Title:
Food Rest
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A food rest includes a base and at least one support body extending upwardly from the base. The support body defines a recess configured to at least partially support a resting food item. In another configuration, a food rest includes first and second legs, each having first and second ends, and a substantially U-shaped food support joining the first ends of the legs. The legs are configured to stand on their second ends to at least partially support a resting food item on the food support extending therebetween. In yet another configuration, a food rest includes a base, at least one support extending upwardly from the base, and a food support extending laterally from the support. In another configuration, a food rest includes first and second legs extending upwardly from a base, and a food support joining the legs.



Inventors:
Gold, Adam (Boston, MA, US)
Application Number:
11/852733
Publication Date:
03/12/2009
Filing Date:
09/10/2007
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47F7/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
BARNETT, DEVIN K
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
FISH & RICHARDSON P.C. (BO) (MINNEAPOLIS, MN, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A food rest comprising: a base; and a support body extending upwardly from the base and defining a recess configured to exert a force tending to support a food item.

2. The food rest of claim 1, wherein the recess is U-shaped.

3. The food rest of claim 1, wherein the base comprises a tray.

4. The food rest of claim 1, wherein a planar top surface of the recess forms an angle with the base of between about 10° and about 80°.

5. The food rest of claim 1, wherein a top surface of the recess defines a peaked shape forming an apex along a plane defined by the support body.

6. The food rest of claim 1, wherein the recess defines an arcuate top surface.

7. A food rest comprising: first and second legs, each leg having first and second ends; and a U-shaped food support extending between the first ends of the first and second legs; wherein the first and second legs are configured to stand on their second ends to exert a force tending to support a resting food item on the food support extending therebetween.

8. The food rest of claim 7, wherein a substantially flat top surface of the food support forms an angle with the base of between about 10° and about 80°.

9. The food rest of claim 7, wherein a top surface of the food support defines a peaked shape forming an apex along a center plane defined by the food support.

10. The food rest of claim 7, wherein the food support defines an arcuate top surface.

11. A food rest comprising: a base; a support extending upwardly from the base; and an arm extending laterally from the support, the arm being configured to exert a force tending to support a resting food item.

12. The food rest of claim 11, wherein the arm defines an arc.

13. The food rest of claim 11, wherein the base comprises a tray.

14. The food rest of claim 11, wherein a substantially flat top surface of the arm forms an angle with the base, the angle being between about 10° and about 80°.

15. The food rest of claim 11, wherein a top surface of the arm defines a peaked shape forming a ridge along a center plane defined by the food support.

16. The food rest of claim 11, wherein the food support defines an arcuate top surface.

17. A food rest comprising: a base; first and second legs extending upwardly from the base; and a food support extending between the first and second legs, the food support being configured to exert a force tending to support a resting food item.

18. The food rest of claim 17, wherein the food support is substantially U-shaped.

19. The food rest of claim 17, wherein the food support is pivotally attached to the first and second legs, the food support rotating to accommodate support of a resting food item at different angles.

20. The food rest of claim 17, wherein the food support comprises a compliant material.

21. The food rest of claim 17, wherein the base comprises a tray.

22. The food rest of claim 17, wherein a substantially flat top surface of the food support forms an angle with the base, the angle being between about 10° and about 80°.

23. The food rest of claim 17, wherein a top surface of the food support defines a peaked shape forming an apex along a center plane defined by the food support.

24. The food rest of claim 17, wherein the food support defines an arcuate top surface.

Description:

TECHNICAL FIELD

This disclosure relates to food rests.

BACKGROUND

A number of food items are elongated and generally eaten from either longitudinal end. Examples of such food items include burritos, hotdogs, and wraps. These food items are generally served on a plate or tray and/or wrapped in paper or foil.

SUMMARY

In one aspect, a food rest includes a base and at least one support body extending upwardly from the base. The support body defines a recess configured to exert a force tending to support a food item.

