Title:
Denomination organized wallet
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A foldable denomination organized wallet (100) is provided. The wallet can include a billfold presenting a plurality of departments (101-120) to separately store money of differing denominations, wherein each department presents a monetary visual identifier for each denomination of the money, and the plurality of departments are visually staggered in order of denomination for showing the visual identifiers, a plurality of columns (125-126) to hold coins of differing denominations, wherein each column presents a coin visual identifier for each denomination of the coins, and the columns are visually ordered by denomination, and an identification pocket (160) made of a clear material to hold and show an identification card, wherein the coin holder and the identification pocket is attached to a front department of the billfold.



Inventors:
Duchon, Tina (Boynton Beach, FL, US)
Application Number:
11/825872
Publication Date:
01/15/2009
Filing Date:
07/11/2007
Assignee:
Tina Duchon (Boynton Beach, FL, US)
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
150/132, 150/140, 150/145
International Classes:
A45C1/06
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20080121322Cell phone Wallet SleeveMay, 2008Thomson
20020108688Handbag and case with multi-purpose strapAugust, 2002Reiss
20080060730Wallet for the visually impairedMarch, 2008Young et al.
20040060627Automobile coverApril, 2004Davis
20090193616Rolling Patio Furniture CoversAugust, 2009Hendricks et al.
20050194386Zipper box coverSeptember, 2005Shai
20080222782Decorative Removable Helmet CoverSeptember, 2008Stokes
20030168879Ladder rack coverSeptember, 2003Grudek
20040074577Protective structure for vehiclesApril, 2004Tavelli et al.
20080245452Weatherproofing Apparatus and Method for Cameras and Video RecordersOctober, 2008Law et al.
20090133789Sanitary cover for a handleMay, 2009Hall



Primary Examiner:
WEAVER, SUE A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Tina Duchon (Boynton Beach, FL, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A foldable denomination organized wallet comprising: a billfold presenting a plurality of departments to separately store money of differing denominations, wherein each department presents a monetary visual identifier for each denomination of the money, and the plurality of departments are visually staggered in order of denomination for showing the visual identifiers; a plurality of columns to hold coins of differing denominations, wherein each column presents a coin visual identifier for each denomination of the coins, and the columns are visually ordered by denomination; and an identification pocket made of a clear material to hold and show an identification card, wherein the coin holder and the identification pocket is attached to a front department of the billfold.

2. The foldable denomination organized wallet of claim 1, wherein the departments are staggered such that a money placed in a department of the wallet does not block a visibility of the monetary visual identifier for the department or other departments.

3. The foldable denomination organized wallet of claim 1, wherein the columns are arranged such that coins placed in a column of the wallet overlaps with coins already in the column, and the coins do not block a visibility of the coin visual identifier

4. The foldable denomination organized wallet of claim 1, wherein the foldable wallet is a tri-fold wallet that is of a length at least as long as the money.

5. The foldable denomination organized wallet of claim 1, further comprising a detachable fastener to securely close the foldable wallet.

6. The foldable denomination organized wallet of claim 1, wherein the departments are staggered in order from highest denomination to lowest denomination, such that higher denomination bills are foremost visible when the foldable wallet is opened.

7. The foldable denomination organized wallet of claim 1, wherein the foldable wallet is made of at least one among leather, a synthetic material, denim, cloth, or plastic, and the columns of coin holders are made of plastic or lightweight metal.

8. The foldable wallet of claim 1, wherein the columns have a grooved top insert for holding the coins in place once entered into a column.

9. The foldable denomination organized wallet of claim 1, wherein a first column holds at least 5 quarters, a second column holds at least 5 dimes, a third column holds at least 5 nickels, and a fourth column holds at least 5 pennies.

10. The foldable denomination organized wallet of claim 1, wherein a first column holds 4 quarters to equate to $1, and a second column and a third column each hold 5 dimes to equate to $1.

