Title:
Stacking Cassette
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A document storage container assembly (100) comprises a storage container (102), a first tray (330) mounted to the container so as to receive documents to be stacked, the bottom of said tray including an elongate aperture (331) opening into the storage container, and a pusher member (103) mounted on and laterally extending from at least one elongate supporting member (104, 204) which is coupled to an operating mechanism (150, 250) located within the storage container; wherein the operating mechanism is adapted to first move the pusher member through the aperture from a retracted position to an extended position above the first tray and then to move the pusher member from the extended position laterally over the first tray , before moving the pushing member from the extended position to the retracted position orthogonally to the first tray so as to push any documents on the said first tray into the container through the aperture .



Inventors:
James, Alexander Charles Harold (Waterlooville, GB)
Neal, David Richard (Waterlooville, GB)
Application Number:
12/086173
Publication Date:
01/29/2009
Filing Date:
01/09/2007
Assignee:
De La Rue International Limited (Basingstoke, GB)
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
271/84, 271/177
International Classes:
B65H29/46
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
MORRISON, THOMAS A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
OLIFF PLC (ALEXANDRIA, VA, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A document storage container assembly (100) comprising: a storage container (102); a first tray (330) mounted to the container (102) so as to receive documents to be stacked, the bottom of said tray including an elongate aperture (331) opening into the storage container; and a pusher member (103) mounted on and laterally extending from at least one elongate supporting member (104, 204), which is coupled to an operating mechanism (150, 250) located within the storage container; wherein the operating mechanism (150, 250) is adapted to first move the pusher member (103) through the aperture (331) from a retracted position to an extended position above the first tray and then to move the pusher-member (103) from the extended position laterally over the first tray (330), before moving the pushing member (103) from the extended position to the retracted position orthogonally to the first tray so as to push any documents on the said first tray (330) into the container (102) through the aperture (331).

2. A document storage container assembly (100) according to claim 1 wherein the operating mechanism (150, 250) further comprises: at least one guide member (105, 205) in which the at least one supporting member (104, 204) is free to move; and driving means (108, 160) to propel the at least one supporting member (104, 204) through the at least one guide member (105,205) to move the pusher member (103) from the retracted position to the extended position;

3. A document storage container assembly (100) according to claim 2 wherein each guide member (105, 205) further comprises: an aperture (113, 213) through which a respective supporting member (104, 204) is slideably mounted; wherein: each guide member (105, 205) is pivotally mounted at a pivot point (106, 206) to the storage container (102), the guide member aperture (113, 213) and the pivot point (106, 206) are offset from each other; and wherein the rotation of the or each guide member (105, 205) about the pivot point (106, 206) causes a corresponding pivotal movement of the pusher member (103).

4. A document storage container assembly (100) according to claim 2 or claim 3, wherein the driving means comprises a base axle (108) and a belt assembly (160, 260), and the at least one supporting member (104, 204) is attached to the belt (114, 214) at a rigid base (107, 207), the movement of the belt propelling the at least one member through its respective guide member (105, 205).

5. A document storage container assembly (100) according to claim 4, wherein the rigid base (107, 207) comes into contact with, and applies a force to, the guide member (105, 205), wherein the force generates a moment about the pivot point (106, 206) and produces the rotation of the or each guide member about the pivot point.

6. A document storage container assembly (100) according to claims 2 to 5 in which the driving means are powered manually (111) or by electric motor (225).

7. A document storage container assembly (100) according to any of the preceding claims, further comprising a second tray (332) mounted within the container (102) so as to receive documents pushed through the aperture (331) of the first tray (330), wherein the second tray is urged towards the first tray by an urging member (333).

8. A document storage container assembly (100) according to any of the preceding claims wherein the pushing member (103) is mounted between two lateral supporting members (104, 204).

9. A document transport system (900) comprising: housing apparatus (901); a document inlet (902); and a transport system defining a document deposit path to convey documents from the inlet; wherein the transport system comprises a document storage container assembly (100), according to any of the preceding claims, removably mounted within the housing apparatus (901) and adapted to receive documents from the document deposit path and to provide a secure storage facility for said documents;

10. A document transport system (900) according to claim 9, wherein, in the extended position, the pusher member (103) of the document storage container assembly (100) extends beyond the assembly into the housing apparatus so as to lock the assembly in place within the housing apparatus (901).

