Title:
Auxiliary engine driven device and methods for use thereof
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Auxiliary engine driven devices and methods for using the same are provided. The auxiliary engine driven devices includes an engine having a first end and a second end and an auxiliary device. The engine is drivingly connected to the auxiliary device on the first end of the engine to provide power to operate the auxiliary device. A cooling system is disposed on the engine with the cooling system having a heat exchanger disposed adjacent the second end of the engine. A tangential blower is positioned along a side of the engine. An enclosure for enclosing the engine and the auxiliary device is also included. The enclosure has a first and second end and is configured to permit the pulling of air by the tangential blower over the auxiliary device and at least a portion of the engine from the first end of the enclosure and pulling of air by the tangential blower through the heat exchanger of the cooling system and over at least a portion of the engine from a second end of the enclosure.



Inventors:
Couick, Stephen A. (Fort Mill, SC, US)
Application Number:
11/820931
Publication Date:
12/25/2008
Filing Date:
06/21/2007
Assignee:
Engine Power Source, Inc.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F04B17/05
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
GIMIE, MAHMOUD
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Jenkins, Wilson, Taylor & Hunt, P.A. (Morrisville, NC, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. An auxiliary engine driven device comprising: (a) an engine having a first end and a second end, (b) an auxiliary device, the engine drivingly connected to the auxiliary device on the first end of the engine to provide power to operate the auxiliary device; (c) a cooling system disposed on the engine, the cooling system having a heat exchanger disposed adjacent the second end of the engine; (d) a tangential blower positioned along a side of the engine; and (e) an enclosure for enclosing the engine and the auxiliary device, the enclosure having a first and second end and being configured to permit the pulling of air by the tangential blower over the auxiliary device and at least a portion of the engine from the first end of the enclosure and the pulling of air by the tangential blower through the heat exchanger of the cooling system and over at least a portion of the engine from the second end of the enclosure.

2. The auxiliary engine driven device of claim 1, wherein the enclosure includes accessory ducts configured to specifically direct air from outside the enclosure over components of at least one of the engine or the auxiliary device with the air being pulled in through the ducts by the tangential blower.

3. The auxiliary engine driven device of claim 2, wherein the components over which air is directed by the accessory ducts include at least one of the alternator, starter, stop solenoid, oil pan, or wiring of the engine.

4. The auxiliary engine driven device of claim 2, wherein the components over which air is directed by the accessory ducts include at least one of the frame or wiring of the auxiliary device.

5. The auxiliary engine driven device of claim 1, wherein the enclosure includes accessory apertures configured to direct air from outside the enclosure over components of at least one of the engine or the auxiliary device with the air being pulled in through the ducts by the tangential blower.

6. The auxiliary engine driven device of claim 1, wherein the auxiliary device is at least one of an electric generator or a hydraulic power unit.

7. The auxiliary engine driven device of claim 1, wherein the tangential blower changes the direction of the air being pulled into the enclosure before discharging the air from the enclosure.

8. The auxiliary engine driven device of claim 7, wherein the enclosure defines a top, a bottom, and at least two sides and wherein a discharge chute of the tangential fan opens through one of the a top, a bottom, or sides.

9. The auxiliary engine driven device of claim 7, wherein the direction of the air is changed by about 90°.

10. The auxiliary engine driven device of claim 1, wherein the enclosure is minimally enlarged to accommodate the tangential blower.

11. The auxiliary engine driven device of claim 1, wherein the tangential blower is positioned along the side of the engine between the first end and the second end of the engine.

12. The auxiliary engine driven device of claim 1, wherein the tangential blower is driven directly by the engine.

13. The auxiliary engine driven device of claim 1, wherein the tangential blower is positioned within a recess along a side of the engine.

14. An auxiliary engine driven device comprising: (a) an auxiliary device for providing auxiliary power; (b) an engine having a first end and a second end, the engine drivingly connected to the auxiliary device on the first end to provide power to the auxiliary device to be converted into the auxiliary power; (c) a cooling system disposed on the engine, the cooling system having a heat exchanger disposed adjacent the second end of the engine; (d) a tangential blower positioned along a side of the engine between the first end and the second end of the engine, the tangential blower configured to be driven during operation of the engine; and (e) an enclosure for enclosing the engine and the auxiliary device, the enclosure having a first and second end and being configured to permit the pulling of air by the tangential blower over the auxiliary device and at least a portion of the engine from the first end of the enclosure and pulling of air by the tangential blower through the heat exchanger of the cooling system and over at least a portion of the engine from a second end of the enclosure.

15. The auxiliary engine driven device of claim 14, wherein the enclosure includes accessory ducts configured to specifically direct air from outside the enclosure over components of at least one of the engine or the auxiliary device with the air being pulled in through the ducts by the tangential blower.

16. The auxiliary engine driven device of claim 15, wherein the components over which air is directed by the accessory ducts include at least one of alternator, starter, stop solenoid, oil pan, or wiring of the engine.

17. The auxiliary engine driven device of claim 15, wherein the components over which air is directed by the accessory ducts include at least one of the frame or wiring of the auxiliary device.

