Title:
Firearm Rest
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A firearm rest is constructed and arranged to receive a weight plate of standard size and shape. The firearm rest can secure the weight against movement in three orthogonal directions. In some embodiments, a firearm rest comprises a frame defining a planar weight support surface, a front firearm support, and a rear firearm support, wherein the frame is constructed and arranged to support and secure a weight plate. In some embodiments, the frame comprises a clamp, a magnet, a strap, a vertically oriented shaft, a friction pad, and/or a platform having a raised perimeter flange. In some embodiments, the frame comprises a shaft that is moveable between first and second positions.



Inventors:
Reinert, Jeffrey (Sparta, WI, US)
Knudtson, Tom (Holmen, WI, US)
Nau, David (Onalaska, WI, US)
Application Number:
11/828990
Publication Date:
01/29/2009
Filing Date:
07/26/2007
Assignee:
ALLIANT TECHSYSTEMS INC. (Edina, MN, US)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F41C27/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
TROY, DANIEL J
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
VAS/NGIS (Eden Prairie, MN, US)
Claims:
1. A firearm rest comprising: a frame; a front support; a rear support; and a shaft attached to the frame, the shaft moveable between first and second positions; wherein a longitudinal axis of the shaft is oriented substantially vertically in the first position.

2. The firearm rest of claim 1, further comprising a weight having an aperture, the shaft oriented within the aperture.

3. The firearm rest of claim 2, wherein the weight comprises a standard-sized or Olympic-sized plate.

4. The firearm rest of claim 1, wherein the frame comprises a front portion, a central portion and a rear portion, the front support attached to the front portion, the shaft attached to central portion, and the rear support attached to the rear portion.

5. The firearm rest of claim 1, wherein the frame comprises a first rail and a second rail, the shaft located between the first rail and the second rail.

6. The firearm rest of claim 5, the first rail comprising a first flat surface and the second rail comprising a second flat surface, the first flat surface and the second flat surface oriented on a common plane.

7. The firearm rest of claim 6, wherein the shaft is attached to the frame at a location below said common plane, the shaft extending upwards through said common plane when in the first position.

8. The firearm rest of claim 6, wherein the entire shaft is located below said common plane when the shaft is oriented in the second position.

9. The firearm rest of claim 6, wherein the frame further comprises a first cross-member and a second cross-member, the shaft located between the first cross-member and the second cross-member, each cross-member spanning between the first rail and the second rail.

10. The firearm rest of claim 9, the first cross-member comprising a third flat surface and the second cross-member comprising a fourth flat surface, the third flat surface and the fourth flat surface oriented on the common plane, the first, second, third and fourth flat surfaces forming a continuous perimeter around the shaft.

11. The firearm rest of claim 9, further comprising a pin, the pin attached between the first cross-member and the second cross-member; the shaft further comprising a shaft aperture oriented orthogonal to the longitudinal axis, the pin extending through the shaft aperture.

12. The firearm rest of claim 1, the shaft further comprising threadings, the firearm rest further comprising a fastener that engages the threadings.

13. A firearm rest comprising: a frame defining a planar weight support surface; a front firearm support; a rear firearm support; and a shaft attached to the frame at a location below the planar weight support surface, the shaft extending upwards through a plane defined by the planar weight support surface.

14. The firearm rest of claim 13, further comprising a weight supported by the planar weight support surface.

15. The firearm rest of claim 14, the weight comprising an aperture, the shaft oriented within the aperture.

16. The firearm rest of claim 14, wherein the weight comprises a standard or Olympic plate.

17. The firearm rest of claim 13, wherein the shaft is moveable between first and second positions, the shaft oriented substantially vertically in the first position.

18. A firearm rest comprising: a frame defining a planar weight support surface; a front firearm support; and a rear firearm support; wherein the frame is constructed and arranged to support and secure a weight plate.

19. The firearm rest of claim 18, wherein said weight plate is secured against movement in three orthogonal directions.

20. The firearm rest of claim 18, wherein the frame comprises at least one structure selected from a group consisting of: a clamp, a magnet, a strap, a vertically oriented shaft, a friction pad, and a platform having a raised perimeter flange.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates generally to a firearm rest, and more specifically to a recoil-reducing firearm rest.