11. A document transport system (900) according to claim 9 or claim 10, further comprising: a temporary store (905) between the document deposit path and the container assembly (100) comprising a moveable platform (502) that drops down into the housing apparatus (504, 901) so as to deposit any documents onto the first tray (330) of the document storage container assembly;

12. A method for storing documents in a container comprising the steps of: depositing a plurality of documents to be stored on a tray mounted to the container; moving a pusher member in an extended position laterally over the tray; and moving the pushing member from the extended position to a retracted position orthogonally to the tray so as to push the plurality of documents through an aperture in the bottom of the tray into the container.

Description:

The invention relates to a document storage container assembly, for example for use in securely storing documents such as banknotes, cheques, security documents or other documents of value.

The use of document storage containers is common in banking and other areas where secure containment of documents is required. Within the banking industry, the containers are often used as part of an automated deposit facility. This service enables the sorting and counting of cash and cheques, and further provides online accounting procedures to assist Bank Tellers and Managers during the banking day. The facility is provided by a number of automated document deposit apparatus, located within the bank. Once secure documents are processed by this apparatus, they are deposited in secure temporary storage containers located at individual Teller stations. At the end of the day, these containers may then be collected and the deposited documents stored at a secure central location such as a bank vault. As such, the containers are often designed to be carried by hand between two secure locations.

A similar procedure is also found in other commercial areas where cash is deposited at several locations during a day of trading and then is required to be collected and transported elsewhere after trading. As well as cash and cheques, the containers can also be used to store larger A4 size documents, for example in a secure file depository.

Currently, most documents are deposited into a document storage container by simply dropping the documents into the container through an opening at its top. While this is simple and requires no additional equipment it often leads to a haphazard arrangement of notes in the container. This causes at least two problems: one, the total available storage volume is not utilised efficiently, and two, it becomes harder to retrieve the documents from the container when it needs to be emptied. The latter is particularly problematic since each container takes a relatively long period of time to empty. Often time may be limited in high security environments for reasons of cost or risk limitation.

Certain methods and devices have been proposed to try to reduce these undesirable effects. EP-A-0613107 discloses a secure drop cassette where banknotes are initially arranged on a platform above a container. The platform is then withdrawn to one side and the notes drop into the container. Whilst providing limited order to the notes arranged in the container, the action of moving the platform, including the subsequent friction between the platform and any adjacent notes, often disturbs the note arrangement leading to the same disorder found with conventional approaches.

An alternative solution to the problems associated with ‘drop’ deposits has been to use side-feed mechanisms. These feed individual notes into the side of a deposit apparatus located above the document storage container, typically from an external note transport system. However, even though the use of side-fed notes can reduce some of the ‘drop’ problems, the increase in complexity in both the note transport and the interface with external systems can often compound note jam problems. This is especially the case when using ragged, well-used, real-world currency. Also these feed system are slow as each note has to be fed individually. This can be problematic when using international currencies with many note denominations.

WO04090817 discloses a system in which individual notes are fed into a moveable apparatus that subsequently deposits the notes into a series of storage containers. Similar systems are also disclosed in EP1460590A, U.S. 200210056960A1 and U.S. Pat. No. 5,372,361A.

The main features of these systems are illustrated in FIG. 11 which is based on WO 04090817. Note deposit system 1100 comprises a document storage container 1102 and a deposit apparatus 1110. Deposit apparatus 1110 comprises a scissor-jack mechanism 1109 located above-document storage container 1102. To-deposit notes, a single note 1101 is first fed under the scissor-jack mechanism 1109 from an external note transport system (not shown) to the right of the deposit apparatus 1110. Subsequently, a member 1107 of the scissor-jack mechanism 1109 is rotated counter-clockwise about a pivot point 1106 which-extends the mechanism 1109. A bar 1103 then pushes the note into a storage area 1108 containing other deposited notes. The two members of the mechanism 1109 are pivoted near their centre 1104 and after a note 1101 has been deposited member 1107 is rotated clockwise to retract the bar 1103 and compress the scissor-jack mechanism 1109.