18. The auxiliary engine driven device of claim 14, wherein the enclosure includes accessory apertures configured to direct air from outside the enclosure over components of at least one of the engine or the auxiliary device with the air being pulled in through the ducts by the tangential blower.

19. The auxiliary engine driven device of claim 14, wherein the auxiliary device is at least one of an electric generator or a hydraulic power unit.

20. The auxiliary engine driven device of claim 14, wherein the tangential blower changes the direction of the air being pulled into the enclosure before discharging the air from the enclosure.

21. The auxiliary engine driven device of claim 20, wherein the enclosure defines a top, a bottom, and at least two sides and wherein a discharge chute of the tangential fan opens through one of the a top, a bottom, or sides.

22. The auxiliary engine driven device of claim 20, wherein the direction of the air is changed by about 90°.

23. The auxiliary engine driven device of claim 14, wherein the enclosure is minimally enlarged to accommodate the tangential blower.

24. A method for cooling an auxiliary engine driven device, the method comprising; (a) providing a cooling system having a heat exchanger disposed adjacent an end of a engine; (b) providing a tangential blower positioned along a side of the engine; and (c) pulling air through an enclosure encompassing the auxiliary engine driven device so that air is pulled through the heat exchanger of the cooling system and over at least a portion of the engine from the first end of the enclosure and air is pulled over an auxiliary device driven by the engine and at least a portion of the engine from a second end of the enclosure.

25. The method of claim 24, further comprising directing air from outside the enclosure being pulled by the tangential blower over components of at least one of the engine or the auxiliary device.

26. The method of claim 24, further comprising changing the direction of the air being pulled into the enclosure before discharging the air from the enclosure.

Description:

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention generally relates to an auxiliary engine driven device and method of use for same. More particularly, the present subject matter relates to an auxiliary device driven by an engine both of which are cooled by airflow generated by a tangential blower which pulls air through an enclosed compartment in which the auxiliary device and engine are housed.

BACKGROUND

Internal combustion engines have frequently used axial fans to generate airflow for proper cooling. In order for a cooling system to properly operate for an internal combustion engine, convective transfer of heat must be established to aid the cooling system in maintaining a proper operating temperature. Such an operating temperature allows the combustion chamber to completely vaporize the fuel while maintaining an optimal viscosity of the oil to lubricate and reduce friction within the engine and reduce metal wear within the engine. Many such combustion engines use a liquid cooling system which circulates fluid through pipes and passageways in the engine. As this liquid passes through the hot engine it absorbs heat, cooling the engine. After the fluid leaves the engine, it passes through a heat exchanger such as a radiator, which transfers the heat from the fluid to the air around the heat exchanger. Preferably, air is blown through the heat exchanger to create a convective heat exchange.

When there is a large space around the combustion engine or a movement of a large volume of airflow such as within a moving car, an axial fan effectively aids in cooling the engine. An axial fan pulls air through the heat exchanger and blows air across the engine linearly. Thus, axial fans only move air along its axis. When such an engine is used in a tight compartment, for example, in an engine-driven electric generator, an axial fan does not work as well in cooling the engine. In such a closed confined compartment in a generator, an artificial flow of air created by movement such as in a car is not provided to aid the axial fan in cooling the engine. Further, the air directed along the axis of the axial fan only has a confined space in which to travel and thus has no place to go since a wall is often in front of the axial fan preventing the air from escaping. Therefore, engines used in such confined compartments have a tendency to overheat when an axial fan is used to aid the cooling system in cooling the combustion engine.

Centrifugal blowers have been used with such engines to redirect the air and provide a better cooling system for combustion engines that are placed in tight confines such as electrical generator housings. However, due to the volume of air that must be generated to effectively aid in the cooling of the cooling system and the engine, the centrifugal blowers have to be quite large to accommodate such capacity. For example, the centrifugal blower used to effectively cool the cooling system and the engine can be almost half the size of the engine and will add considerable length and width to the engine package. When the size of an auxiliary engine driven device such as a mobile generator used on buses and RVs has limited space in which operated, such added size is unacceptable.

Further, neither the axial fan nor the centrifugal blower are very effective in aiding the cooling of the auxiliary device attached to the combustion engine due to size constraints. For example, an electric generator connected to the combustion engine in an engine-generator will normally have a fan attached thereto to cool the generator and its components. However, the fan is usually not large enough to effectively cool the generator for optimum performance. An axial fan when used in an engine-generator such as a mobile generator that has tight confines can actually hinder the cooling effect of the fan of the electric generator. The axial flow of air from the axial fan blows hot air from the engine toward the generator thereby further creating an opportunity for failure of the electric generator. Due to the size constraints of a centrifugal blower, it also does not create an effective airflow that aids in the cooling of the electric generator.

Therefore, in light of the above, a need exists for an auxiliary engine driven device that provides an air circulation within a confined compartment that adequately aids the cooling of the engine as well as the auxiliary device.

SUMMARY

In accordance with the disclosure, auxiliary engine driven devices and methods for using the same are provided.

