Title:
Emergency backpack
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Emergency responders, such as ski patrollers and search and rescue emergency medical technicians, need to be able to carry all gear for immediate medical response for injured skiers, people injured on cliffs, etc.

This backpack invention will allow the emergency responders to comfortably carry oxygen tank, bandages, drugs, water, blanket, cell phone, radio, gloves, and additional paraphernalia for quick access, and then to work out of the backpack either when the backpack is opened up and lying flat on the ground or when it is held upright. The heavy weight of an oxygen tank in the loaded backpack will be carried in this pack close against the responder's body, towards the middle (best for balance), with the medical gear and various other needed items quickly accessible in an unstable personal situation.




Inventors:
Gold, Nancy (Niskayuna, NY, US)
Spektor, Inna (Niskayuna, NY, US)
Application Number:
11/881373
Publication Date:
12/25/2008
Filing Date:
07/26/2007
Assignee:
Tough Traveler Ltd.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
224/628, 224/637, 224/653, 224/657
International Classes:
A45F3/04
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
WAGGENSPACK, ADAM J
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
NANCY GOLD, PRES. (SCHENECTADY, NY, US)
Claims:
We claim:

1. An emergency rescue first responder backpack with a. padded and non-padded pockets b. oxygen cylinder adjustable pocket c. front pocket with zippered clear vinyl interior pocket, web loop syringe holders, and elastic pocket d. padded waist belt e. padded shoulder straps f. load control straps g. weight load support system

2. An emergency rescue first responder backpack with a. padded and non-padded pockets b. oxygen cylinder adjustable pocket c. front pocket with zippered clear vinyl interior pocket, web loop syringe holders, and elastic pocket d. padded waist belt e. padded shoulder straps f. load control straps g. weight load support system h. padded adjustable tongue for oxygen tank valve protection i. front opening to pack j. interior pack pockets that open to the front

3. An emergency rescue first responder backpack with a. padded and non-padded pockets b. oxygen cylinder adjustable pocket c. front pocket with zippered clear vinyl interior pocket, web loop syringe holders, and elastic pocket d. padded waist belt e. padded shoulder straps f. load control straps g. weight load support system h. zippered bottom front section that opens widely i. bottom front section largely covered with mesh material

4. An emergency rescue first responder backpack with a. padded and non-padded pockets b. oxygen cylinder adjustable pocket c. front pocket with zippered clear vinyl interior pocket, web loop syringe holders, and elastic pocket d. padded waist belt e. padded shoulder straps f. load control straps g. weight load support system h. zippered bottom front section that opens widely i. bottom front section largely covered with mesh material j. zippered shelf midway in backpack

5. An emergency rescue first responder backpack with a. padded and non-padded pockets b. oxygen cylinder adjustable pocket c. front pocket with zippered clear vinyl interior pocket, web loop syringe holders, and elastic pocket d. padded waist belt e. padded shoulder straps f. load control straps g. weight load support system h. zippered bottom front section that opens widely i. bottom front section largely covered with mesh material j. shelf midway in backpack

6. An emergency rescue first responder backpack with a. padded and non-padded pockets b. oxygen cylinder adjustable pocket c. front pocket with zippered clear vinyl interior pocket, web loop syringe holders, and elastic pocket d. padded waist belt e. padded shoulder straps f. load control straps g. weight load support system h. zippered bottom front section that opens widely i. bottom front section largely covered with mesh material j. zippered shelf midway in backpack

7. An emergency rescue first responder backpack with a. padded and non-padded pockets b. hydration pouch with outlet c. front pocket with zippered clear vinyl interior pocket, web loop syringe holders, and elastic pocket d. padded waist belt e. padded shoulder straps f. load control straps g. weight load support system h. zippered bottom front section that opens widely i. bottom front section largely covered with mesh material j. zippered shelf midway in backpack

8. An emergency rescue first responder backpack with a. padded and non-padded pockets b. hydration pouch with outlet c. front pocket with zippered clear vinyl interior pocket, web loop syringe holders, and elastic pocket d. padded waist belt e. padded shoulder straps f. load control straps g. weight load support system h. zippered bottom front section that opens widely i. bottom front section largely covered with mesh material j. shelf midway in backpack

