Title:
FABRIC ARTWORK WITH MOUNTING ASSEMBLY FOR NESTING IN FRAME
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Framed fabric artwork features an artwork canvas with an artwork body having a first set of tabs and an orthogonal second set of tabs wherein the rectangular artwork body has a back surface configured to be attached to a first composite backing structure. The first set of tabs is folded beneath the first composite backing structure and adhered to it. A second composite backing structure is configured to be attached to a lower side of the first set of tabs and the second set of tabs is folded beneath the second composite backing structure and adhered to it. A third composite backing structure is adhered to the lower side of the second set of tabs and also joined to the artwork body which, in turn, is nested in a unitary frame with a rectangular well with upright walls at an outer periphery. The outer periphery of the frame may have bosses adaptable for jewelry uses.



Inventors:
Slautterback, Frederick A. (Sand City, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/689999
Publication Date:
09/25/2008
Filing Date:
03/22/2007
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47G1/06
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
KIM, SHIN H
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Law Offices of Thomas Schneck (SAN JOSE, CA, US)
Claims:
1. Framed fabric art comprising: a unitary frame having an outer periphery and a central well less than one-quarter inch deep with upright side walls; and a fabric artwork mounting assembly having a fabric artwork body with peripheral tabs folded beneath the body, the artwork mounting assembly adhesively secured in the central well of the frame and contacting the side walls of the well in a nested relation with the well.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the fabric artwork mounting assembly has at least two composite backing structures beneath the fabric artwork body.

3. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein at least one of the composite backing structures comprises a substrate sandwiched between double sided adhesive films.

4. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein a third composite backing structure secures the fabric artwork mounting assembly to the central well.

5. Framed fabric art comprising: a fabric artwork canvas, said canvas including a fabric artwork body, a rectangular body back surface with projecting tabs including a first set of tabs, and a second set of tabs; a first composite backing structure: attached to the artwork canvas including a substrate having first and second adhesive films on opposite sides of the substrate, wherein said rectangular artwork back surface is configured to be attached to said first adhesive film, and said first set of tabs attached to said second adhesive film, a second composite backing structure attached to a side of the first set of tabs and opposite the first composite backing structure and a second set of tabs attached to said second composite backing structure on a side opposite the first set of tabs, with both sets of tabs and composite backing structures behind the artwork body; a frame having dimensions nesting the artwork body within a rectangular well, said rectangular well including a well rear surface, wherein said second of tabs is configured to be attached to said rear surface by a third composite backing structure.

6. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein the frame is configured as a jewelry pendant.

7. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein the frame has at least one eyelet projecting from the outer periphery of the frame.

8. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein the frame is selected from metal, plastic, wood and ceramics.

9. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein the frame is configured as a jewelry brooch.

10. The apparatus of claim 9, wherein at least one of said first adhesive film, said second adhesive film and said third adhesive film, includes a pressure sensitive adhesive.

11. The apparatus of claim 5, wherein said third composite backing structure is an adhesive.

12. The apparatus of claim 11, wherein said adhesive is one of a natural adhesive, a synthetic adhesive, a drying adhesive, a contact adhesive, a hot melt adhesive, a reactive adhesive, a pressure sensitive adhesive, and a removable adhesive.

13. The apparatus of claim 5, wherein said well has rounded corners.

14. The apparatus of claim 5, where said frame is made of one of metal, plastic, and ceramic.

15. A method of manufacturing framed fabric artwork comprising: providing a fabric artwork canvas including a rectangular artwork body back surface with projecting tabs in a Greek cross shape including a first set of tabs and a second set of tabs; adhering a first composite backing structure to the artwork body back surface; adhering a first set of tabs behind the first composite backing structure, the first set of tabs haying an exposed back surface; adhering a second composite backing structure to the exposed back surface of the first set of tabs; adhering a second set of tabs behind the second composite backing structure, the second set of tabs having an exposed back surface; providing a frame defining a rectangular well; securing said second set of tabs in said rectangular well.

16. The method of claim 15, wherein the step of securing said second set of tabs in said rectangular well is by adhering a third composite backing structure joining the second set of tabs onto said rectangular well.

17. The method of claim 16 further defined by making a composite backing structure by providing a substrate with opposed major surfaces and double sided adhesive film on each major surface.

18. The method of claim 16 further defined by making a composite backing structure by providing a double sided adhesive film.