It is therefore an object of the present disclosure to provide an auxiliary engine driven device that has an engine and auxiliary device which are cooled by airflow created by a tangential blower placed in a position along the side of the engine to maximize the cooling effectiveness of the airflow and the use of space within a confined compartment in which the auxiliary driven device resides.

This and other objects as may become apparent from the present disclosure are achieved, at least in whole or in part, by the subject matter described herein.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

A full and enabling disclosure of the present subject matter including the best mode thereof to one of ordinary skill in the art is set forth more particularly in the remainder of the specification, including reference to the accompanying figures in which:

FIG. 1 illustrates a cross-sectional side view of an embodiment of an auxiliary engine driven device according to the present subject matter showing an interior of the auxiliary engine driven device;

FIG. 2 illustrates a perspective bottom side view of the an auxiliary engine driven device according to FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 illustrates a cross-sectional front view of the auxiliary engine driven device according to FIG. 1 showing an interior of the auxiliary engine driven device;

FIG. 4 illustrates a perspective view of an engine and auxiliary device of the auxiliary engine driven device according to FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 illustrates a perspective view of a portion an embodiment of a tangential blower for use in an embodiment of an auxiliary engine driven device according to the present subject matter;

FIG. 6A illustrates a front plan view of the portion of the tangential blower of FIG. 5;

FIG. 6B illustrates a front plan view of the inlet and outlet of the housing of the tangential blower of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7A illustrates a side plan view of the portion of the tangential blower of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7B illustrates a side plan view of the inlet and outlet of the housing of the tangential blower of FIG. 5;

FIG. 8A illustrates a perspective side view of a vehicle housing another embodiment of an auxiliary engine driven device according to the present subject matter;

FIG. 8B illustrates a plan side view of the vehicle and the auxiliary engine driven device of FIG. 8A;

FIG. 8C illustrates a cross-sectional side view of the vehicle taken along the lines 8C of FIG. 8B showing an end of the auxiliary engine driven device of FIG. 8A; and

FIG. 9 illustrates a cross-sectional side view of a further embodiment of an auxiliary engine driven device according to the present subject matter showing an interior of the auxiliary engine driven device.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Reference will now be made in detail to presently preferred embodiments of the present subject matter, one or more examples of which are shown in the figures. Each example is provided to explain the subject matter and not as a limitation. In fact, features illustrated or described as part of one embodiment can be used in another embodiment to yield still a further embodiment. It is intended that the present subject matter covers such modifications and variations.

Referring now to FIGS. 1-3, an auxiliary engine driven device, generally designated as 10, may be provided which includes an engine, generally designated as 12, and an auxiliary device, generally designated as 14. Auxiliary engine driven device 10 can be any number of devices driven by an engine. For instance, auxiliary engine driven device 10 may be a device to produce auxiliary power by converting the power generated by the engine to other forms of mechanical or electrical power. For example, auxiliary engine driven device 10 may be an engine-generator as illustrated in FIGS. 1-3. Similarly, depending on the purpose of the auxiliary engine driven device 10, the auxiliary device 14 may be any number of devices which can be driven by an engine 12. For example, in the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1-3, auxiliary device 14 can be an electric generator which is driven by engine 12. In other embodiments, auxiliary device 14 may be, for example, a hydraulic power unit. However, the auxiliary devices disclosed herein are not limited to any form of an auxiliary device or the manner of its operation.

Engine 12 can be drivingly connected to the auxiliary device 14 to provide the mechanical power to auxiliary device 14. For example, engine 12 can provide the mechanical power to the auxiliary device 14 which can be, for example, an electric generator that converts that mechanical power to electric power. Engine 12 can have a first end 16 and second end 18. Auxiliary device 14 may be drivingly connected to the first end 16 of engine 12. Engine 12 can be an internal combustion engine that includes an engine block 20 which can house pistons and a crankshaft used to operate auxiliary device 14 shown in FIGS. 1-3. For example, the pistons and crankshaft can be operably connected to the rotor of an electric generator to rotate the rotor to generate electrical energy.

Engine 12 can further include a cooling system 22 disposed on engine 12. Engine block 20 may also further include passageways cast or machined therein. Cooling system 22 may circulate cooling fluid through the passageways formed in engine block 20 to cool the engine to a desirable temperature. Cooling system 22 can include a heat exchanger 24 in the form of a radiator used to transfer thermal energy from the cooling fluid which passes through the passageways in engine block 20 of engine 12 to the air surrounding or passing through heat exchanger 24. Heat exchanger 24 may be disposed adjacent second end 18 of engine 12.

