Title:
Vent Stack Repair Sleeve
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A vent stack repair sleeve and method comprising an upper end and a bottom end; an outer sleeve surface and an inner flange extending into the body of said sleeve and generally parallel to said outer surface whereby a channel and a rim on the upper end is formed therebetween; and the outer sleeve surface and inner flange are adapted to fit over a vent stack.



Inventors:
Dalmasso, Ramon (Cooper City, FL, US)
Application Number:
11/743814
Publication Date:
11/06/2008
Filing Date:
05/03/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/741.1
International Classes:
F24F7/02
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
CHAPMAN, JEANETTE E
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Plager Schack LLP (HUNTINGTON BEACH, CA, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A vent stack repair sleeve comprising: an upper end and a bottom end; an outer sleeve surface and an inner flange extending into the body of said sleeve and generally parallel to said outer surface whereby a channel and a rim on the upper end is formed therebetween; and the outer sleeve surface and inner flange are adapted to fit over a vent stack.

2. The vent stack repair sleeve of claim 1 wherein: said inner flange extends a distance less than the total length of the vent stack.

3. The vent stack repair sleeve of claim 1 wherein: the outer surface of said repair sleeve is formed to fit flush against an outer surface of said vent stack; and the inner flange of said repair sleeve is formed to fit flush against an inner surface of said vent stack.

4. The vent stack repair sleeve of claim 1 wherein the width of said channel creates a flush fit: over the rim of said vent stack, between an inner sleeve surface and an outer surface of said vent stack and, between an outer flange surface and an inner surface of the vent stack when said repair sleeve is inserted over said vent stack.

5. A method for repairing a vent stack comprising: placing a tubular sleeve with an upper end, a bottom end, an outer sleeve surface, and an inner flange extending into the body of said sleeve and generally parallel to said outer surface whereby a channel and a rim on the upper end is formed therebetween, over a vent stack.

6. The method of repairing a vent stack of claim 5 wherein said inner flange extends a distance less than the total length of the vent stack.

7. The method for repairing a vent stack of claim 5 wherein: the width of said channel creates a flush fit: over the rim of said vent stack, between an inner sleeve surface and an outer surface of said vent stack and, between an outer flange surface and an inner surface of the vent stack when said repair sleeve is inserted over said vent stack.

8. The vent stack repair sleeve of claim 1 wherein an adhesive is used to secure repair sleeve to the vent stack.

9. The method for repairing a vent stack of claim 5 wherein an adhesive is used to secure the repair sleeve to the vent stack.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to plumbing repair devices. More particularly, the present invention relates to an inexpensive sleeve device that can quickly and easily fit over and be adhered to a damaged vent stack to prevent water leakage.

2. Description of Related Prior Art

Vent stacks are part of a house's plumbing system and are found on most homes in the United States. These stacks jut up from the interior of a home and through the roof to allow air to go into a plumbing drain line. To avoid leaks, vent stacks are layered with flashing—a thin layer of waterproof material—that extends over the base of the vent pipe and over the top and into the interior of the pipe to prevent rain water from getting into gaps between the pipe and the roof.

Like all vents, vent stacks are prone to clogging when debris gets into the stack pipe. Typically, a plumber will use a “snake”, a metal flexible auger that can be forced through the drain to clear out any debris. Unfortunately, when a snake is forced over the flashing of the vent stack, it will often tear. However, once damage to the flashing or pipe occurs, there is no easy way to repair the vent stack without a complicated stack attachment that can be easily applied without a plumber or other professional. Devices for supplying new vent stack covers are quite costly, complex, and require the use of a plumber to replace. See, U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,372,585; 3,797,181; 4,442,643; 5,694,724; and 5,778,611.

Therefore, it is desirable to provide a novel vent stack repair sleeve made from plastic or lightweight metal that is lightweight, inexpensive, and can be easily fitted and adhered to a vent stack by a non-professional.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a vent stack repair sleeve method and device comprising: an upper end and a bottom end; an outer sleeve surface and an inner flange extending into the body of said sleeve and generally parallel to said outer surface whereby a channel and a rim on the upper end is formed therebetween; and the outer sleeve surface and inner flange are adapted to fit over a vent stack.