19. The method of claim 16 further defined by making a composite backing structure by providing an adhesive layer.

Description:

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention generally relates to backing assemblies incorporating fabric works of art for mounting in special frames.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Needlepoint exemplifies fabric works of art. It uses thread stitches in woven canvas in order to create a new fabric. Typically employing an open grid construction, the woven canvas includes horizontal (woof) and vertical (warp) threads that are woven together to create openings, called cells, in a special needlepoint fabric. The size of the canvas is generally described by the number of cells (counts, stitches, etc.) per inch (e.g., 13 cells per inch, etc.).

Needlepoint thread or filling yarn is typically pulled through the cells from the front to the back by techniques of interlacing the yarn through the woven canvas typically using a tapestry needle. The portion of the canvas with the needlepoint thread or yarn is commonly called the stitchwork, and is generally surrounded by an unstitched canvas border.

Often, the completed new fabric is subsequently finished into a variety of items such as pillows, rugs, eyeglass cases, clothing, etc. Since the integrity of the stitchwork is generally maintained by the surrounding unstitched canvas border, the border is generally hidden from view rather than cut away. For example, in one technique, commonly used with pillows, etc., an additional piece of cloth fabric is sewn onto the canvas such that the edge of the fabric is aligned with the edge of the stitched needlepoint covering the unfinished areas. However, this technique generally requires that a visible perimeter boundary be displayed along with the stitchwork.

In contrast, in a technique commonly used with display frames, the canvas may be folded at a first parallel line of unstitched openings and subsequently bent underneath and secured to the underside of the stitchwork. However, although the perimeter boundary is hidden from view, folding the canvas at each of the canvas corners tends to be problematic. For example, since a portion of one folded side is typically placed over another perpendicular folded side, a double-thickness build-up is created at each corner. Consequently, the unstitched canvas at these right-angle corners may be difficult to hide, arid hence may be unsightly.

Consequently, display frame molding with rabbets, i.e. deep notches at the corners, is often used to hide some of the canvas build-up. However, when mounted, a rabbet also tends to cover a portion of the stitchwork, further detracting from the full presentation of the needlework, particularly with framed needlepoint jewelry applications, where the actual size of the stitchwork tends to be relatively small.

In view of the foregoing, there is desired an enhanced framed display apparatus for fabric works of art, particularly stitchwork but also needlepoint fabric artworks, such as quilting.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention features fabric works of art mounted snugly within a unitary frame that hides the perimeter boundary of the artwork or stitchwork in the case of needlepoint. The fabric work of art may project forwardly slightly from the frame but the artwork is nested snuggly by walls of a well that are formed in the frame. The well may be machined or otherwise formed in a block of frame material such that the well only exposes the surface of the artwork.

In accordance with the present invention, a fabric artwork is prepared for mounting by establishing a shape resembling a Greek cross, with the fabric art in a center section and members extending outwardly from the borders of the fabric art. The outwardly extending members are first and second sets of orthogonal tabs that will be folded below the center section. The present invention employs three composite backing structures, two associated with each of the sets of tabs and one with a frame.

A composite backing structure preferably employs a first double sided adhesive film, a substrate attached to the first adhesive film and a second double sided adhesive film attached to the substrate in a sandwich construction with exposed adhesive facing outwardly on both sides. Alternatively, a composite backing structure can be a layer of semi-viscous adhesive spread uniformly. To avoid contact of semi-viscous adhesive with the fabric artwork composite backing structures involving adhesive films are preferred for the upper two composite backing structures. Double sided adhesive film is commercially available.

A first composite backing structure is applied against the center section of the fabric art. A first set of tabs is folded beneath the first composite backing structure and attached to exposed adhesive film. Preferably the tabs are cut so that they do not overlap but rather fit like double doors closing over exposed adhesive film of the composite backing structure such that folded tabs form a substantially flat surface.

