Title:
Portico assembly kit and method of manufacture
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A portico assembly kit to install a portico construction around an existing entranceway to a home or building. The kit is installed quickly and efficiently by consumers with little or no construction experience and is manufactured in various aesthetic designs with quality architectural features.



Inventors:
Olt, Catherine D. (Chatham, NJ, US)
Application Number:
11/894439
Publication Date:
02/26/2009
Filing Date:
08/21/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/745.16
International Classes:
E04G23/06; E04B1/38
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
CANFIELD, ROBERT
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Bakos & Kritzer (Summit, NJ, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A portico assembly kit comprising: a structure assembly including framing components; a plurality of connections including the materials required to fasten said structure to portions of said portico assembly kit; an enclosure assembly for providing shelter; a plurality of finishing components for providing detail and decorative portions of said portico assembly kit required to present an aesthetically pleasing portico as well as a code-acceptable assembly; and a plurality of accessories for providing final aesthetic characteristics.

2. A portico assembly kit according to claim 1 wherein said structure assembly includes framing members are selected from the group including beams, joists, ties, blocking, cutout tie, columns and sheathing.

3. A portico assembly kit according to claim 1 wherein said plurality of connections are selected from the group consisting of brackets, straps, bolts, screws, nails, clips, snaps, biscuits, adhesive, cut joints, grooves, plates, fasteners, and connectors.

4. A portico assembly kit according to claim 1 wherein said enclosure is selected from the group consisting of roof assembly, flashing, drip edge, finished cut face, finished arch, fascia, and soffit.

5. A portico assembly kit according to claim 1 wherein said plurality of finishing components for providing detail and decorative portions of said portico assembly kit required to present an aesthetically pleasing portico as well as a code-acceptable assembly are selected from the group consisting of rake, eave, crown, curved foldover, capitol, and base.

6. A portico assembly kit according to claim 1 wherein said a plurality of accessories for providing final aesthetic characteristics are selected from the group consisting of embellishments, pilasters, lighting, railing, runoff, drainage control, gutters, mailboxes, and modifications.

7. A portico assembly kit comprising: a structure assembly including framing components; a plurality of connections including the materials required to fasten said structure to portions of said portico assembly kit; an enclosure assembly for providing shelter; a plurality of finishing components for providing detail and decorative portions of said portico assembly kit required to present an aesthetically pleasing portico as well as a code-acceptable assembly; and a plurality of accessories for providing final aesthetic characteristics. Wherein said portico assembly kit is manufactured in a colonial application, modern application, craftsman application, or Victorian application.

8. A portico assembly kit according to claim 7 wherein said structure assembly includes framing members are selected from the group including beams, joists, ties, blocking, cutout tie, columns and sheathing.

9. A portico assembly kit according to claim 7 wherein said plurality of connections are selected from the group consisting of brackets, straps, bolts, screws, nails, clips, snaps, biscuits, adhesive, cut joints, grooves, plates, fasteners, and connectors.

10. A portico assembly kit according to claim 7 wherein said enclosure is selected from the group consisting of roof assembly, flashing, drip edge, finished cut face, finished arch, fascia, and soffit.

11. A portico assembly kit according to claim 7 wherein said plurality of finishing components for providing detail and decorative portions of said portico assembly kit required to present an aesthetically pleasing portico as well as a code-acceptable assembly are selected from the group consisting of rake, eave, crown, curved foldover, capitol, and base.

12. A portico assembly kit according to claim 7 wherein said a plurality of accessories for providing final aesthetic characteristics are selected from the group consisting of embellishments, pilasters, lighting, railing, runoff, drainage control, gutters, mailboxes, and modifications.

13. A method of assembly of a pre-manufactures modular building kit comprising the steps of assembly including: a structural assembly stage for assembling framing components; a connections assembly stage for adhering a plurality of connections including the materials required to fasten said structure to portions of said modular building kit; a enclosure assembly stage for assembling an enclosure for providing shelter; a finishing assembly stage for affixing a plurality of finishing components for providing detail and decorative portions; and an accessory assembly stage for affixing a plurality of accessories for providing final aesthetic characteristics.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to the field of building assemblies and, more particularly, to ready-to-assemble building assemblies and kits for efficiently erecting and installing aesthetic custom building extensions such as porticos, window dormers, chimney structures, roofing systems, and the like.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Portico structures have traditionally been utilized to provide shelter and cover at entranceways of buildings and homes for centuries. A portico is generally comprised of a roofed space, porch, or walkway that is typically open on at least one side and usually positioned at an entranceway to a building or home. These entranceways are often bounded or supported by at least one row of columns, brackets or pillars. Porticos add an aesthetic as well as functional element to buildings or structures. Some well-known examples of classical porticos include the East Portico of the United States Capital building and the Pantheon in Rome. In addition to supplementing a building's facade with an often bold, yet elegant, architectural element, the addition of a portico may drastically augment the building's market value. Portico extensions also function to aid in the protection from inclement or oppressive weather, including wind, rain, and snow, as well as to provide a cool, shaded area for leisurely access to a building. In this regard, porticos may serve a similar purpose as canopies, overhangs, awnings, and porches.

Various products and systems for enhancing building structures are well known in the art. For example, U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,945,624 and 4,796,393, entitled “Method of Forming and Assembling Decorative Awning and Building Facia” to Toti (hereinafter “Toti”) disclose a metal awning assembly comprising separate panel sections with edges that snap together for quick assembly. A sheet of thin gauge metal is disposed between each individual panel section. Male and female rib sections hook together to hold the panel sections together.

Although Toti's awning is quick and easy to assembly, it does not provide a durable, permanent addition to a building or home. In addition, the thin gauge metal and overhang design of Toti's assembly provide inadequate protection from inclement weather. Moreover, the awning structure design disclosed by Toti does not provide an aesthetically pleasing addition to an existing home or building that would increase the structure's value. The awning structure also does not come in kit form for ease of installation on-site.

As another example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,299,395, entitled “Canopy Structure and Method of Assembly” to Smith et al. (hereinafter “Smith”) discloses a canopy overhang for a door or window. The canopy includes a frame assembly, a roof-trim assembly, and a pair of channels vertically mounted between the girts on the inside of a building wall. The roof-trim assembly is mounted within the frame assembly and includes a canopy panel with an eave trim on each side.

Similar to the awnings disclosed by Toti, the canopy structure disclosed by Smith is not a durable, permanent addition to a building. The canopy also only provides minimal protection from inclement weather and does not come in a partially assembled kit for simple installation by consumers with little construction experience.

Many techniques have also been utilized to reduce building costs associated with erecting home additions, refurbishments, or replacements. Traditionally, conventional building construction involves a labor intensive process including skilled workers and laborers. In addition, a significant amount of time and effort is typically expended by these skilled artisans to build, erect, and install home improvements and structural additions. This labor and time-intensive process may make many home improvement projects complex, not worthwhile, or impractical. As a result, systems and methods exist for simplifying the building process by delivering prefabricating building structures in kit form.

For example, U.S. Patent Application Publication 2004/0187414, entitled “Prefabricated Building System” to Brochu (hereinafter “Brochu”) discloses a prefabricated metal building structure with a concrete base. A plurality of studs extends up from the concrete base to form wall sections. Rafters are disposed between opposed wall sections and support a sheet metal roof covering. Brochu also discloses a building system kit including many of the building components in partially-assembled form. The building system kit may be easily delivered to the construction location and assembled on-site.

Although Brochu discloses a system for simplifying the building process, Brochu's building structure is a basic four wall shed-type structure. This structure does not provide an aesthetically pleasing or architectural design. In addition, although Brochu's prefabricated building is rigid enough to resist natural elements, such as high wind, it does not contemplate a portico-type addition to be installed around an existing entranceway to a building or home.

As another example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,447,000, entitled “Prefabricated Building Kit” to Larsen (hereinafter referred to as “Larsen”) discloses a containerized prefabricated building kit allowing the container to be transported as a standard shipping container. A shelter building is erected from the building kit comprising plywood and wooden beams for the roofing support, wall panels, and floor. Elongated beams form the frame edges of the building structure, which may exhibit a floor area many times larger than the floor area of the kit.

Although the Larsen building kit permits the construction of a simple structure through the use of a building kit, like the Brochu system, the Larsen kit does not provide a portico extension design utilizing quality architectural features and components. In addition, Larsen's building kit allows a simple building shelter composed of plywood and beams, however, Larsen does not contemplate an aesthetic home addition that can augment a building's value.