9. An emergency rescue first responder backpack with a. padded and non-padded pockets b. oxygen cylinder adjustable pocket c. front pocket with zippered clear vinyl interior pocket, web loop syringe holders, and elastic pocket d. padded waist belt e. padded shoulder straps f. load control straps g. weight load support system h. padded adjustable tongue for oxygen tank valve protection i. front opening to pack j. interior pack pockets that open to the front k. placement adjustment for shoulder straps

10. An emergency rescue first responder backpack with a. padded and non-padded pockets b. oxygen cylinder adjustable pocket c. front pocket with zippered clear vinyl interior pocket, web loop syringe holders, and elastic pocket d. padded waist belt e. padded shoulder straps f. load control straps g. weight load support system h. placement adjustment for shoulder straps

11. An emergency rescue first responder backpack with a. padded and non-padded pockets b. hydration pouch with outlet c. front pocket with zippered clear vinyl interior pocket, web loop syringe holders, and elastic pocket d. padded waist belt e. padded shoulder straps f. load control straps g. weight load support system h. front opening to pack i. interior pack pockets that open to the front j. placement adjustment for shoulder straps

12. An emergency rescue first responder backpack with a. padded and non-padded pockets b. hydration pouch with outlet c. front pocket with zippered clear vinyl interior pocket, web loop syringe holders, and elastic pocket d. padded waist belt e. padded shoulder straps f. load control straps g. weight load support system

13. An emergency rescue first responder backpack with a. padded and non-padded pockets b. hydration pouch with outlet c. front pocket with zippered clear vinyl interior pocket, web loop syringe holders, and elastic pocket d. padded waist belt e. padded shoulder straps f. load control straps g. weight load support system h. capacity adjustment compression straps

14. An emergency rescue first responder backpack with a. padded and non-padded pockets b. oxygen tank pocket c. front pocket with zippered clear vinyl interior pocket, web loop syringe holders, and elastic pocket d. padded waist belt e. padded shoulder straps f. load control straps g. weight load support system h. capacity adjustment compression straps

15. An emergency rescue first responder backpack with a. padded and non-padded pockets b. adjustable oxygen tank pocket c. front pocket with zippered clear vinyl interior pocket, web loop syringe holders, and elastic pocket d. padded waist belt e. padded shoulder straps f. load control straps g. weight load support system h. capacity adjustment compression straps

16. An emergency rescue first responder backpack with a. padded and non-padded pockets b. oxygen tank pocket c. front pocket with zippered clear vinyl interior pocket and web loop syringe holders d. padded waist belt e. padded shoulder straps f. load control straps g. weight load support system h. capacity adjustment compression straps

17. An emergency rescue first responder backpack with a. padded and non-padded pockets b. hydration pouch with outlet c. front pocket with zippered clear vinyl interior pocket and web loop syringe holders d. padded waist belt e. padded shoulder straps f. load control straps g. weight load support system h. capacity adjustment compression straps

Description:

This invention is a backpack designed to carry emergency supplies for ski patrol or other emergency medical personnel who need to carry a comfortable, organized backpack and then work out of the pack when the pack is flat on the ground or other surface; also can be used when held upright.

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

PPA Ser. No. 60/834,774 was filed on Aug. 1, 2006, under the title “Emergency Backpack” and the Assignment was recorded, on Aug. 1, 2006, #103287157A.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

This invention did not have federally sponsored research and design.

REFERENCE TO SEQUENCE LISTING, A TABLE, OR A COMPUTER PROGRAM LISTING APPENDIX

There is no listing, table, or appendix.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

While there are many medical gear bags, backpacks, and cases that have accessible pouches and pockets, and even some designed specifically to hold oxygen tanks, this backpack is intended to help medical emergency personnel who must work in either tight situations or on sloped areas, and must be able to carry the backpack without great stress on their backs. Heavy medical supply items need to be carried comfortably, well-organized, and with rapid access sections.