Whilst offering a novel solution to note depositing, the design of these prior art systems also causes numerous problems. A first problem is that the scissor-jack mechanism 1109 occupies a large amount of space in the system 1100. When retracted it is often not possible to have all the scissor-jack members 1107 aligned closely to the horizontal. Additional allowances must also be made for the pivot points 1104, 1105, 1106 and the bar 1103. Furthermore, the means to extend the scissor-jack mechanism (in the example above means to rotate member 1107) must also be located with the mechanism above the notes. As well as increasing the overall size of the deposit and storage system, the scissor-jack and associated drive mechanisms also increase the proportion of the total system that extends beyond the document storage container 1102 or note storage area. This means that external apparatus often has to be specifically designed to accommodate this extra height;

A second problem that arises with the scissor-jack prior art systems is the need to feed each note individually from the side of the storage system. As discussed previously, this not only limits the speed with which bundles of notes can, be deposited in the system but generally increases the complexity of the note transport pathway. A complex note transport pathway can be difficult to fit and repair and provides more opportunity for note jams.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,863,039 and EP1244075A1 also suffer from the problems of large size and feed complexity but lack the scissor-jack mechanism. Instead, these two documents teach bespoke deposit mechanisms located above the note storage compartments.

In accordance with the present invention, a document storage container assembly comprises a storage container;

a first tray mounted to the container so as to receive documents to be stacked, the bottom of said tray including an elongate aperture opening into the storage container; and

a pusher member mounted on and laterally extending from at least one elongate supporting member, which is coupled to an operating mechanism located within the storage container;

wherein the operating mechanism is adapted to first move the pusher member through the aperture from a retracted position to an extended position above the first tray and then to move the pusher member from the extended position laterally over the first tray, before moving the pushing member from the extended position to the retracted position orthogonally to the first tray so as to push any documents on the said first tray into the container through the aperture.

The invention provides a complete deposit system within the confines of a standard storage container. This then allows the simple replacement of existing containers with no modification of external systems. The current invention also provides a document storage container assembly that maximises storage capacity and efficiency when depositing a plurality of documents into the container. One or more deposited documents can be aligned on the first tray by the movement of the pusher member, and by pushing the documents into the container this alignment is preserved. Thus the documents stack inside the container, making more efficient use of the available storage volume and providing a compact bundle which can be easily removed by an operator, for example when deposited banknotes are removed in a counting operation. The invention further allows bundles of notes to be deposited in one rapid operation without the use of complicated side-feed mechanisms.

The lateral movement of the pusher member whilst in an extended configuration provides further alignment of the notes, allowing an initial imperfect arrangement of the documents on the first tray and thus more flexibility as to how the documents are deposited. This then removes the need for the more precise feed equipment found within the prior art, saving space and reducing note jam problems.

Typically the above movement is facilitated by pivotally mounted guide mountings, within which the at least one supporting member is free to move. Driving means are then used to propel the at least one supporting member.

In one embodiment, the document storage container assembly is mounted within a document transport system further comprising housing apparatus, a document inlet and a transport system that defines a document deposit path. The assembly can then be adapted so that, in its extended position, the pusher member extends beyond the assembly into the housing apparatus so as to lock the assembly in place within the housing apparatus. Additionally, in a further modification, the first tray receives documents from a temporary or escrow store between the document deposit path and the container assembly. The temporary store comprises a moveable platform that drops down so as to deposit documents onto the first tray.

The current invention also provides a method for storing documents in a container comprising the steps of:

depositing a plurality of documents to be stored on a tray mounted to the container;

moving a pusher member in an extended position laterally over the tray; and

moving the pushing member from the extended position to a retracted position orthogonally to the tray so as to push the plurality of documents through an aperture in the bottom of the tray into the container.

The document transport system can be located at an individual Teller station within a bank, so that the temporary storage container required at each station is provided by the document storage container of the present invention.

Some examples of document storage container assembly according to the invention will now be described with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:-

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the assembly from the front and one side with a front panel omitted for clarity;

FIG. 2 is a second perspective view of the assembly from the front and an opposite side to that shown in FIG. 1, with the front panel again omitted for clarity;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the front panel of the assembly from the same viewpoint as FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a second perspective view of the front panel of the assembly from the rear and one side;

FIGS. 5 to 8 are views of the storage container assembly resident within a document deposit system, showing the top of the assembly at various stages in an operational cycle;

FIG. 9 is a side view of the storage container assembly mounted within housing apparatus of a document transport system;

FIG. 10 is a block diagram of a control system for the storage container assembly; and,

FIG. 11 is a cross-section of a note deposit system conceptualizing the system elements of the prior art as found in WO 04090817.

