Title:
STACKING GAME ASSOCIATED WITH AN ORGANIZATION
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A stacking game including trademarks of an organization is disclosed. Each player forms their own tower of multiple levels of play pieces. A predetermined quantity of the play pieces are distributed to each player. The play pieces include a plurality of first pieces having a first shape and a plurality of second pieces having a second shape. Each first piece bears a first trademark of the organization, and each second piece bears a second trademark of the organization. During a turn of a player, the player rolls a first die to determine whether one or more of the first or the second pieces is designated for play during the turn, and the player rolls a second die to determine a number of the designated play pieces to play during the turn. The player adds the number of designated play pieces to his/her tower.



Inventors:
Paul, Karon S. N. (Tualatin, OR, US)
Kemp, John A. (Sherwood, OR, US)
Application Number:
12/056733
Publication Date:
10/02/2008
Filing Date:
03/27/2008
Assignee:
J-K Pursuits, LLC (Tualatin, OR, US)
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
273/290, 273/160
International Classes:
A63F9/26
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20090278312GAME SYSTEM WITH COOPERATIVE AND COMPETITIVE BOARDSNovember, 2009Bower
20080116639Method of Playing Game Variation Over Multiple Rounds With Player Decision RuleMay, 2008Ko et al.
20060237906Winner's Card GameOctober, 2006Bowling
20100009738Game of blackjack and apparatus thereforeJanuary, 2010Cohen
20070225055PLAYING CARD IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM & METHODSeptember, 2007Weisman
20090166969INTERACTIVE BOTTLE GAMEJuly, 2009Imboden
20010032652Cigarette lighter bingo card dauber combinationOctober, 2001Ng
20080197569Inverse ChessAugust, 2008Srinivasa et al.
20070102877Apparatus and methodology for sports square wageringMay, 2007Personius et al.
20100025930FAMILY MEAL TIME BOARD GAMEFebruary, 2010Rank et al.
20050288105Target game apparatus and system for use with a toiletDecember, 2005Piccionelli et al.



Primary Examiner:
CHIU, RALEIGH W
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
STOEL RIVES LLP - PDX (PORTLAND, OR, US)
Claims:
1. A method of playing a stacking game including trademarks of an organization, in which each of multiple players of the game forms a free standing tower of multiple levels of play pieces, the method comprising: distributing to each of the players a predetermined quantity of the play pieces including a plurality of first pieces having a first shape and a plurality of second pieces having a second shape different than the first shape, each first piece bearing a first trademark of the organization, and each second piece bearing a second trademark of the organization; during a turn of a player, rolling a first die to determine whether one or more of the first or the second pieces is designated for play during the turn; rolling a second die to determine a number of the designated play pieces to play during the turn; and adding the number of designated play pieces to the tower of the player.

2. The method of claim 1, in which the multiple levels include an uppermost active level, and adding the number of designated play pieces to the tower includes stacking the designated play pieces in the uppermost active level, on top of the uppermost active level, or both in and on top of the uppermost active level.

3. The method of claim 2, in which stacking a designated play piece on the uppermost active level forms a new uppermost active level.

4. The method of claim 1, further comprising disqualifying a play piece of a player that falls during the turn of the player.

5. The method of claim 1, further comprising declaring a winner by comparing heights of the towers after all play pieces have been exhausted.

6. The method of claim 1, in which rolling the second die determines that a player must draw a penalty card.

7. The method of claim 6, in which the player removes one or more of the play pieces from the player's tower as directed by the penalty card.

8. The method of claim 1, in which the first shape resembles the first trademark of the organization.

9. The method of claim 8, in which the second shape resembles the second trademark of the organization.

10. The method of claim 1, in which the first pieces and the second pieces include opposing major face surfaces and peripheral surfaces, and at least one of the first pieces or second pieces is added to the tower stacked horizontally on one of its face surfaces.

11. The method of claim 10, in which at least one of the first pieces or second pieces is added to the tower stacked vertically on one of its peripheral surfaces.

12. A stacking game including trademarks of an organization, comprising: first and second groups of play pieces having opposing major face surfaces and peripheral surfaces, the play pieces of the first group having a first shape, the play pieces of the second group having a second shape, and the play pieces of the first and second groups bearing one or more trademarks of the organization, wherein the play pieces of the first and second groups are stackable to form for each player of the game a tower of multiple levels, each level of the multiple levels including at least one play piece of the first group or the second group; a first die to determine whether the play pieces of the first or second group are to be stacked during a turn of a player; and a second die to determine a number of the play pieces of the first or second group to stack during the turn.

