Title:
Sheeted cleaning medium and dispenser/receptacle
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An article of a sheeted cleaning medium (such as a tissue, napkin or wipe) and a dispenser/receptacle is provided for dispensing the sheeted cleaning medium and providing a practical means of storage for the sheeted cleaning medium after use by employing an expandable re-insertion fold. The dispenser is typically pocket-sized, and typically has an adhesive tab that provides a means for the initial seal of the package and allows for the making of a secondary closure seal after the dispenser has been opened. The sheeted cleaning medium may be dry, moist or wet.



Inventors:
Rapala, Gregg R. (Arlington Heights, IL, US)
Application Number:
12/218534
Publication Date:
11/13/2008
Filing Date:
07/16/2008
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
383/207, 383/211
International Classes:
B65H1/00; B65D33/00; B65D33/16
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
GRANO, ERNESTO ARTURIO
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Gregg R. Rapala (Arlington Heights, IL, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. An article of sheeted cleaning media for dispensing a single of said sheeted cleaning media and providing for the re-containment of the sheeted cleaning medium after use, comprising: a container being generally flat and flexible having a first wall and a second wall, the first wall containing an opening determined by folding back a flap in the first wall, the shape of the flap being defined by one or more perforations in the first wall, and the first wall or second wall having a re-insertion fold that provides increased container storage space for a used sheeted cleaning medium; and an adhesive tab that is attached to the container for sealing the opening of the container and having an area without adhesive to provide a grasping edge to pull to open the opening of the container; and a single sheeted cleaning medium, having been folded multiple times and being disposed within the container.

2. The article of claim 1 wherein the adhesive tab provides a means for a single-use reseal of the opening of the container for the re-containment of a sheeted cleaning medium after the sheeted cleaning medium has been used.

3. The article of claim 1 wherein the sheeted cleaning medium contains chemicals, compounds, or liquids for hygiene, such as moisturizers, medications, surfactants, disinfectants, sanitizers, antibacterial agents, powders and oils.

4. The article of claim 1 wherein the sheeted cleaning medium is used to apply chemicals, compounds, or liquids for surface treatment, such as cosmetics, medications, corrosion inhibitors, and lubricants.

5. The article of claim 1 wherein the sheeted cleaning medium is about 50 to 120 square inches in area.

6. The article of claim 1 wherein the container opening is generally trapezoidal, semi-circular or semi-oval in shape.

7. The article of claim 1 wherein the container is made of paper, or a plastic film such as polyethylene or polypropylene.

8. The article of claim 1 wherein the container walls are made of a laminate of different film materials, such as two or more plastic types, aluminum and plastic, or aluminum and paper.

9. An article of sheeted cleaning media for dispensing a single of said sheeted cleaning media and providing for the re-containment of the sheeted cleaning medium after use, comprising: a container being generally flat and flexible having a first wall and a second wall, the first wall containing an opening determined by folding back a flap in the first wall, the shape of the flap being defined by one or more perforations in the first wall, and the first wall or second wall having a re-insertion fold that provides increased container storage space for a used sheeted cleaning medium; and an adhesive tab that is attached to the container for sealing the opening of the container and having an area without adhesive to provide a grasping edge to pull to open the opening of the container, and wherein the adhesive tab provides a means for a reseal of the opening of the container for the re-containment of a sheeted cleaning medium after use; and a single sheeted cleaning medium having a first dimension and a second dimension, the second dimension being generally perpendicular to the first dimension, wherein the sheeted cleaning medium is folded multiple times by being first reversibly folded onto itself two to six times to decrease the size of the sheeted cleaning medium in the first dimension, and second folded one to two times to decrease the size of the sheeted cleaning medium in the second dimension, and is disposed within the container.

10. The article of claim 9 wherein an edge of the sheeted cleaning medium in the first dimension is exposed across a face of the folded sheeted cleaning medium and is placed generally parallel to a line drawn across the widest part of the container opening and can be grasped through the opening to remove the sheeted cleaning medium from the container.