The use of firearm rests is known in the art. A firearm rest, such as a rifle rest, can be used to support a firearm during aiming and shooting, thereby increasing accuracy. A firearm rest can also help brace the firearm against movement immediately after firing, which can reduce the amount of recoil felt by the shooter.

More recently, firearm rests have been introduced that can accept additional weight. Thus, the mass of the firearm rest can be adjusted according to properties of the firearm and the ammunition. One example is disclosed in Patent Application Publication US 2007/0074439, which teaches a rifle rest having a u-shaped holder that accepts 25 pound bags of lead shot.

It has been found that in some instances, bags having additional mass, such as lead shot or sand, will undesirably shift in position when the firearm is fired. Further, the firearm user often must buy the shot bags and the lead shot specifically for use with the rifle rest. Thus, the additional weight for the rifle rest is only useful to the owner in conjunction with the rifle rest.

There remains a need for novel firearm rest designs that are capable of accepting and securing various amounts of weight. Further, it would be desirable for the weights to be useful to the owner in applications other than in conjunction with the firearm rest.

All US patents and applications and all other published documents mentioned anywhere in this application are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.

Without limiting the scope of the invention a brief summary of some of the claimed embodiments of the invention is set forth below. Additional details of the summarized embodiments of the invention and/or additional embodiments of the invention may be found in the Detailed Description of the Invention below.

A brief abstract of the technical disclosure in the specification is provided as well only for the purposes of complying with 37 C.F.R. 1.72. The abstract is not intended to be used for interpreting the scope of the claims.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In some embodiments, a firearm rest comprises a frame, a front support, a rear support and a shaft attached to the frame. The shaft is moveable between first and second positions. A longitudinal axis of the shaft is oriented substantially vertically in the first position.

In some embodiments, a weight plate of standard size can be supported by the frame, and the shaft can extend through a central aperture of the weight. The shaft can brace the weight against lateral movement with respect to the frame.

In some embodiments, a firearm rest comprises a frame defining a planar weight support surface, a front firearm support, a rear firearm support and a shaft. The shaft can be attached to the frame at a location below the planar weight support surface, and can extend upwards through a plane defined by the planar weight support surface.

In some embodiments, a firearm rest comprises a frame defining a planar weight support surface, a front firearm support, and a rear firearm support, wherein the frame is constructed and arranged to support and secure a weight plate. In some embodiments, the frame comprises a clamp, a magnet, a strap, a vertically oriented shaft, a friction pad, and/or a platform having a raised perimeter flange.

These and other embodiments which characterize the invention are pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed hereto and forming a part hereof. However, for a better understanding of the invention, its advantages and objectives obtained by its use, reference can be made to the drawings which form a further part hereof and the accompanying descriptive matter, in which there are illustrated and described various embodiments of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

A detailed description of the invention is hereafter described with specific reference being made to the drawings.

FIG. 1 shows an embodiment of a firearm rest supporting weight plates of a standard size.

FIG. 2 shows the embodiment of FIG. 1 with the weight plates removed.

FIG. 3 shows another view of an embodiment of a firearm rest.

FIG. 4 shows an embodiment of a frame in greater detail.

FIG. 5 shows an embodiment of a firearm rest with weight bags.

FIG. 6 shows an embodiment of a firearm rest with a raised flange.

FIG. 7 shows an embodiment of a firearm rest with clamps.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

While this invention may be embodied in many different forms, there are described in detail herein specific embodiments of the invention. This description is an exemplification of the principles of the invention and is not intended to limit the invention to the particular embodiments illustrated.

For the purposes of this disclosure, like reference numerals in the figures shall refer to like features unless otherwise indicated.

FIG. 1 shows an embodiment of a firearm rest 10 supporting a firearm 8. The firearm rest 10 may also be referred to herein as a rifle rest, a gun rest, etc. The firearm rest 10 can be used with any suitably sized firearm, for example, rifles, shotguns and the like.

