Title:
Vacuum floor brush
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The embodiment of this disclosure in one form is a plurality of tabs for the specific use of vacuuming hardwood, laminate, linoleum, marble, tile and other hard surface floors. The apparatus in one form is designed to fit and function in a universal vacuum head, on built-in or canister style vacuum cleaners. The tabs may be made of several materials, including felt, Teflon, and other fluorine-containing polymers.



Inventors:
Florent, Roy (Langley, CA)
Application Number:
11/341943
Publication Date:
11/13/2008
Filing Date:
01/27/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47L9/02
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MULLER, BRYAN R
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
HUGHES LAW FIRM, PLLC. (Bellingham, WA, US)
Claims:
1. 1-15. (canceled)

16. A vacuum head comprising: a. a vacuum housing, b. a plate attached to the vacuum housing, c. a plurality of raised tabs attached to a first side of the plate,

17. The vacuum head as configured in claim 16 wherein the plurality of raised tabs are formed substantially of a malleable material.

18. The vacuum head as configured in claim 17 wherein the soft material is substantially comprised of felt.

19. The vacuum head as configured in claim 16 wherein unexposed edges of the felt tabs are exposed to a hardening solvent operatively configured to prevent hairs, lint, and other debris from adhering to the felt tabs.

20. The vacuum head as configured in claim 16 wherein the arrangement of the raised tabs form openings configured to allow air and debris to pass.

21. The vacuum head as configured in claim 16 wherein the plurality of raised tabs are formed substantially of a non-malleable material.

22. The vacuum head as configured in claim 21 wherein the plurality of raised tabs are formed substantially of fluorine-containing polymers.

23. The vacuum head as configured in claim 22 wherein the plurality of raised tabs are formed substantially of Teflon.

24. The vacuum head as configured in claim 20 wherein the tabs are tapered toward the forward side of the vacuum housing.

25. The vacuum head as configured in claim 20 wherein the raised tabs form openings adjacent a plurality of sides, and a rear portion of the vacuum housing.

26. The vacuum head as configured in claim 16 wherein the plate is formed substantially of metal.

27. The vacuum head as configured in claim 16 wherein the felt tabs are attached by an adhesive.

28. The vacuum head as configured in claim 16 wherein the plate, and attached raised tabs are removable from the vacuum housing.

29. The vacuum head as configured in claim 28 wherein the plate is attached to the vacuum housing with screws.

30. The vacuum head as configured in claim 16 wherein the plurality of tabs comprise eight independent tabs.

31. The vacuum head as configured in claim 16 wherein the tabs are formed as a unitary structure.

32. The vacuum head as configured in claim 31 wherein the tabs and the plate are formed as a unitary structure.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention is for the specific use of vacuuming hardwood, laminate, linoleum, marble, tile, and other hard surface floors. It is designed to fit and function in a universal vacuum head, on Built-in and Canister Vacuum Cleaners.

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

Ten years or so ago, wall-to-wall rugs and carpeting were the choice of floor coverings for a majority of homeowners.

Vacuum manufacturers capitalized on the demand, created by the carpet industry for good reliable vacuums. Great emphasis was put on the designing of efficient and durable power heads, for deep cleaning rugs and carpets. In time it became obvious that no amount of vacuuming was able to eliminate the accumulation of deeply imbedded dirt in very soiled carpets and rugs, with heavy traffic areas. Continuous shampooing was required to keep such coverings clean in the home. Maintenance became costly and also time consuming.

Wall-to-wall rugs became a health concern for many homeowners, as it became obvious that many people were becoming allergic to the dust in the environment in their homes.

Doctors and home care professionals, through articles and other publications, were encouraging homeowners to eliminate rugs and carpeting from their homes.

The elimination of rugs and carpeting from homes revolutionized the hardwood and laminate floor industry, along with other hard surfaces such as stone, slate, marble, tile, granite, etc.

So far, little emphasis has been put on new innovative products that work efficiently to meet that need. Currently there are products on the market used to sweep, and in some cases, spray and wipe hard surface floors. Such products work in a limited capacity, not really addressing the problem of eliminating the dust and removal of pet hair from the home. Dry dust and other home pollutants tend to settle above the floor; therefore the most effective way to remove this condition is by vacuuming.

The power head is no longer useful in vacuuming such floors, because they will inevitably scratch, mark and damage hard surface floors and simultaneously cause damage to the power head itself. A brush attachment to a vacuum cleaner is the only effective tool to thoroughly remove dust and pet hair from hard surface floors.

Traditional floor brushes used with canister and built-in vacuum systems are not efficient in their use as a primary tool for vacuuming the home, because their primary design and function was only for occasional use in small areas. These brushes often detach or fall apart when in use over large surface areas.

In spite of the many vacuum-manufacturing companies, there seems to be a lack of innovation in creating the type of floor brush conducive to vacuuming the different types of hard floor surfaces found in the same household.