A second composite backing structure is applied against the first set of tabs and attached to exposed adhesive film. Then the second set of tabs is folded beneath the second composite backing structure and attached to exposed adhesive film. The tabs, cut as described above, close over the exposed adhesive film forming a substantially flat surface. The fabric artwork is secured to a frame having a rectangular or square well in which the fabric artwork snugly rests. A third adhesive backing structure, the lowermost, is used to adhesively secure the exposed side of the second set of tabs to the frame. The preferred type of composite backing structure is a layer of hot melt adhesive that is dispensed by nozzles in uniform stripes across the well. When the second set of tabs is pushed against the hot melt adhesive, the adhesive spreads to create a bond across most of surface of the well and the tabs. Another composite backing structure could a be a double sided adhesive film of high adhesive strength without any substrate attached.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF TBS DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 shows a plan perspective view of a jewelry necklace and pendant having a decorative unitary frame nesting a fabric artwork in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 1a is a back side perspective view of an alternative embodiment of the frame of FIG. 1;

FIG. 2 is a top view of a completed needlepoint woven canvas used to create the fabric artwork shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a top plan view of the needlepoint woven canvas of FIG. 2 cut to the shape of a Greek cross;

FIG. 4 is a corner detail of the woven canvas of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a detailed view of a corner of the completed needlepoint woven canvas of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a top plan view of an embodiment of a composite backing structure used in making the fabric artwork illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 7 shows a side-sectional view of a composite backing structure taken along lines A-A in FIG. 6 for use in mounting the canvas of FIG. 5 on the pendant of FIG. 1;

FIG. 8 is a plan view of the woven canvas of FIG. 5 illustrating a preferred tab folding sequence;

FIG. 9 is a side plan view of fabric artwork for mounting in a frame as shown in FIG. 1 in accordance with a first embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 10 is a side plan view of fabric artwork for mounting in a frame as shown in FIG. 1 in accordance with a second embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 11 is a perspective assembly view illustrating the mounting of the woven canvas of FIG. 8 in a special frame.

BEST MODE FOR CARRYING OUT THE INVENTION

Referring to FIG. 1, a fabric artwork pendant 102 may be coupled to an attachment structure 110, such as a necklace, with a set of eyelets 108 formed on a special frame 104 of the present invention. In general, frame 104 may be manufactured from any suitably machinable, tooled, or molded material, such as metals e.g. aluminum, copper, steel, etc. or plastic, wood, ceramic, etc., preferably as a unitary article with a central well for the needlepoint artwork and optional integral eyelets 108. In this example, a pendant frame is shown with peripheral bosses, in this case eyelets, adaptable for jewelry uses. As an alternative to peripheral bosses, the backside of the frame could be provided with a pin to form a brooch. However other frames may be used, such as hanging frames, etc. The frame has a central well. typically one-eighth to three-eighths inches deep to accommodate a fabric artwork. The depth of the well is adjusted to the thickness of the artwork so that a slight amount of the surface of the artwork is exposed when the artwork is fully seated and attached to the well. Secured to frame 104 is fabric artwork 106, having a backing assembly, not shown.

Fabric artwork 106 may be created from scratch, or from a kit, for example a needlepoint kit comprising an initial design on a canvas, as well as required materials, e.g. plain, printed or painted canvas, threads, needle, and instructions. Other artwork kits, such as quilt kits also may be used.

Referring to FIG. 1a, the frame 104 may alternatively have a back side pin 112 arid ho peripheral bosses for use as a brooch displaying fabric art on the reverse side.

Referring to FIG. 2, an exemplary needlepoint canvas 124, completed with the needlepoint artwork, is further adapted for subsequent placement in frame 104 of FIG. 1. In general, canvas 124 may be divided into two sections, a stitchwork 125 portion with the completed needlepoint design, as an example of a fabric artwork body, and an unstitched portion surrounding stitchwork 125 at its peripheral border.

In order to protect stitchwork 125 during the mounting process, unstitched portions of needlepoint canvas 124 are stiffened by adding a coating of liquid adhesive or other liquid stiffener such as varnish. Penetrating the canvas threads, the adhesive may adhere to the “woof” (horizontal) and “warf” (vertical) threads together at the crossover points, consequently creating a stable sheet that holds together when bent.

In an advantageous manner, a water-based polyvinyl acetate, or other appropriate adhesive, is applied to the unstitched portions of needlepoint canvas 124 with a brush. Without substantially coating the thread, the adhesive may be brushed substantially close to the stitchwork. Per example, the adhesive may be placed on top of a row of unstitched thread that borders the outside of a stitched needlepoint row in stitchwork 125. Once the adhesive has substantially dried, corners 130 may then be removed with a sharp knife, such as with a Xacto blade, with minimal unraveling damage to the stitchwork, leaving the canvas in a Greek cross shape, shown in FIG. 3.

