Title:
Skate Shoe
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A shoe, such as a skate shoe, includes at least two rotatable wheels, which are arranged on at least one axle oriented substantially transversally to the longitudinal direction of the shoe or transversally to the direction of displacement. At least one axle carries at least one wheel and is either fully or partially embedded in the sole of the shoe. The axles are present in one-third of the sole of the shoe, which begins in the heel region, with the arrangement of the axles and the size of the wheels being measured so that the sole of the shoe ensures an, at least, partially flat tread in the region which is not provided with any axles or wheels. The wheels can be lowered into a skating position and lifted into a walking position very rapidly by a wearer using a rapid lifting device, so that the shoe can be used in the walking position for either walking or running.



Inventors:
Maiores, Rainer (Wurzburg, DE)
Application Number:
11/569850
Publication Date:
10/23/2008
Filing Date:
06/09/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A43B5/00; A43B5/16; A63C17/08; A63C17/20
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
VANAMAN, FRANK BENNETT
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
EDWIN D. SCHINDLER (HUNTINGTON, NY, US)
Claims:
1. 1-55. (canceled)

56. A shoe, comprising: a shoe sole having a heel region; at least one axle aligned substantially transversely to a longitudinal direction of said shoe or transversely to a running direction, and at least partially arranged within said shoe sole and located within a first region of only one-third of said shoe sole, said first region defined as commencing with said heel region of said shoe sole, and a second region not being part of said first region; and, a plurality of rollers disposed on said at least one axle with said at least one axle bearing on said plurality of rollers and with an arrangement of said at least one axle and said plurality of rollers being dimensioned so that said shoe sole has a partially flat tread in a second region not provided with any axles.

57. The shoe according to claim 56, wherein said at least one axle includes a continuous axle positioned in said heel region of said shoe sole with said at least one roller of said plurality of rollers fixed at each end of said continuous axle.

58. The shoe according to claim 56, wherein said at least one axle includes two axles positioned in said heel region of said shoe sole with at least one roller of said plurality of rollers fixed at each end of said two axles.

59. The shoe according to claim 56, wherein a first roller and a second roller of said plurality of rollers are fixed on both sides in said heel region of said shoe sole and a third roller is fixed outside of said heel region at an end of said first region of said shoe sole.

60. The shoe according to claim 56, wherein said at least one axle is a plurality of axles and said plurality of rollers are fixed on both sides of said plurality of axles in said heel region of said shoe sole.

61. The shoe according to claim 56, wherein a first portion of rollers of said plurality of rollers fixed in said heel region have a diameter that is larger than, or project further beyond, a lower edge of said shoe sole that a second portion of said rollers of said plurality of rollers provided at said first region of said shoe sole.

62. The shoe according to claim 56, wherein said at least one axle is a plurality of axles comprising means for detachably connecting to said shoe sole.

63. The shoe according to claim 56, wherein said at least one axle is at least one continuous axle that is received by grooved depressions, formed vertically and of variable depth, in said shoe sole.

64. The shoe according to claim 56, wherein said shoe sole includes lateral recesses in said first region of said shoe sole that are dimensioned so that said plurality of rollers are able to, at least, partly located therein without being rotatably restricted.

65. The shoe according to claim 56, wherein at least a portion of said at least one axle bear said plurality of rollers, so that said plurality of rollers rise outwardly relative to a plane that is parallel to a surface of said shoe sole.

66. The shoe according to claim 56, wherein said plurality of rollers are suspended in a lateral direction for being tiltable and are connected to an underside of said shoe sole via a tension element or a compression element, with said plurality of rollers being tiltable relative to a plane that is parallel to a surface of said shoe sole that is capable of being influenced by shifting weight.

67. The shoe according to claim 56, wherein said plurality of rollers are secured to end sections of said at least one axle via a snap-in connection.

68. The shoe according to claim 56, wherein said shoe sole has a center portion contiguous with said heel region, and a section comprised, at least partly, of metal or hard plastic and having a planar or grooved surface.

69. The shoe according to claim 56, wherein said plurality of rollers are fixed on said shoe sole in said heel region via a strappable frame.

70. The shoe according to claim 56, wherein said at least one axle comprises half axles that are rotatable backwards about a substantially vertical fulcrum, inclined in a direction of movement with an angle of inclination of said at least one axle being dimensioned so that, at a front limit stop, lower edges of said plurality of rollers are located below a lower edge of said shoe sole with said half axles in a skating position and when said half axles are at a rear limit stop, said lower edges of said plurality of rollers are located above said lower edge of said shoe sole in a running position.

71. The shoe according to claim 56, wherein said plurality of rollers is two rollers and said at least one axle is a rigid axle with said two rollers being fixed on said rigid axle with said rigid axle being guided through a J-shaped opening in said shoe sole with a shorter leg of said J-shaped opening being dimensioned so that lower edges of said two rollers are located below a lower edge of said shoe sole in a skating position and a long leg of said J-shaped opening being dimensioned so that said lower edges of said two rollers are located above said lower edge of said shoe sole in a running position.

72. The shoe according to claim 56, further comprising a heel element in said heel region having an upper element and a lower element adjacent one another and an interface formed by said upper element and said lower element that rises against a direction of movement, so that said lower element is fixable and movable in the longitudinal direction relative to a remainder of said shoe and fixable in two positions.

73. The shoe according to claim 56, further comprising two side walls in said heel region with one side wall of said two side walls being fixed on each side of two sides of said shoe, against which a roller carrier is fixed that is tiltable forward and backward in a direction of travel, about a horizontal fulcrum, and means for fixing for retaining said roller carrier in either said forward or said backward direction of travel while in a skating position with lower edges of said plurality of rollers located beneath a lower edge of said shoe sole or, in a running position, said lower edges of said plurality of rollers are above said lower edge of said shoe sole.

74. The shoe according to claim 73, wherein said means for fixing for retaining said roller carrier is capable of retaining said roller carrier in a plurality of skating positions.

75. The shoe according to claim 56, wherein said at least one axle includes a continuous axle with crank-shaped bends on each end of said continuous axle adjacent to two rollers of said plurality of rollers with lengths of said crank-shaped bends being dependent on an angular position of said crank-shaped bends and with said two rollers being fixed thereon in either a skating position or in a running position.

76. The shoe according to claim 75, wherein said angular position of said crank-shaped bends is fixed via an additional bend in a central point of said continuous axle in two positions.

77. The shoe according to claim 75, wherein said angular position of said crank-shaped bends is fixed via two additional bends at an edge of said shoe sole in two positions.

78. The shoe according to claim 75, further comprising a detachable element on said continuous axle, said detachable element being fixable in at least two angular positions for securing said continuous axle against rotation.

79. The shoe according to claim 56, wherein said plurality of rollers are fixed on a demountable wheel carrier that is mountable in, at least, two positions in a corresponding recess on an underside of said shoe sole, said demountable wheel carrier and said corresponding recess being formed so that said plurality of rollers are either in a skating position or in a running position, depending upon how said demountable wheel carrier is mounted.

80. The shoe according to claim 79, wherein said demountable wheel carrier is vertically slidable, within said corresponding recess, from said skating position into said running position.

81. The shoe according to claim 80, wherein said demountable wheel carrier is fixed via pins when vertically slid into either said skating position or said running position.

82. The shoe according to claim 80, wherein said demountable wheel carrier is vertically slidable via at least one vertically extending screw rotatably mounted in said shoe sole above said corresponding recess with a corresponding internal screw thread within said demountable wheel carrier.

83. The shoe according to claim 80, wherein said demountable wheel carrier is vertically slidable via an air cushion within said corresponding recess.

84. The shoe according to claim 80, wherein said demountable wheel carrier is vertically slidable via a wedge horizontally insertable between said demountable wheel carrier and said corresponding recess.

85. The shoe according to claim 56, further comprising: two side walls with one side wall located on each side of two sides of said shoe; sliding elements; and, a guide element for each side wall of said two side walls for said sliding elements that are movable, or slidable, along each said guide element.

86. The shoe according to claim 85, wherein said guide element is a rail that is open toward a lower edge of said shoe sole.

87. The shoe according to claim 85, wherein said guide element is a groove arranged on each said side wall of said two side walls.