Thus, a clear need exists for a high-quality, inexpensive, and aesthetic portico extension assembly that is simple to construct and easy to install by individuals with little or no construction experience. The need also exists for a kit or set of component parts for quickly and efficiently erecting a portico extension with quality architectural features on-site. This portico extension may add aesthetic value as well as market value to a home or building.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The preferred embodiment of the present invention is directed to a system and method for quickly and easily assembling an aesthetically pleasing portico extension around a door or entranceway to a building. While the preferred embodiment is directed to an improved portico kit system, it will be readily apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art that such specific teachings and instrumentalities apply to various other building structures or extensions thereof including such structures as window assemblies, window dormer systems, decking structures, and like building appendages. The system and method disclosed herein is developed to effectively reduce building costs associated with erecting home and business structures, home and business additions, home and business refurbishments, or home and business replacements, or other similar modifications to various building structures. Typically, such construction, modifications, etc. of building structures involve labor intensive processes utilizing such expensive resources as skilled artisans, workers, and laborers. These skilled personnel expend a significant amount of time and effort to build and install the aforementioned improvements and structural additions resulting in disruptions to homeowners and business owners as well as added expense to a construction project.

Thus, the system of the present invention reduces the effort and time required to build and install certain structures by providing a series of prefabricated component parts for the assembly of various structures. In particular, disclosed is a portico assembly kit capable of being attached to the façade of an adjoining structure, positioned within close proximity thereto, or constructed as a free standing structure such as that of a garden-type arch or gable. The kit-form structure is attached to the adjoining structure with common attachment mechanisms commonly used in the art such as nails, screws, plugs, dowels, straps, bolts, fasteners, adhesives, etc. constructed of various metals, plastics, wood, ceramic, etc. The portico system comprises an upper housing consisting of two planar surfaces affixed at an apex for providing above-head protection. The system includes framing members such as beams, joists, ties, blocking, cutout tie, columns, sheathing or any other structural member now known or contemplated within the art for supporting the planar member of the upper housing. This upper housing is supported by a plurality of columns of various shapes and sizes depending on the dimensions of the structure, materials utilized in the structure, and the aesthetic aspects of the assembled system. Thus, the method for manufacturing the kit allows for the construction of the assembly in a variety of prefabricated architectural designs with various aesthetic elements. Typically, the columns abut the upper housing at a particular point based on the desired support required to sufficiently construct the system and terminate at an opposite end at a foundation. The foundation may be constructed of various materials such as concrete, stone, wood, compacted soil or other surface commonly found outside a doorway.

Thus, in accordance with the foregoing objects, there is provided a portico kit comprising a pre-cut frame, columns, trim, and finish materials to be assembled and mounted around an entranceway to a building structure. The portico extension components are packaged in a deliverable package, or kit. The kit also includes easy-to-follow instructions bundled within the portico components for quick and simple construction and installation of the portico extension.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

A further understanding of the present invention can be obtained by reference to a preferred embodiment as well as various alternate embodiments as set forth in the illustrations of the accompanying drawings. Although the illustrated embodiments are merely exemplary of systems for carrying out the present invention, both the organization and method of operation of the invention, in general, together with further objectives and advantages thereof, may be more easily understood by reference to the drawings and the following description. The drawings are not intended to limit the scope of this invention, which is set forth with particularity in the claims as appended or as subsequently amended, but merely to clarify and exemplify the specific methods and instrumentalities disclosed.

For a more complete understanding of the present invention, reference is now made to the following drawings in which:

FIG. 1 depicts the general method of assembly of final assembly 1A including the various steps of Structure 1B, Connections 1C, Enclosure 1D, Finish 1E, and Accessories 1F—“SCEFA” in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2A depicts a front perspective view of the final assembly of a high arch portico kit with a single column on each side of the structure in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2B depicts a front perspective view of the STRUCTURE stage of assembly of a high arch portico kit with a single column on each side of the structure in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2C depicts a front perspective view of the CONNECTIONS stage of assembly of a high arch portico kit with a single column on each side of the structure in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2D depicts a front perspective view of the ENCLOSURE stage of assembly of a high arch portico kit with a single column on each side of the structure in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2E depicts a front perspective view of the FINISH and trim stage of assembly of a high arch portico kit with a single column on each side of the structure in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2F depicts a front perspective view of the ACCESSORIES stage of assembly of a high arch portico kit with a single column on each side of the structure in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 3 depicts a front perspective view of a high portico assembly kit in accordance with a first alternate embodiment of the preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 4 depicts a front perspective view of a high arch paired column portico attached to or abutting façade of building in accordance with a second alternate embodiment of the preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 5 depicts a front perspective view of a low arch small portico kit with semi-ovular assembly attached to façade of building in accordance with a third alternate embodiment of the preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 6 depicts a front perspective view of a low arch single column portico kit with semi-ovular assembly attached to façade of building in accordance with a fourth alternate embodiment of the preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 7 depicts a front perspective view of a low arch paired column portico kit with semi-ovular assembly attached to façade of building in accordance with a fifth alternate embodiment of the preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 8A depicts an elevated perspective view of an assembled rectangular pediment wall-type portico kit with single supporting front columns and decorative rear columns on each side of the structure in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 8B depicts an elevated perspective view of the STRUCTURE stage of an assembled rectangular pediment wall-type portico kit with single supporting front columns and decorative rear columns on each side of the structure in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 8C depicts an elevated perspective view of the CONNECTIONS stage of an assembled rectangular pediment wall-type portico kit with single supporting front columns and decorative rear columns on each side of the structure in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 8D depicts an elevated perspective view of the ENCLOSURE stage of an assembled rectangular pediment wall-type portico kit with single supporting front columns and decorative rear columns on each side of the structure in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 8E depicts an elevated perspective view of the FINISH and trim stage of an assembled rectangular pediment wall-type portico kit with single supporting front columns and decorative rear columns on each side of the structure in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 8F depicts an elevated perspective view of the ACCESSORIES stage of an assembled rectangular pediment wall-type portico kit with single supporting front columns and decorative rear columns on each side of the structure in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 9 depicts a front perspective view of wall type small rectangular pediment portico with decorative railing in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 10 depicts a front perspective view of a large wall type pediment portico with paired columns positioned symmetrically around entryway with rectangular structure in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 11 depicts a front perspective view of small wall type shed roof portico in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 12 depicts a front perspective view of wall type shed roof portico kit with single columns in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 13 depicts a front perspective view of wall type shed roof double column portico kit in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 14A depicts an worms eye view of a full assembly wall type gable portico modular kit with single supporting front columns and decorative rear columns on each side of the structure in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 14B depicts a worms eye view of the STRUCTURE stage of an assembled wall type gable portico modular kit with single supporting front columns and decorative rear columns on each side of the structure in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 14C depicts a worms eye view of the CONNECTIONS stage of an assembled wall type gable portico modular kit with single supporting front columns and decorative rear columns on each side of the structure in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 14D depicts a worms eye view of the ENCLOSURE stage of an assembled wall type gable portico modular kit with single supporting front columns and decorative rear columns on each side of the structure in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 14E depicts a worms eye view of the FINISH and trim stage of an assembled wall type gable portico modular kit with single supporting front columns and decorative rear columns on each side of the structure in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 14F depicts a worms eye view of the ACCESSORIES stage of an assembled wall type gable portico modular kit with single supporting front columns and decorative rear columns on each side of the structure in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 15 depicts a front perspective view of a small wall type gable portico kit constructed in STRUCTURE, CONNECTIONS, ENCLOSURE, FINISH, and ACCESSORIES stages in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 16 depicts a front perspective view of a wall type gable portico kit with paired columns constructed in STRUCTURE, CONNECTIONS, ENCLOSURE, FINISH, and ACCESSORIES stages in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 17 depicts a front perspective view of a wall type hip roof portico modular kit with single columns constructed in STRUCTURE, CONNECTIONS, ENCLOSURE, FINISH, and ACCESSORIES stages in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 18 depicts a front perspective view of a small wall type hip roof portico kit constructed in STRUCTURE, CONNECTIONS, ENCLOSURE, FINISH, and ACCESSORIES stages in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 19 depicts a front perspective view of a wall type hip roof portico kit with paired columns constructed in STRUCTURE, CONNECTIONS, ENCLOSURE, FINISH, and ACCESSORIES stages in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 20 depicts a front perspective view of a small wall type vault portico kit constructed in STRUCTURE, CONNECTIONS, ENCLOSURE, FINISH, and ACCESSORIES stages in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 21A depicts a side perspective view of a full assembly wall type box bay gable window modular kit in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 21B depicts a side perspective view of the STRUCTURE stage of an assembled wall type box bay gable window modular kit in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 21C depicts a side perspective view of the CONNECTIONS stage of an assembled wall type box bay gable window modular kit in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 21D depicts a side perspective view of the ENCLOSURE stage of an assembled wall type box bay gable window modular kit in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 21E depicts a side perspective view of the FINISH and trim stage of an assembled wall type box bay gable window modular kit in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 21F depicts a side perspective view of the ACCESSORIES stage of an assembled wall type box bay gable window modular kit in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 22 depicts a front perspective view of a wall type box bay vault window unit modular kit in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 23 depicts a front perspective view of a wall type box bay pediment double window unit modular kit in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 24 depicts a front perspective view of a wall type box bay shed roof double window unit modular kit in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 25 depicts a front perspective view of a wall type box bay hip roof triple French-style door unit with triple transom windows modular kit in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 26 depicts a front perspective view of a wall type roof chimney modular kit composed of a stone veneer in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 27A depicts a birds eye view of a full assembly chimney modular kit in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 27B depicts a birds eye view of the STRUCTURE stage of an assembled chimney modular kit in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 27C depicts a birds eye view of the CONNECTIONS stage of an assembled chimney modular kit in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 27D depicts a birds eye view of the ENCLOSURE stage of an assembled chimney modular kit in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 27E depicts a birds eye view of the FINISH and trim stage of an assembled chimney modular kit in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 27F depicts a birds eye view of the ACCESSORIES stage of an assembled chimney modular kit in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 28 depicts a front perspective view of a roof type cupola kit constructed in STRUCTURE, CONNECTIONS, ENCLOSURE, FINISH, and ACCESSORIES stages in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 29 depicts a front perspective view of a roof type gable roof oblong widow walk constructed in STRUCTURE, CONNECTIONS, ENCLOSURE, FINISH, and ACCESSORIES stages in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 30 depicts a front perspective view of a roof type angled widow walk modular kit constructed in STRUCTURE, CONNECTIONS, ENCLOSURE, FINISH, and ACCESSORIES stages in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 31 depicts a front perspective view of a roof type arch/eyebrow dormer single window modular kit constructed in STRUCTURE, CONNECTIONS, ENCLOSURE, FINISH, and ACCESSORIES stages in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 32 depicts a front perspective view of a roof type pediment dormer single window unit modular kit constructed in STRUCTURE, CONNECTIONS, ENCLOSURE, FINISH, and ACCESSORIES stages in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 33 depicts a front perspective view of a hip roof type dormer double window modular kit constructed in STRUCTURE, CONNECTIONS, ENCLOSURE, FINISH, and ACCESSORIES stages in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 34A depicts a birds eye view of a full assembly of roof assembly dormer kit in finished form attached to roof of a particular building in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 34B depicts a birds eye view of the STRUCTURE stage of a full assembly of a roof assembly dormer kit attached to roof of a particular building in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 34C depicts a birds eye view of the CONNECTIONS stage of a full assembly of a roof assembly dormer kit attached to roof of a particular building in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 34D depicts a birds eye view of the ENCLOSURE stage of a full assembly of a roof assembly dormer kit attached to roof of a particular building in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 34E depicts a birds eye view of the FINISH and trim stage of a full assembly of a roof assembly dormer kit attached to roof of a particular building in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention; and