As seen in FIG. 3, a tangential blower, generally designated as 30, can be positioned along a side 26 of engine 12, for example, between first end 16 and second end 18 of engine 12 as shown in FIG. 4. Tangential blower 30 may include a blower wheel 32, a baffle 34 and a scroll 36. Baffle 34 and scroll 36 can define at least a portion of a housing 38 of tangential blower 30. Housing 38 of tangential blower 30 defines an inlet, generally designated as 40, for intake of air surrounding blower wheel 32 of tangential blower 30. Housing 38 further defines an outlet, generally designated as 42, where air can be discharged from tangential blower 30 away from engine 12 and auxiliary device 14. Tangential blower 30 may be operated through a belt and pulley system, generally designated as 44. The belt and pulley system can include a crankshaft pulley 46 attached to and rotated by the crankshaft within engine block 20 of engine 12. Crankshaft pulley 46 rotates a belt 48, which in turn rotates tangential blower pulley 50 integral to blower wheel 32. Belt 48 can be tensioned by tension pulley 52 such that as crankshaft pulley 46 is turned, then belt 48 turns tangential blower pulley 50. Thus, as engine 12 turns the crankshaft therein, crankshaft pulley 46 can be rotated in a direction A which in turn rotates blower wheel 32 in a direction A1 to draw air away from engine 12 through inlet 40 of housing 38. Tangential blower 30 directs the air drawn by blower wheel 32 in a different direction through outlet 42 of housing 38.

Alternatively, tangential blower 30 can be operated by a separate motor, such as an electric motor, that turns blower wheel 32 independent of the crankshaft within engine 12.

By moving the fan for cooling the engine in the form of a tangential blower from being in axial alignment with the engine between the engine block and the cooling system to the side of the engine, the engine is more compact in the length with the heat exchanger of the cooling system next to the end of the engine. Placing the longitudinally lean tangential blower along the side of the engine adds very little size in the width direction of the engine package. Thus, the use of the tangential blower placed along a side of the engine results in a more compact engine package.

Auxiliary engine driven device 10 further includes an enclosure, generally designated as 60, that defines a compartment TC. Enclosure 60 can have a length LC, a height HC and a width WC. The length, height and width of enclosure 60 can vary within auxiliary engine driven device 10. Enclosure 60 can have a top 62 and a bottom 64. Enclosure 60 may further include a first end 66 and a second end 68 as shown in FIG. 1. Further, enclosure 60 may include one or more sides 70. Top 62, sides 70, first and second ends 66 and 68 and/or bottom 64 of enclosure 60 can be defined by the confines in which auxiliary engine driven device 10 is placed. Thereby, the walls of the confines can comprise any one of top 62, bottom 64, sides 70, or first and second ends 68, 68. For example, a motor home vehicle can provide a walled space for inclusion of an auxiliary engine driven device 10. The walled spaced can create one or more of the top 62, bottom 64, sides 70 and first and second ends 66, 68 of enclosure 60. In other embodiments, enclosure 60 can be a free-standing structure, separate from the confines in which the auxiliary engine drive device 10 resides.

First end 66 and second end 68 can be configured to permit the pulling of air by tangential blower 30 over auxiliary device 14 and at least one portion of the engine 12 from first end 66 of enclosure 60 and the pulling of air by tangential blower 30 through heat exchanger 24 of cooling system 22 and over at least a portion of engine 12 from second end 68 of enclosure 60. Second end 68 of enclosure 60 may be defined by an opening in which at least a portion of heat exchanger 24 resides. Further, first end 66 of enclosure 60 may define an opening in which a portion of auxiliary device 14 may extend. For example, the auxiliary device 14 can include an airflow casing 72 or at least a portion of its frame which allows air to flow inward. Airflow casing 72 allows air to flow in and over a frame 74 of auxiliary device 14. Airflow casing 72 can include a small fan. Often, electric generators will include a small fan in an airflow casing which is used to provide a cooling airflow over the electric generator. However, in such an environment as enclosure 60, the axial fan used in the electric generator does not provide enough airflow to effectively cool the electric generator. This problem is compounded by the heat generated by engine 12 within the same enclosure 60. Thus, the airflow created by tangential blower 30 can increase the airflow through airflow casing 72 and around frame 74 of auxiliary device 14 to increase the effectiveness of the cooling of auxiliary device 14.

In order to maximize space, enclosure 60 can provide a tight compartment TC which provides small tolerances between the maximum height, width, and length of the operational alignment of engine 12 and auxiliary device 14 and top 62, bottom 64, sides 70, and first and second ends 66, 68 as shown in FIGS. 1-3. For example, in the embodiment shown, engine 12 has a greater height and width as compared to auxiliary device 14, which extends from first end 16 of engine 12. As shown in FIG. 3, a maximum engine height HE can be close in measurement to enclosure height HC such that the difference between enclosure height HC and engine height HE is minimized. For example, enclosure height HC is larger than engine height HE to provide a minimal top clearance C1 and/or bottom clearance C2. Such top clearance C1 as measured from top 62 of enclosure 60 and the top most portion 28A of engine 12 and the bottom clearance C2 as measured from the bottom 64 of enclosure 60 to the bottom most portion 28B of engine 12 amounts to only a fraction of the overall height HC of enclosure 60.

Similarly, very little clearance is provided between engine 12 including tangential blower 30 and enclosure 60 in the width direction. For example, as seen in FIG. 3, maximum width WE of engine 12 including tangential blower 30 is only slightly smaller than maximum width WC of enclosure 60 such that a clearance C3 is provided on one side. Further, side 70B can be configured so that a top width WC2 of enclosure 60 can be less than width WC of the bottom of enclosure 60 to again minimize extra space within the compartment defined by enclosure 60. The top width WC2 can be large enough to accommodate the upper portion of engine 12 excluding tangential blower 30. Side 70B is configured to accommodate tangential blower 30 while minimizing unneeded space thereby creating multiple widths WC, WC2. The difference between the width WC of the bottom of enclosure 60 and the width WC2 of the top of enclosure 60 equals an added width WA which is the needed width to accommodate tangential blower 30.

