Title:
Narrow Body Model Glider
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
There is provided a model glider having a wing having a first thickness and a body having a second thickness. The wing is operatively connected to the body. The ratio of the first thickness of the wing to the second thickness of the body is about 2 to 3.



Inventors:
Adamonis, Corinne (Fairview Park, OH, US)
Rizzo, Kenneth (Bethel Park, PA, US)
Application Number:
11/743183
Publication Date:
11/06/2008
Filing Date:
05/02/2007
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63H27/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
KLAYMAN, AMIR ARIE
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Pearne & Gordon LLP (Cleveland, OH, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A model glider comprising: a wing having a first thickness; and a body having a second thickness, the wing being operatively connected to the body; wherein the ratio of the first thickness of the wing to the second thickness of the body is about 2 to 3.

2. The device of claim 1 further comprising a rudder secured to the body.

3. The device of claim 2 wherein the rudder is aligned along a longitudinal axis which divides the body generally in half.

4. The device of claim 3 wherein a back edge of the rudder is aligned with a trailing edge of the body at a rear end of the glider.

5. The device of claim 4 wherein the rudder is tapered both rearwardly and forwardly.

6. The device of claim 1 further comprising a canopy being generally positioned generally over a cockpit in the body, and defining a third dimension from a lowermost portion of the canopy to a lowermost portion of the cockpit, wherein the ratio of the first thickness of the wing to the third dimension is about 4 to 5.

7. The device of claim 6 further comprising a rudder secured to the body.

8. The device of claim 7 wherein the rudder is aligned along a longitudinal axis which divides the body generally in half.

9. The device of claim 7 wherein a back edge of the rudder is aligned with a trailing edge of the body at the rear of the glider.

10. The device of claim 6 wherein the ratio of the third dimension to the second thickness is about 5 to 6.

11. A model glider comprising: a wing having a first thickness; and a body having a second thickness, the wing being operatively connected to the body; a canopy being generally positioned generally over a cockpit in the body, and defining a third dimension from a lowermost portion of the canopy to a lowermost portion of the cockpit, wherein the ratio of the first thickness of the wing to the third dimension is about 4 to 5.

12. The device of claim 11 wherein the ratio of the third dimension to the second thickness is about 5 to 6.

13. The device of claim 11 further comprising a rudder secured to the body wherein the rudder is aligned along a longitudinal axis which divides the body generally in half.

14. The device of claim 13 wherein a back edge of the rudder is aligned with a trailing edge of the body at a rear end of the glider.

15. A model glider comprising: a wing having a first thickness; and a body having a second thickness, the wing being operatively connected to the body; a canopy being generally positioned generally over a cockpit in the body, and defining a third dimension from a lowermost portion of the canopy to a lowermost portion of the cockpit, wherein the ratio of the third dimension to the second thickness is about 5 to 6.

16. The device of claim 15 wherein the ratio of the first thickness of the wing to the second thickness of the body is about 2 to 3.

17. The device of claim 15 further comprising a rudder secured to the body wherein the rudder is aligned along a longitudinal axis which divides the body generally in half.

18. The device of claim 17 wherein a back edge of the rudder is aligned with a trailing edge of the body at a rear end of the glider.

19. The device of claim 15 further comprising a dihedral secured to the wing.

20. The device of claim 19 further comprising a rudder secured to the body wherein the rudder is aligned along a longitudinal axis which divides the body generally in half wherein a back edge of the rudder is aligned with a trailing edge of the body at a rear end of the glider.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Model gliders can provide an excellent opportunity for experiencing flight from the ground. Tossing or launching a model glider can provide an education experience and a nice pastime for hobbyists.

Model gliders can be provided for enhanced flight experiences. If a model glider body is bulky, it will not provide optimal performance. Current attempts to make model gliders better performing and aesthetically pleasing have been largely unsuccessful. There remains a long-felt need for an improved model glider.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective elevational view of a Model Glider in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the Model Glider of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is cross sectional view in elevation of the Model Glider of FIG. 1 viewed along line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a bottom plan view of the Model Glider of FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a side elevational view of the Model Glider of FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is a front elevational view of the Model Glider of FIG. 1.