The firearm rest 10 generally comprises a frame 20, a front support 40, and a rear support 60. The front and rear supports 40, 60 are arranged to support the firearm 8, and the frame 20 is arranged to support the front and rear supports 40, 60. The frame 20 is preferably constructed and arranged to receive a weight 16, such as a standard or Olympic size weight plate 18. Weight plates 18 are desirable because they can be secured to the firearm rest 20 quickly and easily, and because a purchaser of a firearm rest 20 may already own weight plates 18.

In some embodiments, the frame 20 comprises a plurality of legs 12 that can contact a surface 9 that is supporting the firearm rest 10. In some embodiments, each leg 12 can further comprise a foot 14, which can be made from a material having a higher frictional coefficient than the leg 12. Desirably, a foot 14 will frictionally engage the support surface 9 and resist lateral movement. In some embodiments, feet 14 comprise rubber. In some embodiments, a foot 14 is adjustable with respect to the leg 12, for example comprising a threaded shaft that is received by the leg 12. Thus, the feet 14 can be adjustable in height, which allows the firearm rest 10 to be oriented level on a supporting surface 9 that is not level.

FIG. 2 shows the firearm rest 10 of FIG. 1 with the weight 16 removed. The firearm rest 10 can comprise a shaft 36. A shaft 36 can comprise a portion of the frame 20 and/or can be attached to the frame 20. In some embodiments, a longitudinal axis 37 of the shaft 36 is oriented vertically or substantially vertically when the firearm rest 10 is on a horizontal surface. Preferably, a longitudinal axis 37 of the shaft 36 is oriented within 30 degrees of vertical.

The shaft 36 is preferably arranged to receive and secure a weight 16, such as a plate 18 (see FIG. 1). In some embodiments, a weight 16 comprises an aperture, and when the weight 16 is placed on the firearm rest 10, the shaft 36 extends through the aperture, for example as shown in FIG. 1.

The firearm rest 10 can further comprise a fastener 39 that engages the shaft 36 via any suitable engagement mechanism. For example, in some embodiments, a fastener 39 can frictionally engage or clamp to the shaft 36. In some embodiments, the shaft 36 comprises threads 38, and the fastener 39 comprises complimentary threads as shown in FIG. 2. In some embodiments, the fastener 39 can be shaped to allow a user to easily rotate the fastener 39 with respect to the shaft 36, for example having knurling, or comprising a star shape as illustrated in FIG. 2. The fastener 39 can be used in conjunction with the shaft 36 to secure a weight 16 against movement in three orthogonal directions.

The shaft 36 is preferably sized to allow use with both standard-sized and Olympic-sized weight plates 18. In some embodiments, the shaft 36 comprises a diameter of approximately 1 inch, or slightly less, and is therefore sized to receive a standard-sized weight plate 18. In some embodiments, a sizing adapter 17 can be provided, such as a cylindrical tube. The sizing adapter 17 desirably comprises a central aperture 19 that is sized to receive the shaft 36, for example having an inner diameter of approximately 1 inch, or slightly larger. The adapter 17 is desirably sized to receive an Olympic-sized weight plate 18, for example having an outer diameter of approximately 2 inches, or slightly less. An adapter 17 desirably has a length that is less than the length of the shaft 36, to allow for use of a fastener 39.

In some embodiments, a fastener 39 comprises a lower flange 58 that can extend into the aperture of a weight plate 18. In some embodiments, a lower flange 58 comprises a cylindrical shape having a diameter of approximately 2 inches, or slightly less. Thus, the fastener 39 can be used to secure an Olympic-sized weight, and an adapter 17 is not required.

In some embodiments, the shaft 36 can comprise a diameter of approximately 2 inches, or slightly less, and is therefore sized to receive an Olympic-sized weight plate 18.

In some embodiments, the frame 20 comprises a front portion 21, a central portion 22 and a rear portion 23. The shaft 36 is located in the central portion 22. The front support 40 can attach to the front portion 21, and the rear support 60 can attach to the rear portion 23. Legs 12 can be attached to the front and rear portions 21, 23. Preferably, the firearm rest 10 comprises at least three legs 12. For example, at least two legs 12 can attach to the front portion 21 and at least one leg 12 can attach to the rear portion 23. Additional legs 12 can provide improved stability. In some embodiments, a plurality of legs 12 can attach to the front portion 21, and a plurality of legs 12 can attach to the rear portion 23.