It is a further object to provide: a vent stack repair sleeve wherein an inner flange extends a distance less than the total length of the vent stack; an outer surface of a repair sleeve is formed to fit flush against an outer surface of said vent stack and, an inner flange of the repair sleeve is formed to fit flush against an inner surface of the vent stack; and an adhesive is used to secure the repair sleeve to the vent stack.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is an elevated perspective view showing the insertion of a vent stack repair sleeve onto a vent stack.

FIG. 2 is side view of a vent stack repair sleeve fitted over a vent stack protruding through the roof of a house.

FIG. 3 is a side cross-sectional view of a vent stack repair sleeve fitted over a vent stack.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS AND PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

A complete understanding of this invention can be gained through reference to the drawings in conjunction with a thorough review of the disclosure herein.

In general, the present invention is a quick repair device for fixing damaged vent stacks. FIG. 2 shows how a vent stack 1 with flashing 2 extends from the base of a vent stack 1 and a roof 10 and onto a vent stack 1. Flashing needs to be installed over vent stack 1 because if it is not installed, a gap 11 is formed between the base of the vent stack 1 and the roof 10. When installed correctly, flashing 2 will extend over the rim 3 of the vent stack 1 and adhere to within an acceptable depth inside of the stack to prevent water from falling into gaps 4 between flashing 2 and the PVC 5 portion of the vent stack 1. Flashing 2, in general, comes in long sheets and is flexible and prone to breakage. Further, to adhere to any surface, it requires special glues that can make replacement difficult. Therefore, when someone needs to access blockages through a vent stack they usually break the flashing which needs to be repaired or else water will leak into the house.

A preferred embodiment of the present invention is found in FIGS. 1, 2, and 3 which show a vent stack repair sleeve 6 capable of being fitted over a vent stack 1 to cover and repair leaks created by damaged flashing 2 or even breaks of the vent stack rim 3 or PVC 5. In FIG. 2, flashing 2 has been damaged and does not cover the entire circumference of vent stack circumference 5 and therefore water can leak between flashing 2 and vent stack 1.

Repair sleeve 6 is formed to fit a standard vent stack 1 which usually comes in several different sizes from 1½″-4″ diameter stacks. Vent stacks 1 also come in various materials such as PVC plastic piping or cast iron. Depending on the size and material used, the thickness of the stack rim 3 will also vary.

Preferably, a vent stack repair sleeve 6 comprises an outer flange 7, and an inner flange 8. Outer and inner flanges are adapted to fit the various vent stack sizes and so are joined by an annular channel 9 circumscribing the upper portion of the repair sleeve 6 that is wide enough to fit over the rim 3 of a vent stack 1. In a preferred embodiment, channel 9 extends wide enough to allow flanges 6 7 to fit over the stack rim 3 so that sleeve 6 will fit snugly over vent stack 1. Flange 8 is preferably a solid flange that extends equally into the interior of repair sleeve 6 but other designs and shape are also available such as notched or grooved flanges so that the repair sleeve can adapt to fit odd-shaped vent stacks or to accommodate obstructions.

In another preferred embodiment, and to properly secure repair sleeve 6 and ensure it does not become dislodged from environmental or other forces, an adhesive (not shown) is applied to the inside of outer flange 6 and/or inner flange 7 before being fitted over a damaged vent stack.

To properly protect and repair a vent stack 1, a sleeve 4 can be comprised of galvanized seventeen gauge or comparable lightweight metal or a sturdy plastic such as polyvinyl chloride or equivalent vinyl material that are inert, resistant to water, acids, weather and other elements. By implementing the above embodiments, a vent stack 1 can be restored to a usable condition notwithstanding a damaged flashing 2 and without having to replace and repair the flashing 2.

Additionally, the present invention can be used in combination with other prior art devices since it is a single-piece repair assembly that form fits over a vent stack 1 and assume, as closely as possible, it's original shape, in addition to protecting it from plumber's augers and other objects that could damage it. Therefore, any of the prior art devices could still be fitted on a repaired vent stack 1 that is fitted with any embodiment of the present invention.

While the above description contains various preferred, exemplary, and other specific embodiments, these should not be construed as limitations on the scope of the invention, but as exemplifications of the presently preferred embodiments thereof. Many other ramifications and variations are possible within the teaching of the invention. Thus the scope of the invention should be determined by the appended claims and their legal equivalents, and not solely by the examples given.