FIG. 7 is a rear elevational view of the Model Glider of FIG. 1.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of another embodiment of a Model Glider.

FIG. 9 is a top plan view of another preferred embodiment of a Model Glider.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION

There is provided a model glider having a wing having a first thickness and a body having a second thickness. The wing is operatively connected to the body. The ratio of the first thickness of the wing to the second thickness of the body is about 2 to 3.

There is also provided a model glider having a first thickness and a body having a second thickness. The model glider also has a canopy generally positioned generally over a cockpit in the body, and defining a third dimension from the lowermost portion of the canopy to the lowermost portion of the cockpit. The ratio of the first thickness of the wing to the third dimension is about 4 to 5.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

This application claims the benefit of two design patent applications, both filed Apr. 10, 2007 and having serial numbers 29278800 (titled Concave Body Model Glider) and 29278794 (titled Convex Body Model Glider).

Preliminarily, it should be noted that certain terms used herein, such as for example above, below, upper, lower, left and right, are used to facilitate the description of the invention. Unless otherwise specified or made apparent by the context of the discussion, such terms and other directional terms should be interpreted with reference to the figure(s) under discussion. Such terms are not intended as a limitation on the position in which the invention or components may be used. Indeed, it is contemplated that the components of the invention may be easily positioned in any desired orientation for use. Likewise, numerical terms such as for example “first”, and “second” are not intended as a limitation or to imply a sequence, unless otherwise specified or made apparent by the context of the discussion. The term “operatively connected” is understood to include a linking together of the portions under consideration and may include a physical engagement and/or a functional or operational connection. All definitions herein are provided solely to facilitate an understanding of the invention—not to limit the invention.

Referring now to the drawings, there is illustrated in FIGS. 1 through 9 a model glider, indicated generally at 10, according to the invention. For ease of reference, the model glider 10 will simply be referred to herein as a glider 10. The illustrated glider 10 includes a wing 12, a body 14, and a rudder 16. Since the glider 10 is generally laterally symmetrical, discussion of the wing 12 will discuss only one wing—though two identical wings are shown. The body 14 may be positioned generally centrally with respect to the wing 12- or in any other suitable position. The body 14 is a fuselage of the glider 10. The term “fuselage” as used in this application may be understood to include, but is not necessarily limited to, the body of an airplane or glider. The term “body” as used in this application may be understood to include, but is not necessarily limited to, a mass of matter generally distinct from other masses. The term “wings” as used in this application may be understood to include, but is not necessarily limited to, the generally flat parts that stick out from the main body of an airplane or glider.

It will be noted that the illustrated body 14 includes a nose portion 15 at a front end of the body 14—seen generally to the left in FIG. 1. The nose portion 15 is the apex of the glider 10. The term “apex” as used in this application may be understood to include, but is not limited to, any structure or functionality which generally defines or includes a tip, point, peak, or terminus.

Similarly, the rudder 16 may be positioned generally centrally with respect to the body 14 and the wing 12—or in any other suitable position. The term “rudder” as used in this application may be understood to include, but is not necessarily limited to, an airfoil for directing or steering an airplane which may be located on or near the tail portion of an airplane. The illustrated glider 10 may be generally symmetrical as shown. A dowell 20 or suitable weight may be embedded in a nose pod 24 of the body 14. The dowell 20 is shown extending along an axis that extends along the length of the glider 10. The leading edges 26 and 28 may be reinforced with vinyl tape 34, or any other suitable tape or protective layer or coating, to protect against abrasion of the wing 12. The term “axis” as used in this application may be understood to include, but is not limited to, a generally straight line about which a body or a geometric figure rotates or may be supposed to rotate. The “axis” may be a generally straight line with respect to which a body, component, or figure may be generally symmetrical. The “axis” may be a reference line of a coordinate system. The rudder 16 is aligned along a longitudinal axis which divides the body 14 generally in half.