The front support 40 is constructed and arranged to support a firearm 8. In some embodiments, the front support 40 comprises a contoured sandbag 42.

The front support 40 can be vertically adjustable. In some embodiments, the front support 40 comprises a threaded shaft 44 and an adjustment mechanism 46, such as a nut with complimentary internal threadings. In some embodiments, the adjustment mechanism 46 abuts the front portion 21 of the frame 20. In some embodiments, rotation of the adjustment mechanism 46 will cause the threaded shaft 44, and thus the front support 40, to actuate upwards or downwards with respect to the frame 20. In some embodiments, the adjustment mechanism 46 comprises a shape that allows easy adjustment of the mechanism, for example having knurling, or comprising a star shape as illustrated in FIG. 2.

In some embodiments, the height of the front support 40 can be locked with a locking mechanism 48. In some embodiments, for example as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, the locking mechanism 48 comprises a threaded pin that is received by the front portion 21 of the frame 20. The locking mechanism 48 preferably abuts and tightens against the threaded shaft 44 in order to lock the threaded shaft 44 in place. In some embodiments, the threaded shaft 44 can comprises a groove or channel 49 that can receive the locking mechanism 48. The channel 49 allows the locking mechanism 48 to be quickly released, and the height of the front support 40 to be adjusted without complete removal of the locking mechanism 48. In some embodiments, a locking mechanism 48 can comprise a T-shape, which allows for easier rotation.

The front support 40 can further comprise a lateral adjustment mechanism 52. A lateral adjustment mechanism 52 can comprise a receiving member 54 that mounts upon the threaded shaft 44, or in some embodiments, mounts upon the front portion 21 of the frame 20. The receiving member 54 is laterally adjustable with respect to the rest of the front support 40. In some embodiments, the receiving member 54 is engaged to a threaded adjustment shaft 56, which comprises a knob 57. Rotation of the threaded adjustment shaft 56 causes the receiving member 54 to actuate laterally.

The rear support 60 is constructed and arranged to support a firearm 8. In some embodiments, the rear support 60 comprises a contoured sandbag 62. In some embodiments, the rear support 60 comprises a recoil strap 64. In some embodiments, the recoil strap 64 comprises a non-metallic material, such as a fabric. In some embodiments, the recoil strap 64 can be removed. In some embodiments, the size/length of the recoil strap 64 is adjustable, thus allowing for use with firearms of different sizes and shapes.

The rear support 60 can be vertically adjustable, for example comprising a vertical adjustment mechanism similar to that of the front support 40. In some embodiments, the rear support 60 comprises a threaded shaft 44a, an adjustment mechanism 46a and a locking mechanism 48a, for example as described with respect to the front support 40.

FIG. 3 shows another view of an embodiment of a firearm rest 10, wherein the central portion 22 of the frame 20 is more visible.

The frame 20 can have any suitable shape and comprises at least one structural member spanning between the front portion 21 and the rear portion 23. In some embodiments, the frame 20 comprises a first rail 30 and a second rail 32 spanning between the front portion 21 and the rear portion 23. The first rail 30 and second rail 32 are preferably oriented on opposite sides of the shaft 36, and can therefore provide stable support for a weight 16. In some embodiments, the first rail 30 comprises a mirror image of the second rail 32, wherein the mirror image is taken across a longitudinal axis 11 of the firearm rest 10.

In some embodiments, each rail 30, 32 comprises a flat surface 24 that defines a support area for a weight. The flat surfaces 24 of the rails 30, 32 are preferably oriented on a common plane 26. In some embodiments, the common plane 26 is oriented horizontally. Supporting surfaces that are oriented in the common plane 26, such as the flat surfaces 24, can collectively define a planar weight support surface.

In some embodiments, the frame 20 further comprises at least one cross-member 34 that spans between the first rail 30 and the second rail 32. In some embodiments, the frame 20 comprises a plurality of cross-members 34. In some embodiments, a cross-member comprises a flat surface 24 oriented in the common plane 26. In some embodiments, flat surfaces 24 of the rails 30, 32 and cross-members 34 can form a continuous perimeter that extends around the shaft 36, wherein each surface of the continuous perimeter is oriented in the common plane 26.