FIG. 34F depicts a birds eye view of the ACCESSORIES stage of a full assembly of a roof assembly dormer kit attached to roof of a particular building in accordance with an alternate embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

As required, a detailed illustrative embodiment of the present invention is disclosed herein. However, techniques, systems, and operating structures in accordance with the present invention may be embodied in a wide variety of forms and modes, some of which may be quite different from those in the disclosed embodiment. Consequently, the specific structural and functional details disclosed herein are merely representative, yet in that regard, they are deemed to afford the best embodiment for the purposes of disclosure and to provide a basis for the claims herein, which define the scope of the present invention. The following presents a detailed description of a preferred embodiment (as well as some alternative embodiments) of the present invention.

Referring to the drawings wherein like numerals indicate like elements throughout, there is shown in FIG. 1 the primary method of construction for a portico final assembly. In particular, FIG. 1 depicts the final assembly of the portico structure 1A. Stages 1B, 1C, 1D, 1E through 1F demonstrate the various steps in forming the final assembly of the portico structure depicted in 1A. These steps represent the common methods for all types of structures disclosed herein. Specifically, disclosed is the “SCEFA” method of construction of a portico assembly. “SCEFA” is an acronym for “Structure, Connections, Enclosure, Finish, and Accessories.” By following the simple SCEFA steps any individual of ordinary skill in the art, as well novices in many instances, can construct the modular structures disclosed in the present invention.

For example, if a customer requests a particular portico assembly such as a single column arch-type portico product (as depicted in 1A), the shipment includes the basic components to allow a customer to assemble said portico structure. The components of portico structure 1A are assembled according to the SCEFA steps as depicted by steps 1B through 1F. Upon unpacking the modular portico shipment, a customer must first perform the first SCEFA step, Structure 1B. In this example, Structure 1B includes the preliminary installation of the components required to install the framing portions, including the support joists of the basic portico structure. Once Structure 1B is compete, a customer proceeds to the Connection step 1C. Connection 1C includes all of the materials required to fasten structure to the enclosure and in many cases will allow the customer to attach preliminary finish and trim components as well as preliminary attachment mechanisms for accessories and extensions to the final structure. With Structure 1B and Connections 1C complete, a customer is instructed to add the components required to form Enclosure 1D. In the present example, Enclosure 1D is comprised of the roofing sheathing and fascia materials necessary to provide a weather-protective overhead structure common in portico assemblies. Once all components of Enclosure 1D are attached, the next stage includes the application of Finish 1E. Finish 1E includes all final and decorative portions of a portico assembly required to present an aesthetically pleasing portico as well as a code-acceptable assembly. These details include finish and trim components (e.g., roofing shingles, detailed molding, mahogany wood application, etc.) that may be inherent in a portico assembly product or may include additional finish and trim components specified by the customer. It will be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art that finish and trim components may comprise a broad range of customer options. For example, a customer selecting a single column arch-type portico product may specify finish and trim components from a colonial application, modern application, craftsman application, Victorian application, or other similar sub-class application depending on the desired aesthetics. Likewise, a customer may further select Accessories/Extensions 1F options to further modify the resulting portico product. Common Accessories/Extensions 1F may include the inclusion of lighting, home identification accessories, and additional products such as railings, attachable flower boxes, etc. Thus, while the present invention provides a standardized modular construction option for various structures, it is readily apparent that a customer may modify the structure within certain constraints to provide a unique assembly based on modifications to Finish 1E and Accessories/Extensions 1F. With Structure 1B, Connections 1C, Enclosure 1D, Finish 1E, and Accessories/Trim 1F in place, portico structure as depicted in 1A is complete.

While it is an objective of the present invention to provide modular structural components in accordance with the SCEFA principles to allow for ease of installation, it will be readily apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art that the same principles allow for ease of manufacture. Specifically, it is beneficial to manufacture a modular portico assembly wherein the structure, connection, and enclosure remain consistent for a particular portico structure such as for an arched single column product. However, the present invention still allows for customization of the resultant product as described in Finish 1E and Accessories/Extensions 1F.

