Title:
Water-channeling system for rainwear
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The invention is a lengthwise Basin flanked by two Walls which hold water as it is carried down the length of the Water Channeling System, and its attachment to the outer surface of a garment.

This effectively forms a barrier to the downward flow of water on the garment. The water is stopped and redirected toward the sides of the garment and away from the front and back of it. This keeps the wearer drier, reducing the amount of water rolling off the bottom of the raincoat onto the wearer's pants.

This invention can be manufactured by extrusion, injection molding or any number of plastic fabrication methods. This invention may have many embodiments, varying in form. The essential and consistent characteristics of any of its embodiments are the recessed basin, the accompanying walls, their relative placement to each other and its placement along the outer surface of a garment.




Inventors:
El, Michael Herd (Cambridge, MA, US)
Application Number:
11/900013
Publication Date:
03/12/2009
Filing Date:
09/10/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
2/85, 2/87
International Classes:
A41D3/08; A41D3/02; A41D3/04
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20090031484Protective face guard with transparent shieldFebruary, 2009Broersma et al.
20030066122Disposable front opening brief with pre-selected pad shape and locationApril, 2003Niedermeyer
20090000010High tactility glove systemJanuary, 2009Sunder et al.
20100088797CAMOUFLAGE PATTERN APPLIED TO A SURFACEApril, 2010Simione et al.
20040216215Protective glove, as for firefighter, with wristlet having water-repellant finishNovember, 2004Grilliot et al.
20040098787Small gun glove holsterMay, 2004Cole
20080141432CLOTHING FOR NON-AMBULATORY AND WHEELCHAIR BOUND PEOPLEJune, 2008Simon
20060174409Blanket for use during bodyworking or massageAugust, 2006Hermanson
20040068778Garment with configurable designsApril, 2004Van Veghel et al.
20060010556Swimwear as information deviceJanuary, 2006Dickey et al.
20060150299Oil resistant work gloveJuly, 2006Geng



Primary Examiner:
HOEY, ALISSA L
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
MICHAEL HERD EL (CAMBRIDGE, MA, US)
Claims:
1. Generally, the outer surface of a raincoat is smooth enough that water rapidly rolls downward and onto the front of the wearer's pants. This invention, a Water Channeling System for Rainwear, when applied to a raincoat, directs the flow of rainwater on the garment in a manner similar to that in which a bowling alley “gutter” directs a bowling ball that rolls into it. A more accurate analogy would be the way a barricade along a roadway prevents cars from driving over the edge. As water rolls down the surface of the garment it is stopped by a Wall and caught in a Basin which carries it toward the sides of the garment. As the water accumulates at the lowest part of the Basin it is thrown outwards by the force of gravity and the motion of the wearer. A series of such channels on a raincoat reduces the amount of water that rolls onto the wearers pants. The overhang of the garment allows the water to fall from the sides of the garment without wetting the pants. When applied around the wrist or lower sleeve of the garment the invention reduces the amount of rainwater that rolls down the sleeves onto the wearer's hands or into the wearer's pockets when his hands are in them. This invention may have many embodiments, varying in form. The essential and consistent characteristics of any of its embodiments are the recessed basin, the accompanying walls, their relative placement to each other and its placement along the outer surface of a garment.

Description:

BACKGROUND

Raincoats are used to keep one dry in rainy weather. They generally are made of a waterproof or water-resistant material such as rubber, latex or vinyl. Most raincoats extend in length just past the waistline while some extend as far down as the ankle or boot. A defining aspect of a raincoat, aside from its water-repellant material, is its hood which protects the head of the wearer from rain. Raincoats are effective at protecting the body from rain-water however there is room for improvement in raincoat construction.

BRIEF SUMMARY

This invention is a flexible, elongated Basin, or “gutter,” formed by two walls which “catch” rainwater rolling along the outer surface of a garment, and its application to a garment, especially a raincoat. It can be sewn, glued or otherwise bonded to the outer surface of the garment. The application of this invention enhances the performance of a raincoat by reducing the amount of rainwater that rolls down off of the garment and onto the pants of the wearer.

DESCRIPTION

In section view this invention has the shape of a fishing hook or a letter “J” (FIG. 1). It can be manufactured by extruding silicon, rubber, plastic or any other suitable material and can also be manufactured by injection molding. It should be made of a flexible material so that it can bend with the garment.

The height (“h” in FIG. 1) of the invention can vary anywhere from ½ inch to 2 or more inches. The depth (“d” in FIG. 1) of the invention can vary anywhere from ¼″ or less to 1 or more inches. The size of the opening (“d2” in FIG. 1) can be as small as ¼″ or as large as 2″ or more. The scale and relative proportions of these dimensions can vary widely. The essential characteristics of this invention are the Basin (“a” in FIG. 1), the Retaining Wall (“b” in FIG. 1), the Back Wall (“c” in FIG. 1) their relationship to one another and its application to a garment (“l” in FIG. 6). The length (running at approximately a 90 degree angle to the height angle, “m” in FIG. 6) of the invention, when applied to a garment, varies depending on the size of the garment it is applied to. The invention is intended to extend across the front, back and or sides of a garment, including the sleeves (FIGS. 3-5). The dotted lines in FIGS. 3-5, respectively showing the front back and side view of a garment, indicate the suggested placement along the surface of the garment.

The invention can be attached to a garment with stitching (FIG. 2), glue or thermal bonding. FIG. 2 and FIG. 6 show a section and perspective view of an application to a garment with stitching. With stitching it is recommended that a flap (“d” in FIG. 2, “k” in FIG. 6) hang over the top of the Back Wall of the invention to prevent water from seeping behind the Back Wall or through the stitching and guide in into the basin. The invention should be placed at an angle sufficient to allow water to roll downward and not stagnate (FIGS. 3-5). When the water inside the Basin reaches the height of the Retaining Wall the force of gravity and the motion of the person wearing the garment should cause it to be thrown outward and more or less away from the wearer.

This invention may have many embodiments, varying in form. The essential and consistent characteristics of any of its embodiments are the recessed basin, the accompanying walls, their relative placement to each other and its placement along the outer surface of a garment.