88. The shoe according to claim 56, further comprising: a first longitudinal wheel carrier fixed on a left-hand side of said shoe; and, a second longitudinal wheel carrier fixed on a right-hand side of said shoe, said first longitudinal wheel carrier and said second longitudinal wheel carrier having, at a respective rear end on an edge of said heel region of said shoe sole, an inwardly directed horizontal platform on which said first region of said heel region of said shoe sole rests with said heel region being removable from said horizontal platform by sliding a respective said first longitudinal wheel carrier or said second longitudinal wheel carrier and pressable against a front edge of said horizontal platform.

89. The shoe according to claim 88, wherein said horizontal platform includes holding pin or hook on which a fitting counterpart is provided on said shoe with a place for attachment on said shoe being provided so that said plurality of rollers are in a running position.

90. The shoe according to claim 56, further comprising a first receptacle device and a second receptacle device for each roller of said plurality of rollers with each said roller being detachably affixed to said first receptacle device and said second receptacle device and positioned in a manner that is dependent upon whether said shoe is in a skating position or in a running position.

Description:

The invention relates to a shoe comprising two or more rotatable rollers, which are disposed on one or more axles, the axles being aligned essentially transversely to the longitudinal direction of the shoes, or transversely to the running direction.

The prior art discloses roller shoes that are either detachably joinable to conventional shoes by means of a frame which can be strapped on or are firmly joinable to the shoes by means of a frame which bears against the underside of the shoe sole. So-called “inline skates” can be regarded as a development of the second version. These are shoes that are firmly or detachably connected to a row of “in-line” rollers. A common feature of both inline skates and roller shoes is that they can only be used for skating.

Shoes in which two or more rollers are arranged one behind the other in the direction of movement are particularly widespread. The advantage of this arrangement lies in the fact that the user learns to stand reliably on the roller shoes even without long practice. If, seen in the direction of travel, at least two rollers are arranged side by side and—as mentioned above—also at least two rollers are arranged one behind the other then, stable standing is possible.

The disadvantage of this arrangement is that only roller movements are possible with the shoe. For acceleration as well as to generate a forward force component, the roller shoe-user has the possibility of adjusting the travel direction of both roller shoes slightly away from the main direction of movement, so that the two roller shoes are distanced from one another. During this phase, the user must apply muscle forces, which spread his legs and thereby exert a force on the roller shoe that is oriented obliquely to their current direction of travel. The component of this force that is oriented in the travel direction accelerates the roller shoe and thereby also the user who is standing on them.

For slowing down, the same method can be used as for acceleration with different travel directions for the left and right shoes. If, for example, the shoes move away from one another, the user, in order to slow down, must use muscle force to counteract the spreading exerted on his legs by the roller shoes.

The accelerations or retardations obtained thereby are, however, comparatively small. This method is therefore not very widespread in the practical use of roller shoes. On the other hand, it is used with so-called “snake boards”.

A person is rather used to shifting his weight onto only one leg while he extends the other leg in the direction of movement. When the desired stride distance is reached, the weight is shifted onto the other leg and removed from the first leg, which is extended forwards again.

A “walking” movement is only possible with restrictions, as the rollers provided on each of the important support points of the foot prevent a pushing of the foot against the solid base surface. Reasonably, roller shoes or inline skates cannot therefore be worn in buses and trains. Likewise walking on stairs with roller shoes or inline skates should be avoided because of the risk of falling. In department stores or pedestrian zones, too, persons wearing roller shoes or inline skates are at risk because these sports appliances only allow rapid and reliable stopping by very practiced persons.

Against this background, the object of the invention is to design a shoe that can be used both as a skating and playing implement and as a fitness device and, besides the skating movement, also permits a walking or running movement and rapid retardation.

For unpracticed users and for crowded areas, it is a great advantage if the shoe according to the invention can be converted by inexperienced users, without a special tool, in such a manner that, on lowering the heel region, the rollers in contact with the ground can be lifted in such a manner that they are no longer in contact with the ground in normal walking or running motion. In the process, the rollers should remain on the shoe. A further alternative is to remove the rollers or the rollers with their axles, or a frame on which the axles and rollers are fixed, from the shoe, and to transfer these parts to the user for transport and for safekeeping.

To achieve this object, the invention teaches a shoe that is characterized in that one or more axles, which in each case bear one or more rollers, are entirely or partly inset into the shoe sole in a vertical direction, and the axes only lie in that third of the shoe sole that starts with the heel region of the shoe sole, the arrangement of the axes and the size of the rollers being dimensioned such that the shoe sole ensures a partly flat tread in the region that is not provided with axles and rollers.

The axles that are fitted with rollers are inset into the shoe sole in the rear third thereof, that is to say in the heel region or in the heel-element. The “heel region of the shoe sole” in the sense of the invention can, independently of the shoe type, be extended from the rear, floorward end of a shoe to beyond the first third, lying in the travel direction. In the case of plateau shoes, which do not have a clear subdivision between the heel-element and the front part of the shoe sole, the heel region/heel of the sole, in the sense of the invention, can also extend to the center of the sole.

With a correspondingly small roller diameter, it is possible for the should to be hardly raised at all (high-heel effect). Since the axles with the rollers mounted thereon are only mounted in the rear part, that is to say preferably in the region of the heel-element, the front region of the shoe sole remains available for non-slip treading.

The gist of the invention consists in the fact that the carrier of a left and right shoe according to the invention, which in each case have the features described in the claims, can gain in force by means of an initiating running movement, and that this force can be converted into a skating movement by shifting the weight towards the heel region.

The user can thus achieve the desired speed by walking and/or running (exclusively on the front region of the shoe). Then the rear region of the shoe sinks and in return lifts the front region of the shoe. In this state, only the rollers of the shoe according to the invention are in contact with the surface. The kinetic energy stored in the mass of the human body now provides the propulsion.

For slowing down of this movement, it is closest to habitual human running and walking for the user of the shoe according to the invention to lower the front region of the shoe back onto the surface. As soon as the surface comes into contact with the ground, the user must suddenly change over to a running or walking movement, according to the speed. This transition requires a certain training in order to keep the balance during the transition phase. It is therefore pointed out that shoes according to the invention, with fixed-mounted rollers, should not be used in means of transport such as buses and trains, on stairs or in crowded areas such as pedestrian zones or shops. This recommendation is only intended for entirely unpractised or relatively inexperienced users.

However, the wearer of the shoes can also initiate the force by means of a rolling movement, such as is known from snake boards. To stabilize the position during skating, the legs, can be offset with respect to one another seen in the direction of travel. (Braking is carried out by shifting the weight from the heel region of the shoe sole towards the ball of the foot, until the free shoe sole, in this region, that is to say that region not provided with wheels, comes into contact with the solid ground. Alternatively to the gradual braking, it is also possible, with a correspondingly lower skating velocity, to change over from the skating movement into a running movement. Rapid braking, however, is also possible by tilting the heel-element edge of a shoe. The angle of attack with this braking manoeuvre depends on the position of the axle, that is to say, the further this is away from the rear heel-element edge, the less is the necessary tilting movement of the shoe backwards that is necessary for braking.

For shifting the weight to the heel region during skating with the shoes according to the invention, muscles are stretched that are not trained during normal walking or skating. That particularly concerns muscle groups of the thigh, calf, stomach and back. The shoe is therefore suitable, in principle, for use in leisure sports such as aerobic exercises and for orthopaedic gymnastics.

For the skate shoe according to the invention with the above-described hybrid properties, almost any type of shoe are conceivable, i.e. running shoes, leisure shoes, half-shoes, ankle boots, cowboy boots, ladies' shoes, high-heel shoes or even bathing sandals. The shoe soles ideally have the necessary thickness and stability, particularly in the heel region, to receive the axles. However, the attachment of the axles is, in principle, also possible with thinner soles. Particularly suitable are sports and leisure shoes with rubber soles. A particular type of these leisure shoes that is currently worn particularly by relatively young purchasers is characterised in that the sole does not have a recognizable transition between the heel region (heel-element) and the rest of the shoe sole. Where the heel region is mentioned within this application, that part of the shoe sole is meant that starts with the rear edge of the heel-element and extends at least to that point on the shoe sole that is marked by the imaginary perpendicular extension of the shin.