In some embodiments, the shaft 36 is attached to a cross-member 34. In some embodiments, the shaft 36 is supported by multiple cross-members 34. For example, the shaft 36 can be connected between a first cross-member 34a and a second cross-member 34b.

In some embodiments, the shaft 36 can be attached to a connector 28, and the connector 28 can be attached to the frame 20, for example being attached to one or more cross-members 34. As shown in FIG. 3, the connector 28 comprises a pin that is attached between the first cross-member 34a and the second cross-member 34b. The shaft 36 is hingedly attached to the pin. In some embodiments, the shaft 36 can comprise an aperture, and the pin can extend through the shaft aperture.

In some embodiments, the firearm rest 10 further comprises at least one magnet 66. The magnet(s) 66 are preferably arranged to attract and help secure a weight positioned on the frame 20. In some embodiments, the magnet(s) 66 are attached to the frame 20. In some embodiments, an upper side of a magnet 66 can be placed flush with a flat surface 24 of one or more frame 20 elements. Thus, an upper side of a magnet 66 can lie in the common plane 26.

In some embodiments, the shaft 36 is moveable between at least first and second positions. For example, as shown in FIG. 3, the shaft 36 is hingedly attached to the frame 20 and rotatable about an axis 11 that passes through the center of rotation of the shaft 36.

A first position can comprise a deployed position wherein the shaft 36 is arranged to receive and secure a weight plate 18, for example as illustrated in FIG. 2. In some embodiments, a longitudinal axis 37 (see FIG. 2) of the shaft 36 is oriented vertically or substantially vertically when the shaft 36 is in the first position.

A second position can comprise a stowed position wherein the shaft 36 is not positioned to receive a weight plate 18. In some embodiments, when in the second position, the shaft 36 is oriented such that it will not interfere with any type of weight placed upon the frame 20. In some embodiments, the entire shaft 36 is positioned below the common plane 26 or weight support area when in the second position.

Preferably, the longitudinal axis 37 of the shaft 36 has different orientations in the first and second positions. Thus, the longitudinal axis 37 in the second position is oriented at an angle to the longitudinal axis 37 in the first position. In some embodiments, the longitudinal axis 37 is oriented vertically in the first position and non-vertically in the second position, for example being oriented horizontally.

In some embodiments, the shaft 36 is attached to the frame 20 at a location below the common plane 26. In some embodiments, the shaft 36 extends up through the common plane 26 when oriented in the first position.

FIG. 4 shows a view of the shaft 36 oriented in a second or stowed position. In some embodiments, a securement device 64 can be included to retain the shaft 36 in a given position. In some embodiments, the securement device 64 comprises a strap. As shown in FIG. 4, the securement strap 64 is arranged to secure the shaft 36 in the stowed position.

In some embodiments, the firearm rest 10 can further comprise a weight strap 68. When the shaft 36 is oriented in the second position, any suitable weight can be placed on the frame 20. One or more weight straps 68 can be used to secure the weight in place. In some embodiments, a weight strap 68 can be threaded between cross-members 34 of the frame 20.

FIG. 5 shows an embodiment of a firearm rest 10 supporting weight bags 74. Weight bags 74 can be filled with sand, lead shot, etc. Desirably, each weight bag 74 can be secured to the frame 20 with a securement device, such as a weight strap 68.

FIG. 6 shows another embodiment of a firearm rest 10. In some embodiments, the frame 20 further comprises a raised flange 72 that extends around a support area for the weight. In some embodiments, a support area comprises the collective supporting surfaces of various frame 20 elements, for example the flat surfaces 24 described with respect to FIG. 3.