11. The article of claim 9 wherein the sheeted cleaning medium contains chemicals, compounds, or liquids for hygiene, such as moisturizers, medications, surfactants, disinfectants, sanitizers, antibacterial agents, powders and oils.

12. The article of claim 9 wherein the sheeted cleaning medium is used to apply chemicals, compounds, or liquids for surface treatment, such as cosmetics, medications, corrosion inhibitors, and lubricants.

13. The article of claim 9 wherein the sheeted cleaning medium is about 50 to 120 square inches in area.

14. The article of claim 9 wherein the container opening is generally trapezoidal, semi-circular or semi-oval in shape.

15. The article of claim 9 wherein the container is made of paper, or a plastic film such as polyethylene or polypropylene.

16. The article of claim 9 wherein the container walls are made of a laminate of different film materials, such as two or more plastic types, aluminum and plastic, or aluminum and paper.

17. An article of sheeted cleaning media for dispensing a single of said sheeted cleaning media and providing for the re-containment of the sheeted cleaning medium after use, comprising: a container being generally flat and flexible having a first wall and a second wall, the first wall and second wall having a defined tear line area for opening, and either wall having a re-insertion fold that provides increased storage space for a used sheeted cleaning medium; and a single sheeted cleaning medium, having been folded multiple times and being disposed within the container.

18. The article of claim 17 wherein the sheeted cleaning medium is a moist or wet wipe made of synthetic materials, and contains chemicals, compounds, or liquids for hygiene, such as moisturizers, medications, surfactants, disinfectants, sanitizers, antibacterial agents, powders and oils.

19. The article of claim 17 wherein the sheeted cleaning medium has a first dimension and a second dimension, the second dimension being generally perpendicular to the first dimension, and is folded multiple times by being first reversibly folded onto itself three or five times to decrease the size of the sheeted cleaning medium in the first dimension, such that an edge of the sheeted cleaning medium in the first dimension is exposed across a face of the folded sheeted cleaning medium and the opposite and generally parallel edge of the sheeted cleaning medium is extended away from the faces of the folded sheeted cleaning medium, and second folded one to two times to decrease the size of the sheeted cleaning medium in the second dimension.

20. The article of claim 17 wherein the container walls are made of a laminate of different film materials, such as two or more plastic types, aluminum and plastic, or aluminum and paper.

Description:

This application claims the benefit of Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/005,813 filed Dec. 7, 2007 and is a Continuation In Part of application Ser. No. 11/452,162 filed Jun. 13, 2006.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to sheeted cleaning media (such as facial tissues, napkins and wipes) and a dispenser therefore; and in particular, individually packaged sheeted cleaning media, preferably pocket sized, where the dispenser may function as a receptacle for the sheeted cleaning medium after use.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to sheeted cleaning media using the broadest classifications for such. Such media includes facial tissues, napkins and all types of wipes—for general purposes and specific purposes. The media can be dry, moist or wet; and it can be made of natural, synthetic or combinations of natural and synthetic materials. The invention is anticipated to have wide use as pocket facial tissues, wipes, moist wipes, and wet wipes; and embodiments of these will be described in more detail. The word “tissue” will be used to mean a sheeted cleaning medium, using the broadest classifications for such, unless it is further described (for example, “facial tissue”), or used in the context of what is being described.

Generally, sheeted cleaning media are packaged in multi-packs. The only known exceptions to this are individually packaged wet wipes and medical gauze. The handkerchief is a single sheeted cleaning medium, and had been widely used prior to the appearance of facial tissues. The handkerchief is usually made of cloth and is nicely sized for facial use, but provides no container for storage (either for clean or soiled conditions). However, handkerchiefs are large so a soiled portion can be wrapped within clean sections of the cloth, thereby allowing the handkerchief to be returned to ones pocket without worry of soil transfer to the pocket. Rather than being disposed of like current facial tissues, it's to be laundered after use. The popularity of the handkerchief has diminished over the years, as facial tissues have offered an inexpensive and disposable alternative.