It lies within the scope of the invention that the axes are designed either as continuous axles or as axle sections. While the continuous axles span the entire width of the shoe sole in the heel region, the axle sections are inset blind into the shoe sole by an end section. The fastening within the shoe sole can be performed by means of a screw thread. The outward ends of the axes have either a screw thread or a plug facility, by means of which the roller plugged onto the respective axle can be secured. The rollers mounted on the projecting axle sections project laterally beyond the shoe and widen the shoe at least by the width of the rollers.

In an alternative embodiment, two rollers, which are fixed at both sides of the shoe sole, are mounted on two axes, which are offset with respect to one another in the horizontal direction of the shoe sole. By means of the offset of the axes, the position in the skating position is advantageously more stable.

In a further development of the invention, it is provided that a total of three rollers are attached to each shoe. Two of the rollers are fixed on both sides of the shoe heel-element and a further, third, roller is fixed in the region of the shoe sole, in which the heel region merges with the rest of the shoe sole. The attachment of three rollers per shoe has the advantage that even less well practiced shoe wears can skate for longer distances with the show, because he stands in a more stable position. Because of the possibility of shifting a part of the weight towards the ball of the foot, that is to say the front region of the shoe sole, the demands on the balance during skating are no longer as high as, for example, with a continuous axle with two rollers.

In principle, more than three rollers can of course be attached in the heel region of the shoe sole.

In a preferred embodiment, it is conceivable that the two rollers fixed in the region of the shoe heel-element have a larger diameter than the third or every further roller mounted in the front third of the heel region. If the axes are connected to the shoe sole at the same height in each case, the rollers with the large diameter project further beyond the lower edge of the shoe sole, so that the shoe is slightly inclined forwards.

It lies within the scope of the invention that the axes, whether continuous axles or blind-ending, are either firmly or detachably connected to the sole. The continuous axles can be either fixed either in an opening extending through the shoe sole or in a groove-like depression. The depth of the groove-like depression in a vertical direction of the shoe sole can be variable. The attachment of the continuous axle in a groove-like depression furthermore has the advantage that the axle can be removed from the shoe together with the rollers fixed thereon. If the rollers are mounted on the blind-terminated axles, openings corresponding to the outer shape of the axle form are provided in the shoe sole. To fix the blind-terminating axles, the openings can have screw threads that can be screwed into.

To change the sole as little as possible in the region of the heel-element by the attachment of the axles, the attachment of the axles is provided directly on the surface of the shoe sole by means of fixing elements known to the person skilled in the art.

In a further development of the invention, it is provided that the shoe sole has recesses in the heel region, which serve to receive the rollers in the manner of mudguards. By this means, it is advantageously achieved that the rollers do not lead to widening of the shoe sole and thereby a greater restriction of the freedom of movement, in particular, during walking.

In an alternative embodiment of the invention, it is provided that the rollers have a slightly tilted position as seen from the toe of the shoe. This inclination is effected in that axle sections serving at least to receive the rollers have an outwardly directed inclination with respect to a plane that is parallel to the surface of the sole. By virtue of the inclination of the axes, the respective top halves of two mutually opposite rollers come closer to one another, while the lower halves have a greater distance from one another. By means of this attachment, the skating track is made wider, which leads to an improved road holding. Furthermore, the inclined rollers, with an appropriately rounded outer edge, permit the use of the shoe for show inserts, with break-dance elements, while the performer supports himself with one hand on the ground, the skating leg on the inclined roller describes a circular motion. With the aid of the shoe according to the invention, however, a large number of complicated acrobatic inserts are conceivable. In this case, the performer can cover a larger distance, skating in an arena, between the individual acrobatic inserts in a similar manner to ice figure skating.

In a further preferred embodiment, it is provided that the rollers are suspended on axle sections, which are tiltable laterally and an element that can be tension and/or compression loaded forms a connection between each roller suspension and the underside of the shoe sole, which makes it possible to influence the position of the rollers by a weight shifting. For example, it would be obvious to diagonally attach the connecting elements from the lower edge of each roller suspension as far as the opposing opposite edge of the shoe sole.

It lies within the scope of the invention that the axles bear directly against the inside of the shoe sole or are indirectly connected to the shoe sole, inserted into a sleeve.

It goes without saying that all possibilities known to the person skilled in the art from the area of roller shoes, inline skates and skateboards for fixing the axes and rollers can also be used for the shoe according to the invention.

For fastening the rollers, continuous axes can have a screw thread at their ends in each case for screwing on a locking nut. The locking nuts here serve for fixing the axle in the opening in the shoe sole provided for this purpose. After the rollers have been plugged onto the end sections of the axles, they are secured by means of two additional nuts, which can be designed as securing nuts. Alternatively, screw threads can be inserted in the shoe sole, which are accessible from the side. For fastening the rollers, a screw with thread is sufficient in the simplest case.

It goes without saying that all roller bearings or ball bearings known to a person skilled in the art come into consideration for bearing the rollers on the end sections of the axles.

To increase the acrobatic application of the shoe, it is provided that the shoe sole is fitted on the underside, in the centre part contiguous with the heel region, with a metal plate or a hard plastic plate. Here, the metal or plastic surface can have a planar or grooved structure. By means of such a shoe, it is possible to slide along hard edges or banisters. Movement on such a subsurface is known by the term “grinding” and is known from the skateboard scene.

The fixing of the rollers on the shoe sole by means of a frame that can be firmly strapped to the shoe or detachably fixed in another manner also lies within the scope of the invention. It is conceivable here that one of the continuous axes is inset into the shoe sole in a groove-like depression that runs transversely to the skating direction. By introducing the axle into a groove-like depression, the mountability of the frame is facilitated and at the same time the torsion-resistant fixing of the axes, and therefore of the rollers is ensured.

As another embodiment, the invention describes a shoe with two rotatable half-axes as carriers of the rollers. In the skating position, these half axles are oriented transversely to the direction of movement and extend from the edge of the shoe to about the center of the shoe.

Here, they are rotatably mounted about an almost vertical axle. The fulcrum is inclined slightly forwards from the perpendicular in the direction of travel. If the half axles are pivoted backwards about this fulcrum, the slight inclination of the fulcrum leads to the roller lifting of the roadway. By this means, they are changed over from the skating position to the running position. In the running position, the two rollers are visible side by side at the back of the shoe in the region of the heel.

For reliable fixing of the skating position, it is appropriate to provide a depression in the pivoting face of the half axles, into which the half axes can be pressed by the weight of the shoe user. If the half-axles are to be pivoted from the skating position into the running position, it is necessary in this embodiment first to move the half-axle somewhat downwards, so that it detaches itself from the depression. Only then can the pivoting movement be initiated backwards.

The advantage of this solution is that the half axes, seen from above, can be made very wide and thereby offer space for a fulcrum with a very large diameter. Seen from the side, the fulcrums can then be dimensioned with a very low profile, so that they only require a very shallow recess in the shoe sole. Because of their large surface area, such half axles are pressed onto the shoe sole in a tilt-resistant manner. The large diameter of the fulcrum allows the latter to be made of the same material as the shoe sole itself in one casting mould. As a safeguard against dropping down of the unloaded half axles of the sole, it is sufficient, with a semi-flexible sole material at the end of the half axle, to form a bead, beyond which the half-axle is pushed onto the fulcrum.

Of course, all other forms of securing a rotating par on an axle are also applicable.

To change over from the driving position into the running position, it is necessary for the user to make a separate manual operation for each half axle. A further advantageous embodiment of the aforementioned variants consists in the fact that the two half axes in each case have, in the region of their fulcrums, toothing at their outer edges, which intermesh with one another. These toothings act as gear wheels, but only within the pivot range of the half-axles. The advantage of this configuration is that both half axes can be moved simultaneously with only a single manual operation. However, care must be taken that, in this configuration, only one of the two half-axles should have a safeguard against unintentional pivoting.

The invention describes another configuration, in which both rollers are arranged on a rigid axle, which extends through the shoe sole. For passing the axle through the sole, an opening is provided in the sole. Seen from the side, the opening has the shape of a letter “J.” A spring pulls the axle into on or other leg of the J-shaped openings. The short leg of the “J” is dimensioned such that the lower edge of the rollers is located below the lower edge of the shoe sole, that is to say, in the skating position. The long leg of the “J” is dimensioned such that the lower edges of the rollers are below the lower edge of the shoe soles.

The advantage of this configuration is the very simple design of the axle and the simple and robust quick-lifting mechanism, which is very easy for the user to understand.