13. The stacking game of claim 12, in which the first shape resembles a first trademark of the organization and the second shape resembles a second trademark of the organization.

Description:

RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/908,964 filed Mar. 29, 2007, which is incorporated herein by reference.

TECHNICAL FIELD

The field of the present disclosure relates to a stacking game and method of game play.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

Stacking games involving multiple levels or layers of stacked blocks are known. For example, in the well known game of Jenga®, blocks are stacked three to a layer to form a tower. During play, blocks are removed from any layer below the top layer and placed on top of the tower. The last player to remove a block and place it on top of the tower without causing the tower to collapse wins the game.

In most block stacking games, all blocks are shaped substantially the same and the players stack blocks on a single shared tower. The Jenga® game is offered in various collector's editions in which the blocks contain sports logos; the shape of the blocks, however, is substantially the same as the original version of Jenga®. Known stacking games do not include play pieces that are shaped to resemble a trademark of an organization.

SUMMARY

The preferred embodiments disclose a stacking game that includes trademarks or other insignia or symbols of an organization. Each of multiple players of the game forms a tower of multiple levels of play pieces, and each of the players forms their own tower. To begin, a predetermined quantity of the play pieces are distributed to each of the players. The play pieces include a plurality of first pieces having a first shape and a plurality of second pieces having a second shape. Each first piece bears a first trademark of the organization, and each second piece bears a second trademark of the organization. During a turn of a player, the player rolls a first die to determine whether one or more of the first or the second pieces is designated for play during the turn, and the player rolls a second die to determine a number of the designated play pieces to play during the turn. The player adds the number of designated play pieces to his/her tower. The player who builds the tallest tower wins.

Additional aspects and advantages will be apparent from the following detailed description of preferred embodiments, which proceeds with reference to the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 depicts various game pieces of a stacking game according to an embodiment.

FIGS. 2 and 3 depict various faces of two die of the stacking game according to an embodiment.

FIGS. 4A-4F depict alternative shaped play pieces of the stacking game.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

In preferred embodiments, a stacking game includes trademarks of an organization. Play pieces include a plurality of first pieces bearing a first trademark and a plurality of second pieces bearing a second trademark. Bearing a trademark means that the shape of the play piece resembles a trademark, or that the play piece includes a trademark placed on (e.g., inscribed, printed, etc.) or fixed to (e.g. adhered) the play piece. A trademark includes any registered or unregistered name, symbol, figure, letter, word, logo, insignia, or mark adopted by an organization to distinguish it from other organizations. Preferably, the play pieces include one or more colors publicly associated with the organization. While the organizations discussed in the embodiments described herein are colleges or universities, the stacking game may represent any organization or group, such as a charity and/or non-profit organization, company, business, or sports team.

FIG. 1 depicts a stacking game 100 according to a first embodiment. Stacking game 100 is a University of Oregon version and includes first play pieces 102 and second play pieces 104. Play pieces 102 and 104 are stacked to form towers 105. Each tower 105 includes multiple levels 105′ or layers of play pieces 102 and 104. Each play piece 102 is shaped in a first shape to resemble a stylized letter “O” trademarked by the University or Oregon. Play pieces 102 include one or more University of Oregon school colors (e.g., green and/or yellow). Play pieces 102 include opposing major face surfaces 106 and peripheral surfaces 108. Play pieces 102 can be stacked vertically on one of their peripheral surfaces 108, as demonstrated by play piece 102′, or horizontally on one of their face surfaces 106 as demonstrated by play piece 102″. Each play piece 104 is shaped in a second shape to resemble a duck foot trademark of the University of Oregon. Play pieces 104 include one or more University of Oregon school colors (e.g., yellow and/or green). Play pieces 104 also include major opposing face surfaces 110 and peripheral surfaces 112. Play pieces 104 can be stacked vertically on one of their peripheral surfaces 112 as demonstrated by play piece 104′, or horizontally on one of their face surfaces 110 as demonstrated by play piece 104″. Play pieces 102 and 104 can be made of any material (e.g., wood, metal, plastic). Stacking game 100 can include stacking rules. For example, only one play piece 102 or 104 may be stacked at a time; or once a play piece 102 or 104 has been stacked, it cannot be moved unless a penalty card (discussed below) requires to the contrary.