Pocket packs of facial tissues were made for people to carry with them, and to take along when away from home or office. However, facial tissues are much smaller in size than the handkerchief, and therefore do not have the same quantity of material for use, or for wrap-up protection for re-pocketing after use. This often causes more than one tissue to be used. The packages are also bulky to carry, and provide no storage space for the used tissue. Therefore, people do not often carry pocket facial tissue multi-packs on them, as they are rather large for a pocket and may be needed only on infrequent occasions. Hence, they often fail the real need. Often, loose tissues are carried for convenience instead; or worse, nothing is carried at all. Paper napkins are also carried as a substitute for facial tissues, and as a general-purpose wipe. In these instances, again, there is no storage means for the clean or used tissue. Dirt, dust and dyes can accumulate on tissues while pocketed, and fibers from the tissue can become loosened and dislodged. Re-pocketing after use may cause more severe material transfers, and often from the soiled tissue fibers to ones pocket.

The only known facial tissue products on the market today are multi-packs. The pocket facial tissue multi-packs typically contain 9 to 15 tissues. One of the most common and smaller packages is approximately ⅞″ thick, 2¼″ wide, and 4¼″ long. The Kleenex® brand by Kimberly-Clark Corporation (Neenah, Wis.) is possibly the most widely used product of this type. These packages supply more than an adequate quantity of tissues. When pocket tissue multi-packs are used, a tissue is removed from a thin plastic film container for use. In the most common Kleenex® pocket pack, as made for the United States market, the tissues are folded into rectangles and are dispensed from a somewhat centered area of the main body of the container by lifting an edge of a tissue that lays flat against a folded side (face) of the tissue from within the container; or by removing the entire tissue from the container first. If one is able to grasp and pull the edge that lays flat against the tissue, the tissue may open up pretty much on it's own when slightly shaken. However, often times the entire tissue is removed first, and one then needs to unfold it about two times in one direction and another two times in a different direction to arrive at the full-sized tissue. The Kleenex® pocket tissue pack in the European market opens like many other brands, at one end of the package, and not from a more centered main body area. These tissues need to be removed from the package first, and then grasped by an exposed edge of the tissue that lies along a face of the folded tissue to begin their unfolding. Many other brands available (United States and worldwide) require the tissue to be removed from an end of the package, and then unfolded by hand, as there is no grasping edge of the tissue exposed across a face of the tissue to start off the unfolding. The Puffs to Go® brand of tissue by Puffs® (Dist. by Procter & Gamble, Cincinnati, Ohio) has a tissue that will open up pretty much on its own when removed from the package, with a good hand position on the tissue for use. It is folded similar to the Kleenex® brand (the one mostly marketed in the United States) with one less fold and has a grasping edge that is positioned differently in the container, but also lays flat against a face of the folded tissue. The package is also larger, approximately ⅞″ thick, 4″ wide and 5″ long. This is a large package to carry for occasional tissue use, and is basically a full hand-size to hold. Often, these multi-packs are not even carried on an individual, but rather are placed in a car, travel bag, or large purse. Typically then, the multi-pack cannot be held comfortably while a tissue is being used, and is put down or placed back into ones pocket, purse, bag, or car before a tissue is used. Therefore, upon removal and use of a tissue, one has both the multi-pack and the soiled tissue to re-pocket or re-store. That's now two items, to handle and carry. Also, the items are usually separated from each other by using different pockets, or sections of one's purse, bag, or car. After half or more of the multi-pack's tissues have been used, handling of the package becomes increasingly awkward as the tissues become loose in an increasingly oversized package. It's most awkward with the last few remaining tissues.

Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. (Neenah, Wis.), one of the largest tissue manufacturers, has summarized a number of the drawbacks with current pocket tissue multi-packs in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,012,572 Heathcock, et al. and 6,126,009 Schiffler, et al., both filed in 1998. Each of the excerpts below are said verbatim in both patents. Specifically addressing the most widely used pocket tissue multi-pack (sized about ⅞ inch×2¼ inch×4¼ inch) they said: “ . . . it is generally too bulky to be placed into ones pants pocket comfortably.”; and for portable packs in general: “ . . . many of them are too bulky to be carried comfortably and discreetly in a user's pocket.”; and regarding the tissue: “Current facial tissues in portable packs, however, may not be large enough to be effective in cleaning spills and the like . . . ”. Yet another drawback described in these patents, is that the adhesive tab is used multiple times and may lose its ability to reseal the package properly before all the tissues have been used. These patents suggest that solutions to these drawbacks would be desirable; however, since the date of these filings, these same pocket packs of tissues remain the norm in the industry. The present invention addresses these drawbacks and offers practical solutions, while providing quick and easy access to a tissue, a good hand position at the initial grip site, less repositioning of the tissue to unfold, and a practical means of storage for the tissue after use.

Smaller wet and moist wipe multi-packs also use plastic film containers that can be resealed, and typically hold about 10 to 30 wipes. The smallest known wet wipe multi-pack approximates the size of a pocket facial tissue multi-pack, as previously described. These packages have similar drawbacks to the pocket facial tissue multi-packs, but also often dry out before all the wipes are used, due to a failure of the resealable adhesive tab to consistently make an airtight seal.

The current availability of individually packaged tissues and dry wipes is extremely limited. No individually packaged consumer facial tissue or dry wipe is known to be available. The closest known product is sterile gauze used in medical applications. In this instance, the sterile gauze is often contained between two flat sheets of a medical grade paper, or a medical grade paper-like plastic such as Tyvek® brand of spun-bonded olefin made by DuPont (Wilmington, Del.), and the two sheets are typically peeled apart to expose the gauze for use. Individually packaged wet wipes are available, however, these wipes are uncomfortably sized and folded, and are sandwiched between two sheets of a laminate typically of metal foil and plastic film. The package must be torn open to arrive at the wipe. The wipe, which had been folded into a very small rectangle, must then be unfolded. One of the more popular products of this type is the Wet Ones® brand of “Singles” moist wipes, distributed by Playtex Products, Inc. (Dover, Del.). The package is to be torn open along its sides. These, and the other brands of individually packaged wet wipes, typically have inadequate room to restore the used wipe, as the very small package is not designed for a return of the wipe, nor is the tear of the package controlled to maximize space for re-storage. Also, no means for re-closure is provided for. These products are to be immediately disposed of after use. Unfortunately, users of these products typically are using them in situations where the disposal means is not readily at hand.

The preferred embodiment of the present invention advances the prior art of the resealable adhesive tab, package opening, and perforations as described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,524,759 to Herzberg et al, and previously U.S. Pat. No. 4,460,088 to Rugenstein et al., to an individual tissue package that allows for actual pants pocket sizing, provides a very practical means of storage for the used tissue by use of a re-insertion fold that expands for increased container storage space, and provides for a new premium multi-purpose (face, spills, etc.) tissue. The presently preferred embodiment of the current invention also offers an easily grasped exposed edge of the tissue for dispensing the tissue from the package, easy unfolding, and a very good hand position initially on the tissue without repositioning it. The tissue in the presently preferred embodiment also naturally “cups” itself better for facial use, due in part to the vertical centerfold. A more robust tissue construction is also desired; such as, more dry and wet strength so it's less apt to rip (tear), improved flexing and wear properties, and more water holding capability. For wet and moist wipes, there's a similar ease of use due to the improved package design and sizing.

In the selection of pocket facial tissues and wipes, size, convenience, and ease of use are all extremely important. It should fit easily within a pocket, while leaving room for other things. It should be easy to use, with a tissue that quickly and easily dispenses from a container and unfolds by itself, or almost by itself. It should be new and clean, and in a standardized form. After the tissue has been soiled, there should be somewhere to store it, as a means of disposal may not be nearby. It should also be inexpensive, and an item that can be readily asked for and exchanged in public when needed. This invention describes such an article. Accordingly, several objects and advantages of the present invention are:

a.) to provide a tissue package that comfortably and discreetly fits into a pants pocket. Thus, making these items easily carried on an individual.