To prevent, as far as possible, the penetration of foreign objects into the J-shaped opening of the shoe sole, it is proposed to apply an additional covering on the axle, which covers the J-shaped opening in both positions and, by virtue of its flexible design, presses on the side edge of the shoe sole. It should be possible to fold this cover back for cleaning purposes.

The invention describes another configuration, which is effective as a fast-lifting device. In this configuration, the rollers are fixed firmly and unchangeably on the shoe sole. In the region of the heel, the shoe sole has an outer surface that rises towards the back. Below this outer surface, there is arranged an element that is wedge-shaped seen from the side. The wedge-shaped element is displaceable in the direction of movement. When the wedge-shaped element is in its rear position, only the rollers are in contact with the road. However, when the wedge-shaped element is displaced into its front position, the rollers are no longer in contact with the road but only the wedge-shaped element. The effect of this displacement is that the shoe has a raised heel-element, with the aid of which the user can execute is customary walking and running movements unrestricted. In a variant of the above-described configuration, the invention proposes that both the outer surface of the shoe sole and the upper surface of the wedge-shaped adjustment element is provided with a toothing or another regularly patterned deformation transversely to the direction of movement of the shoe. This surface formation secures the wedge-shaped adjustment element against unintentional deformation.

In a further variant of the above-described configuration, the wedge-shaped adjustment element is provided with an upwardly acting spring or with a screw or dovetailed profile of a correspondingly shaped groove in the upper element, or with a detachable pressing device against the shoe sole.

In a further configuration, the invention proposes the formation of two stable side walls, in the region of the rollers, on the left and right-hand sides of the shoe. On the side wall, in each case, a roller carrier is fixed, which is tiltable forwards or backwards about a horizontal fulcrum. The roller carrier is triangular. In the three corners are arranged the fulcrums for the roller carrier, the half-axles for the rollers and the fixing means. It is proposed to dimension the triangular roller carrier such that, in the skating position, the fulcrum marks the highest point of the triangle, that the fixing means is approximately at the height of the lower edge of the shoe sole and that the half-axle of the roller is positioned lower than the fulcrum of the roller carrier—in each case with respect to the lower edge of the shoe sole. When the fixing means is detached and pivoted downwards, to the extent that it is again at the level of the lower edge of the shoe sole, the half-axle of the roller moves upwards.

The advantages of this configuration are that the side wall and the roller carrier, can be produced, e.g., of sheet metal in a very low-profile design. The fast lifting device of this configuration therefore hardly widens the shoe according to the invention.

A further advantage is that the distance of the half axle from the fulcrum of the roller carrier is very much smaller than the distance of the fixing means. Forces acting on the half axle 3a therefore generate on the fixing means forces that are lower in the inverse ratio of the respective distance from the fulcrum. Consequently, the fixing means can be dimensioned so as to be correspondingly weaker.

An advantageous design is that the fixing means of the left- and right-hand side can be connected to one another below the shoe sole, e.g. by means of a steel wire. It is a practical design to provide, to receive this steel wire in the shoe sole, groove-like depressions, which are equipped in certain regions with small snap lugs, which hold the fixing means. In a further subvariant, additional grooves can be provided along the pivot circle of the fixing means in order to receive the latter. By this means, it is possible to active different skating positions of the roller. In this way, a variable ground clearance can be of advantage, in particular at the beginning of the training with shoes according to this subsequent application.

Another sub-variant of the above-described configuration with pivotable roller carriers is the connection of the side walls not to the shoe but below the shoe sole. By this means, it is possible for both side walls with their connection and the roller carriers that are pivotable thereon to be removable from the shoe as a complete assembly.

In a further variant, it is proposed that the connection is adjustable in its distance below the shoe, for example by means of two interlocking tongues. By this means, it is possible to adapt to different widths of shoes.

In a further sub-variant, it is proposed that this removable assembly can be fixed onto the shoe, via one or two eyelets, with tensioning tapes, which run from the eyelet at one side above the shoe to the eyelet at the other side. To connect and adjust these tensioning tapes, all known variants, such as a buckle with holes in the counterpart, a Velcro fastening or a clamp connection can be used.

The advantages of this configuration are that the rollers are raised in critical regions and that the user can then walk normally and run, or that they can even be removed completely. By this means, any desired shoe can be equipped.

Another configuration according to the invention provides for a continuous, rigid axle, which bears rollers at its ends. In this case, the shaft is bent over twice, in each case at right angles, at the two ends. By this means, the ends of the axle are designed as a crank. The rollers are mounted and secured on these ends. The axle is rotatably mounted in a bore that passes transversely through the shoe sole 4. When the crank points upwards, the rollers are in the highest position (running position). When the crank points downwards, the rollers are in the lowest position (skating position). The advantage of this configuration is that the axle can be economically produced from round steel and nevertheless is very stable and can even withstand peak loads. Likewise it is comparatively simple to receive the axle in the shoe sole. For the user, the adjustment principle is very easy to understand. If the length of the crank is dimensioned such that it extends perpendicularly both in the skating position and in the running position, extremely load-bearing receptacles are not necessary for fixing the axle. For fixing, the invention proposes one or two additional bars, which run along the side of the shoe and are fixed at one end to the center point of the roller and are detachably fixed to shoe at the other end. If the distance of the fixing point from the crank arm in the skating position or in the running position is designed such that the crank arm extends perpendicular in both states, it is sufficient if the bar has a single fixing point on the shoe. The advantage of this configuration is that only a single fixing mechanism needs to be provided. Since it must be easily detachable by the user, all known variants, e.g. a pin with a surrounding bead that engages in a correspondingly shaped depression in the sole material, or a hook-shaped securing means, or another known design, can be used.

In a further design of the aforementioned configuration, the invention additionally proposes, in addition to the two crank-shaped bends at the ends of the axle, a further bend in the centre of the axle. It is imposed in the interest of optimum ease of manufacture that this bend should have the form of a loop. Corresponding to the shape of this additional bend, a recess is to be provided in the centre of the sole, into which the bend fits. An advantageous design of this configuration is that one or more additional snap lugs made of a semi-flexible material of the sole, which are made of a semi-flexible material and behind which the bend engages, are formed out of the sole.

It is to be preferred that, seen from the side, the center bend is at an angle of 90° to the two crank-shaped bends at the end of the axle. The advantage of this form of configuration is that the center bend can fit into recesses on the underside of the shoe sole and that the bend undergoes a pivot angle of 180° between these two recesses. A pivot angle of 180° is also advantageous for the crank-shaped designs at the ends of the axle, since it corresponds to the path from the running position (raised wheel with crank pointing vertically upwards) into the skating position (roller lowered downwards with crank pointing vertically downwards).

Another safety-relevant design is achieved in the fact skating position of the axle is achieved when the centre bend points backwards against the skating direction. If, during skating, a bump or foreign body is rolled over, a force will suddenly act on the crank-shaped bends at the axle ends. By this means, a torque forms in the centre region of the axle. This torque is received by the center bend and transferred by the fact that the centre bend is pressed with an increased contact force into the rearward recess. If—against the preference of this subsequent application—the center bend was located in the front recess in the skating position, then when a foreign body was rolled over with the resulting torque on the axle, the bend might possibly be detached from the recess and the rollers would leave their skating position. The rear region of the shoe sole would lower onto the road. The user would have great difficulty in intercepting the delaying force that would suddenly occur. Therefore, the center bend should point backwards in the skating position.

The advantages of the above-described configuration include the fact that, with a manual operation by the user, both rollers are changes over from the skating position into the running position, and that the two positions can be very easily safeguarded by means of snap lugs made of the material of the shoe sole. The manufacture of the axle from round steel material is also comparatively simple. The same applies to mounting by means of an additional block in the heel region of the sole.

A further improvement of this configuration can be achieve in that the center bend is subdivided by virtue of the design into two bends, which are arranged on the edges of the shoe. Thus, a continuous axle is provided, which is bent threefold at each of its edges. The first bend fulfils the function of the limit stop for the skating position and running position, the two other bends form the crank, to which the rollers are fixed. For those bends that serve as a limit stop, one fitting recess in each case is formed, in this configuration, at the edges of the shoe sole. This recess should also be provided with snap lugs made of the material of the shoe sole, behind which the bends engage. As with the configuration with a centre bend on the axle, the two bends for the stop in the skating position should also point backwards in the skating position.