Turning next to FIGS. 2A through 2F, depicted is a complete assembly of a high arch portico kit delineating the various steps of manufacture and construction in accordance with SCEFA system and method. In particular, FIG. 2A depicts a front perspective view of a fully assembled high arch portico kit of the preferred embodiment. Portico 200 is attached to or abuts façade 204 of a building, preferably symmetrically around entranceway 206. The attachment means may be any well known means of attaching two surfaces known in the art including those developed in the future. Alternatively, an attachment mechanism may not be employed and the portico structure and corresponding components may rest on neighboring components. Portico 200 comprises an upper housing 208 composed of two planar surfaces 210 and 212 which meet at apex 214. In this example, underside 216 of upper housing 208 is semi-ovular in shape, however other shapes are contemplated in accordance with the teachings of the present invention based on the desired aesthetic appeal. Front fascia 228 encloses upper housing 208 and hides the structural support and connections within portico 200. Additional surfaces and structures may be utilized to further define the structure, hide various components, and add to the aesthetic appeal of the structure. Upper housing 208 is comprised of suitable joists and corresponding roofing structure for attaching roofing material thereto that generally exhibits the same characteristics of the corresponding roofing structure of the building system to which the portico system accents. For example, common roofing material may include asphalt roofing tiles, shingles, clay tiles, plastic shingles, or other like material. In certain instances, the roofing material may be provided as part of the portico kit assembly for attachment thereto upon installation or may be affixed to various components of the portico system to further ease of assembly by a purchaser of the system. Upper housing 208 is supported by columns 218 and 220. The outer edges 230 of upper housing 208 are substantially flat in the present example and connect to framing members which secure upper housing 208 to each column 218 and 220. Columns 218 and 220 abut the upper housing 208 at outer edges 230 at one end and the ground 222 at the opposite end. In this example, columns 218 and 220 provide substantial structural support for upper housing, however, depending on the various attachment mechanisms utilized, columns 218 and 220 may be required to provide minimal support or no support at all. Columns 218 and 220 are constructed of a multitude of materials common in the art such as various plastics, resin, fiberglass, wood, metal, etc. As is typical in various construction operations, the supporting ground 222 can be dirt, a wooden platform, a concrete pad, a porch, a step or any other surface commonly found outside a building structure or building entrance.

To assemble the high arch portico kit depicted in full assembly in FIG. 2A in accordance with the SCEFA system, the customer must first address Structure. The components for the Structure are shown in FIG. 2B. FIG. 2B depicts the front view and corresponding side view to demonstrate the Structure of various structural framing components of portico 200 of the present embodiment. Generally, the structure is comprised of framing members including beams, joists, ties, blocking, cutout tie, columns, sheathing or any other structural member commonly utilized in the art for providing structural framing as well as additional framing structures developed in the future for providing structural support to building structures. The structure comprises columns, outer edges of upper housing 208, and framing members 232 supporting the planar members 210 and 212 of upper housing 208. The framing members connect at apex framing member 234 at apex 214 of portico 200.

Moving to FIG. 2C, in accordance with the SCEFA principles, depicted is Connections. In particular, FIG. 2C depicts the connections used in the Portico 200 from the front view and side view. Depending on the size of portico 200 and the materials utilized, connections may be disposed in various configurations to provide adequate support to the structure. However, for the purpose of describing the present invention, a series of connection locations and types are disclosed herein. The connections may be brackets, straps, bolts, screws, nails, clips, snaps, biscuits, adhesive, cut joints, grooves, plates or any other fastener or connector now known or contemplated in the art. Alternatively, the various components of the portico could merely be positioned at a desired point, such as a groove, indentation, etc. and not permanently affixed to a portion of the structure. Generally, components not adhered by a securing mechanism can be held at a desired point in the construction by compressing the components within the structure. Various decorative elements can be employed to cover the connections from view for aesthetic purposes such as common moldings, screw covers, etc. Base connections 238 and 240 are located at or near ground 222 at one terminal end of each column of portico 200 to prevent substantial movement of columns and column support members. Base connections 238 and 240 may also utilize various systems known in the art for compensating for settlement and expansion of columns or supporting earth at ground 222. Alternatively, columns and column support members may comprise a suitable material positioned at the terminal end of columns to allow for the expansion, contraction or settlement of the system. Support member connections 242 and 244 are provided to allow for connection to the second terminal end of columns. Support member connections 242 and 244 secure the upper portion of columns to the base of portico enclosure and more particularly attach columns to upper housing at outer edges to provide substantially vertical support to the front of portico 200. Based on the type of connection employed, support member connections 242 and 244 may also provide horizontal support to portico 200. Framing connections 248 allow the assembler to secure front fascia to first framing member. Framing connections 248 provide structural support to upper housing and corresponding roofing structure, which in this embodiment are angled. To further support upper housing, lower side framing connections 246 secure lower portion of framing members, while upper side framing connections 248 secure upper portion of framing members near apex 214 of the upper housing. Upper housing is further secured by upper housing member connections 256 at apex 214. Additional connections may exist at the upper portion of portico 200 by building connection 250 attaching the upper housing to building façade or building. The lower surface of the upper housing is secured by lower surface outer connection 254 to the framing members and the support members of columns proximate lower surface outer edges. Additionally, lower surface of portico is attached by lower surface inner connection 252 to framing members 232 within the semi-ovular inner region.

The next portion of assembly is Enclosure as defined by the acronym “SCEFA”—Structure, Connections, Enclosure, Finishing, and Accessories/Extension. Turning next to FIG. 2D, the front view of the Enclosure of the high arch portico according to the present embodiment is depicted. The enclosure is comprised of roof assembly, flashing, drip edge, finished cut face, finished arch, fascia, and soffit. With the structure described in FIG. 2B and secured in place by the aforementioned connections described in FIG. 2C, the enclosure can be completed and attached thereto.

In particular, the top of the upper housing 208 is comprised of two planar members 210 and 212 such as sheathing and the upper edges of two planar members 210 and 212 are joined at apex 214 and secured with connections. Additional enclosure portions are added such as the roof assembly, flashing, drip edge, etc. The front fascia 228 is attached to front framing member and hides the framing member and connections within portico 200. The front fascia 228 supports upper housing 206 for providing an aesthetically appealing structure. Further, adequate enclosure is provided for support members 258 of lower portion of upper housing 206.

With the Structure, Connections, and Enclosure properly constructed, the assembler of the high arch single column portico addresses the Finishing and trim (i.e., the “F” in the acronym “SCEFA”). FIG. 2E demonstrates certain common finish elements for the high arch portico according to the preferred embodiment. It is common in the art for the finish and trim to comprise rake, eave, crown, curved foldover, capitol, base or any other type of trim now known or contemplated in the art. Typically, finish trim will be made of the same type of material utilized elsewhere in the formation of portico 200, however, it is contemplated that finish trim will be made from alternate material based on the desired intricacy of the design and objective to minimize cost. For example, portico 200 may be primarily built using wood components, however, due to the intricate nature of certain finish trim and the availability of suitable wood, a resin, cellular PVC or vinyl-clad finish trim may be utilized. Finish trim is utilized in various locations to provide a further aesthetically appeasing portico structure. Depending on how ornate portico 200 is designed to be, finish trim may be positioned in a multitude of locations. In particular, in the present embodiment, first portion of decorative finish trim 264 is depicted near the terminal base of columns 218 and 220. Corresponding second portion of decorative trim 260 is affixed at the opposing end of columns 218 and 220 near the top of portico 200 where columns interact with support members 258. Additional second portion of decorative finish trim 260 and third portion of decorative finish trim 262 may be adhered to support members 258 near the base of upper housing 208. Fascia Decorative finish trim 266 may be affixed to upper housing 208 at either the lower portion or upper portion thereof. Finally, in the present embodiment finish trim may be adhered to the apex of portico and may extend along the entire length of the portico 200.

Accordingly, the final stage of construction is Accessories/Extension (i.e., the “A” in the acronym “SCEFA”). FIG. 2F depicts the front view of the accessories and extensions of the preferred embodiment. Depending on the desired marketing aspects of the present system, accessories may be included with the portico system components or may be separate and independent options for enhancing the portico structure. These accessories and extensions may include embellishments, pilasters, lighting, railing, runoff, drainage control, gutters, mailboxes, or modifications of the portico structure depending on individual existing conditions. In particular, extensions may include side panels for spanning the area between the façade of the building and support columns or an extension on upper housing to connect to an existing roof or building structure. In the present embodiment accessories are provided as a representative sample of potential accessories and other accessories may be provided to further enhance the desired portico structure. For example, depicted in this figure is lighting fixture 270. Lighting fixture is designed to hang from a cable, cord, wire, bar, or other like device 272. Cable, cord, wire or bar is affixed or connected to lower surface of portico and supported by a connection apparatus 274. Connection apparatus 274 may be designed of any screw-type assembly common in the field of electrical lighting or any other type of connector assembly employed to affix lighting structures.

Alternate embodiments of the modular portico structure described in FIG. 2A through 2F are depicted in FIG. 3, FIG. 4, FIG. 5, FIG. 6, and FIG. 7. These alternate modular embodiments are manufactured and constructed in the same manner as previously described. In particular, the portico assemblies of FIG. 3, FIG. 4, FIG. 5, FIG. 6, and FIG. 7 are manufactured, constructed, and offered to consumers in modular form as Structure, Connection, Enclosure, Finish, and Accessories/Extensions (i.e., “SCEFA”). While these alternate embodiments are provided for exemplary purposes, each is not intended to limit the alternate embodiments available in accordance with the disclosure of the present invention.