b.) to provide a tissue package containing a more dependable (robust) tissue for facial use, light spills, and clean-ups.

c.) to provide a tissue package that upon which advertisement such as company names, logos, and artistic designs may be printed or placed for promotional, fanciful, or fashionable purposes.

d.) to provide a tissue package that can be displayed for complimentary use at establishments, such as hotels and restaurants.

e.) to provide a tissue package that may be sufficiently small and compliant so that the package may be comfortably held while the tissue is used. This would allow for more immediate use of a tissue with fewer handling steps.

f.) to provide a tissue package where a tissue may dispense and unfold easily and be close to the hand position normally used during tissue use, so that repositioning of the tissue is minimized.

g.) to provide a tissue package where a tissue may dispense and unfold in such a manner so as to “cup” itself nicely for facial use.

h.) to provide a tissue package that offers a practical solution to the unsolved need of “Where to put the soiled tissue?” by providing a practical means of storage for the used tissue, and thus providing for more sanitary handling prior to final disposal. With the use of a re-insertion fold, the container will expand to provide additional storage space for the used tissue, and the adhesive tab may provide a re-seal of the container to confine the used tissue.

i.) to provide a tissue package that is readily available both in public and on a person.

j.) to provide a tissue package that makes exchanging a tissue in public more common and acceptable. One would feel more comfortable requesting a tissue in public, as one would be asking for a standardized item with known quality and sanitary condition. Likewise, a provider of the article will also feel more comfortable in providing a tissue, as this is now in a known form, and is both useful to others and of little expense. The article also provides the recipient with a practical means of storage for the used tissue, which is especially useful, as often in public a means of disposal is not readily available.

Further objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent from a consideration of the drawings and ensuing description.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides a sheeted cleaning medium (such as a facial tissue, napkin, or wipe), a typically pocket-sized container for dispensing the sheeted cleaning medium and providing a practical means of storage for the sheeted cleaning medium after use by employing an expandable re-insertion fold, and typically an adhesive tab that provides the means for having an initial seal of the package and allowing for making a secondary closure seal. The sheeted cleaning medium may be dry, moist or wet. The container may have printed or placed upon it company names, logos, and artistic designs for promotional, fanciful, or fashionable purposes.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a tissue package of the presently preferred embodiment of the invention, showing it's first wall.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a tissue package of the presently preferred embodiment of the invention, showing it's second wall and re-insertion fold.

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the tissue package of FIG. 1 having the first wall open to show an enclosed fully folded tissue of FIG. 7d.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the tissue of FIG. 7a-d being open and held by the hand that removed it from the tissue package shown in FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a plan view of the empty tissue package of FIG. 3 being held for reinsertion of the tissue shown in FIG. 4 after it has been used.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the tissue package of FIG. 5 having the tissue shown in FIG. 4 reinserted after it has been used, and the package storage space having been increased by the expansion of the re-insertion fold, and the package resealed.

FIGS. 7a-d show a series of folds to a tissue of the presently preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 7a is a plan view of a tissue showing fold lines as dashed lines.

FIG. 7b is a perspective view of the tissue of FIG. 7a being initially folded at the vertical fold lines.

FIG. 7c is a perspective view of the tissue of FIG. 7b having been more compressed and flattened.

FIG. 7d is a plan view of the tissue of FIG. 7c having been folded in half at the horizontal fold line.

FIGS. 8a-d show an alternate series of folds to a tissue similar to FIGS. 7a-d, but providing a grasping area that may be especially useful for wet and moist wipes.

FIG. 8a is a plan view of a tissue showing fold lines as dashed lines.

FIG. 8b is a perspective view of the tissue of FIG. 8a being initially folded at the vertical fold lines.

FIG. 8c is a perspective view of the tissue of FIG. 8b having been more compressed and flattened.

FIG. 8d is a plan view of the tissue of FIG. 8c having been folded in half at the horizontal fold line.

FIG. 9 is a plan view of a first wall of an alternate package that may be useful for wet and moist wipes. The wall shows a defined tear line area.