An advantage of these configurations with two edge bends for the limit stop is that no contaminants and foreign bodies can lodge in the recesses. For the user of the shoes, the limit-stop bends are outwardly visible, which greatly assists the intuitively correct operation of the quick-lifting mechanism.

A further embodiment according to the invention of the continuous axle, which is bent in the manner of a crank at both ends is that differently formed anti-rotation devices are arranged in the centre of the axle, by means of which the axle can be fixed in the skating position or in the running position. The invention also proposes for this a pin that projects laterally from the axle or a welded-on star, or a laterally projecting flattening of the axle. To receive these anti-rotation devices, corresponding counterparts must be arranged around the bore, which runs transversely through the shoe sole, said counterparts permitting engagement of the anti-rotation device in two different angular positions.

In order that this anti-rotation device can be released by the user with only one manual operation and fixed back in place again, the invention proposes that the anti-rotation device only extends over a very small portion of the continuous axle and is arranged near to one of the two crank-like bends at the ends of the axle. To release this anti-rotation device, it is proposed to displace the axle transversely to the direction of movement until the anti-rotation device has emerged from its corresponding counterpart in the shoe sole. The axle can thereby be rotated and pushed back in the opposite direction until the anti-rotation device engages in the new angular position. For this, it is necessary for the distance between the two cranks to be enlarged until the anti-rotation device has adequate space to move out of its counterpart.

For the reliable operation of this configuration, it is necessary to provide a securing means against lateral displacement of the axle. A suitable possibility is to arrange a slide along the side wall of the shoe, which can be pushed in front of the anti-rotation device such that the anti-rotation device cannot emerge from its counterpart in the axle. An alternative is a pin that preferably passes, in the direction of movement of the shoe, through a bore in the anti-rotation device and thereby prevents the anti-rotation device from displacing laterally. In dimensioning this additional securing means, it should be observed that the user of the shoe according to the subsequent application uses it like the roller shoe of the prior art for acceleration by steering the shoe in a direction that deviates somewhat from the main skating direction and shifts his weight transversely to this direction of movement. The resulting forces transversely to the main direction of movement do cause, in the case of roller shoes,—as mentioned above—a force component directed in the main direction of movement. These forces, which act on rollers and on their suspension must also be intercepted in a design in which a lateral displacement possibility of the axle is provided.

The invention proposes, as a further alternative of a quick-lifting device, a configuration in which the two rollers are rotatably fixed to a wheel carrier that passes through the shoe sole transversely to the direction of movement. The wheel carrier fits into a corresponding recess on the underside of the shoe sole.

In the simplest design of this configuration, the wheel carrier takes the form of a cuboid. The cuboid fixture is designed such that it can be detached from the shoe sole, twisted through 180° and mounted again with the same fixture.

For guiding the wheel carrier while it is being changed, it is advantageous to provide, in the centre of the wheel carrier, a rod, which faces forwards or backwards towards the heel; this rod is located in a recess on the underside of the shoe sole and, at its end that is distant from the wheel carrier, is rotatable on the shoe and is pivotably mounted. Seen from above, the wheel carrier, including the guide rod, has a T-shaped configuration.

The change between the skating position and running position is subdivided into three phases. First the wheel carrier is detached from a recess and removed from the shoe sole, wherein it is held by the guide rod. In the second phase, the wheel carrier is pivoted through 180° about its center point and the formerly left-hand roller is then located on the right-hand side of the shoe. In the third phase, the wheel carrier is brought onto the sole again and latched into the recess on the underside of the sole.

The advantages of this configuration are that the continuous axle can consist of a single piece of round steel and the wheel carrier, together with the guide rod that is allocated to it can be formed as a large-area plastic element. It is conceivable to use the same or a similar material as for the shoe sole, so that the running properties of the shoe are not influenced by the quick-lifting device.

The T-shaped design on the underside of the shoe sole is very clearly visible for the user of the shoe according to this subsequent application and can therefore be optically further emphasized by means of a suitable design, and used as a distinguishing feature in advertising campaigns.

In a further configuration according to the invention the shoes are equipped on both sides with an additional side wall, on which a rail, arranged in a Z-shape, extends. On the rail there runs a sliding element, which bears the half axles for the rollers. The rails are arranged such that the sliding element that is displaceable thereon can be removed from the rail towards the sole. When the sliding element is moved in the other direction, it reaches, as a first characteristic point on the rail, the first kink of the Z. This point is arranged such that it corresponds to the skating position of the roller. The weight forces of the user, which act on the roller during skating, ensure that the roller moves automatically into this position on the rail. However, an additional safeguard, e.g. by means of a small snap lug, is recommended. When the user moves the sliding elements on the Z-shaped rail, the end point of the/will mark the running position of the rollers. When the rollers are adjusted in this position, their lower edge is located above the lower edge of the shoe sole. An advantage of this configuration is that, for the rollers, the three operating states of “roller removed,” “roller in skating position,” and “roller in running position” are possible.

Another configuration according to the invention provides for one side wall in each case, on which a roller carrier is rotatably mounted, to be arranged on the sides of the shoe. The fulcrum for these roller carriers extends approximately in the direction of movement. The roller carrier can be pivoted almost through 180°.

When the fulcrum for the roller carrier is arranged above the shoe sole, the relationship between the

height of the pivot axle above the shoe sole,
the distance between the roller centre point and the pivot axle
and the diameter of the wheel
must be matched such that the rollers are in the skating position when the roller carrier is in the lower position and are in the running position when in the roller carrier is in the upper position.

A variant of this configuration is that the additional sidewalls can be dispensed with. Instead of this, the pivot axle of each roller carrier is arranged on the side of the shoe soles. The roller carrier, together with the rollers fixed thereon, can be pivoted out of this position of the pivot axle beneath the shoe sole. Preferably, the roller and roller carrier pivot into a correspondingly formed recess on the underside of the shoe sole.

When the roller is arranged on the roller carrier such that, in the running position (roller or shoe sole pivoted) above the roller carrier, it is possible to form the other side of the roller carrier such that it corresponds to the tread surface of a shoe sole.

In the skating position, the roller is located with its entire diameter below the lower edge of the shoe sole; a comparatively large floor clearance in the skating state is thereby achieved.

Another variant of this configuration consists in the fact that, in the running position, the roller carrier is arranged above the rollers. The side surfaces of the rollers are then visible from below. When the distance from the fulcrum to the pivot axle is smaller than the radius of the roller, the roller projects, in the running state, laterally beyond the shoe soles. The advantage of this configuration is that the floor clearance of the rollers can be fixed during the skating state independently of the diameter of the rollers.

In a further configuration, the invention proposes the longitudinal wheel carriers on the left and right sides of the shoe, which are connected to one another in the region of the heel. This creates the configuration of a U-shaped carrier, which conforms to the outer edges of the sole. The longitudinal wheel carrier bears one roller in each case on each side. In an embodiment of this configuration, the longitudinal wheel carriers are rotatably mounted in the front region of the shoe. The fulcrum extends parallel to the shoe sole and transversely to the direction of movement of the shoe. On its rear region, the longitudinal wheel carrier has a platform with an approximately sickle-shaped outline. Seen from above, this platform is shaped such that the rear region of the heel region of the shoe sole can be placed down thereon. To place it down, it is necessary for the longitudinal wheel carrier to be slidable forwards in the direction of movement. This state is the running position of the configuration. For the running position of the wheel carrier, the wheel carrier must be pushed backwards with respect to the rest of the shoe; the heel region of the shoe thereby slips down from the platform at the end of the longitudinal wheel carrier. The longitudinal wheel carrier can then be raised and moved somewhat forwards again. Fixing spikes on the front edge of the platform penetrate somewhat into the wall of the shoe and ensure that, in this manner, the longitudinal wheel carrier is fixed vertically in the heel region. So that the fixing spikes do not slip out of the shoe, a tensioning tape is expedient, which runs from the left-hand side of the wheel carrier above the shoe to the right-hand wheel carrier region.

Instead of the fixing spikes, a pin or hook can be provided, which engages in a corresponding counterpart in the shoe. The counterpart is to be arranged on the shoe at such a height that, when the wheel carrier is raised, the running position of the shoe is achieved.