The first alternate embodiment of the present invention is disclosed in FIG. 3. Specifically, FIG. 3 depicts a high arch small portico assembly. High arch portico 300 is attached to or abuts façade of building 302, preferably symmetrically around entranceway 306. High arch small portico 300 comprises upper housing 308 composed of two planar surfaces 310 and 312 the proximate ends of which meet at apex 314. In this example, underside 316 of upper housing 308 is semi-circular in shape. The opposing ends of planar surfaces 310 and 312 of upper housing 308 are attached to or abut support members 318 and 320. Support members 318 and 320 are attached to or abut upper housing 308 at each upper end and façade of building 602 at the lower end. The attachment means may be any well knows means of attaching two surfaces known in the art or developed in the future such as nails, screws, adhesives, snaps, etc. Alternatively, high arch small portico 300 may be suspended or each component may rest on a neighboring component.

Next, FIG. 4 depicts a high arch paired column portico 400, attached to or abutting façade of building 402, preferably around entranceway 406. High arch paired column portico 400 comprises upper housing 408 composed of two planar surfaces 410 and 412 the proximate ends adjoined at an apex 414. In this embodiment, underside 416 of upper housing 408 is semi-circular in shape. The opposing ends of planar surfaces 410 and 412 of upper housing 408 are attached to or abut paired columns 418 and 420. Upper housing, as well as other portions of the kit, is further designed to be modified and integrated with various rooflines as depicted. Paired columns 418 and 420 are attached to or abut upper housing 408 at the upper end, while the lower end is attached to or rests on ground 422. Typically, ground 422 can be dirt, a wooden platform, a concrete pad, a porch, a step or any other surface commonly found outside a doorway. The attachment means may be any well knows means of attaching two surfaces known in the art or developed in the future. Alternatively, high arch paired column portico 400 may not be attached and each component may rest on a neighboring component. In the present embodiment, various accessories may be added to the structure including light fixture 424. In this example, light fixture 424 is designed to hang from a string, wire, chain or cable 426 connected to underside 416 of upper housing 408.

Turning to FIG. 5, a low arch small portico kit is depicted. Low arch small portico 500 is attached to or abuts façade of building 502, preferably around entranceway 506. Low arch small portico 500, comprises upper housing 508 consisting of two planar surfaces 510 and 512 the proximate ends of which meet at an apex 514. Underside 516 of upper housing 508 is semi-ovular in shape. The shape of the semi-ovular underside is significantly smaller in magnitude than that of the semi-circular shaped underside of the porticos depicted in FIGS. 3 and 4. Thus, it is readily apparent that various shapes of portico assembly kits may be offered to accommodate different portico constructions. Opposing ends of planar surfaces 510 and 512 of upper housing 508 are attached to or abut support members 518 and 520. Support members 518 and 520 are attached to or abut upper housing 508 at upper end and façade of building 502 at the lower end. Attaching support members 518 and 520 to façade of building 502 allows low arch small portico 500 to act to protect entranceway 506 while not interfering with or obstructing with any decorative or functional elements, for example lamps 524 and 526 on façade of building 502. The attachment means may be any well knows means of attaching two surfaces known now or developed in the future. Alternatively, low arch small portico 500 may not be attached at all and each component may simply rest on a neighboring component.

FIG. 6 also depicts a low arch portico kit. Low arch single portico 600 is attached to or abuts façade of building 602, preferably around an entranceway 606. Low arch single column portico 600 comprises upper housing 608 formed by two planar surfaces 610 and 612, the proximate ends of which meet at apex 614. Underside 616 of upper housing 608 is semi-ovular in shape. In this embodiment, upper housing 608 exhibits a semi-ovular shaped underside 616 of significantly extended radial magnitude compared to the semi-circular shaped underside of upper housing as depicted in FIG. 4. The opposing ends of planar surfaces 610 and 612 of upper housing 608 are attached to or abut columns 618 and 620. Columns 618 and 620 are attached to or abut upper housing 608 at the upper end of columns 618 and 620 and the lower end of columns 618 and 620 is attached to or rests on ground 622. Ground 622 can be dirt, a wooden platform, a concrete pad, a porch, a step or any other surface commonly found outside a doorway. The attachment means may be any well knows means of attaching two surfaces in the art. Alternatively, low arch single column portico 600 may not be attached at all and each component may simply rest on its neighboring component. Low arch single column portico may serve to protect light fixture 624 or other accessory from the elements. Light fixture 624 may be affixed to façade of building 602 with decorative elements 626 located proximate to light fixture 624.

FIG. 7 depicts a low arch paired column portico 700, attached to or abutting façade of building 702, preferably around entranceway 706. Low arch paired column portico 700, comprises upper housing 708 consisting of two planar surfaces 710 and 712. Ends of planar surfaces 710 and 712 join at apex 714. Underside 716 of upper housing 708 is semi-ovular in shape as compared to a semi-circular shape. The opposing ends of planar surfaces 710 and 712 of upper housing 708 are attached to or abut paired columns 718 and 720. Paired columns 718 and 720 are attached to or abut upper housing 708 at the upper end of columns 718 and 720. The lower end of columns 718 and 720 are attached to or rest on ground 722. Typically, ground 722 can be dirt, a wooden platform, a concrete pad, a porch, a step or any other surface commonly found outside a doorway. The attachment means may be any well knows means of attaching two surfaces presently known in the art or developed in the future. Alternatively, low arch paired column portico 700 may not be attached at the lower terminal end and each component may simply rest on its neighboring component. Light fixture 724 may hang from a string, wire, chain or cable 726 connected to underside 716 of upper housing 708.

The previous embodiments, FIG. 2 through FIG. 7, are directed to arch portico modular assemblies manufactured, constructed, and offered for sale in accordance with the Structure, Connection, Enclosure, Finish, and Accessories/Extensions (i.e., “SCEFA”) principles disclosed herein. Similarly, the next set of embodiments, FIG. 8 through FIG. 13 depict wall-type pediment and shed type modular portico assemblies embodying the “SCEFA” principles of manufacture, construction, and marketing.

Turning to FIGS. 8A through 8F, depicted is a complete assembly of a wall-type pediment portico kit delineating the various steps of manufacture and construction in accordance with SCEFA system and method. In particular, FIG. 8A depicts an elevated perspective view of an assembled wall-type portico kit of an alternative embodiment of the present invention. Rectangular pediment portico 800 is attached to or abuts façade of building 802, preferably around an entranceway. Rectangular pediment portico 800 is comprised of an upper housing 808 supported by front columns 820 and rear columns 822. It is contemplated by the present invention that additional decorative columns and half columns may be employed to enhance the aesthetic attributes of the rectangular pediment portico. Rectangular pediment portico 800 comprises a flat, planar upper housing 808. Underside of upper housing 808 is primarily flat allowing for a slight pitch for drainage and generally parallel to the ground 824. Upper housing 808 has a top surface 814, a front surface 810 and side members 812. Top surface 814 of upper housing 808 may employ a decorative rail 828 affixed thereto. It is common in the art that decorative rail 828 may include a series of vertical, horizontal, or angled decorative elements to further add to the aesthetic nature of decorative rail 828. Decorative rail 828 is connected between vertical posts 826. In this embodiment, front columns 820 and rear columns 822 are substantially rectilinear in shape compared to common circular columns and are further attached to or abut the upper portion of upper housing 808. The lower portions of front columns 820 and rear columns 822 are attached to or rest on ground 824. The ground 824 can be dirt, a wooden platform, a concrete pad, a porch, a step or any other surface commonly found outside an entranceway to a structure. Portico 800 may attach to a building structure or may not be attached at all and each component may rest on its neighboring component.

In accordance with the “SCEFA” acronym, FIG. 8B depicts the Structure step of the fabrication of pediment portico. The structure is comprised of structural framing members including beams, joists, blocking, columns, sheathing, furring strips or any structural framing member known or contemplated within the art. The upper housing of pediment portico is comprised of two side members 830 extending perpendicularly from the façade of the building. Side members 830 are connected to the façade of the building at one end and supported by columns. Additional framing joists 828 span the region between side members 830 and serve to support the upper housing of pediment portico.

