Title:
Safety helmet lining emitting far-infrared radiation
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A safety helmet lining emitting far-infrared radiation is mounted inside a safety helmet and has an active layer and ceramic powder. The active layer is mounted inside a safety helmet. The ceramic powder is installed on the active layer and is made of material that is capable of inherently radiating far-infrared rays that can penetrate deeply into a human body and resonate with cells to activate cells and accelerate metabolism. Further, far-infrared rays also have proven utilities of deodorization and bacteriostasis. So, activity of bacteria propagating in the lining of a safety helmet can be effectively inhibited and bad smell emitted from people's heads after wearing the safety helmet often can be effectively mitigated by the far-infrared rays radiating from the ceramic powder.



Inventors:
Hsieh, Hsin-mao (Pingtung City, TW)
Application Number:
11/801822
Publication Date:
11/13/2008
Filing Date:
05/11/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
2/412
International Classes:
A42B3/10
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
TOMPKINS, ALISSA JILL
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
COOPER & DUNHAM LLP (NEW YORK, NY, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A safety helmet lining emitting far-infrared radiation for a safety helmet comprising an outer surface; an active layer; and ceramic powder being installed on the active layer.

2. The safety helmet lining as claimed in claim 1, further comprising a cushion layer adjacent to the outer surface of the safety helmet lining and having an inner surface, wherein the active layer is attached to the inner surface of the cushion layer; and the ceramic powder is applied to the active layer.

3. The safety helmet lining as claimed in claim 1, further comprising at least one adhesive mounted on the outer surface of the safety helmet lining.

4. The safety helmet lining as claimed in claim 2 further comprising at least one adhesive mounted on the outer surface of the safety helmet lining.

5. The safety helmet lining as claimed in claim 1 further comprising a cushion layer adjacent to the outer surface of the safety helmet lining and having an inner surface, wherein the active layer is attached to the inner surface of the cushion layer; at least one ceramic powder layer is mounted between the cushion layer and the active layer; and the ceramic powder is applied to the at least one ceramic powder layer.

6. The safety helmet lining as claimed in claim 3, further comprising a cushion layer adjacent to the outer surface of the safety helmet lining and having an inner surface, wherein the active layer is attached to the inner surface of the cushion layer; at least one ceramic powder layer is mounted between the cushion layer and the active layer; and the ceramic powder is applied to the at least one ceramic powder layer.

7. The safety helmet lining as claimed in claim 1, the ceramic powder is incorporated with the active layer.

8. The safety helmet lining as claimed in claim 3, the ceramic powder is incorporated with the active layer.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to a safety helmet lining, and more particularly to a safety helmet lining emitting far-infrared radiation which is capable of inhibiting propagation of bacteria, deodorizing and improving a person's physiological condition.

2. Description of the Prior Arts

Conventional helmet designs for safety helmets always emphasize safety but usually overlook comfort for people wearing the helmets. Safety helmets have a shock-absorbing layer usually made of expanded polystyrene foam and a lining of soft material to provide a cushion between the shock-absorbing layer and a person's head. Many helmets are tight and poorly ventilated, which may result in significant discomfort like being hot and causing the wearer's head to sweat or the scalp to smell bad, especially in hot weather. In addition to the discomfort, wearing the helmet time after time could easily cause the helmet lining to become a breeding ground for bacteria, which could result in hair loss or bacterial infection.

Some manufacturers have provided vents in helmets to improve ventilation, however, most have been proven to be ineffective or were added merely for cosmetic appearance.

To overcome the shortcomings, the present invention provides a safety helmet lining emitting far-infrared radiation to mitigate or obviate the aforementioned problems.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The primary objective of the present invention is to provide a safety helmet lining that inhibits the growth of bacteria.

The safety helmet lining emitting far-infrared radiation in accordance with the present invention is mounted inside a safety helmet and comprises an active layer and ceramic powder. The active layer is mounted inside a safety helmet. The ceramic powder is installed on the active layer and is made of material that is capable of inherently radiating far-infrared rays that can penetrate deeply into a human body and resonate with cells to activate cells and accelerate metabolism. Further, far-infrared rays also have proven utilities of deodorization and bacteriostasis. So, activity of bacteria propagating in the lining of a safety helmet can be effectively inhibited and bad smells emitted from people's heads after wearing the safety helmet often can be effectively mitigated by the far-infrared rays radiating from the ceramic powder.

