted sheath 40. A receiving portion 110 is formed on the rear surface 60. The receiving portion 110 is designed to fit a weighted object 100 within it. In an embodiment a sealing portion 120 is provided to secure the weighted portion within the receiving portion 110. The sealing portion can be fastened using Velcro or another suitable attaching method. The receiving portion can be configured to receive weighted objects 100 of varying weights, shapes and sizes. In an embodiment the weighted object 100 is approximately rectangular shaped, approximately square shaped, approximately oval shaped, approximately circular shaper, or any other suitable shape.

Shown in FIG. 4 is a drawing showing the blade of the cricket bat 30 enclosed with the weighted sheath 40. In an embodiment the rear surface of the weighted sheath 60 is placed approximately above the rear surface 37 of the cricket bat and the front surface 50 of the weighted sheath 40 is placed approximately above the front surface 33 of the cricket bat. In a further embodiment the rear surface of the weighted sheath 60 is placed approximately above the front surface 33 of the cricket bat and the front surface 50 of the weighted sheath 40 is placed approximately above the rear surface 37 of the cricket bat. The weighted sheath 40 is secured to the cricket bat using the attaching portions 80.

Shown in FIG. 5 is a drawing showing the blade of the cricket bat 30 enclosed with the weighted sheath 40. In an embodiment the rear surface of the weighted sheath 60 is placed approximately above the rear surface 37 of the cricket bat and the front surface 50 of the weighted sheath 40 is placed approximately above the front surface 33 of the cricket bat. In a further embodiment the rear surface of the weighted sheath 60 is placed approximately above the front surface 33 of the cricket bat and the front surface 50 of the weighted sheath 40 is placed approximately above the rear surface 37 of the cricket bat. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 5 the upper region of the weighted sheath is drawn around the upper region of the blade 30 of the cricket bat using the attaching portions. The weighted sheath 40 is secured to the cricket bat using the attaching portions 80.

The method of attaching the weighted sheath 40 to the blade of the cricket bat 30 is not to be limited to the embodiments shown in FIGS. 4 and 5. Shown in FIG. 6 is a further embodiment of the invention. In this embodiment the rear surface of the weighted sheath 60 is placed approximately above the rear surface 37 of the cricket bat and the front surface 50 of the weighted sheath 40 is placed approximately above the front surface 33 of the cricket bat. In a further embodiment the rear surface of the weighted sheath 60 is placed approximately above the front surface 33 of the cricket bat and the front surface 50 of the weighted sheath 40 is placed approximately above the rear surface 37 of the cricket bat. As shown in FIG. 6 the additional members 130 using attaching mechanisms such as buckles, Velcro, or any other suitable mechanism can be used to secure the weighted sheath 40 to the blade 30 of the cricket bat.

In use, following the enclosing of the blade of the cricket bat 30 using the weighted sheath 40 as shown in FIGS. 4, 5 and 6, the cricket bat is swung in a repetitive manner to simulate the striking of a cricket ball. In swinging the cricket bat enclosed by the weighted sheath any combination of the number of weighed portions 90, weight of the weighted portions and position along the weighted sheath can be used to stimulate the targeted muscles used in swinging the cricket bat. This can be accomplished using varying amounts and sizes of the weighted objects 100 in any or all of the receiving portions 110 attached to the weighted sheath. In addition to simulating the striking of a cricket ball, the cricket bat enclosed with the weighted sheath can be used to actually strike a cricket ball in practice.

The preferred embodiments can be modified in various ways while retaining the features of a weighted sheath with varying numbers and placements of the weighted portions. For example, the number of the weighted portions can be varied from one to fifty depending on the preciseness of the weight distribution required. The weight of each weighted portion can also be varied. After repeated use the weighted portions can be varied to continue to strengthen the targeted muscles.