Moving to the next “SCEFA” step, FIG. 8C depicts the Connections utilized as the primary assembly points for the pediment portico according to the alternate embodiment presented in FIG. 8A. In this embodiment, the connections can be brackets, straps, bolts, screws, nails, clips, biscuits, adhesive, cut joins, grooves, plates or any other connector known or contemplated in the art. The location of the connection points disclosed herein are primarily for disclosure purposes only as the locations of each point can be modified depending on the overall size and structure of the pediment portico. Façade/column connections 836 are employed to secure side members of the pediment portico to the façade of the building in the parallel direction and to anchor the rear columns in the perpendicular direction. Front columns are anchored at the top portion with column connections 832. Column connections 832 also secure side members to columns and portico enclosure. Framing member connections 838 secure framing joists to side members at predetermined intervals, generally eighteen inches, allowing for the assembly of roofing structure. Ground connections 834 secure columns to the ground providing vertical support and vertical post connections 842 secure the vertical posts of railing to top surface of upper housing allowing for the support of a decorative rail. Finally, façade anchors 840 further link the upper housing of pediment portico enclosure to the façade of the building.

Turning to FIG. 8D, in this embodiment, the enclosure comprises roof assembly, flashing, drip edge, finished face, fascia, and soffit. The visible portion of the upper housing of portico is comprised of a top sheathing or top surface 846. a Front fascia 850 is installed and two side fascias 848 are installed. Finally a soffit member 852 is attached to the underside of upper housing of portico. In this embodiment, soffit member 852 is comprised of a mahogany wood inlay structure, however, it will be readily apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art that various materials as well as various finish details addressed in the next step may be utilized.

Next, FIG. 8E depicts the finish and trim of rectangular pediment portico 800 according to the alternate embodiment disclosed in FIG. 8A. In this embodiment, the finish and trim may consist of a finished ceiling, eave, base, capitol, crown or any other finish or trim material known or contemplated within the art. First, column base trim 854 is installed to column to ground column anchors at the base and a second set of decorative column trim 856 is attached to columns at the connecting points to upper housing. Additionally, upper housing trim 858 is affixed at the intersection of top surface and side fascias and the intersection of side fascias and front fascia. Decorative lateral flooring trim 860 may be superimposed on top of top surface as well. Of course, depending on the desired final product, various finish and trim components may be utilized as is customary in the art.

Finally, once structure, connections, enclosure, and finish are complete, accessories may be incorporated as FIG. 8F depicts. At this stage, accessories and extensions for pediment portico are added. Accessories and extensions may include embellishments, pilasters, lighting, railing, runoff, drainage control, adaptations to existing conditions or any other accessory or extension known or contemplated within the art. In this alternate embodiment of the present invention, upper housing of rectangular pediment portico exhibits an extension of the existing structure including vertical posts 862 extending upward from top surface. Vertical posts 862 are capable of supporting decorative railing 864. Additional decorative columns may be positioned near to structural columns.

Alternate embodiments of the modular rectangular pediment portico structure described in FIGS. 8A through 8F are depicted in FIG. 9, FIG. 10, FIG. 11, FIG. 12, and FIG. 13. These alternate modular embodiments are manufactured and constructed in the same manner as previously described. In particular, the portico assemblies of FIG. 9, FIG. 10, FIG. 11, FIG. 12, and FIG. 13 are manufactured, constructed, and offered to consumers in modular form as Structure, Connection, Enclosure, Finish, and Accessories/Extensions (i.e., “SCEFA”). While these alternate embodiments are provided for exemplary purposes, each is not intended to limit the alternate embodiments available in accordance with the disclosure of the present invention.

Alternate embodiments of the rectangular pediment portico modular kits of the present invention are disclosed in FIG. 9, FIG. 10, FIG. 11, FIG. 12, and FIG. 13. Specifically, FIG. 9 depicts a wall type small rectangular pediment portico 900. FIG. 10 is a wall type pediment portico with paired columns 1000. Next, FIG. 11 depicts a small wall type shed roof portico kit 1100. FIGS. 12 and 13 also disclose wall type shed roof portico kits, the first with single columns (wall type shed roof single column portico 1200) and the second with double columns on each side of portico (wall type shed roof double column portico 1300).

These alternate modular rectangular pediment embodiments are manufactured and constructed in the same manner as previously described. In particular, the portico assemblies of FIG. 9, FIG. 10, FIG. 11, FIG. 12, and FIG. 13 are manufactured, constructed, and offered to consumers in modular form as Structure, Connection, Enclosure, Finish, and Accessories/Extensions (i.e., “SCEFA”) modular kits. While these alternate embodiments are provided for exemplary purposes, each is not intended to limit the alternate embodiments available in accordance with the disclosure of the present invention. One of ordinary skill in the art will recognize these pediment and shed type portico kits are offered with common structural elements such as joists and framing. Furthermore, similar common connection elements may be employed such as brackets, straps, bolts, screws, nails, clips, etc. to as part of the modular kits. Likewise, enclosure comprises roof assembly, flashing, drip edge, finished face, fascia, etc. Trim and finishing detail are supplied as part of the modular kit and finally various accessories are available.

Turning to the next version of modular kit porticos, disclosed in FIGS. 14A through 14F and FIGS. 15 through 20 are various wall type gable portico modular kits. Each product depicted in these figures are manufactured, offered for sale, and constructed following the basic principles of first providing for structural components, connections, enclosures, finish and trim components, and accessory offerings (i.e., the “SCEFA” system of construction).

First, FIGS. 14A through 14F demonstrate the steps in constructing a common wall type gable portico kit. Particularly, FIG. 14A depicts a worms eye view of a full assembly wall type gable portico kit 1400. This view of the full assembly demonstrates the final product with all structure, connections, enclosure, finish, and accessories assembled. Interestingly, the common wall type gable portico kit 1400 includes front columns 1402 that were assembled as part of the finish and trim stage and rear columns 1404 that were ordered as accessories and are merely ornamental.

In order to generate the full assembly of the common wall type gable portico kit as depicted in FIG. 14A, the assembler must first prepare the structure as depicted in FIG. 14B. FIG. 14B depicts the worms eye view of various structural framing components. In this type of construction, the structure is comprised of framing members including beams, joists, ties, blocking, cutout tie, columns, sheathing or any other structural member commonly utilized in the art for providing structural framing as well as additional framing structures developed in the future for providing structural support to building structures. The structure comprises columns supporting upper housing 1418. To form the base of upper housing 1418, side framing members 1416, front and rear framing members 1406 box the housing and framing joist members 1420 are disposed therebetween to provide additional structural support. Left apex framing members 1408 and right apex framing members 1410 connect at one end at apex framing member 1414 at apex 1412 to generate the basic structure for gable. Left apex framing members 1408 and right apex framing members 1410 connect to side framing members 1416 at the end to provide structural support for upper housing 1418 of gable portico.

Moving to FIG. 14C, in accordance with the “SCEFA” principles, depicted is Connections. Various connections are provided to allow for the connection of structure, enclosure, and in certain instances finish and trim. Depending on the desired size of gable portico and the materials utilized, connections may be disposed in various configurations to provide adequate support to the structure. In general, the connections may be brackets, straps, bolts, screws, nails, clips, snaps, biscuits, adhesive, cut joints, grooves, plates or any other fastener or connector now known or contemplated in the art. Alternatively, the various components of the portico could merely be positioned at a desired point, such as a groove, indentation, etc. and not permanently affixed to a portion of the structure. Generally, components not adhered by a securing mechanism can be held at a desired point in the construction by compressing the components within the structure. Various decorative elements can be employed to cover the connections from view for aesthetic purposes such as common moldings, screw covers, etc. In the present embodiment, support member connections 1422 and 1430 are provided to allow for connection to a second terminal end of columns (e.g., structural columns or decorative columns). Support member connections 1422 and 1430 secure the upper portion of columns to the base of portico enclosure and more particularly attach columns to upper housing to provide substantially vertical support to the front of portico. Based on the type of connection employed, support member connections 1422 and 1430 may also provide horizontal support to portico. Framing connections 1424 (and in some instances front apex connections 1426) allow the assembler to secure a front fascia to left apex framing members and right apex framing members. Framing connections 1424 provide structural support to upper housing and corresponding roofing structure. To further support upper housing, lower side framing connections 1428 secure lower portion of framing members, while apex connections 1426 secure upper portion of framing members. Additional façade connections 1420 exist at the upper portion of portico for attaching the upper housing to building façade or building.