FIG. 10 is a plan view of a second wall of the package of FIG. 9 depicting an alternate re-insertion fold.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PRESENTLY PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the presently preferred embodiment of the invention in the unopened package form. The package has a first wall 35 and a second wall 37 (depicted in FIG. 2), and is constructed as one sheet having folded edges 38, 39 (not shown, but depicted in FIG. 2), and 40, and heat sealed edges 41, 42, and 43. Although this is the presently preferred use of folded edges and heat sealed edges, it should be noted that variations in placement of the folded edges and heat sealed edges might be made, as well as to the number of each. Additionally, a folded edge may also possibly be obtained by plastic forming methods, such as heat forming and extrusion. The fold line 38 is from the second wall 37 (shown in FIG. 2) and is shown slightly exposed from the first wall 35. FIG. 1 also shows perforations 45 in the first wall 35 that will define the opening and flap 50, and shows the adhesive tab 55 that is used for opening the package. The adhesive tab 55 is preferred made with a re-stickable adhesive for resealing. The adhesive tab 55 covers both sides of the first wall 35 areas, as defined by the perforations 45, as is shown. The preferred packaging material is a thin plastic, such as polyethylene film. For wet and moist wipes, an adhesive tab 55 covering all perforations is desirable.

The unopened package shown in FIG. 1 may be approximately 3⅞ inches long by 2⅛ inches wide and ¼ inch thick.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the second wall 37 of the unopened tissue package shown in FIG. 1. A fold line 39 is hidden under a portion of the second wall 37 and lies over the enclosed fully folded tissue 5, as can be seen through the cut-away 70 that has been made in wall 37. Edges 6 of tissue 5 are also shown. Fold lines 38, 39 and 40 define the re-insertion fold. The re-insertion fold may also be located on the first wall 35 (the opposite side of tissue 5), especially if the hidden fold line 39 does not cross any perforations defining the opening. The second wall 37 is a good place for the printing or placement of company names, logos and artistic designs. Also, the re-insertion fold makes for a possible flap for grasping when dispensing the tissue; or when the re-insertion fold is located on the first wall, for getting a finger under (indirectly) the grasping area of the adhesive tab 55 (shown in FIG. 3).

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the presently preferred embodiment shown in FIG. 1 open and containing the presently preferred folded tissue 5 of FIG. 7d, having been folded in the series of folds as shown in FIGS. 7a-d. The size, shape, and location of the opening are defined by the perforations 45 (shown on FIG. 1), and provide for easy access to the exposed edge 30 of the tissue 5 for grasping and removing the tissue 5 from the package. The exposed grasping edge 30 and grasping area 25 of the tissue 5 are preferred to be closest to the widest part of the package opening, and lay across a face 20 of the folded tissue 5. The adhesive tab 55 is shown to have an adhesive area 60 used to seal the flap 50 (and thus the opening), and a non-adhesive area 65 used for grasping to open the tissue package.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the tissue 5 of FIG. 3 with a hand holding it at the grasping area 25, as would be typical for removing it from the package. FIG. 4 shows the good hand position one gets with the initial grasp of the tissue, without any repositioning of the tissue. The grasp is about ¼ of the way down, along the width of the tissue 5, as is shown.

FIG. 5 is a plan view of the emptied package of FIG. 3 being held by flap 50 for reinserting the tissue 5 shown in FIG. 4 after its' use. The large opening and the expandable re-insertion fold defined by folds 38, 39, and 40, provide for easy re-insertion of the typically balled-up used tissue into a now larger-sized container storage space.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the package of FIG. 5 showing the flap 50 now back over the used tissue to re-confine it, with the adhesive tab 55 making a re-seal of the package. The expansion of the re-insertion fold (defined by fold lines 38, 39, and 40) of the second wall 37 is shown, as it provides increased container storage space for the used tissue.