The rudder 16 may be employed as a handle for the glider 10 and assist in the launching and direction of the glider 10. By the user placing the index finger (not shown) on the back edge 18 of the rudder 16, the thumb (not shown) and second finger (not shown) of the hand (not shown) may come to rest on opposite sides of the rudder 16 to provide a secure grip of the glider 10 during launching. The back edge 18 of the rudder 16 corresponds with the trailing edge 44 of the body 14. The rudder 16 in the embodiment shown in FIG. 3 is tapered both rearwardly at 30 and forwardly at 32 respectively, although a rudder 16 tapered otherwise may also be satisfactory. By tapering both the rear and forward portions of the rudder 16 the moment of turning may be generally determined for performance. At the same time the advantage is retained of having the end portion 18 of the rudder 16 in the same generally vertical plane as the trailing edge 44.

The illustrated glider 10 includes a canopy 50 positioned generally over a cockpit 54. The term “canopy” as used in this application may be understood to include, but is not necessarily limited to, the cover of an aircraft's cockpit. The term “cockpit” as used in this application may be understood to include, but is not necessarily limited to, the compartment in an aircraft where the pilot might sit. Because the present invention is merely a model, there is no location for a pilot to sit, so the cockpit 54 may be understood to be located adjacent to the front belly portion of the glider 10. The term “adjacent” may include, but is not limited to, structures or components situated generally near or generally close to each other, which may or may not be touching and/or connected.

FIG. 6 is a front elevational view of the glider 10 of FIG. 1 and features three dimensions. The wing 12 is shown to have a first thickness D1. The body 14 is shown to have a second thickness D2. A third dimension D3 is shown and defined as the distance from the lowermost portion of the canopy 50 to the lowermost portion of the cockpit 54. The three dimensions may be any suitable dimensions. The first thickness D1 of the wing 12 may be about 0.50 inches. The second thickness D2 of the body 14 may be about 0.750 inches. The third dimension D3 may be about 0.625 inches. It will thus be understood that the ratio of the first thickness D1 of the wing 12 to the second thickness D2 of the body 14 is about 2 to 3. The ratio of the first thickness D1 of the wing 12 to the third dimension D3 is about 4 to 5. The ratio of the third dimension D3 to the second thickness D2 is about 5 to 6. These dimensions and ratios of dimensions may be varied as desired.

FIGS. 8 and 9 are directed to another embodiment of a model glider. The glider there includes two wings 12, each oriented at an angle to a dihedral 36. The term “dihedral” as used in this application may be understood to include, but is not necessarily limited to, an upward inclination of an aircraft's wing. The term “angle” as used in this application may be understood to include, but is not limited to, any structure or functionality which defines or creates a corner. The corner may constitute a projecting part or an enclosed or partially enclosed space. The corner may be generally straight, generally curved or arced—or partially straight or curved. The term “angle” may also include the space between two lines or surfaces at or near the point at which they touch or intersect. The wing 12 may be generally swept back in sections 38 and 40, as shown in FIG. 9, to obtain yet other flight characteristics. The term “section” as used in this application may be understood to include, but is not limited to, any distinct part that can be separated or considered separately from the whole of something. It should be noted that the dimensions D1, D2, and D3 shown in the embodiment of FIGS. 1-7 may also be embodied in the embodiment of FIGS. 8 and 9.

The invention may be made from any suitable material and by any suitable method. The invention may be adapted to fit a wide variety of uses. It will be appreciated that the components of the invention may be easily modified as needed to accommodate varying sizes and shapes.

It is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and to the arrangements of the components set forth in the accompanying description or illustrated in the drawings. The invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced and carried out in various ways. Also, it is to be understood that the phraseology and terminology employed herein are for the purpose of description and should not be regarded as limiting. The disclosure may readily be utilized as a basis for the designing of other structures, methods and systems for carrying out the present invention. It is important, therefore, that the claims be regarded as including equivalent constructions. Further, the purpose of the foregoing abstract is to enable the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and the public generally, and especially the scientists, engineers and practitioners in the art who are not familiar with patent or legal terms or phraseology, to determine quickly from a cursory inspection the nature and essence of the technical disclosure of the application. The abstract and disclosure are neither intended to define the invention of the application, which is measured by the claims, nor are they intended to be limiting as to the scope of the invention in any way.