To provide the desired protective cover, the enclosure is applied next (FIG. 14D). Generally, the enclosure is comprised of roof assembly, flashing, drip edge, finished cut face, finished arch, fascia, and soffit. The enclosure is applied to the structure set forth in FIG. 14B and secured by the connections supplied in FIG. 14C. In the present embodiment, sheathing 1436 and flashing where necessary is secured to the upper portions of left apex framing members and right apex framing members. Front fascia is secured to front portions of left apex framing members and right apex framing members. Drip guard 1432 is affixed to specific portions of roofing structures to further protect the materials of upper housing.

Next, Finish and trim is applied as depicted in FIG. 14E. For example, finish and trim frequently includes rake, eave, crown, curved foldover, capitol, base or any other type of trim now known or contemplated within the art. In the present embodiment, finish trim is made of the same type of material utilized for other components of the portico. Finish trim complements the aesthetic nature of the portico structure. In the present embodiment, decorative finish lower column trim 1438 is depicted near the lower terminal base of columns 1440. In this embodiment, columns 1440 are decorative, although each provides a certain degree of rigidness to the structure. Upper column trim 1444 is applied to the upper terminal base of columns 1440. Applied wood soffit trim 1442 is affixed to the lower portion of upper housing to further enhance the architectural nature of the portico structure. Finally, decorative trim molding 1444 is attached at various portions of the upper housing of the portico structure.

FIG. 14F depicts the addition of Accessories. Generally, accessories and extensions include embellishments, pilasters, lighting, railing, runoff, drainage control, gutters, mailboxes, or modifications of the portico structure depending on individual existing conditions. In the present embodiment accessories are provided as a representative sample of potential accessories and other accessories may be provided to further enhance the desired portico structure. For example, lighting fixture 1450 is added to the portico structure. Further, rear columns 1404 are provided.

Alternate embodiments of the wall type gable portico kit depicted in FIGS. 14A through 14F include the modular kits depicted in FIG. 15 (wall type small gable portico kit 1500), FIG. 16 (wall type gable portico kit with paired columns 1600), FIG. 17 (wall type hip roof portico kit with single columns 1700), FIG. 18 (wall type hip roof portico kit 1800), FIG. 19 (wall type hip roof portico kit with paired columns 1900), and FIG. 20 (wall type vault portico kit 2000). The portico kit assemblies of FIGS. 15 through 20 are manufactured, constructed, and offered to consumers in modular form as Structure, Connection, Enclosure, Finish, and Accessories/Extensions (i.e., “SCEFA”). While these alternate embodiments are provided for exemplary purposes, each is not intended to limit the alternate embodiments available in accordance with the disclosure of the present invention.

The aforementioned preferred and alternate embodiments are directed to wall-type modular kits and more particularly wall type portico modular systems. However, in accordance with the present invention, one of ordinary skill in the art will readily recognize that such principles of design can be exploited for other type of structures such as wall type box bay window units.

For example, FIGS. 21A through 21F depict a side perspective view of wall type box bay gable window unit modular kit at various stages of construction starting from structure, connections, enclosure, finish, and accessories. First, for ease of reference, FIG. 21A depicts a side perspective view of a full assembly of the wall type box bay gable window unit 2100 manufactured, constructed, and offered for sale according to the “SCEFA” system and method. The wall type box bay gable window unit 2100 is integrated with the existing wall structure 2102 of a building.

FIGS. 21B through 21F demonstrate the steps in constructing the wall type box bay gable window unit kit. The final wall type box bay gable window kit is constructed as first step structure, second step connections, third step enclosure, fourth step finish, and fifth step accessories. In order to generate the full assembly of the wall type box bay gable window kit as depicted in FIG. 21A, the assembler must first prepare the structure as depicted in FIG. 21B. FIG. 21B depicts the side perspective view of various structural framing components. In this type of construction, the structure may be comprised of framing members including beams, joists, ties, blocking, cutout tie, columns, sheathing or any other structural member commonly utilized in the art for providing structural framing as well as additional framing structures developed in the future for providing structural support to building structures. The structure comprises upper housing 2104 formed by joists 2106 and planar members 2110 and 2112 fixed at apex 2108. Upper housing provides a support for upper window framing member 2114. In addition, lower window framing member 2116 provides lower support for box bay window. Lower window framing member 2116 is constructed of lower support members 2118.

Moving to FIG. 21C, in accordance with the “SCEFA” principles, depicted is Connections. Various connections are provided to allow for the connection of structure, enclosure, and in certain instances finish and trim. Depending on the desired size of gable end and the materials utilized, connections may be disposed in various configurations to provide adequate support to the structure. In general, the connections may be brackets, straps, bolts, screws, nails, clips, snaps, biscuits, adhesive, cut joints, grooves, plates or any other fastener or connector now known or contemplated in the art. Alternatively, the various components of the portico could merely be positioned at a desired point, such as a groove, indentation, etc. and not permanently affixed to a portion of the structure. Generally, components not adhered by a securing mechanism can be held at a desired point in the construction by compressing the components within the structure. Various decorative elements can be employed to cover the connections from view for aesthetic purposes such as common moldings, screw covers, etc. In the present embodiment, upper support member connections 2122 are provided to provide structure for box bay assembly by providing support for joists of upper housing. Lower support member connections 2128 provide structure for lower portion of box bay assembly. Further, upper window connections 2122 and lower window connections 2126 allow for the installation of window. Apex connections 2124 support upper housing members.

To provide the desired protective cover, the enclosure is applied next (FIG. 21D). Generally, the enclosure is comprised of roof assembly 2132, flashing, drip edge, fascia 2130, and soffit. The enclosure is applied to the structure set forth in FIG. 21B and secured by the connections supplied in FIG. 21C. Further, in the present embodiment, insulation 2134 is secured within box bay frame structure.

Next, Finish and trim is applied as depicted in FIG. 21E. In the present embodiment, finish trim is installed on interior portions and exterior portions of box bay assembly and is made of the same type of material utilized for other components of the portico. Finish trim complements the aesthetic nature of the portico structure. In the present embodiment, decorative finish trim 2138 is depicted as well as window trim 2136.

FIG. 21F depicts the addition of Accessories. Generally, accessories and extensions include embellishments, pilasters, lighting, railing, runoff, drainage control, gutters, mailboxes, or modifications of the desired box bay structure depending on individual existing conditions. In the present embodiment accessories are provided as a representative sample of potential accessories and other accessories may be provided to further enhance the desired box bay structure. For example, window box 2142, window seat 2144, and interior light 2146 are added to the portico structure.

Further examples of common wall type box bay modular structures are depicted in FIG. 22, FIG. 23, FIG. 24, and FIG. 25. It will be readily apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art that these alternate embodiments can be manufactured, constructed, and offered for sale in the same “SCEFA” system disclosed herein. Specifically, each example can be offered as a kit in the form of Structure, Connections, Enclosures, Finish, and Accessories. For example, FIG. 22 depicts a front perspective view of a wall type box bay vault window unit 2200 constructed from a modular kit product. FIG. 23 depicts a wall type box bay pediment double window unit 2300 constructed from a modular kit. Similarly, FIG. 24 depicts a wall type box bay shed roof double window unit 2400 and FIG. 25 depicts a wall type box bay hip roof triple door unit 2500, both units constructed from modular kits.

Additional wall type modular kits can be offered. For example, one of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that wall type chimney kits or like designs are common wall structures. One example of an alternate wall structure is depicted in FIG. 26. Specifically, a full assembly wall type roof chimney 2600 manufactured from a modular kit product is displayed in FIG. 26.

The aforementioned preferred and alternate embodiments are directed to wall-type modular kits and more particularly wall type portico modular systems, wall type box bay modular systems, and wall type chimney kits. However, in accordance with the present invention, one of ordinary skill in the art will readily recognize that such principles of design can be exploited for other applications. For example, one of ordinary skill will readily recognize that similar kits can be developed for roof type applications. Thus, in a first embodiment of a roof type kit assembly, FIG. 27A depicts a birds eye view of a roof type chimney kit.

Disclosed in FIG. 27A is a roof type chimney 2700 manufactured in kit form and displayed in full assembly attached to a roof 2702 of a common building. Roof type chimney 2700 includes a crown assembly 2706, an exhaust structure 2742, and vent exhaust cut out 2704 to allow for ease of integration with a chimney flue apparatus thereby allowing for the release of gases, particulars, etc. from the structure.