11. A tri-fold wallet suitable for use by Autistic individuals, the tri-fold wallet comprising: a billfold for twenty dollar bills, ten dollar bills, five dollar bills, and one dollar bills, wherein the billfold comprises a plurality of departments arranged in order of monetary denomination, wherein each department visually presents a monetary visual identifier corresponding to a denomination of a bill; and a coin holder for quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies, wherein the coin holder comprises a plurality of columns arranged in order of denomination for securely holding coins, where each column visually presents a coin visual identifier corresponding to the denomination of the coin, wherein the coin holder is attached to a front department of the billfold.

12. The tri-fold wallet of claim 11, wherein the departments of the billfold are staggered such that a bill placed in a department of the wallet does not block a visibility of the monetary visual identifier for the department or other departments.

13. The tri-fold wallet of claim 12, wherein the departments are color coded such that a bill of a certain denomination corresponds to a certain color.

14. The tri-fold wallet of claim 11, wherein the columns are arranged such that coins placed in a column of the wallet overlaps with coins already in the column, and the coins do not block a visibility of the coin visual identifier

15. The tri-fold wallet of claim 12, wherein the columns are color coded such that a coin of a certain denomination corresponds to a certain color.

16. The tri-fold wallet of claim 11, wherein the tri-fold wallet is made from leather, denim, cloth, plastic, or any combination thereof.

17. The tri-fold wallet of claim 11, wherein the coin holder is made of plastic, aluminum, or a light weight metal.

18. A wallet comprising: a billfold presenting a plurality of departments to separately store money of differing denominations, wherein each department presents a monetary visual identifier for each denomination of the money, and the plurality of departments are visually staggered in order of denomination for showing the visual identifiers; a coin holder attached to a forefront department of the billfold to hold coins of differing denominations, wherein the coin holder includes a first pair of columns for holding high denomination coins, and a second pair of columns for holding low denomination coins, wherein each column presents a coin visual identifier for each denomination, and the columns are visually ordered by denomination; and an identification pocket attached to the forefront department of the billfold positioned between the first pair of columns and the second pair of columns and made of a clear material to hold and present an identification card, wherein the coin holder and the identification pocket is attached to a front department of the billfold.

19. The wallet of claim 18, wherein the departments of the billfold are staggered such a bill placed in a department of the wallet does not block a visibility of the monetary visual identifier for the department or other departments, and the departments are color coded such that a bill of a certain denomination corresponds to a certain color, wherein higher denominations correspond to brighter colors than lower denominations.

20. The tri-fold wallet of claim 11, wherein the columns are arranged such that coins placed in a column of the wallet overlaps with coins already in the column, and the coins do not block a visibility of the coin visual identifier, and the columns are color coded such that a coin of a certain denomination corresponds to a certain color, wherein higher denominations correspond to brighter colors than lower denominations.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to wallets and, more particularly, to denomination organized wallets.

BACKGROUND

Children and adults with Autism and neurological disorders need to be able to function appropriately in the real world. These individuals generally lack organizational skills which make it difficult for them to interact on a financial level with others. These individuals generally have a difficult time using a standard wallet.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The features of the system, which are believed to be novel, are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The embodiments herein, can be understood by reference to the following description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in the several figures of which like reference numerals identify like elements, and in which:

FIG. 1 depicts an exemplary illustration of a foldable denomination organized wallet in a closed arrangement in accordance with one embodiment;

FIG. 2 depicts the exemplary foldable denomination organized wallet in a partially open arrangement in accordance with one embodiment;

FIG. 3 depicts the exemplary foldable denomination organized wallet in a fully open arrangement in accordance with one embodiment; and

FIG. 4 depicts a back view of the exemplary foldable denomination organized wallet in a fully open arrangement in accordance with one embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Embodiments in accordance with the present disclosure provide a denomination organized wallet.