Thus, by using tangential blower 30, the enclosure is only enlarged by width WA. Height HC of enclosure 60 is unaffected by tangential blower 30. Further, as compared an auxiliary engine driven device that uses an axial fan or a centrifugal blower, length LC of enclosure 60 can be actually smaller. Thus, the added volume needed to accommodate tangential blower 30 within enclosure 60 is also minimal as compared to other fans used to cool such auxiliary engine driven devices. By adjusting the width between the top width WC2 and the bottom width WC of enclosure 60, the unoccupied volume of enclosure 60 can be further minimized which in turn can increase the effectiveness of tangential blower 30 in aiding to cool engine 12 and auxiliary device 14.

As seen in FIGS. 2 and 3, tangential blower 30 can effectively change the direction of airflow into and through enclosure 60. For example, airflow can flow into enclosure 60 through heat exchanger 24 in a direction AF1 and can flow into enclosure 60 through airflow casing 72 of auxiliary device 14 in a direction AF2 as blower wheel 32 of tangential blower 30 is rotated by engine 12. Blower wheel 32 pulls air into compartment TC of enclosure 60 in directions AF1 and AF2 and then pushes air out through outlet 42 in direction AF3. This changing of direction of the airflow enabled by the structure of tangential blower 30 helps minimize the space needed in compartment TC of enclosure 60 to provide effective cooling of both auxiliary device 14 and engine 12. Also, the changing of direction of the airflow increases the cooling efficiency of the airflow on the engine 12 and auxiliary device 14.

As shown in FIG. 2, one or both sides 70 as well as top 62 and bottom 64 of enclosure 60 may include accessory apertures 76 which help to provide air that may flow over specific components of engine 12 and/or auxiliary device 14 to provide extra cooling for such components. For example, auxiliary apertures 76A formed in side 70A of enclosure 60 shown in FIG. 2 may be used to provide cooling air that passes over wiring of engine 12 (see FIGS. 2 and 4). Similarly, for example, accessory apertures 76B can be formed in side 70A of enclosure 60 may be provided to create direct airflow over oil pan 78 of engine 12. Such accessory apertures 76 may provide an airflow over the alternator, starter, stop solenoid, oil pan or wiring of the engine, for example. Further, such accessory apertures may also provide airflow over wiring and/or the frame of auxiliary device 14. Even though tangential blower 30 can be on the other side and in close proximity of engine 12, tangential blower 30 can create a vacuum that adequately pulls air across components on the other side of the engine 12 and/or auxiliary device 14.

FIG. 4 illustrates a perspective side view of the assembly of engine 12, auxiliary device 14 and tangential blower 30. In the embodiment shown, tangential blower 30 is positioned in a lower recess 26B of side 26 of engine 12. In this manner, tangential blower 30 can further minimize the space it occupies within enclosure 60. Additionally, due to the operation of blower wheel 32 of tangential blower 30, tangential blower 30 can be placed within close proximity of engine block 20 of engine 12 and still effectively pull air to cool both engine 12 and auxiliary device 14. However, tangential blower 30 can vary in length, diameter and position in regards to engine 12 and auxiliary device 14. For example, tangential blower 30 can be positioned along the top side or bottom side of the enclosure. Such variations of tangential blower 30 can depend on the volume of air that needs to be moved by tangential blower 30, the available unoccupied volume of compartment TC of enclosure 60, and the direction of discharge that may be desirable as well as the position and direction of the airflow within enclosure 60.

Tangential blower 30 can include end plates 54 along with baffle 34 and scroll 36 to define inlet 40 and outlet 42, each of which can be used to control the volume of air being pulled by blower wheel 32 through tangential blower 30. The shape, size and placement of scroll 36 and baffle 34 can greatly impact the volume of air which can be pulled by tangential blower 30 during operation. The tangential blower can be placed in a position which is optimal within compartment TC in view of cooling needs for both engine 12 and auxiliary device 14. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 4, even at the recess 26B on side 26 of engine 12, the tangential blower 30 provides enough pull to more than effectively cool the liquid flowing through heat exchanger 24 as shown in FIG. 1 while still providing needed airflow over strategic components of engine 12 such as wiring 80, starter 82 and alternator 84. Airflow can also be provided on the backside away from tangential blower 30 in such an arrangement due to the limited amount of extra volume within compartment TC of enclosure 60.