FIGS. 1 and 2 present a perspective view of a storage container assembly 100 according to the first embodiment of the current invention. The container 102 defines a generally cuboid storage volume for documents. FIG. 1 illustrates a side view of the assembly, with a front panel 334 removed. At the top of the container 102 is an opening 101 where a top tray 330 (shown in FIG. 3) is mounted. This is where documents enter the container. A pair of operating mechanisms 150, 250 are mounted to respective side walls 151, 251 of the container 102, and each mechanism comprises a supporting member 104, 204, a guide member 105, 205, and a flexible belt assembly 160, 260.

In the current embodiment, a pusher member 103 is mounted to the top of each supporting member 104, 204, between which it extends laterally, and each member extends vertically from the base. In another embodiment, the assembly could be. arranged on its side with the supporting members 104, 204 extending horizontally or, alternatively, the pusher member 103 could be mounted elsewhere along each supporting member.

Each supporting member 104, 204 is coupled to a flexible belt assembly 160, 260 by means of a rigid base 107, 207. Each flexible belt assembly comprises two pulleys 109, 209 (second pulley not shown) spaced vertically, about which an endless loop belt 114, 214 is free to circulate. Both lower pulleys 109, 209 are fixed to a base axle 108 which extends across the width of the container 102 and is journal led in bearings in the opposite side walls 251, 151. Typically, a belt guard 110, 210 is affixed in front of each flexible belt 114, 214.

Each guide member 105, 205 is pivotally mounted to the container wall 151, 251 at a respective pivot point 106, 206. Offset from each pivot point 106, 206 is an aperture 113, 213 through which respective supporting members 104, 204 are moveably connected. Each guide member 105, 206 is optimally further connected to the respective side walls 151, 251 of the container 102 by a wire spring 112, 212 that biases each guide member 105, 206 to the horizontal.

As can be seen in FIG. 2, the base axle 108 is driven by a belt drive 226 coupled to an electric motor 225. The control of this electric motor is illustrated in FIG. 10. Alternatively, the base axle 108 can be rotated by hand using the knob 111 on the exterior of the case, as shown in FIG. 1.

FIGS. 3 and 4 illustrate the front panel assembly 300 of the container, together with the top tray 330 to receive documents. The front panel 334 of FIG. 3 is attached to the cut-away front of FIG. 1 to form the closed container volume.

The top tray 330 includes-an elongate horizontal -aperture 331 running parallel to the front of the container. It is through this aperture 331 that documents placed on the top tray 330 are conveyed into the storage volume. In the present embodiment, a platform 332 is attached to a spring mounted bracket 336 to receive documents pushed through the aperture 331. The bracket 336 is slideably received within a guide channel 335 cut into the centre of the front panel 334, and is free to move up and down under the weight of documents deposited on the attached platform 332. A pair of spring mountings 333, 337 are arranged to retain the top of a bundle of documents stacked on the platform 332 underneath the top tray 330. FIG. 4 illustrates the same front panel assembly 300 from the rear, clearly illustrating the platform 332 and the bracket 336.

The movement of the pusher member 103, from a retracted position as shown in FIGS. 1-2 to an extended position as shown in FIG. 6, will now be described. From the perspective of FIG. 1, movement is initiated by a clockwise rotation of the base axle 108. This can be provided by hand or by an electric motor 225 via the belt drive 226. If an electric motor 225 is to be used it can be actuated through an input 1004 signal received by a central controller 1003, as illustrated in FIG. 10. The input means and controller 1003 are not shown in FIGS. 1 or 2 but could, for example, take the form of a push button and a PCB respectively. The clockwise rotation of the base axle 108 drives the flexible belts 114, 214 of each operating mechanism 150, 250 around each set of upper and lower pulleys 109, 209. This causes the pair of rigid bases 107, 207 to move upwards along with their respective flexible belt 114, 214 and thus generate an upwards movement of each supporting member 104, 204. Both rigid bases 107, 207 continue to move upwards with the continued rotation of the base axle 108, propelling the supporting members 104, 204 through the apertures 113, 213 located on the respective guide members 105, 205. The continued movement of the supporting members 104, 204 thus propels the pusher member 103 through the elongate aperture 331 in the top tray 330 of the assembly. 100.