In a further development of this configuration, it is proposed that the left-hand and right-hand sides of the wheel carrier are connected together in the front shoe region beneath the shoe by means of a metal plate. The metal plate is displaceable forwards or backwards beneath the shoe; furthermore, it is possible, by virtue of the large distance between the metal plate and heel region, without impairing the running property, for the wheel carrier to be pivoted somewhat about the metal plate as a fulcrum.

In this configuration, a removable unit is possible, which has a very simple quick-lifting device, which can be intuitively understood by the user. In a further development of this configuration, it is proposed that the left-hand and right-hand sides of the wheel carrier are connected together at the rear region by means of two intermediate pieces which are arranged in an articulated manner. In the interests of optimum stability of the unit, the pivot axles for these additional intermediate pieces should run perpendicular to the surface of the shoe sole. The two most important advantages of these articulated intermediate pieces are adaptation to different shoe sizes and shoe forms and folding up of the unit when it is not in use.

A major advantage of this configuration is that an additional assembly is provided, which can be mounted on any shoes and matched to their dimensions. The platform in the rear region acts as a quick-lifting device. Furthermore, the entire unit can be rapidly removed from the shoe. It counts as another advantage that the unit is clearly recognizable from the outside as an additional element. The outer surfaces are available from forming fashionable styling. In particular, the front region of the longitudinal wheel carrier can be given a variety of styles.

Another, highly varied group of quick-lifting devices results from the different embodiments of the configuration of a wheel carrier, which is located, transversely to the direction of movement of the shoe, in a recess in the shoe sole. When the wheel carrier is guided vertically in this recess by means of a guide—e.g. tongue and groove—different variants are possible for vertical adjustment.

In one embodiment, a screw, arranged perpendicular to the surface of the shoe sole, is rotatably disposed above the wheel carrier and within the recess. An internal thread in the wheel carrier fits this screw. Turning the screw moves the wheel carrier upwards and downwards. Here, it is to be noted that the screw has a comparatively large diameter if it is to be actuatable without a tool.

A further embodiment of this configuration is an air cushion, which is arranged between the wheel carrier and recess. When the air cushion is inflated, it becomes effective as a quick-lifting device, which moves the wheel carrier downwards towards the outer surface of the shoe sole and thereby changes over the roller from the running position into the skating position. In a sub-variant of this design, the invention proposes the integration of an air pump, which can be actuated externally by means of a pin in the heel region. An outwardly accessible outlet valve serves four releasing the air within the air cushion.

In a further subvariant of the configuration of a wheel carrier in a recess in the shoe sole, it is proposed that a wedge is inserted between the wheel carrier and recess. To this end, the wedge must move parallel to the outer surface of the sole. As a movement mechanism for the wedge, for example, a screw with a corresponding internal thread in the shoe sole is conceivable. Another variant is that the wedge has snap fastenings, by analogy with the displaceable element beneath the heel region of the shoe, which is also presented here. By means of these snap fastenings, the wedge can be fixed in two different positions.

Another variant consists in the fact that spacer pieces slide between the wheel carrier and recesses and can be folded out or rotated out of the wheel carrier.

For all the above-described configurations, the invention proposes, as an additional option, the formation of beads before and/or behind the rollers. These beads are designed such that their outer surface runs in the vicinity of the rollers flush with the outer surface of the rollers and, with increasing distance from the roller approaches ever close to the outer surface of the shoe and finally merges into the outer surface of the shoe. These beads perform the function of a wheel deflector and prevent the outwardly projecting rollers from ensnaring with the roller of the adjacent other shoe during use. Smaller objects that are located on the roadway are pushed aside by these beads and cannot be jammed between the roller and shoe.

Another configuration of the shoe according to the invention is the fixing of rollers on one of two receptacle devices, the first receptacle device being arranged such that the roller fixed thereon is in the skating position, that is to say that the lower edge of the roller 2 is below the lower edge of the shoe sole 4.

The second receptacle device is arranged such that the roller fixed thereon is in the running position; thus the lower edge of the roller 2 is below the underside of the shoe sole.

This second receptacle device can be arranged at any desired point on the outside of the shoe. That is to say on the side in the vicinity of that receptacle that is used for the skating position. Or in the front region, elsewhere on the sides or in the rear region close to the heel. When the shoe is equipped with two rollers, the respective receptacle devices for the running position can, for example, both be arranged on one side, preferably on the outside of the shoe so as not to collide with the other shoe. Or one receptacle is positioned on the toe and the other on the heel. Or both receptacles are arranged one above the other on the heel.

The receptacle device can also be integrated in the underside of the shoe sole. To this end, a corresponding recess, in which the roller fits, must be provided in the shoe sole. The advantage of this position is that the rollers are not outwardly visible in the running position. In order that the recesses do not become dirty, they can be closed with a removable cover. As safeguard against loss, the cover should be provided with a flexible tape on the shoe sole or fold open against spring pressure.

When the rollers are in the skating position, the recess must be able to withstand the forces during skating and transfer them to the shoe. When the rollers are in the running position, the recess must only be able to bear the inherent weight of the rollers themselves.

The simplest form of the recess is an internal thread in the shoe sole or in the shoe, in which a screw fits as counterpart. An advantageous embodiment is the (loss-proof) fastening of the screw on the roller. For rapid and tool-free exchange, the invention prefers that the actuating elements on the head of the screw—similar to a wing nut—have sufficiently large actuating surfaces on a greatest possible diameter.

As an improved form of receptacle, the invention prefers a bayonet fitting instead of the screw. The bayonet fitting acts like a screw, but with a different pitch. When the bayonet fitting is in the end position, the pitch is reduced to zero at first and is then negative for a short distance.

By this means, the risk of unintentional release is reduced.

A further alternative is a lever that is articulated to the receptacle device and can be folded out transversely to the fulcrum of the roller. When extended, the lever fits through the opening of the roller. After folding out, a tensioning spring presses the lever onto the roller and thereby keeps it in this position. The articulation point of the tensioning spring can only be removed from the rotation point of the lever to the extent permitted by the size of the opening in the roller. The lever itself, however, is longer. By this means, the actuating force for unlocking is reduced.

Further details and features of the invention are explained below in greater detail with reference to examples. The illustrated examples are not intended to restrict the invention, but only to explain it. In schematic view:

FIG. 1 shows a shoe with two rollers in the heel region

FIG. 2 shows a shoe with three rollers in the heel region

FIG. 3 shows a shoe with inclined rollers

FIG. 4 shows a section through a shoe with inclined half-axles that can be rotated away backwards

FIG. 5 shows a view of a shoe from below with half-axles that can be intermeshed with one another and can be rotated away backwards

FIG. 6 shows a section through a shoe sole with a J-shaped opening for guiding a continuous axle

FIG. 7 shows a section through a shoe with a fixed roller and a displaceable wedge-shaped heel-element

FIG. 8 shows an additional side wall with a triangular roller carrier which can be fixed thereon and is pivotable in the direction of movement

FIG. 9 shows a shoe with an additional sidewall and roller carriers that are pivotable laterally

FIG. 10 shows a shoe sole with a bent axle and rods for fixing thereof

FIG. 11 shows a shoe sole with an axle that is bent at both ends and additionally in the centre

FIG. 12 shows a shoe sole with an axle that is passed through transversely and is bent three times at both ends

FIG. 13 shows a shoe sole with axle carriers that can be removed, rotated through 180° and reinserted

FIG. 14 shows a shoe with additional side walls and a Z-shaped groove in which a sliding element with rollers fixed thereon can be moved

FIG. 15 shows longitudinal wheel carriers as a separate assembly with two rollers that can be strapped beneath normal shoes

FIG. 1 shows the shoe 1 according to the invention with the rollers 2a and 2b, which are fixed on a continuous axle 3a in the heel region 5 of the shoe sole 4. The special feature is that the axle 3a is inserted through a bore in the heel region 5 of the shoe sole 4. The heel region 5 extends approximately over the first third of the shoe sole 4; contiguous therewith is the center region 6, which is provided with a grind plate 8. The grind plate 8 in the center region 6 permits a skidding movement on hard edges or pipes. Acrobatics of this kind are known from the skateboard scene. Between the shoe sole 5 and the rollers, locking nuts 9 are screwed onto the axle stubs 3a and 3b. The diameter of the rollers 2a and 2b in the heel region 5 of the shoe 1 is dimensioned such that the front surface of the sole 7 has direct ground contact with the sub-surface. The carrier of the shoe according to the invention thus stands firmly on the ground, when it loads both the heel region 5 as well as the front sole region 7. After a short run-up phase, in which predominantly the front region 7 of the sole is used, the weight is shifted onto the heel region 5. With the lifting of the front sole region 7 from the subsurface and the simultaneous balancing out, the running movement changes into a skating movement.