In a first embodiment of the present disclosure, a foldable denomination organized wallet can include a billfold presenting a plurality of departments to separately store money of differing denominations, wherein each department presents a monetary visual identifier for each denomination of the money, and the plurality of departments are visually staggered in order of denomination for showing the visual identifiers. The foldable denomination organized wallet can include a plurality of columns to hold coins of differing denominations, wherein each column presents a coin visual identifier for each denomination of the coins, and the columns are visually ordered by denomination. The foldable denomination organized wallet can include an identification pocket made of a clear material to hold and show an identification card, wherein the coin holder and the identification pocket is attached to a front department of the billfold.

In a second embodiment of the present disclosure, a tri-fold wallet suitable for use by Autistic individuals and individuals with neurological disorders can include a billfold for twenty dollar bills, ten dollar bills, five dollar bills, and one dollar bills, wherein the billfold comprises a plurality of departments arranged in order of monetary denomination, wherein each department visually presents a monetary visual identifier corresponding to a denomination of a bill. The tri-fold wallet can include a coin holder attached to a front department of the billfold for quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies, wherein the coin holder comprises a plurality of columns arranged in order of denomination for securely holding coins, where each column visually presents a coin visual identifier corresponding to the denomination of the coin.

In a third embodiment of the present disclosure, a wallet can include a billfold presenting a plurality of departments to separately store money of differing denominations, wherein each department presents a monetary visual identifier for each denomination of the money, and the plurality of departments are visually staggered in order of denomination for showing the visual identifiers. The wallet can include a coin holder attached to a forefront department of the billfold to hold coins of differing denominations, wherein the coin holder includes a first pair of columns for holding high denomination coins, and a second pair of columns for holding low denomination coins, wherein each column presents a coin visual identifier for each denomination, and the columns are visually ordered by denomination. The wallet can include an identification pocket attached to the forefront department of the billfold positioned between the first pair of columns and the second pair of columns and made of a clear material to hold and present an identification card, wherein the coin holder and the identification pocket is attached to a front department of the billfold.

Broadly stated, embodiments are directed to a special needs wallet that has compartments organized by denominations of coins (e.g. quarters, dimes, nickels, pennies) and bills (e.g. twenty dollar bill, ten dollar bill, five dollar bill, and one dollar bill) which allows children and adults with special needs to perform independently when they go out in public. For example, individuals with Autism and neurological disorders generally have a difficult time keeping track of money. These individuals lack organizational skills and cannot differentiate between a dime and a nickel, or a quarter and a nickel, or any other monetary denominations. They either do not have the ability to differentiate or they are losing the ability to differentiate. However, they can recognize compartments or containers and perform efficient tasks such as sorting items with the compartments or containers, though they may not be able to differentiate between the items among one or more containers themselves.

The special needs wallet allows children and adults to feel independent when they go out on their own or with their parents and carry their own wallet. The special needs wallet is a teaching tool that allows them to be financially responsible and independent. It can mitigate frustration and embarrassment these individuals generally face when they go out in public. The special needs wallet gives them a sense of self worth and security about spending money for a meal, a movie, a store bought object, or just to know they have a wallet like everyone else. Moreover, most Autistic individuals are very methodical by nature and may be very happy that each bill and each coin goes into their proper place in the special needs wallet.

While the specification concludes with claims defining the features of embodiments of the invention that are regarded as novel, it is believed that the invention will be better understood from a consideration of the following description in conjunction with the figures, in which like reference numerals are carried forward. Embodiments herein can be implemented in a wide variety of ways using a variety of materials and manufacturing processes.