Other backpacks that carry emergency medical supplies, such as the Tietze U.S. Pat. No. 5,573,154, may not be designed to be carried comfortably and the needed medical items accessed quickly; the Tietze does not have a backpack frame and internal structure for an oxygen tank. The Moore U.S. Pat. No. 4,739,913 does not have space to carry additional needed items, nor the ability to carry various sizes of 0-2 cylinders effectively or comfortably and ready for quick use on sloped areas. The Thomas U.S. Pat. No. 4,513,866 has no oxygen cylinder space, no space for the first responder's own interior cases, no frame for comfortable weight distribution, and no special use for oxygen tanks on sloped areas. Likewise, the Rutledge U.S. Pat. No. 4,844,307 does not allow for oxygen tanks and the special needs they require, or for other heavy gear.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

There are many daypack medical backpacks currently in use and in the commercial marketplace. These have various structures, but the current embodiment of this present new invention is designed to allow a first responder to comfortably carry an oxygen tank (various sizes), weight supported primarily at the hips (most oxygen tanks being too heavy for the first responder backpack user to want the oxygen tank weight to rest on his/her shoulders), have very quick access to many needed items, and be able to rest the backpack on a sloped area and still access and use the oxygen tank. Also, the present invention will allow other varied or heavy medical equipment to be comfortably carried and quickly accessed.

The embodiment of the present invention is a daypack with a mini frame support structure consisting of a Delrin® rod frame, an aluminum stay, and adjustable padded shoulder straps. This daypack embodiment of the invention has an oxygen tank cylinder pocket toward the middle of the pack, pockets for radio, cell phone, water, bandages, and additional medical gear such as continuous positive air pressure equipment and disposable cervical collar, along with space for blanket and jacket. The outer pocket on the front of the bag has a fully opening zipper, and will hold syringes securely, individually and visibly, plus has additional see-through space for even smaller items (such as drugs in states where drugs are not required to be more affixed to the first responder). Each of the emergency items is easy to access, and they may be held in separate bags or loose within the pockets themselves. Because of the way that the oxygen tank is held in the pack, the oxygen tank may be used either while in the pack or taken out of the pack and used, making the emergency backpack invention particularly useful for sloped or tight areas, such as on ski slopes or in very tight wooded areas.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 Front of the present backpack embodiment of the invention, with all pockets and top closed.

FIG. 2 Detail of the front of the invention, with outer pocket open.

FIG. 3 Front of the invention, with the opening unzipped and top open.

FIG. 4 Back of the invention.

FIG. 5 Shoulder straps of the invention.

FIG. 6 Front of an alternative embodiment backpack.

FIG. 7 Interior adjustable oxygen cylinder pocket.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

FIG. 1 shows the present embodiment of the emergency backpack invention top lid Q secured by web O with quick-release buckle P; top section of the backpack A, front pocket r, zipper a opening pocket r; zipper a opening pocket e on pocket r; pocket r open zipper d reveals FIG. 2 inside back wall W; looped web X to hold syringes, elasticized-opening pocket U to secure syringes; underside of pocket r is clear vinyl pocket T. Pocket r on section b of top section A opens at zipper d to reveal FIG. 3 inside back wall E, two inside front-opening pockets J with hook and loop N closure; elasticized-opening pocket G on back wall R of pocket r. On back wall E of section A is oxygen cylinder pocket D with interior space I. Padded tongue B is lifted against C underside of lid Q to allow use of oxygen tank when it is in pocket D, otherwise tongue B tucks into top section A. The bottom section of the invention in this embodiment is multiple pockets M with zippers a, padded hip belt L, web O and quick-release buckles P. Section A has hook and loop closure N on foam-padded side pocket Z, zipper a on foam-padded side pocket K, and drawstring y top closure. FIG. 7 shows oxygen cylinder pocket D both with padded tongue B open for valve use or to allow cylinder to be removed and BB closed into opening I to protect valve, as well as pocket D bottom w closed for a smaller tank and open v for a larger tank. On the FIG. 4 back of the present embodiment of the emergency backpack is wipe-off nylon material f on the bottom section so that the pack may be laid down on its back and still give protection from wetness to the pack's interior contents, web O and triangles S alternative placements to secure FIG. 5 the hooks g of the web O of the padded backpack straps h. Back to FIG. 4, hook and loop N secures web OV vertical, and web OV vertical interweaves with web OH horizontal so that the connecting section n of padded backpack straps h is secured (FIG. 5). Also on FIG. 4 is lift control web O and slider SL at top of either pack embodiment as shown here for attachment of FIG. 5 web O on shoulder straps. Aluminum Bar AB is in channel RC. In FIG. 6, bottom section i of alternative emergency backpack embodiment has mesh opening q with zipper a for access to the interior bottom of the backpack, along with internal shelf IS. FIG. 8 shows more workings of the present invention embodiment's support structure: Web OV is shown securing connecting section n of padded backpack straps h.