To assemble the roof type chimney kit depicted in full assembly in FIG. 27A, the structure must be set in place as depicted in FIG. 27B. Specifically, vertical framing members 2710 are attached to pitched roof on the lower portion and connected to framing cap 2712 on the upper portion to provide a substantially rectangular construction. Vertical framing members 2710 of chimney kit roof type structure 2700 allow for the basic construction of chimney roof type structure 2700 for connection to roof support structure elements 2712. To meet common building fire code regulations, specific fire-proof materials are employed for vertical framing members 2710 and framing cap 2712. Further, insulating sheathing 2710 is applied to all vertical portions in light of certain building fire code regulations common in the industry.

Turning to FIG. 27C, depicted are Connections utilized in the construction of roof type chimney kit depicted in full assembly in FIG. 27A. Specifically, the framing cap is affixed to vertical framing members through the use of internal framing cap connectors 2722, external corner framing connectors 2724, and external lateral framing connectors 2726. The vertical framing members are affixed to pitched roof joists by roof connectors 2718. Sheathing is affixed to chimney structure by sheathing connectors 2720. In general, the connectors may be brackets, straps, bolts, screws, nails, clips, snaps, biscuits, adhesive, cut joints, grooves, plates or any other fastener or connector now known or contemplated in the art.

Once structure and connections are attached, enclosure may be assembled to form the chimney structure as depicted in FIG. 27D. Noted in FIG. 27D is the inclusion of pitched chimney cap 2730 with exhaust cut-out 2732. In this example, exhaust cut-out 2732 is fabricated in a rectilinear shape, however other common structures for a vent system may be employed such as a cylindrical structure, conical structure, or other structures known in the art. Exhaust cut-out 2732 allows for the construction of a venting system constructed of any material commonly utilized in the art for the construction of a vent exhaust structure such as aluminum, iron, copper, clay, etc. Furthermore, in this example, wood shingles 2734 are affixed to chimney structure. While wood shingles 2734 are utilized in the present example, it is well known in the art that various materials may be utilized to enclosure structure such as masonry materials (e.g., stone, concrete, etc.), plastic siding, vinyl, or aluminum siding, stone veneers, etc. to coordinate chimney structure with the existing building structure. Finally, chimney flashing 2736 is installed to create a generally weather impervious connection to roof.

With structure, connections, and enclosure assembled, Finish and trim can be applied as depicted in FIG. 27E. In this example, four pieces of corner molding 2738 is affixed to the chimney structure. However, additional finish and trim components may be added such as weather elements protection, crown assembly, drip mold, weep holes, band mold, stop mold, brick mould, vapor barriers, insulation, etc.

The final addition to the chimney structure is accessories as depicted in FIG. 27F. With the exhaust structure 2742 in place, the finished roof type chimney kit depicted in full assembly in FIG. 27A is complete. As previously stated, exhaust structure 2742 may be constructed of any material commonly utilized in the art for the construction of a vent exhaust structure such as aluminum, iron, copper, clay, etc.

Additional modular roof type kits can be manufactured, constructed, and offered for sale. Alternate embodiments of the roof type modular kits are depicted in FIGS. 28 through 33. For example, FIG. 28 depicts an example of a front view of a roof type (e.g., a vault roof, pediment roof, or hip roof) cupola 2800 manufactured from a kit product. FIG. 29 provides a front view of a roof type gable roof oblong widow walk 2900 constructed from a kit product. FIG. 30 depicts a front view of a roof type angled widow walk 3000 fabricated from a kit product. FIG. 31 depicts a front view of a roof type arch/eyebrow dormer single window unit 3100 constructed based on the principles of the present invention. FIG. 32 depicts a front view of a roof type pediment dormer single window unit 3200 developed from a kit product. Finally, FIG. 33 depicts a front view of a roof type hip roof dormer double window unit 3300 manufactured in kit form. The kit assemblies of FIGS. 28 through 33 are manufactured, constructed, and offered to consumers in modular form as Structure, Connection, Enclosure, Finish, and Accessories/Extensions (i.e., “SCEFA”). Several of these examples include specific accessories such as weathervanes, however, additional accessories may be offered such as window boxes, pilasters, lighting, power outlets, drainage controls, decorative hardware, awning, vents, caps, etc. Additional internal elements may include interior cabinetry, window seats, ducts, etc. While these alternate embodiments are provided for exemplary purposes, each is not intended to limit the alternate embodiments available in accordance with the disclosure of the present invention.

A further modular kit structure is depicted in FIGS. 34A through 34F. This kit assembly is manufactured, constructed, and offered to consumers in modular form as Structure, Connection, Enclosure, Finish, and Accessories/Extensions (i.e., “SCEFA”). It will be readily to one of ordinary skill in the art that this dormer structures may be manufactured in various dimensions and shapes depending on the desired field application. In addition, while a single dormer is depicted, one of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that the principles of manufacture and construction disclosed herein can be easily adapted to include a double dormer, triple dormer, etc.

FIG. 34A depicts a birds eye view of a full assembly of roof assembly dormer kit 3400 in finished form attached to roof 3402 of a particular building. In this embodiment, roof assembly former kit 3400 includes window 3406 and finished roof 3404 comprised of a similar materials utilized on other portions of the building. However, depending on the desired aesthetics, complimentary or contrasting building materials may be utilized.

To assemble the roof assembly dormer kit depicted in full assembly in FIG. 34A, the structure must be set in place as depicted in FIG. 34B. Specifically, vertical framing members 3414 are attached to pitched roof on the lower portion and connected to upper housing comprised of front horizontal framing member 3416, rear horizontal framing member 3418 and upper joist framing members 3412 affixed at apex 3410.

Turning to FIG. 34C, depicted are Connections utilized in the construction of roof assembly dormer kit. For example, vertical framing members are attached to pitched roof on the lower portion by vertical member lower connectors 3426. Joists of upper housing are connected upper connectors 3428 and roof connectors 3424. Depending on the desired structured, various other connectors may be utilized. In general, the connectors may be brackets, straps, bolts, screws, nails, clips, snaps, biscuits, adhesive, cut joints, grooves, plates or any other fastener or connector now known or contemplated in the art.

Once structure and connections are attached, enclosure may be assembled to form the dormer structure as depicted in FIG. 34D. Noted in FIG. 34D is the inclusion of pitched roof sheathing 3434 with window cut-out and window assembly 3438. In this embodiment, wood shingles 3436 are affixed to structure. While wood shingles 3436 are utilized in the present example, it is well known in the art that various materials may be utilized to enclosure structure such as masonry materials, plastic siding, vinyl, or aluminum siding, etc. to coordinate structure with the existing building structure. Finally, copper flashing 3440 is installed to create a generally weather impervious connection to roof.

With structure, connections, and enclosure assembled, Finish and trim can be applied as depicted in FIG. 34E. In this example, corner moldings 3446 and window corner moldings 3448 are assembled. Fascia molding 3444 and flashing is installed to front portion of dormer. Further, roofing shingles 3450 manufactured of plastic composite is adhered to structure. Of course, various roofing materials may be utilized depending on the desired resulting structure. It is common in the art, that climatic conditions effect the desired roofing material installed and as a result dormer kit may be ordered with various roofing protection options. Additional finish and trim components may be added such as weather elements protection, crown assembly, drip mold, weep holes, band mold, stop mold, brick mould, vapor barriers, insulation, etc.

The final addition to the roof assembly dormer kit is accessories as depicted in FIG. 34F. In this example, window drip cover 3454, roofing drip edge 3456, and window box 3452 is installed. Various options for accessories are available and may be specified by consumer at the time an order is placed for roof assembly dormer kit.

Each of the aforementioned various component kit structures depicted in various embodiments are constructed in accordance with the principles and objectives of construction of each of the components kit structures described in detail herein. Each of the component kit structures may be comprised of the various structural and finishing elements such as the various building materials described herein as well as various other materials currently commonly utilized in the art and various building materials developed and utilized in the future. Furthermore, each of the component kit structures are designed to reduce building/labor costs, building duration, fabrication costs, etc. commonly associated with erecting home and business structures, home and business additions, home and business refurbishments, or other similar creations or modifications related to various building structures.

From the foregoing description of the embodiments, which embodiments have been set forth in considerable detail for the purpose of making a complete disclosure of the present invention, it can be seen that the present invention comprises a kit for erecting various portico assembly extensions around an existing entranceway to a building or home. It will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that changes could be made to the embodiment described above without departing from the broad inventive concept thereof. It is understood, therefore, that this invention is not limited to the particular embodiment disclosed, but it is intended to cover all modifications that are within the scope and spirit of the invention as defined by the appended claims.





 
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