As can be seen in FIG. 4, the crankshaft in engine block 20 of engine 12 can drive two sets of belts on second end 18 of engine 12. An inner belt drive system 88 can be used to operate alternator 85 and can be driven by an inner crankshaft pulley 90, while the outer belt drive system 44 is driven by crankshaft pulley 46 to drive tangential blower 30 connected to tangential blower pulley 50. Having a second crankshaft pulley 46 extending from end 18 of engine 12 slightly increases its length LE as seen in FIG. 1. However, due to the fact that a fan does not have to be placed along the length of the auxiliary engine driven device 10, the overall length of enclosure 60 can be greatly shortened. Thus, length LC of enclosure 60 only needs to be long enough to enclose at least a portion of auxiliary device 14 and engine 12 while affording enough space between heat exchanger 24 and engine block 20 to provide an adequate area and volume for cooling airflow created through tangential blower 30 to occur. As shown in FIG. 1, auxiliary device 14 can have a length LA. The combined length of length LE of engine 12 and length LA of auxiliary device 14 can be greater than length LC of enclosure 60. In other embodiments, length LC of enclosure 60 can be a greater than the combined length of length LE of engine 12 and length LA of auxiliary device 14.

Thus, the shape and size of enclosure 60 is dictated by the shape, size, configuration and operational alignment of engine 12 and auxiliary device 14. However, since the volume of enclosure 60 based on height HC, widths WC, WC2 and length LC of enclosure 60 can be minimized by using tangential blower 30, the overall size of auxiliary engine driven device 10 can be decreased while still supplying sufficient cooling for optimizing the efficiency of the auxiliary engine driven device 10. In this manner, an auxiliary engine driven device 10 can be supplied which can address space concerns without affecting efficiency and power provided by the auxiliary engine driven device whether used in a mobile setting or in a stationary, fixed setting. The use of tangential blower 30 to aid in cooling an auxiliary device 14 and engine 12 of an auxiliary engine driven device 10 allows for overall cooling and directed cooling depending on placement of tangential blower 30, while still optimizing compartment space of enclosure 60 to further increase efficiency and minimize needed space.

Tangential blower 30 is selected so as to provide necessary movement of a specified volume of air to circulate air through heat exchange 24 to adequately cool the fluid within cooling system 22. As described above, engine block 20 and cylinder head of engine 12 can have many passageways attached to the machine therein to allow for fluid flow. The passageways direct the fluid used within cooling system 22 to critical areas of engine 12 to prevent overheating.

Temperatures in combustion chambers of a combustion engine can reach 4500° Fahrenheit (or 2500 Celsius). Thus, areas around the cylinders as well as around the exhaust valves need to be cool by cooling system 22 to prevent seizing of the engine. Such seizing occurs when the metal becomes hot enough for the pistons to actually weld to the walls of the cylinder in which they operate. In order to adequately cool the cooling fluid of the cooling system 22, a heat exchanger 24, which can be, for example, a radiator, is used to transfer the heat from the hot fluid leaving the engine to the air surrounding and passing through heat exchanger 24. The cooling fluid moves in a closed system from heat exchanger 24 to engine 12 where it conducts heat away from the engine parts and carries the heat primarily to heat exchanger 24.

Cooling system 22 can operate based on the temperature of engine 12. For example, during the start of the engine, a thermostat allows the engine temperature to build by allowing the fluid to circulate essential through just the engine. When the fluid reaches an activation temperature, the thermostat can begin to open allowing fluid to circulate through the radiator. The fluid can flow from an inlet 24A in the heat exchanger 24 to an outlet 24B. As the fluid flows, it passes through many small tubes mounted in parallel arrangement. Vents can be used to conduct the heat from the tubes and transfer it to the air surrounding and flowing between the tubes of heat exchanger 24. The tubes can have inserts therein which cause a turbulent flow of the fluid to circulate the fluid within the tubes thereby increasing heat transfer from the tubes to the fins and/or air surrounding or passing through heat exchanger 24.

The amount of heat transferred to the tubes from the fluid running therethrough depends on the difference in temperature between the tube and the fluid touching it. Thus, adequate airflow through heat exchanger 24 can greatly increase the transfer heat from the fluid running through the tubes thereby cooling down the fluid. The thermostat will open and close as needed to maintain a desired temperature of engine 12 thereby metering the amount of fluid going into the radiator. Thus, it is helpful to have enough airflow created by tangential blower 30 to efficiently cool the fluid passing through heat exchanger 24.

Since an auxiliary engine driven device such as an engine-generator usually does not obtain the benefit of airflow caused by the movement of the auxiliary engine driven device, a tangential blower, if used, creates the bulk of the necessary airflow to generate the convection needed to adequately cool the fluid passing through the heat exchanger of the engine therein. Ideally, the airflow that is created occurs across the whole or at least the majority of the heat exchanger exposed to possible airflow. For example, tangential blower 30 can create an airflow across all of the exposed portion of heat exchanger 24 to maximize the thermal energy transfer. Such airflow can be created by tangential blower 30 even though it is oriented parallel to the engine crankshaft and resides along a recess portion 26B of side 26 of engine 12. By having tight compartment TC defined by an adequately sized enclosure 60 that minimizes unused space, tangential blower 30 operates well in creating the necessary airflow under low vacuum conditions to create airflow through the entire enclosure 60 while still being placed in close proximity to side 26 of engine 12. In this manner, tangential blower 30 provides enough volume of airflow to adequately cool engine 12, auxiliary device 14 and the other components for both.