FIG. 2 shows the shoe according to the invention in a further embodiment from below. In addition to the two rollers 2a and 2b mounted in the heel region, a third roller 2c is fixed on axle 3c, on the outer edge of the heel region in the direction of the shoe toe. The requirements on the balancing of the wearer of the shoe according to the invention are, in this embodiment, somewhat smaller than when the shoe only has two opposing rollers. The support of the third roller 2c can of course also be achieved with the mounting of only two rollers 2a and 2b, in that the two rollers 2a and 2b are arranged offset with respect to one another. It would of course also be conceivable for the axle 2a, which terminates blind in the shoe sole 5, and serves for bearing the roller 2a, to be offset in the direction of the foot toe in comparison to axle 3b, which bears roller 2b.

FIG. 3 shows a further alternative embodiment of the roller shoe according to the invention. In this case, the axles 3a and 3b for bearing the two rollers 2a and 2b are inset, with an inclination in the heel region of the shoe sole 5. In the illustrated example, the axle sections 3a and 3b are screwed into the screw thread provided for this purpose in the shoe sole. Between the shoe sole 5 and the rollers, locking nuts 9 are screwed onto the axle stubs 3a and 3b. In the illustrated example, the rollers 2a and 2b are secured by means of a pluggable securing means 10. By virtue of the inclination of the axles 3a and 3b, the track becomes wider. This is advantageously associated with a better road holding and a stable footing. Because of the rounded form of the rollers 2a and 2b, the shoes, in the shown embodiment, are also suitable for lateral loading. It is also conceivable to use the shoes for acrobatic demonstrations, in which the wearer of the shoes spins with an extended leg around a hand that is in contact with the ground.

FIG. 4 shows a longitudinal section through a shoe in the vicinity of the center line.

It shows the half axle 3a, with the roller 2 and securing nut 10 arranged thereon, and which can be rotated away backwards towards the heel region.

The fulcrum 11 for the half axle 3a is shown, which is slightly forward inclined and deviates slightly from the vertical. The drawing makes clear that, by rotation around the slightly forward inclined axle 11, the roller is changed over from the skating position (not drawn here) into the running position—which is shown here—in which the lower edge of the roller 2 is located above the lower edge of the shoe sole 4.

FIG. 5 shows the shoe, shown in longitudinal section in FIG. 1, from below, but in distinction to FIG. 3, not with the rollers in the running position but in the skating position. Both half axes 3a and 3b are pivoted around the fulcrums 11a and 11b on the front limit stops 34a and 34b and are thereby in the running position. In FIG. 5, the rear limit stops 12a and 12b in the heel region 5 can be seen. In the variant drawn, the half axes 3a and 3b have, on the outer edges, in the region of the fulcrums 11a and 11b, toothings 13, which intermesh with one another. The drawing makes clear that, with a movement of one half axle, the other half axle is also driven via the toothing, and thereby rotates further.

FIG. 6 shows a section through the shoe sole in the direction of movement. Specifically, in the region of the J-shaped opening 14, which extends transversely to the movement direction. The continuous, rigid axle 3c is displaceable within the slot-shaped opening. FIG. 6 shows, with continuous lines, the section through the axle 3c in that position in which the shorter leg of the “J” is present. The shorter leg of the “J” is matched to the diameter of the roller 2 such that, when the limit stop is reached within the short leg, the rollers 2a and 2b are in the skating position. It is illustrated how the tension springs 15 ensure that the axle 3c is pressed against the limit stop of the J-shaped slot. The broken line shows the running position of the rollers 2a and 2b. In this position, the continuous axle is located in the other leg of the “J”. There, it is held fast by the tensioning spring 15. It can be seen that, in this position of the rollers, their lower edge is located above the lower edge of the shoe sole 4.

FIG. 7 shows the longitudinal section through a shoe with rollers 2 installed firmly on a rigid axle. In the region of the heel 5, it can be seen that the heel-element consists of two elements bearing against one another, of which the lower element 16 can be displaced in the longitudinal direction of the shoe. In FIG. 7, the lower element 16 is drawn in its front position 16. FIG. 7 makes clear that the lower element 16, by longitudinal displacement in the travel direction, together with the inclined interface 18, ensures that the lower edge is lowered, specifically to the lower edge of the fixed mounted rollers 2. By this means, the roller is deactivated and changed over from the skating position into the running position. In position 16 (the running position of the shoe), the lower element 16 of the heel-element is shown with a continuous line. The lower element 16 can be seen in the position in which it is pushed to the rear end of the shoe, completely against the travel direction. In this position, the lower edge of the element 16 is higher than the lower edge of the rollers. The rollers 2 are brought into the skating position by the displacement of the lower element 16, that is to say even without displacing the roller itself. In FIG. 7, it is shown that the interface 18 has a toothed surface. The toothing serves for fixing the lower element 16 against unintentional displacement. Likewise, a loop is drawn here at the end of the element 16, with the aid of which the element can be displaced in the travel direction.

FIG. 8 shows, in side view, an additional side wall 19, which is screwed onto the side of the shoe. Of the shoe, only the sole 4 is shown here. The roller carrier 20 is arranged on the side wall 19. In FIG. 8, the triangular form of the roller carrier 20 can be seen. It is thus pivotable forward or backward about the fulcrum 22, which runs transversely to the direction of travel. At the other two points of the triangle, there are arranged the half axle 3a for the roller 2a and the fixing means 21, with the aid of which the roller carrier is fixed in a recess in the lower edge of the sole 4. FIG. 8 shows, with a continuous line, that position of the roller carrier 20 in which the roller 2 is located in the running position (dotted line), that is to say its lower edge is located above the lower edge of the shoe sole 4. When the fixing means 21 is detached, the roller carrier 20 is pivoted about the axle 22 and the fixing has achieved position 21′, the half axle 3a, and thereby also the roller 2a, are lowered and changed over to the skating position 2a′.

In FIG. 8, two eyelets are drawn on the additional side wall 19, through which a tensioning tape 23 can be guided. In the embodiment as a removable assembly, in which the side wall 19 is not mounted firmly on the shoe 4 but is connected beneath the shoe sole with the side wall on the other side of the shoe, the tensioning ban serves for (detachable) fixing of the assembly below a normal shoe.

FIG. 9 shows, in three-dimensional representation, the view of the rear portion of a shoe, with the sole 4 and the heel region 5. On the side of this shoe, there is fixed an additional side wall 19. At the upper end of this side wall, a fulcrum 22 is arranged, which points in the travel direction of the shoe. A roller carrier 33 is pivotable about this fulcrum. The roller carrier 33 bears the half axle 2 and that bears the roller 2a. In the view shown in FIG. 9, the roller carrier 33 is in the lower position, that is to say in the skating position of the roller. The view shown in FIG. 9 makes it understandable that the rollers 2 can be pivoted upwards by folding up the roller carrier 33, and thereby changed over to the running position of the shoe.

FIG. 10 shows the sole 4 of a shoe, specifically the heel region 5. A continuous axle 3c is illustrated, specifically in the variant with one crank-shaped bend 24 in each case at both ends of the axle 3c. FIG. 10 shows the running position of the rollers 2a and 2b. In this position, the crank-shaped bends 24 point upwards. Also illustrated in FIG. 10 are the rods 25, which extend from the centre point of the rollers to the heel region 5 of the shoe sole 4. There, the rods 25 are fixed with one pin in each case. FIG. 10 makes it clear that, with the axle in the skating position, that is to say with the crank-shaped bend 24 facing downwards, the rod 25 can also be used for fixing, and that with the securing of the shoe sole 4 at the same position as for the running position.