FIG. 1 depicts an exemplary illustration of a foldable denomination organized wallet 100 (herein called ‘wallet’) in a closed arrangement in accordance with one embodiment. The wallet 100 can be made of leather, synthetic material, denim, cloth, plastic, or any combination thereof. The wallet 100 can be a tri-fold wallet that is of a length at least as long as the bills placed in wallet. In one arrangement, the wallet 100 can include a ‘two wise’ (YY) logo for identifying the wallet as a denomination organized wallet. The wallet 100 can include a detachable fastener 140 to securely close the foldable wallet. The fastener can be a button snap, a hook and pin, a button sleeve, or a Velcro attachment but is not limited to these. The wallet 140 in a closed arrangement can be sufficiently small to comfortably fit in a front or back jeans or pants pocket.

FIG. 2 depicts the wallet 100 in a partially open arrangement in accordance with one embodiment. As illustrated, the wallet 100 can include a billfold presenting a plurality of departments 101-120 to separately store money of differing denominations (e.g. twenty dollar bill, ten dollar bill, five dollar bill, and one dollar bill), wherein each department presents a monetary visual identifier for each denomination of the money, and the plurality of departments are visually staggered in order of denomination for showing the visual identifiers. The departments 101-120 can be staggered in order from highest denomination to lowest denomination, such that higher denomination bills are foremost visible when the foldable wallet is opened. This is also beneficial since the higher denomination bills are foremost and the lesser denomination bills are farther from reach when the wallet is in the open configuration. An autistic individual can recognize that the more important bills (e.g. $20) are closer in reach than the less important bills (e.g. $1) which are farther in reach. For example, the first department 101 corresponds to the bill fold for one dollar bills and includes a $1 visual identifier, the second department 105 corresponds to the bill fold for five dollar bills and includes a $5 visual identifier, the third department 110 corresponds to the bill fold for ten dollar bills and includes a $10 visual identifier, and the fourth department 120 corresponds to the bill fold for twenty dollar bills and includes a $20 visual identifier.

The wallet 100 can include a plurality of columns (e.g. 125 and 126) to hold coins of differing denominations (e.g. quarters, dimes, nickels, pennies), wherein each column presents a coin visual identifier for each denomination of the coins, and the columns are visually ordered by denomination. An autistic individual can recognize that coins to the left are more important that the coins on the right since the left section is the first section to open, as shown in FIG. 2. Again, autistic individuals are more capable of recalling organizational aspects than differentiations among items within a group (e.g. coins across multiple columns). For example, the first column 125 on the left can hold four quarters which equate to $1, and the second column on the right can hold 5 dimes which equates to 50 cents. The columns can contain more that 4 coins, and are not limited to the number shown.

The columns can be plastic, aluminum, or lightweight metal structures that allow coins to be overlapped with one another. Each column can have a visual identifier (e.g. 25c, 10c, 5c, 1c). The visual identifier can be numeric based of text based (e.g. ‘quarter’, ‘nickel’, ‘dime’, or ‘penny’). Autistic individuals of individuals with neurological disorders can identify compartments and containers and perform sorting tasks within the containers, though they may not be able to differentiate between items (e.g. bills or coins) within the compartments (e.g. billfold departments and coin holders). The user can slide a coin into a sleeve of the column 125, which can include a topmost insert 113 to hold the coins in place once inserted. Moreover, an inner sleeve of the column 125 can securely hold the coins in place even if the column 125 is not full. The user can slide in and slide out the coins into the column 125 with a single finger.

FIG. 3 depicts the wallet 100 in a fully open arrangement. As illustrated the wallet can include a 120 billfold for twenty dollar bills, a billfold 110 for ten dollar bills, a billfold 105 for five dollar bills, and a billfold 101 one dollar bills, wherein the billfold comprises a plurality of departments (101-120) arranged in order of monetary denomination, wherein each department visually presents a monetary visual identifier (e.g. $20, $10, $5, $1) corresponding to a denomination of a bill. The visual identifier can also be ‘twenty’, ‘ten’, ‘five, and ‘one’. The wallet 100 can include a coin holder 125 for quarters, a coin holder 126 for dimes, a coin holder 127 for nickels, and a coin holder 128 for pennies, wherein the coin holder comprises a plurality of columns arranged in order of denomination for securely holding coins, where each column visually presents a coin visual identifier corresponding to the denomination of the coin. In one arrangement, the first column holds 125 at least 5 quarters, a second column 126 holds at least 5 dimes, a third column 127 holds at least 5 nickels, and a fourth column 128 holds at least 5 pennies. The wallet can include an identification pocket 160 made of a clear material to hold and show an identification card, for example, such as a license, a personal identification card, or any suitable form of identification. The coin holder and the identification pocket is attached to a front department of the billfold.