The raised flange 72 desirably defines the shape of a perimeter of a weight. Thus, the raised flange 72 can encircle a weight and brace the weight against lateral movement. In various embodiments, a raised flange 72 can have any suitable shape and can have any suitable height. In some embodiments, a shaped weight (not shown) can be provided for the firearm rest 10, and the raised flange 72 can define a perimeter of the shaped weight—for example a square or other polygon, or even an irregular shape. In some embodiments, a raised flange 72 comprises a circular shape. In some embodiments, a raised flange 72 can be sized for use with specific standard-sized or Olympic-sized weight plates 18. For example, a raised flange 72 having an 11 inch diameter lends itself to use with one or more 25 pound Olympic-sized weight plate(s). The height of the raised flange 72 can be sized to secure any suitable amount of weight plates 18, for example, two, three or four stacked weight plates 18. A raised flange 72 having a diameter of approximately 18 inches lends itself to use with one or more 35 pound Olympic-sized weight plate(s).

A raised flange 72 can be used with or without a shaft 36 as described previously herein.

In some embodiments, a raised flange 72 can be attached to the frame 20. For example, in some embodiments, the raised flange 72 comprises a ring, which can be attached to the frame 20 at any location where the frame 20 and raised flange 72 overlap. In some embodiments, the raised flange 72 can be attached to the frame rails 30, 32.

In some embodiments, the firearm rest 10 further comprises a shaped platform 76 that is arranged to support the weight. In some embodiments, the platform 76 comprises a planar piece of material that is attached to the frame 20. In some embodiments, a platform 76 can include a raised flange 72.

In some embodiments, a platform 76 can include a frictional surface that engages the weight. In some embodiments, the platform 76 can comprise a rubber coating. In some embodiments, the platform 76 can comprise a leather or suede surface. In some embodiments, the platform 76 can comprise a foam material. In some embodiments, the platform 76 can include one or more suction cups (not shown) oriented to engage a weight.

FIG. 7 shows another embodiment of a firearm rest 10.

In some embodiments, a firearm rest 10 comprises one or more clamps 80. Clamps 80 are preferably arranged to secure a weight that is placed upon the frame 20. A clamp 80 can comprise any suitable structure and shape, and preferably can be actuated between secured and released positions.

As shown in FIG. 7, in some embodiments, a clamp 80 can threadably engage the frame 20. In some embodiments, a clamp 80 engages the frame 20 at a location outside of the weight support area and comprises an arm 81 that overhangs the weight support area. Thus, the arm 81 can engage a weight that is placed in the weight support area, and secure the weight against movement.

In some embodiments, each rail 30, 32 of the frame 20 can comprise two clamps.

Clamps 80 can be used with or without a shaft 36 as described previously herein. Clamps 80 can secure a weight against movement in three orthogonal directions.

Various embodiments of a firearm rest 10 can be designed for use with various amounts of weight. Preferably, a firearm rest 10 is capable of accepting at least 50 pounds of weight. It has been found that 25 pounds of weight is suitable for many shooting applications, while some shooters prefer 50 pounds. In some embodiments, a firearm rest 10 is constructed and arranged to support and secure at least two 25 pound weight plates.

The above disclosure is intended to be illustrative and not exhaustive. This description will suggest many variations and alternatives to one of ordinary skill in this field of art. All these alternatives and variations are intended to be included within the scope of the claims where the term “comprising” means “including, but not limited to”. Those familiar with the art may recognize other equivalents to the specific embodiments described herein which equivalents are also intended to be encompassed by the claims.

Further, the particular features presented in the dependent claims can be combined with each other in other manners within the scope of the invention such that the invention should be recognized as also specifically directed to other embodiments having any other possible combination of the features of the dependent claims. For instance, for purposes of claim publication, any dependent claim which follows should be taken as alternatively written in a multiple dependent form from all prior claims which possess all antecedents referenced in such dependent claim if such multiple dependent format is an accepted format within the jurisdiction (e.g. each claim depending directly from claim 1 should be alternatively taken as depending from all previous claims). In jurisdictions where multiple dependent claim formats are restricted, the following dependent claims should each be also taken as alternatively written in each singly dependent claim format which creates a dependency from a prior antecedent-possessing claim other than the specific claim listed in such dependent claim below.

This completes the description of the preferred and alternate embodiments of the invention. Those skilled in the art may recognize other equivalents to the specific embodiment described herein which equivalents are intended to be encompassed by the claims attached hereto.