Implementations of this aspect of the disclosure may include one or more of the following features. In some implementations, the recess is substantially U-shaped, and the base may be a tray or basket. In some instances, a substantially flat or planar top surface of the recess forms an angle with the base of between about 10° and about 80°. In other instances, a top surface of the recess defines a peaked shape forming a ridge or an apex along a plane (e.g. center plane) defined by the support body. The recess may also define an arcuate top surface.

In another aspect, a food rest includes first and second legs, each having first and second ends, and a substantially U-shaped food support extending between the first ends of the first and second legs. The first and second legs are configured to stand on their second ends to exert a force tending to support a food item resting on the food support extending therebetween.

In yet another aspect, a food rest includes a base, at least one support extending upwardly from the base, and an arm (also referred to as a food support) extending laterally from the support. The arm is configured to exert a force tending to support a resting food item. In some implementations, the arm defines an arc.

In another aspect, a food rest includes first and second legs extending upwardly from a base. A food support extends between the first and second legs and is configured to at least partially support a resting food item. In some implementations, each leg has first and second ends, with the second ends of the first and second legs joined to the base and the first ends of the first and second legs joined to the food support. In some implementations, the food support is pivotally attached to the first and second legs, allowing the food support to rotate to accommodate support of a resting food item at different angles.

Implementations of the disclosure may include one or more of the following features. In some implementations, the food support is substantially U-shaped and may be made of a compliant material. The base may be a tray or basket. In some instances, a substantially flat or planar top surface of the food support forms an angle with the base of between about 10° and about 80°. In other instances, a top surface of the food support defines a peaked shape forming a ridge of an apex along a plane (e.g. center plane) defined by the food support. The food support may also define an arcuate top surface.

The details of one or more implementations of the disclosure are set fourth in the accompanying drawings and the description below. Other features, objects, and advantages will be apparent from the description and drawings, and from the claims.

DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a food rest.

FIG. 2A is a top view of the food rest shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 2B is a bottom view of the food rest shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a food rest supporting a food item.

FIG. 4 is a sectional view of a food rest defining a slanted recess.

FIG. 5 is a sectional view of a food rest defining a peaked recess.

FIG. 6 is a sectional view of a food rest defining an arched recess.

FIG. 7-8 are side views of food rests having substantially “Y” configurations.

FIG. 9 is a side view of a food rest having substantially an “H” configuration.

FIG. 10 is a side view of a food rest having substantially an “M” configuration.

FIGS. 11-12 are perspective views food rests.

FIG. 13 is a sectional view of a food rest with a food support defining a slanted top surface.

FIG. 14 is a sectional view of a food rest with a food support defining a peaked top surface.

FIG. 15 is a sectional view of a food rest with a food support defining an arched top surface.

FIG. 16 is a perspective view of a food rest having a probable food support.

FIG. 17 is a perspective view of a food rest supporting a food item.

Like reference symbols in the various drawings indicate like elements.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

While eating an elongated food item, such as a burrito, hotdog, or wrap, a consumer may need to set the food item down. However, upon setting the food item down, contents or parts of the food item may tend to spill out, thus causing a mess or the inconvenience of having to eat carefully enough to avoid a mess. However, generally, the food item will stay intact when propped at an angle or slight incline.

Referring to FIGS. 1-3, a food rest 100 includes a base 110 and at least one support body 120 extending upwardly from the base 110. The support body 120 defines a substantially U-shaped recess 122 configured to exert a force tending to support a resting food item 10 (e.g. a burrito, wrap, or hotdog). The verb support means to bear or hold up (a load, mass, structure, part, etc.). In some examples, the support body 120 is substantially hollow, defining an inner cavity 123 as shown in FIG. 2B, for ease of manufacturability, while in others, the support body 120 is a solid piece of material. In one example, the food rest 100 is inflatable for portability and compact storage.