The diameter and length of blower wheel 32 and its speed of rotation can greatly affect the amount of air moved by tangential blower 30. Further, the size of inlet 40 and the size of outlet 42 as well as placement of the blower wheel 32 within housing 38 of tangential blower 30 can also greatly affect the volume of air moved by tangential blower 30.

As shown in FIGS. 5-7B, tangential blower 30 can include blower wheel 32, baffle 34 and scroll 36. Blower wheel 32 can include blades 102 that are curved to catch and transport air. Blower wheel 32 may include end discs 100 on either end with blades 102 extending between the wheel discs 100. Further, one or more internal discs 104 can be positioned between end discs 100 to help support blades 102 depending on a desired length LBW of blower wheel 32 and the strength and sizes of blades 102. Blades 102 can extend only between each set of discs so that multiple blades are generally aligned to form a single blade length or each blower blade 102 can be a single blade length so that the blade can be positioned within internal discs 104 and extend the whole length of blower wheel 32.

Blades 102 are curved in order to catch and push air around the blower wheel and thereby help transport the air through tangential blower 30. In this manner, airflow is created by the rotation of blower wheel 32. Preferably, the curve of each blade 102 is directed so that the concavity created by the curve faces in the direction of rotation to facilitate the movement of air.

The number of internal discs 104 again depends on length LBW of blower wheel 32. Further, the number of internal discs 104 may depend on the strength and rigidity of blower blades 102 as stated above. In the embodiments shown in FIGS. 5 and 6A, blower wheel 32 has three internal discs 104 equally spaced between end discs 100 to create a length LBW. The length of scroll 36 and baffle 34 should be similar in size to that of length LBW of blower wheel 32 such that when blower wheel 32 is placed within housing 38, enough clearance is provided on either end to provide space for rotation of blower wheel 32 while at the same time preventing excess airflow around or between end plates 100 of tangential blower 30.

Blower wheel 32 can have a diameter DW which is measured from the outer perimeter of blades 102 of blower wheel 32. As stated above, the diameter DW of blower 32 as well as length LBW of blower wheel 32 will greatly affect the amount of airflow created by tangential blower 30. The amount of air to be moved can be determined based on the size of the engine and the amount of heat generated by the engine as well as the size of enclosure 60 of auxiliary engine driven device 10. Thus, the diameter DW and length LBW of blower wheel 32 can be sized to accommodate the size of engine 12 on which it is used to maximize airflow while minimizing the amount of extra space needed to accommodate tangential blower 30. For a typical engine, a blower wheel having a diameter of about six inches to about eight inches may be used. For example, a six-inch diameter tangential blower wheel can be used to move over about 2500 (CFM) at 0.25 inches of water at normal operating speeds which can be used to sufficiently cool a 2.2 liter diesel powered generator unit.

The placement of blower wheel 32 within housing 38 between baffle 34 and scroll 36 can also affect airflow generated by tangential blower 30. Blower wheel 32 can be placed between an upper end point EC of baffle 34 and a corner LC of scroll 36 where lip LS of scroll 36 bends outward from body BS of scroll 36. Between upper end point EC of baffle 34 and corner LC on scroll 36, blower wheel 32 can be placed such that upper end point EC and end corner LC are align with axis XW of blower wheel 32 in a plane PL. Such a placement of blower wheel 32 helps to maximize airflow in through inlet 40 and out of outlet 42.

As shown in FIGS. 7A and 7B, the entry width WI of inlet 40 is greater than the exit width WO of outlet 42 of housing 38. Both inlet 40 and outlet 42 are created by the positioning of scroll 36 and baffle 34. The angle of baffle 34 in relation to scroll 36 is such that outlet 42 can widen from lower endpoint EC2 of baffle 34 which is closest to scroll 36 and the inner most point of outlet 42 outward through the end point OC1 of outlet 42. For example, distance AE as measured from lower end point EC2 of baffle 34 may be the narrowest distance of the width of outlet 42. Outlet 42 may increase at an angle α from end point EC2 to outlet end point OC1 thereby increasing the width of outlet 42 in the direction of airflow AF3 as the air is discharged from tangential blower 30. By having outlet 42 widening in the direction of airflow as it is discharged, a better airflow is created that increases the effectiveness of tangential blower 30 with respect to the volume of air moved by tangential blower 30 and its ability to aid in cooling auxiliary engine driven device 10.

The static pressure can be lowered and minimized by the blower's changing of direction of the airflow within the application. For example, as shown in the figures, the airflow can change direction within tangential blower 30 requiring the air to make about a 90° turn. The changing of direction can also help minimize recirculation of the hot air discharge from enclosure 60.

While grills may be used to cover outlet 42, the amount of airflow will be directly reduced by the percentage of area covered by a grill if blower wheel 32 maintains the same wheel speed. Such issues can be taken into consideration when designing such an auxiliary engine driven device.

A distance E between the circumference of blower wheel 32 and scroll 36 as well as a distance F between the circumference of blower wheel 32 and upper end point EC of baffle 34 can affect the amount of noise created by the fan as well as the volume of air being transported by blower wheel 32. For example, by reducing both E and F, the volume of air and the noise level will increase.