In the current embodiment, when each rigid base 107, 207 engages with its respective guide member 105, 205, it generates a force which produces a moment about each pivot point 106, 207. This causes both guide members 105, 205 to rotate about the pivot points 106, 207 and, as the supporting members 104, 204 are constrained to move parallel to the guide members by the guide member apertures 113, 213, causes a corresponding rotation of the supporting member and pusher member 103. If an electronic drive system is being used, an upper microswitch 1001 mounted to one of the container walls 151, 251 is actuated once a guide member 105, 205 has rotated by a given angle, and signals to the central controller 1003 to stop the rotation of the electric motor 225. This control process is illustrated in FIG. 10. Alternatively, the upper microswitch 1001 could be actuated by one of the rigid bases 107, 207 reaching a designated height.

After this operation the pusher member 103 resides outside of the container with the supporting members 104, 204 penetrating the aperture 331 in the top tray 330. Furthermore, the rotation of the guide members 105, 205 causes the final resting plane of the pushing member 103 to form an acute angle with the vertical, as shown in FIG. 6.

The document storage container assembly 100 is now in a position to receive documents. This process will now be described in relation to FIGS. 5 to 8. These Figures illustrate the assembly resident in a exemplary document deposit system comprising a temporary store 505 and housing apparatus 504 suitable to receive the assembly 100. In FIG. 5, the assembly 100 is hidden below the temporary store. However, the top tray 330 of the assembly is clearly visible in FIG. 6. The temporary store 505 further comprises a pivoted tray 502, which rests on a lower moveable platform 503.

Documents are initially placed on the pivoted tray 502. In this case they are represented by banknotes 501 but any document can be used in practice. Documents can be placed by hand or alternatively deposited onto the pivoted tray 502 by additional apparatus (see FIG. 9). The depositing method can begin as a result of a user input, a set time delay or a signal from document sensing means connected to the temporary store, for example an IR sensor.

Referring now to FIG. 5, the moveable platform 503 is drawn to the back of the system, removing the support for the pivoted tray 502 and causing the tray to pivot and drop the bundle of notes 501 onto the top tray 330 of the container assembly 100 located below.

The arrangement of the container assembly 100 at rest is illustrated in FIG. 6. Initially, the pusher member 103 is located in the extended position above the top tray 330. The pair of operating mechanisms 150, 250 are then activated. This is achieved either by manually turning the exterior knob 111 or using a controller 1003 mounted within the transport system. If a controller 1003 is used, the input 1004 signal in FIG. 10 could be provided after a time delay from the time of the user input above, or any other suitable input means. From the viewpoint of FIG. 1, this controller 1003 is adapted to begin an anti clockwise rotation of the electric motor 225, rotating in turn the base axle 108 through the belt drive system 226. The anti clockwise rotation of the base axle 108 drives each flexible belt 114, 214 and the respective attached rigid bases 107, 207 downwards. This removes the applied moment from each guiding member 105, 205, allowing the members to pivot back to the horizontal, either under the force of gravity or through the compressive force of an attached spring 112, 212. The movement of both guide members 105, 205 causes a respective lateral movement of the pusher member 103 over the notes 501 in the top tray 330, as illustrated when comparing FIGS. 6 and 7. This movement can help align then notes 501 on the top tray 330 between the two lateral supporting members 104, 204.

When each guiding member 105, 205 has rotated back to the horizontal, the pusher member 103 lies in a substantially vertical plane orthogonal to the top tray 330 of the container assembly 100, as shown in FIG. 7. The continued rotation of the base axle 108 further propels each rigid base 107, 207, and thus each respective supporting member 104, 204, downwards, facilitating a corresponding movement of the pusher member 103. When the lower edge of the pusher member 103 comes into contact with the bundle of notes 501 it applies an orthogonal force to the notes along a centre line which pulls the bundle through the aperture 331 of the top tray 330 into the storage container 102. In the two embodiments, the pusher member 103 is substantially planar and composed of a rigid polymer. However, it could be replaced by a bar or wire to provide the required force.

In a preferred embodiment, these notes 501 then fall onto any notes present on the platform 332 positioned below the top tray 330. Any continued downward motion of the pusher member 103 then acts to compress the bundle and further align any stray notes between the supporting members 104, 204. In another embodiment, the storage volume of the storage container 102 may be matched to the dimensions of the deposited notes.