Most of the brushes are of the same basic design; they are small, extremely lightweight with a narrow opening for suction. Bristles are constructed around the outside edge of the brushes with very little opening for the air to flow through the bristles. The bristles are made of horsehair or nylon, and because they are clustered together they prevent the suction from flowing, in order to allow the suction to pull through the vacuum-able debris.

Furthermore the buildup of human and animal hairs along with lint and other material build up around the bristles, creating a greater impediment to effective airflow, in which case vacuuming becomes more time consuming.

Such build-up in the bristles stiffens them up causing the bristles to bend rendering them inefficient. This new innovation of a spaced configuration of felt tabs will allow the end-user greater airflow and more efficient vacuuming. The design is to move from the traditional clustered bristles to open channels of air.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The main embodiment of the invention seen in (FIG. 5) attaches to the inside of a vacuum floor brush housing (FIG. 2). The housing is generally made of a hard plastic or metal shell.

(FIG. 3) is a galvanized mould with nylon bristles attached to it. The mould can also be made of plastic or other materials used in the art. The nylon bristles, 10 (FIG. 3), are held together by a thin galvanized strip 14 (FIG. 3).

The galvanized plate (FIG. 3) consists of 7 holes, 2a, 2b, 4 and 5, the hole 2a fits over two poles 1 (FIG. 2), 2b (FIG. 3) lines over two holes in the brush housing 2 (FIG. 2). There are also two small rectangular holes 4 (FIG. 3) which fit into two paddle hooks 2 (FIG. 2), 5 (FIG. 3) is the main opening by which the suction of air is released.

The invention, (FIG. 5) is a thin rectangular metal plate with a configuration of eight felt tabs, 9a, 9b, 9c, glued over one side by pressure sensitive adhesive, or other types of adhesive generally used in the art.

The felt tabs create eight air channels, 6a, 6b, 6c, (FIG. 5) by which the suction is distributed while vacuuming. 12c (FIG. 5) lines up, on top of 5 (FIG. 3) by which the main suction of air is released to the channels.

In a further embodiment of the invention a plastic mould in the shape of the felt tabs will be created with the felt tabs glued to the inside of each configured mould to create the air channels.

Felt is used in the main embodiment of the invention because it is scratchproof. Teflon and other material used in the art may also be used in further embodiments of the invention. A further consideration of the use of felt in the invention is its smoothness, which allows the brush to glide effortlessly when in use over hardwoods, laminate, and other types of floors with smooth surfaces.

The invention is a thin durable metal plate 7 (FIG. 4) consisting of four small holes 12a, 12b, and a central opening 12c. Eight tabs of felt 9a, 9b, 9c (FIG. 4) are shaped in curved and tapered ends so that the vacuumable debris can be sucked through the openings without getting stuck in front of or around the tabs.

The galvanized plate (FIG. 3) fits inside the brush housing (FIG. 2).

The poles 1 (FIG. 2) fit inside the holes 2a (FIG. 3), 2b (FIG. 3) and line over 2c (FIG. 2), and the two springs 15 (FIG. 3) sit in a convex mould 11 (FIG. 3). 4 (FIG. 3) fits into two curved hooks 2 (FIG. 2).

The invention (FIG. 5) sits over the two poles 1 (FIG. 2). The holes 12a (FIG. 4) sits over 2a (FIG. 2), 12a (FIG. 2) and is fastened by the screws 8a, 8b (FIG. 6). (FIG. 6) is the manifestation of the brush in its completed form.

(FIG. 1) is a view of the brush housing as it is seen from the top, 2 (FIG. 1) are two paddles that are used to control the movement of the brush. 3a (FIG. 1) is a symbol for moving the felt tabs in a downward position for use on smooth surfaces such as wood, laminate, etc, and 3b (FIG. 1) symbolizes the nylon bristles for use on rough and sculptured surfaces. 6(FIG. 1) is the neck in which the vacuum wand is fitted.

BRIEF DISCLOSURE OF THE INVENTION

The invention will now be described by the way of the following none-limiting example with reference to the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

(FIG. 4); shows the material by which the main embodiment of the invention is made.

7 (FIG. 4) is a thin metal rectangular plate with four small holes, 12a and 12b, by which the plate is fastened to a vacuum brush housing (FIG. 2).

12c (FIG. 4) is a main central opening by which the suction of air is released.

9a, 9b, 9c (FIG. 4) are eight felt tabs shaped to fit in an arranged configuration, glued on top of the plate 7 (FIG. 4) by double sided, pressure sensitive adhesive or other fixation known in the art

FIG. 5 shows the invention having eight air flow channels, 6a at the front, 6b at the sides, and 6c in the middle-rear of the invention.

12c (FIG. 5) is the main outlet by which the suction of air is distributed to the eight air channels of the main invention.

8a and 8b (FIG. 5) are screws by which the invention is fastened to the brush housing 1 and 2c (FIG. 2)

The curved and tapered ends of the felt tabs 9a, 9b, 9c (FIG. 5) allows for vacuumable debris to go around the tabs without getting stuck as they are vacuumed by a connecting wand attached to the brush housing 6 (FIG. 1).