As seen in FIG. 6B, inlet 42 has an inlet area AI and outlet 42 has an outlet area AO. Inlet area AI as measured by inlet width WI and inlet length LI is greater as mentioned above than outlet area AO as measured by outlet width WO and outlet length LO. Such a difference in inlet area as compared to outlet area facilitates discharge of airflow from tangential blower 30 and enclosure 60.

FIGS. 8A, 8B, and 8C illustrate the use of a portable engine-generator 110 which is positioned in a confined space CS on a vehicle V such as a bus. Limited space is provided on vehicle V for such an engine generator 110 due to other design demands of vehicle V. To maximize the amount of power which engine generator 110 generates for the vehicle V, the construction as shown in FIGS. 1-3 and described above of auxiliary engine driven device 10 can be utilized where tangential blower 30 is placed along a recess 26B on side 26 of engine 12 to minimize the amount of space occupied by the blower. Referring back to FIGS. 8A-8C, such a construction allows for a larger engine and electric generator to be used on vehicle. At the same time, the tangential blower creates more than enough airflow to adequately cool the engine and the electric generator to increase efficiency of engine-generator 110 and to ensure proper operation of the generator 110.

As shown in FIGS. 8A-8C, airflow is generated through a heat exchanger 124 on end 168 of enclosure 160 while air flows through airflow casing 172 of electric generator 114 at end 166 of enclosure 160. The tangential blower pulls the air through these inlets and discharges the air through outlet 142 in a direction AF3. The discharge area of outlet 142 as well as the size of inlet 140 and the blower wheel of the tangential blower allow more than enough airflow to adequately cool engine 112 and electric generator 114 of engine-generator 110 at a decreased noise level. Engine-generator 110 can be shorter in length for the same amount of power as compared to an engine generator that employs an axial fan or a centrifugal blower due to the placement of tangential blower 130 on the side. Thus, length LC1 of enclosure 160 can be decreased and maximum width WC1 of enclosure 160 can be impacted minimally by the positioning of the tangential blower.

Further, by using the tangential blower, air is pulled in through both ends of the units rather than being pulled in one end and pushed out the other end as with an axial fan. Such an arrangement requires less space in order to operate. By having the hot air discharged below engine-generator 110 at an outward angle, the hot air is allowed to clear the vehicle to minimize the possibility of hot air recirculating through the inlets at ends 166 and 168 of enclosure 160. This allows fresh, cool air to be drawn into the unit 110 through the inlets at ends 166 and 168 of enclosure 160. For example, as shown in FIG. 8C, enough clearance is provided between the bottom of enclosure 160 and the ground by a carriage VC of vehicle V that the discharge airflow being discharged in a direction AF3 can clear the vehicle away from auxiliary engine driven device 110.

By using a tangential blower, a blower wheel creates a wide uniform flow of air over the width of the auxiliary engine driven device without creating gaps in the flow. For the same volume of air, a tangential blower can use the smaller profile than an axial fan or a centrifugal blower. Also, a tangential blower in its full geometry is also a significantly quieter fan which is desirable in such auxiliary engine driven devices. Additionally, for the same volume of air as generated by a centrifugal blower or a axial fan, a tangential blower requires the same amount of horsepower but utilizes less space.

FIG. 9 shows a partial cross-section of a further embodiment of an auxiliary engine driven device, generally designated as 210, that includes an engine 212 and an auxiliary device 214. In particularly, the scroll of a tangential blower 230 used within auxiliary engine driven device 210 is not shown to illustrate a blower wheel 232. Tangential blower 230 is positioned on a side 226 of auxiliary engine driven device 210 within an enclosure 260 of auxiliary engine driven device 210. Tangential blower 230 pulls air through a radiator 224 of engine 212 and an airflow casing 272 of auxiliary device 214 into enclosure 260. This airflow helps to cool both engine 212 and auxiliary device 214 during operation of auxiliary engine driven device 210.

The auxiliary engine driven device 210 also includes accessory air ducts 240 which allow air to flow in through an inlet 242 in a direction AF4 and out an outlet 244 onto specific components of either engine 212 or auxiliary device 214. For example, air may flow in through accessory air ducts 240 onto alternator 284 and starter 282. These re-directing accessory air ducts 240 specifically direct airflow from outside enclosure 260 onto specific components to allow for direct cooling of these components thereby increasing the efficiency of auxiliary engine driven device 210 as well as engine 212 and auxiliary device 214, individually. Thus, by using the inward pull of tangential blower 230, directed air may be pulled in which aids in cooling specific components within auxiliary engine driven device 210 while at the same time pulling in engine cooling air through heat exchanger 224 and pulling in cool air through airflow casing 272 of auxiliary device 214. In this manner increased efficiency of auxiliary engine driven device 210 may occur.

Embodiments of the present disclosure shown in the drawings and described above are exemplary of numerous embodiments that can be made within the scope of the appending claims. It is contemplated that the configurations of the auxiliary engine driven device using a tangential blower and related methods of use can comprise numerous configurations other than those specifically disclosed. The scope of a patent issuing from this disclosure will be defined by these appending claims.