If an electric motor 225 and controller 1003 are being used, a lower micro-switch 1002 mounted on one of the container walls 151, 251 is actuated by one of the descending rigid bases 107, 207, sending a signal to the controller 1003 to stop the rotation of the electric motor 225, as shown in FIG. 10, and in turn ceasing the rotation of the base axle 108. Alternatively, if the action is manually powered the user simply stops turning the exterior knob 111; If more notes are to be deposited the operating mechanisms 150, 250 are actuated as initially described to return the pusher member 103 to the extended position.

In a second embodiment, the document container assembly is mounted within a document transport system. This system may form a teller deposit system 900 as shown in FIG. 9. The transport system 900 comprises housing apparatus 901 within which the container assembly 100 is mounted. The system further includes a document inlet 902 and defines a deposit path through the system. In a preferred system, a temporary store 905 is located between the document deposit path and the container assembly 100. An equivalent store is illustrated in FIG. 5 and is provided by the pivoted tray 502, which at rest is supported by the further platform 503 below. Hidden below this configuration is the top tray 330 of the container assembly 100.

Documents are initially placed on the document inlet 902. Sensing means detect that documents are present and actuate the feeding of these documents through the deposit path. Along this route processing means 904 may analyse the documents to obtain certain characteristics, for example the denomination of a banknote or the validity of a cheque or other security document.

After this optional processing the documents are deposited in the temporary store 905. Here the documents may be removed or inspected, depending on the result of any processing performed. Typically, the housing apparatus 901 comprises an escrow door 906 mounted to allow access to the temporary store 905. Once the documents have been cleared for deposit, a process similar to that described with reference to FIGS. 5-8 is set in motion, resulting in the documents being deposited in the container assembly 100.

The extended and retracted positions of the pusher member 130 also have uses beyond the deposition of documents. If the housing apparatus 901 of the document transport system 900 is so adapted, the extended position of the pusher member 103 can be used to lock the document storage container assembly 100 into the apparatus 901.

The container assembly 100, in the second embodiment, is typically removed from the housing apparatus 901 by sliding it horizontally along guide channels (not shown) aligned parallel to the plane of the pusher member 103 in FIG. 1. The assembly 100 is then recovered from the side of the housing apparatus 901 and removed for transportation or maintenance. When the pusher member 103 is extended, the removal of the assembly 100 is prevented by the locking of the pusher member in the cavity below the temporary store 905, further locking the assembly within housing apparatus 901. This is also illustrated with reference to FIG. 6 , where it can be seen that the pusher member 103 extends above the assembly 100 into a cavity below the temporary store 505. Thus the assembly 100 cannot be removed until the pusher member 103 is withdrawn to the retracted position inside the assembly. The retracting motion of the pusher member 103 to allow release can be controlled by controller 1003 within the housing apparatus 901 in response to an activating input 1004 signal from a key switch, a security code panel or any other secure input.

When the pusher member 103 is retracted it can be adapted to apply a downwards force to a bundle of notes located within the storage container 102. This force can act to compress and secure the bundle, either on its own or together with an upward force provided by the spring mounted platform 332. This provides advantages in transporting the documents as the notes are more tightly restrained and so less likely to be jumbled by any disturbances applied in transportation. Thus when the assembly 100 reaches its destination the documents or notes are still tightly bundled. To remove the bundle the base axle 108 is actuated, either manually or by applying power to the electric motor 225, and the pusher member 103 is moved to the extended position. The top tray 330 is then removed or pivoted upwards allowing access to the storage container 102 and the documents or notes within, which can be easily removed by hand. This saves time during further processing, as the time needed for removing, reordering and stacking the documents or notes is not necessary.

In alternative examples, the driving means could be provided by a rotating cam or a rack-and-pinion-type apparatus. These could provide the required force to propel the supporting members 104, 204 upwards. Other devices in accordance with the present invention could only provide an upwards and downwards motion of the pusher member 103 to deposit any documents placed on the top tray 330. This could be achieved by preventing the rotation of the guide members 105, 205 by rigidly fixing them to the container side walls 151, 251. In this example, the documents could be deposited under the pusher member 103 by lateral deposit means or by placing the documents by hand under an extended pusher member 103. Furthermore, the assembly need not require a pair of supporting members 104, 204 and their respective operating mechanisms 150, 250 but could operate using a single member and mechanism.