In one arrangement, the coin holder includes a first pair (125 and 126) of columns for holding high denomination coins (e.g. quarters and dimes), and a second pair of columns (127 and 128) for holding low denomination coins, wherein each column presents a coin visual identifier for each denomination, and the columns are visually ordered by denomination. The columns are ordered to make selection of the columns easier for Autistic individuals or individuals with neurological disorder who may have a difficult time identifying relationships between columns. These individuals can associate an order such as left to right or back to front more easily than differentiating between elements within the compartments. In such regard, the billfolds (101-125) and coin holders (125-128) are organized by denomination with visual identifiers for complying with these individuals' ability to organize and sort. That is, the denominations of coins and bills are arranged to more effectively suit their skill sets (e.g. organization and sorting).

The departments of the billfold can be staggered such that a bill placed in a department of the wallet does not block a visibility of the monetary visual identifier for the department or other departments. For example, the height of the 110 department is larger than the height of the $10 bill placed in the $10 department 110. Accordingly, the next department 105 for the $5 bills is larger in height than the $10 department 110, and so on. In such regard, the departments are staggered to allow visibility of the visual identifier ($1, $5, $10, $20) associated with the denomination compartment. The visual identifier can be an imprint, a sewing design, a stamp, an ink print, or any other suitable visual indication element. Moreover, the visual identifier can be repeated at multiple points along a shown edge of the department. For example, as shown in FIG. 3, each bill fold can show the denomination three times, corresponding to the number of wallet folds (i.e. tri-fold wallet). The departments 101-120 can also be color coded such that a bill of a certain denomination corresponds to a certain color. The columns can be arranged such that coins placed in a column 125-126 of the wallet 100 overlap with coins already in the column, and the coins do not block a visibility of the coin visual identifier. Autistic individuals or individuals with neurological disorder benefit from seeing the coin numerical visual identifier (e.g. 25c, 10c, 5c, 1c) or coin text visual identifier (e.g. quarter, dime, nickel, penny). The columns can be color coded such that a coin of a certain denomination corresponds to a certain color. For example, the higher denomination coins can be associated with brighter colors than lower denomination coins. Autistic individuals or individuals can organize better based on contrasts which allows them to associate higher brightness colors with higher denomination money.

FIG. 4 depicts a back view of the exemplary foldable denomination organized wallet in a fully open arrangement. As illustrated, the fastener 140 can freely float in the open arrangement and securely attach to an attachment piece 145 in a closed configuration. In other arrangement, the fastener may be securely fastened in an open configuration, for example, with a snap button fastener.

Upon reviewing the aforementioned embodiments, it would be evident to an artisan with ordinary skill in the art that said embodiments can be modified, reduced, or enhanced without departing from the scope and spirit of the claims described below. Accordingly, the reader is directed to the claims section for a fuller understanding of the breadth and scope of the present disclosure.

While the invention has been described in conjunction with specific embodiments, it is evident that many alternatives, modifications, permutations and variations will become apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art in light of the foregoing description. Accordingly, it is intended that the present invention embrace all such alternatives, modifications, permutations and variations as fall within the scope of the appended claims. While the preferred embodiments of the invention have been illustrated and described, it will be clear that the embodiments of the invention are not so limited. Numerous modifications, changes, variations, substitutions and equivalents will occur to those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the present embodiments of the invention as defined by the appended claims.