Stacking game 100 also includes base members 114 that include the stylized letter “O”. Each base member 114 serves as a foundation for stacked play pieces 102 and 104. Stacking game also includes a first die 116 and a second die 118. As depicted in FIG. 2, first die 116 includes two sides 202 that include the stylized letter “O,” two sides 204 that include the duck foot trademark, and two sides 206 that include the characters “UP2U”®. As depicted in FIGS. 2 and 3, second die 118 includes a side 208 with one dot, a side 210 with a frowning face, a side 212 with four dots, a side 302 with two dots, a side 304 with three dots, and a side 306 with a smiling face. Stacking game 100 also includes a stack of penalty cards 120.

During a game, each player of the game has their own base member 114 to serve as a foundation for their tower 105. Each player receives a predetermined quantity of play pieces 102 and 104 (e.g., 12 play pieces 102, and 12 play pieces 104), and each player forms their own tower 105 by stacking play pieces 102 and 104. During a turn of a player, the player rolls first die 116 and second die 118. The side facing up on first die 116 determines whether play pieces 102 or play pieces 104 are designated for play during the turn (i.e., whether play pieces 102 or play pieces 104 must be stacked during the turn). For example, if one of sides 202 faces up, the player must add one or more play pieces 102 to his/her tower. If one of sides 206 faces up (“UP2U”), the player chooses whether to stack play pieces 102, play pieces 104, or a combination of play pieces 102 and 104.

The side facing up on second die 118 determines the number of play pieces 102 or 104 to add to his/her tower during the turn. For example, if one of sides 202 of first die 116 faces up and side 302 of second die 118 faces up, the player would have to stack two play pieces 102. If side 210 (frowning face) faces up, first die 116 is ignored and the player must draw a penalty card from the stack of penalty cards 120. If side 306 (smiling face) faces up, first die 116 is ignored and the player chooses another player to draw a penalty card from the stack of penalty cards 120. Each penalty card includes one or more instructions to make the game more challenging. For example, a penalty card may instruct the player who draws the card to remove one or more play pieces from his/her tower 105, or to stack a play piece 104 vertically. Some penalties may be agreed upon by the players before the game begins, and the stack of penalty cards 120 may include a “U decide” penalty card that, if drawn, allows the other players to select a penalty for the player from the agreed upon penalties.

After the player rolls first die 116 and second die 118, the player stacks the number of designated play pieces 102 or 104 determined by first die 116 and second die 118. If the player does not have enough designated play pieces 102 or 104, all the remaining play pieces 102 or 104 of the player are stacked. For example, if first die 116 and second die 118 determine that four play pieces 102 are to be stacked but the player only has two play pieces 102 remaining, the two remaining play pieces 102 are stacked. If the player has no remaining play pieces 102 and 104 and one or more other players have not exhausted their play pieces, the player can still roll die 118 and receive or give penalties as determined by, respectively, side 210 or side 306.

While stacking a play piece 102 or 104, the play piece 102 or 104 can be stacked in an uppermost active level 105″ (e.g., next to the top play piece 102′ of tower 105 on the right side of FIG. 1) or on top of uppermost active level 105″ to form a new uppermost active level (e.g., on top of the top play piece 102′ of tower 105 on the right side of FIG. 1). When a play piece 102 or 104 is stacked in the uppermost active level 105″, the play piece 102 or 104 constitutes a portion of the uppermost active level 105″. During the turn of a player, the player can also stack play pieces 102 or 104 both in uppermost active level 105″ and on top of uppermost active level 105″. For example, if first die 116 and second die 118 determine that four play pieces 102 are to be stacked, the player can stack two play pieces 102 in uppermost active level 105″ and two play pieces 102 on top of uppermost active level 105″. If a level is not the uppermost active level 105″, a play piece 102 or 104 cannot be stacked in that level. If a player attempts to stack a play piece 102 or 104 and play pieces 102 and/or 104 of the player's tower 105 fall, all the play pieces 102 and/or 104 that fell becomes disqualified play pieces. Being a disqualified play piece means that it is removed from the game and cannot be restacked during a subsequent turn. If the entire tower 105 of the player collapses when a player stacks a play piece 102 or 104, the player is out of the game. If the player purposefully or accidentally causes the tower 105 of a second player to fall, the player who caused the tower to fall loses a turn and draws a penalty card, and the second player can rebuild his/her tower 105 with levels 105′ configured identically to the player's pre-collapsed tower.