The base 110 is configured to prevent tipping of the food rest 100 by the food item 10, which rests on or against the food rest 100. In one example, the base 110 is substantially flat or planar. However, in other examples, the base 110 may define any shape suitable for stability (e.g. tripod). In some examples, the base 110 is configured to carry out functions other than stabilizing the food rest 100. For example, the base 110 can be configured as a tray or basket, as shown in FIG. 3. In some implementations, the base 110 is integrally formed with the support body 120, whereas in others, the base 110 is a separate piece attached to the support body 120, for example with a fastener (e.g. screw or hook and loop) or an adhesive.

The food rest 100 may be fabricated from plastic (e.g. injection or blow molded plastic), a recyclable material, such as cardboard, or any other suitable material. The food rest 100 advantageously allows a user to rest a food item 10 against the food rest 100, thereby generally avoiding partial disassembly or spillage of the food item 10 that might occur if it were to simply rest on a plate.

The examples illustrated in FIGS. 4-6 provide cross sections of the food rest 100 and, in particular, different profiles of the recess 122 defined by the support body 120 as shown in FIG. 1. In some instances, the recess 122 has a substantially flat slanted top surface 124 forming an angle, θ, with the base 110, as shown in FIG. 4. The angle θ may be between about 10° and about 80°. The recess 122 may have a substantially peaked top surface 124, as shown in FIG. 5, forming an apex 125 along a center plane 15 defined by the support body 120. In other instances, the recess 122 has a substantially arcuate or arched top surface 124, as shown in FIG. 6. Each of the aforementioned recess profiles aid support of the resting food item 10. The examples of FIG. 5-6 are amenable to receiving food items resting on either side of the support body 120.

In some implementations, the support body 120 defines a substantially “Y” shape with the recess 120 to support the resting food item 10, as shown in FIGS. 7-8. Other suitable profiles may be used as well, such as an “H” or “M” profile, as shown in FIGS. 9 and 10, respectively. In each configuration, the support body 120 at least partially supports part of the food item 10 in the defined recess 122.

In the example illustrated in FIG. 11, the food rest 100 includes first and second legs 112, 114, each having first and second ends 113, 115. A substantially U-shaped food support 130 joins the first ends 113 of the first and second legs 112, 114. The first and second legs 112, 114, are configured to stand on their second ends 115 to at least partially support a resting food item 10 on the food support 130 extending between the first and second legs 112, 114.

Referring to FIG. 12, the food rest 100 includes a base 110 and at least one support 140 extending upwardly from the base 110. A food support 130 extending laterally from the support 140 is configured to at least partially support a resting food item 10. As shown, the food support 130 may be substantially U-shaped or define an arcuate shape.

The examples illustrated in FIGS. 13-15 provide cross sections of the food rest 100 and, in particular, different profiles of the food support 130, as shown in FIGS. 11-12. A top surface 134 of the food support 130 may be substantially flat and slanted to form an angle, β, with the base 110 of between about 10° and about 80°. The top surface 134 of the food support 130 may be substantially peaked forming an apex 135 along the center plane 17 defined by the food support 130. In some instances, the top surface 134 of the food support 130 is substantially arcuate or arched.

Referring to FIGS. 16-17, the food rest 100 includes first and second legs 112, 114, each having first and second ends 113, 115. A base 110 joins the second ends 115 of the first and second legs 112, 114, as the first and second legs 112, 114, extend upwardly from the base 110. A food support 130, which may be substantially U-shaped, joins the first and second legs 112, 114, preferably at first ends 113. The food support 130 is configured to at least partially support a resting food item 10. In some implementations, the food support 130 is pivotally attached to the first and second legs 112, 114, preferably at first ends 113. The food support 130 rotates to support a resting food item 10 at various angles, as shown in FIG. 17, which also depicts the base 110 configured as a tray. In some examples, the food support 130 is a sling made of a compliant material, such as a fabric or rope.

A number of implementations have been described. Nevertheless, it will be understood that various modifications may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the disclosure. Accordingly, other implementations are within the scope of the following claims.