FIG. 11 shows the view of the underside of a shoe, specifically the shoe in this representation is rotated through 180° with respect to the normal position during use (standing on its head). The continuous axle 3c has at both ends, in each case one crank-shaped bend 24 and, additionally, a further bend 26 in the center. This bend 26 fits into the trough-like recess 27 in the center of the sole 4. In FIG. 11a, the recess 28 points forward in the direction of travel of the shoe. However, the recess 27 additionally offers an equally sized space that points backwards towards the heel. This space is tailored to the fact that the bend 26 is accommodated therein when the axle 3c is pivoted through 180°. FIG. 11a illustrates the skating position; FIG. 11b, the running position, which results by pivoting the axle 3c through 180°.

FIG. 12 shows, in distinction to FIG. 11, the sole 4 with its heel region 5 such that the shoe would have to be represented from above, that is to say in the user position. For the sake of clarity, however, this upper portion of the shoe is missing, but only the sole 4 is shown. Transversely through the sole, there passes axle 3c, which is bent three times at both ends. It can be seen that the internal bends 26 engage in each case in a recess 27 on the lower edge of the sole 4, bend 26 is followed by bends 24. The bends 24 point upwards in the illustration. That means that the rollers 2a are in the running position, that is to say raised from the road to the height.

FIG. 13 shows the top view of the rear region 5 of the shoe sole 4. Here, too, without the upper part of the shoe that is built thereon. The illustration shows an axle carrier 3d, which extends through the sole transversely to the direction of movement. In the lower drawing of FIG. 13, it is illustrated that the axle carrier 3d has been removed from the shoe sole, rotated through 180° and inserted again. In this position, the rollers are in the running position. When the axle carrier 3d is in the running position, there is a hollow space on both sides of the shoe. This hollow space is filled by the axle carrier 3d when it is inserted into the shoe sole 4 in the running position.

FIG. 14 shows the general view of a shoe in three-dimensional representation. It can be seen that additional side walls 31 are arranged on both sides of the shoe. There is a Z-shaped groove in these side walls. In the Z-shaped groove, there runs a sliding element 32, which bears the half axles 3a and 3b and the rollers 2a and 2b. In FIG. 14, it can be seen that the Z-shaped groove is open towards the lower edge of the sole 4. The sliding element 32 can be removed from the groove through this opening.

In FIG. 14, the sliding element 32 is drawn within the Z-shaped groove, in the running position for roller 2a. In this position, it is in the first kink of the Z-shaped groove. This point is position on the shoe with respect to the diameter of roller 2 such that the lower edge of the roller 2 is arranged above the lower edge of the shoe sole 4. The skating position is also drawn. In the skating position, the sliding elements 32 are at the end of the Z-shaped slot. This end point is arranged so deep in the shoe that the lower edge of the rollers 2 is located below the lower edge of the sole 4.

FIG. 15 shows, in a three-dimensional view, a longitudinal wheel carrier 35, specifically in the variant as a completely removable assembly. A left-hand and a right-hand longitudinal wheel carrier 35 are shown. The longitudinal wheel carrier 35 receives the rollers 2a and 2b. The left-hand and right-hand wheel carriers are connected together by means of the metal strip 36. Shown here in the width-adjustable version, that is to say the metal strip 36 consists of two parts that can be slid one inside the other, with a tongue and groove serving for fixing transversely to the sliding direction. At the heel end, the intermediate pieces can be seen, on which, in each case, a platform 36 is arranged horizontally on the inside. The platform 36 serves to receive the heel-element of a normal shoe. At the front edge of the platforms 36 are located spikes 37. An additional tensioning tape 23, which connects the front regions of the two longitudinal carriers to one another, is not illustrated.

The small platform 36 has an important function for the running position of this arrangement. When the accessory is in the running position, the rear edge of the heel region 5 of the shoe sole 4 is set up on the platform 36. The sole of the shoe must be strong enough at the rear edge of the heel-element that this region ensures correct tread. In this position, the shoe with its heel is lifted from the running surfaces. Only the two rollers are in contact with the running surface, e.g. pavement, road or carriageway. In the front region of the shoe, the connecting metal strip 36 is so low profiled that the surrounding regions of the sole of a sports shoe can still be lowered onto the roadway.

If the longitudinal wheel carrier is no longer in the skating position, it can either be demounted from the shoe or remain on the shoe in a position in which the heel-side region is somewhat raised. The fixing mandrels 37 engage in the heel-side rear wall of the shoe. The entire arrangement of the longitudinal wheel carrier is secured against falling down by a tensioning tape 23, which runs over the shoe at the front. It presses the fixing spikes 37 a little way into the shoe. In this manner, the user can leave the longitudinal wheel carrier on the shoe even in the running position.

In FIGS. 16a to 16c, the wall of the shoe 1 is shown in each case in cross-section. Also shown in cross-section is a roller 2 with a deep-groove ball bearing. The receptacle device 43 is shown in three variants, always in side view.

FIG. 16a shows a screw thread 46 as receptacle device 43. In the side view, the counterpart 45, a screw, is shown. It is shown with very large wings as a manual actuating element and a countemut for clamping the ball bearing.

FIG. 16b shows a bayonet 47 as a receptacle device 43. In the boring of shoe 1, the screw-shaped guide of the bayonet 47 can be seen, in which the guide pin of the counterpart 45 moves. Otherwise, this variant is the same as FIG. 16a.

FIG. 16c shows the variant with a lever 48, which can be folded down. The lever 48 is pressed by a tensioning spring on the bearing of the roller 2. The large size of the receptacle device 43 in this variant can be seen. The receptacle device projects beyond the face of the wall of shoe 1.

It should be noted that FIGS. 16a to 16c also apply if the portion designed shoe 1 also represents the shoe sole 4.

LIST OF REFERENCE NUMBERS

    • 1 Shoe
    • 2a, 2b Rollers, large
    • 2a′ Roller, lowered into skating position
    • 2c Rollers, small
    • 3 Axles (collective term for axles 3a-3c)
    • 3a,3b Blind-terminating axles or half-axles
    • 3c Continuous, rigid axle
    • 3d Wheel carrier for rollers
    • 4 Shoe sole
    • 5′ Heel region of the shoe sole
    • 6 Center region of the shoe sole
    • 7 Front region of the shoe sole
    • 8 Grind plate in the center region of the shoe sole
    • 9 Locking nut
    • 10 Securing nut or securing plug connection
    • 11 Tilted fulcrum for half-axles 3a, b
    • 12 Rear limit stop for half axles 3a, b
    • 13 Toothing
    • 14 J-shaped opening transversely through the shoe sole 4
    • 15: Lifting spring for continuous axle 3c
    • 16 Lower element of the heel element with adjustment ramp
    • 17 Pressure spring for adjustment heel-element 16
    • 18 Inclined upper surface of the adjustment heel element
    • 19 Additional side wall in the heel region
    • 20 Foldable roller carrier
    • 20′ Foldable roller carrier in skating position
    • 21 Fixing element for foldable roller carrier
    • 21′. Fixing for foldable roller carrier in travel position, that is to say lowered roller 2a
    • 22 Fulcrum for foldable roller carrier
    • 23 Tensioning tape for fastening the side walls 19 in the version as removable accessory assembly
    • 24 Crank-shaped bend of the axle 3c
    • 25 Rods for fixing the angular position of the bends 24
    • 26′ Additional bend in the region of the axle 3c
    • 27 Recess in the sole 4 as receptacle and as limit stop for additional bends in the axle 3c
    • 28 Flexible snap lug in recess 27, matched to bend 26
    • 29 Anti-rotation device for axle 3c
    • 30 Recess in shoe sole 4, suitable for wheel carrier 3d
    • 31 Side wall with Z-shaped rail
    • 32 Sliding elements, movable on the rail in the side wall 31
    • 33 Roller carrier, laterally unfoldable
    • 34a, 34b Front limit stop for half axles 3a, 3b
    • 35 Longitudinal wheel carrier
    • 36 Platform at the heel end of the longitudinal wheel carrier 35
    • 37 Fixing spikes at the front edge of platform 36
    • 38 Hook on heel of shoe 1 to receive the counterpart of the longitudinal wheel carrier 35
    • 39 Air cushion
    • 40 Air pump for air cushion 39
    • 41 Valve for air cushion 39
    • 42 Spacer pieces, folding out from wheel carrier 3d
    • 43 Receptacle device
    • 44 Recess on the underside of shoe sole for roller 2
    • 45 Counterpart for receptacle device 43
    • 46 Screw thread on the receptacle device 43
    • 47 Bayonet connection on the receptacle device 43
    • 48 Lever on the receptacle device 43