With reference to FIGS. 2 and 3, the Greek cross shaped canvas 200 has the central stitchwork 125, a first set of tabs 133a and 133b and a second set of tabs 135a and 135b. The tab sets are mutually orthogonal projecting arms of the Greek cross shape.

In a beneficial manner, the cross-shaped canvas of FIG. 3 allows the completed needlepoint pendant 102 of FIG. 1 to display substantially all of stitchwork 125 of FIG. 3, as well as to substantially reduce any wrinkles and ridges caused by excess and overlapping needlepoint canvas material, when finally mounted on frame 104.

Returning to FIG. 2, the first set of tabs 133a-b are generally configured to be folded back away from the front of stitchwork 125, such that outer borders 136a-b substantially rest on midline 116 when folded over the corresponding fold lines 127a-b like two doors closing an entry. In addition, the second set of tabs 135a-b are also generally configured to be folded back away from the front of stitchwork 125, such that borders 138a-b substantially rest on midline 128 when folded over the corresponding fold lines 129a-b like two doors closing an entry. For optimal appearance, a smooth stitched surface is desirable without bumps and depressions. An optimal way of achieving this result is to keep a solid, even surface made of folds and laminating adhesive underneath.

Referring to FIG. 4, to achieve the Greek cross shaped canvas described above, a first set of two perpendicular cuts 190a-b may be made from the outside edge of canvas 124 to the border of stitchwork 125, offset from corners 131. Next, a second set of smaller perpendicular cuts 122a-b is made to remove the remaining unstitched portions of the needlepoint canvas from around the set of corners 131, created by the offset, and held in place by the application of the adhesive.

Consequently, a substantially Greek cross-shaped canvas 200 may be created with a first set of tabs 133a-b (as shown in FIG. 2) of width W3 as shown in FIG. 2 that is smaller than stitchwork width W2, and a second set of tabs. 135a-b (as shown in FIG. 3) of length L3 as shown in FIG. 2 that is smaller than stitchwork length L2. In addition, each of the corners 131 that are cut out form a W-shape, more clearly seen in the detail of FIG. 5. In corners 131, the W-shape 132 creates relief for folding tabs 133a and 135b without the need for rabbets in the frame so that a rabbet-less unitary frame can easily be made with machine tools or by molding. The central point of the W-shape is ideally a right angle corner but in practice may be slightly rounded.

Referring to FIG. 6, composite backing structure 139, for mounting the needlepoint canvas of FIG. 3, has areawise dimensions slightly smaller than the stitchwork that will overlie it. In one configuration, the adhesive films 143 and 144 comprise pressure-sensitive adhesive films (e.g., 3M 486 MP, etc.). In an alternate configuration, only a single adhesive film or even a layer of adhesive is used without a substrate.

In contrast to structural adhesives that form a permanent bond, hardening via processes such as evaporation of solvent, reaction with radiation, chemical reaction, or cooling, pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) form a bond by the application of light pressure to bond the adhesive with the adherent, here substrate 140.

Pressure sensitive adhesive are generally designed with a balance between flow and resistance to flow. The bond forms because the adhesive is soft enough to flow, or wet, the adherend. The bond has strength because the adhesive is hard enough to resist flow when stress is applied to the bond. In addition, in an advantageous fashion, in order to further allow adjustment of a needlepoint canvas during the assembly process, the pressure-sensitive film may be initially removable, but build adhesion to a permanent bond after several hours of days. Hot melt adhesives, applied by multiple parallel nozzles are useful applicators for bonding a completed artwork assembly to the well of a frame.

With reference to FIG. 7, an exemplary composite backing structure 139 is seen to comprise a central self-supporting substrate 140 which may be felt or heavy paper or thin cardboard. Fibrous material is preferred in order to have fibers wet by contacting adhesive. Double sided adhesive films 142 and 144 form a sandwich contacting substrate 140 to complete the composite backing structure. Protective release paper sheets 146 and 148 are discarded when the composite backing structure 139 is ready for use.

In the configuration of FIG. 7, a first adhesive film 142 with a first release paper 146, and a second adhesive film 144 with a second release paper 148, is attached to substrate 140 in a sandwich arrangement. Release papers 146 and 148 are subsequently removed and discarded. The papers are not part of composite backing structure 139 but rather serve as protective members. The Greek cross-shaped canvas as described in FIG. is attached after assembly as seen in FIG. 6. Composite backing structure 139, in turn, provides a semi-rigid support to modified needlepoint canvas 124 for insertion into frame 104 of FIG. 1.