FIGS. 7a-d show a series of folds to a tissue of the presently preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 7a is a plan view of a presently preferred embodiment of a tissue 5 of this invention. The tissue 5 is approximately 9.5 inches long and approximately 7.4 inches wide. FIG. 7a shows multiple vertical fold lines 10, and a single horizontal fold line 15. The fold lines 10 and 15 are shown as dashed lines that are generally parallel and perpendicular to edges of the tissue 5 as shown. Along the length of tissue 5, a first fold line 10 is approximately ¾ inch from the edge of the tissue 5, with four additional fold lines 10 spaced approximately 2 inches apart to leave approx. ¾ inch from the last fold line 10 to the opposite edge of the tissue 5. Along the width of the tissue 5, there is one centerfold line 15 that goes perpendicular to the fold lines 10. A grasping area 25 of the tissue 5 is shown, and will later be accessible to the user by its grasping edge 30. The grasping edge 30 will lie across a face 20 of the tissue 5 when folded.

A Wypall® L30 wiper (boxed version) made by Kimberly-Clark is commercially available and has been used for making samples of the presently preferred embodiment of the invention. However, a very soft paper towel such as the Viva® brand towel, also by Kimberly-Clark, (or similar) made possibly a little lighter-weight and with slightly smoother surfaces, may be better.

FIG. 7b is a perspective view of the initial folding of the tissue 5 of FIG. 7a along vertical fold lines 10. This is the presently preferred look of an open tissue of this invention, as it “cups” to your face—the vertical centerfold is outward and away from you, and the two vertical outer segments to the right and left coming in toward you and toward your thumbs.

FIG. 7c is a perspective view of the tissue 5 of FIG. 7b more fully compressed along the vertical fold lines 10.

FIG. 7d is a plan view of the final folded tissue 5 of FIG. 7c when folded in half at the horizontal fold line 15. The tissue 5 has now been folded to a size of approx. 2 inches by 3¾ inches and is approx. ¼ inch or less thick depending on the tissue material and how compressed it is.

FIGS. 8a-d show an alternate series of folds to a tissue (wipe) similar to FIGS. 7a-d, but providing grasping faces 27a that may be especially useful to aid in unfolding wet and moist wipes.

FIG. 8a is a plan view of a tissue 5a that is similar to tissue 5 in FIGS. 7a-d, having identical fold lines and folding sequences, but having grasping faces 27a of the tissue 5a that are larger, as measured along fold line 15a, than the other faces of the tissue 5a, and is positioned at one end of tissue 5a as is shown.

FIG. 8b is a perspective view of the initial folding of the tissue 5a of FIG. 8a along vertical fold lines 10a.

FIG. 8c is a perspective view of the tissue 5a of FIG. 8b more fully compressed along the vertical fold lines 10a.

FIG. 8d is a plan view of the final folded tissue 5a of FIG. 8c when folded in half at the horizontal fold line 15a. The tissue 5a now has been folded to have grasping faces 27a that are larger than the faces 20a, along with the grasping edge 30a and grasping area 25a.

FIG. 9 is a plan view of an alternate package, such as for an individually packaged wet or moist wipe, consisting of a first wall 100 and a second wall 200 (shown in FIG. 10), and having the two walls sealed about their perimeters, and having a defined tear line area. A perimeter seal 110 is shown, along with a notch 120 to tear the package open generally along the tear line 130. The tear line area may be indicated with text and/or graphics printed on the package, or with only a notch 120. This embodiment of the invention will not close and reseal like the presently preferred embodiment, but will more easily accept a used wet or moist wipe than similar products currently on the market.

FIG. 10 is a plan view of the backside or second wall 200 of the alternate package shown in FIG. 9. A section 235 of the second wall 200 is shown from fold line 230 to a hidden fold line 220 having sealed ends 240 which may or may not be sealed to the perimeter seal 110 directly below them. A cut-away 245 has been made in a sealed end 240 to show that the perimeter seal 110 is underneath the sealed ends 240. The re-insertion fold is defined by the exposed fold line 230, the hidden fold line 220, and the parallel portion of the perimeter seal 110 to these two fold lines that remains after the package is torn open at notch 120.

While various embodiments of the invention have been disclosed and described herein, it may be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes in form and detail may be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope thereof.