Other objectives, advantages and novel features of the invention will become more apparent from the following detailed description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional side view of a safety helmet with a first embodiment of a safety helmet lining emitting far-infrared radiation in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an exploded perspective view of a segment of the lining in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional side view of a safety helmet with a second embodiment of a safety helmet lining emitting far-infrared radiation in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional side view of a safety helmet with a third embodiment of a safety helmet lining emitting far-infrared radiation in accordance with the present invention; and

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional side view of a safety helmet with a fourth embodiment of a safety helmet lining emitting far-infrared radiation in accordance with the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

With reference to FIGS. 1, 3, 4 and 5, a safety helmet lining (10, 10a, 10b, 10c) emitting far-infrared radiation in accordance with the present invention is mounted inside a safety helmet (90) and comprises an outer surface, an optional cushion layer (11), an active layer (12), ceramic powder (15) and an optional adhesive (13). The safety helmet (90) has a shell (91), a shock-absorbing layer (92) and a lining (93). The shell (91) is hard and has an inner surface. The shock-absorbing layer (92) is bonded to the inner surface of the shell (91) to absorb shock and impact, is often polystyrene foam and has an inner surface. The lining (93) is attached to the inner surface of the shock-absorbing layer (92). The outer surface of the safety helmet lining (10, 10a, 10b, 10c) may be attached to the shock-absorbing layer (92) or the lining (93).

The cushion layer (11) is attached to the inner surface of the shock-absorbing layer (92) and is made of soft material like foam rubber or the like and has an inner surface.

With further reference to FIG. 2, the active layer (12) is attached to the inner surface of the shock-absorbing layer (92), may be attached to the inner surface of the cushion layer (11) and is preferably made of fiber.

The ceramic powder (15) is installed on the active layer (12), may be impregnated in or coated on the active layer (12), may be nanometer-sized and is preferably made of aluminum oxide, magnesium oxide, zirconium oxide, titanium dioxide and silicon dioxide in proper proportion.

The ceramic powder (15) may be installed on the active layer (12) in numerous ways including being mixed with material making up the active layer (12) to incorporate the ceramic powder (15) with the active layer (12), being doped into the active layer (12), being applied to the active layer (12) with an adhesive or being applied to at least one ceramic powder layer (15b) to be mounted between the cushion layer (11) and the active layer (12) or the like.

Some studies have proven that some ores mainly containing aluminum oxide, magnesium oxide, zirconium oxide, titanium dioxide and silicon dioxide in specific proportion emit far-infrared rays under normal conditions and are more active at elevated temperatures. Accordingly, the ceramic powder (15) having a composition similar to the aforementioned ores emit far-infrared rays when heated.

The far-infrared rays have wavelengths within the range from 4 to 14 micrometers and have been proven, in medical studies, to have a frequency closely approximating human body cell's natural frequency, so the far-infrared rays have high penetrability to penetrate a human body and resonate with cells to activate cells and accelerate metabolism. Additionally, the far-infrared rays also have utilities of deodorization and bacteriostasis that have been experimentally proven.

Thus, heat from a wearer's head further activates the ceramic powder (15) and causes the ceramic powder (15) to continuously radiate far-infrared rays to inhibit propagation of bacteria, deodorize and improve a wearer's physiological condition.

The adhesive (13) is mounted on the outer surface of the safety helmet lining (10, 10a, 10b) and attaches the safety helmet lining (10, 10a, 10b) to the lining (93) of a safety helmet (90). The safety helmet lining (10, 10a, 10b) may have single piece of adhesive (13) or multiple pieces of adhesive (13).

The safety helmet lining (10, 10a, 10b, 10c) has the advantages of inhibiting the propagation of bacteria, deodorizing the safety helmet and generally making a safety helmet more pleasant to wear.

Even though numerous characteristics and advantages of the present invention have been set forth in the foregoing description, together with details of the structure and features of the invention, the disclosure is illustrative only. Changes may be made in the details, especially in matters of shape, size, and arrangement of parts within the principles of the invention to the full extent indicated by the broad general meaning of the terms in which the appended claims are expressed.