Referring to FIG. 8, in a first step, a composite backing structure 139 of FIG. 6, slightly smaller than stitchwork 125, is attached via a first adhesive film of a first composite backing structure to the rear surface (opposite the needlepoint artwork) of the stitchwork 125, after release paper 146 is removed and discarded. Next, tabs 133a and 133b are folded over and contact a second adhesive film on the opposite side of the composite backing structure, again after the removal of the release paper. Next a third adhesive film associated with one side of a second composite backing structure 149 is applied to exposed surfaces of tabs 133a and 133b. Next, tabs 135a and 135b are folded over to almost complete the artwork mounting, assembly 150. In an alternative configuration, steps are reversed, such that tabs 135a and 135b are folded over first, while tabs 133a and 133b are folded over second.

Alternative artwork mounting assemblies are seen in FIGS. 9 and 10. With reference to FIG. 9, the stitchwork 125 or other center section of Greek cross shaped fabric art is attached to a first composite backing structure 139a. The first set of tabs 133a and 133b are wrapped behind and attached to the first composite backing structure 139a. A second, preferably identical, second composite backing structure 139b is attached to the first set of tabs 133a and 133b. The second set of tabs 135a and 135b is wrapped around the second composite backing structure and securely attached with the resultant artwork mounting assembly 150 in FIG. 8 ready for mounting in the well of a frame. A third composite mounting structure 170 that may be the same or similar to the first and second composite backing structures or may be a piece of double sided adhesive film or stripes of hot melt adhesive, as shown. The entire fabric artwork mounting assembly is now snugly nested in well 154 of frame 104.

In FIG. 10, the stitchwork 125 is attached to a first composite backing structure 174 that is comprised of double sided adhesive film. After the first set of tabs 133a and 133b are wrapped behind and attached to the first composite backing structure 174, a second composite backing structure 176 that is comprised of double sided adhesive film mates to tabs 133a and 133b before the second pair of tabs 135a and 135b are wrapped on the other side. As in FIG. 9, a third composite backing structure 170 secures the assembly into well 154 of frame 104. As an alternative to double sided adhesive films, the first and second composite backing structures 174 and 176 may be formed of viscous adhesive layers.

Referring to FIG. 11, the artwork mounting assembly 150 of FIG. 8 is inserted in and secured to well 154 of frame 104 in a nesting relationship, with the needlework art body exposed and closely surrounded on non-exposed sides by the well walls. Generally, the length L2 of artwork mounting assembly 150 is almost the same as the length L4 of well 154. In addition, the width W2 of combined composite backing structure 150 is almost the same as the width W4 of well 154. Note that dimensions L4 and W4 refer to internal wall-to-wall well dimensions. The frame is preferably a unitary structure, such as a block of metal with a central well less than one-quarter inch deep, in which a needlepoint artwork is nested as described herein.

In one insertion method, artwork mounting assembly 150 is mounted into well 154 first by placing the third composite backing structure in the well and then placing one edge (two corners 160a-b) inside well 154 against a well wall, and then slightly buckling the pad and placing a third corner 160c down inside. The final corner 160d may be insured with a narrow edged insertion tool, such fan a Xacto knife.

In addition, internal corners 152a-d of frame 104 are machined or manufactured in a curved manner in order to substantially reduce the wrinkles when the combined composite backing structure 1150 is inserted into well 154.

The third composite backing structure has the greatest variety of possibilities to secure the artwork mounting assembly 150 in well 154. Examples of possibilities include natural adhesives, synthetic adhesives (e.g., elastomers, thermoplastic, and thermosetting adhesives, etc.), drying adhesives (typically polymers dissolved in a solvent), contact adhesives, hot melt adhesives (e.g., thermoplastic adhesives, etc.) reactive adhesives, pressure sensitive adhesives, removable adhesives, and viscous adhesives (e.g., GE Household Glue (Clear Silicone), etc.).

While a needlepoint canvas has been described as a preferred embodiment, other fabric artworks could be used, such as micro-quits and the like. Advantages of the invention include the ability to create an enhanced framed fabric artwork apparatus for use in jewelry.





 
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