After all play pieces 102 and 104 distributed to every player of the game have been exhausted (i.e., stacked in towers 105 or disqualified by falling), the player with the tallest tower 105 wins the game. If the towers 105 of two or more players are the same height, the player with the most play pieces 102 and 104 stacked vertically wins the game.

Play pieces 102 and 104 of stacking game 100 are not limited to the shapes shown in FIG. 1. FIG. 4F depicts an alternative shape 402″ of play piece 102 that may be used with the University of Oregon version of stacking game 100. Stacking game 100 may include versions other than the University of Oregon version depicted in FIGS. 1 and 4F. For example, stacking game 100 may include a University of Washington version in which play pieces 402, shown in FIG. 4D, resemble a stylized “W” trademarked by the University of Washington. The University of Washington version may also include one or more play pieces 404, 404′, and 404″, shown in FIGS. 4A-4C, that bear one or more trademarks of the University of Washington on one or more face surfaces 410, 410′, and 410″. The University of Washington play pieces can also include one or more University of Washington school colors (e.g., purple and gold). Face surfaces 202 and 204 of first die 116 may include appropriate indicia of the University of Washington play pieces.

As an alternative example, stacking game 100 may include an Oregon State University version in which play pieces 402′, shown in FIG. 4E, resemble a stylized interlocking “OS” trademarked by Oregon State University. The Oregon State University version may also include one or more play pieces 404, 404′, and 404″, shown in FIGS. 4A-4C, that bear one or more trademarks of Oregon State University on one or more face surfaces 410, 410′, and 410″. The Oregon State University play pieces can also include one or more Oregon State University school colors (e.g., orange and black). Face surfaces 202 and 204 of first die 116 may include appropriate indicia of the Oregon State University play pieces.

As another alternative example, stacking game 100 may include a Washington State University version in which one or more play pieces 404, 404′, and 404″, shown in FIGS. 4A-4C, bear one or more trademarks of the Washington State University on one or more face surfaces 410, 410′, and 410″. The Washington State University play pieces 404, 404′, or 404″ can also include one or more Washington State University school colors (e.g., crimson and gray). Face surfaces 202 and 204 of first die 116 may include appropriate indicia of the Washington State University play pieces.

Stacking game 100 is not limited to the examples or versions given. The shape of play pieces may be any shape and play pieces may include any trademark of any organization. For example, stacking game 100 may include versions related to any college or university, professional or non-professional sports team or sport (e.g., basketball, football, baseball, hockey, soccer, NASCAR®, etc.), eating establishment, company, corporation, or business. For example, any one of the college or university versions could include school trademarks, logos, colors, or other markings. Any one of the sports team versions could include the team's trademarks, logos, color, or other markings (e.g., a blue horseshoe shaped play piece for the Indianapolis Colts®). An eating establishment version could include, for example, a yellow play piece shaped as a stylized “M” to resemble the golden arches of McDonald's®, or a play piece could be a green and black circle and bear the Starbucks Coffee® trademark. A Harley-Davidson® version could include play piece shaped like a silhouette of a motorcycle and a black and orange play piece shaped like the trademarked Harley-Davidson Motor Cycles® shield. A Chevrolet® version could include a play piece shaped like the bowtie trademarked by General Motors Corporation®.

Furthermore, stacking game 100 is not limited to two groups of play pieces 102 and 104. Stacking game 100 may include three or more sets of play pieces formed in three or more different shapes. Also, stacking game 100 may be played as a rival game, in which, for example, a University of Oregon fan builds his/her tower with University of Oregon play pieces, and an Oregon State University fan builds his/her tower with Oregon State University play pieces. Furthermore, players may build their towers with play pieces from more than one version (e.g., the towers may include University of Oregon play pieces and Oregon State University play pieces).

It will be obvious to those having skill in the art that many changes may be made to the details of the above-described embodiments without departing from the underlying principles of the invention. The scope of the present invention should, therefore, be determined only by the following claims.





 
Previous Patent: Washer toss

Next Patent: TWO COMPONENT PIN SEAL