Title:
Shower Curtain Fastener
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A shower curtain fastening strip comprises a substrate having first side and second side. A detachable fastening material is affixed on the first and or second side of the substrate. The shower curtain fastening strip is operatively coupled to a single shower hook.



Inventors:
Gregory, Donna Kim (Northbrook, IL, US)
Application Number:
11/688841
Publication Date:
09/25/2008
Filing Date:
03/20/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
4/609, 4/610, 4/608
International Classes:
A47K3/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
LOEPPKE, JANIE MEREDITH
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
LAMPEL & ASSOCIATES, P.C. (NORTHBROOK, IL, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A shower curtain fastening strip comprising: a substrate having a first side and a second side; and a detachable fastening material on at least one of: the first side, and the second side of the substrate, wherein the shower curtain fastening strip is operatively coupled to a single shower hook.

2. The shower curtain fastening strip according to claim 1, wherein at least a portion of the shower hook is operative to insert through a hole in the substrate.

3. The shower curtain fastening strip according to claim 2, further comprising a membrane within the hole.

4. The shower curtain fastening strip according to claim 2, further comprising a rim strengthening element within the hole.

5. The shower curtain fastening strip according to claim 1, wherein the fastening material is at least one of: hook and loop, mushroom hook and loop, pressure sensitive dual interlocking reclosable hook and loop, magnetic fastener, snap fastener, and adhesive.

6. The shower curtain fastening strip according to claim 1, wherein the substrate is at least one of: a backing material, plastic, rubber, metal, and cloth.

7. The shower curtain fastening strip according to claim 1, wherein the first side or the second side are operatively detachable to least one of a shower liner or shower curtain.

8. The shower curtain fastening strip according to claim 1, wherein the fastening material is operative to be cut in various lengths and widths.

9. A detachable shower curtain or shower liner comprising: a shower curtain or shower liner; and a plurality of spaced fasteners attached on one side of the shower curtain or liner.

10. The detachable shower curtain or shower liner according to claim 9, wherein the plurality of fasteners attached on one side of the shower curtain or shower liner are spaced along an upper horizontal edge of the shower curtain or shower liner.

11. The detachable shower curtain or shower liner according to claim 9, wherein at least one of: the shower curtain or the shower liner is made of at least one of: a water repellant material, plastic, and cloth material.

12. The detachable shower curtain or shower liner according to claim 9, wherein the plurality of fastening material is at least one of: hook and loop, mushroom hook and loop, pressure sensitive dual interlocking reclosable hook and loop, magnetic fastener, snap fastener, and adhesive.

13. The detachable shower curtain or shower liner according to claim 9, wherein the plurality of fasteners are attached via at least one of: adhesive, heat bonding, ultra sonic welding, sewn, taped, hook and loop or snapped.

14. The detachable shower curtain or shower liner according to claim 9, wherein said shower curtain or shower liner is made in various lengths and widths to fit within different sized shower enclosures.

15. The detachable shower curtain or shower liner according to claim 9, wherein said plurality of fasteners are operative to be cut in various lengths and widths to be attached to said shower curtain or shower liner.

16. A fastening ring comprising: a ring attached to a substrate having a first side and a second side; and a detachable fastening material on at least one of: the first side, and the second side of the substrate, wherein the fastening ring is operatively coupled to a shower rod.

17. The fastening ring according to claim 16, wherein the ring is attached using at least one of: molding, applying adhesive, heat bonding, ultra sonic welding, bolting, taping, hook and loop, sewing or snapping.

18. The fastening ring according to claim 16, wherein the fastening material is at least one of: hook and loop, mushroom hook and loop, pressure sensitive dual interlocking reclosable hook and loop, magnetic fastener, snap fastener, and adhesive.

19. The fastening ring according to claim 16, wherein the substrate is at least one of: a backing material, plastic, rubber, metal, and cloth.

20. The fastening ring according to claim 16, wherein the first side or the second side are operatively detachable to at least one of a shower liner or shower curtain.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

(1) Field of the Invention

This invention relates to shower curtains and more particularly, shower curtain fasteners.

(2) Description of the Prior Art

Devices to prevent the escape of water from a shower enclosure are known in the art. Shower liners can be used alone or with an aesthetic decorative shower curtain. The decorative curtain and shower liner are normally hung on the same device known as a shower hook. The shower hooks are hung on a device known as a shower rod. The process of hanging and removing a decorative curtain and shower liner is cumbersome and can be dangerous. Because the process is so cumbersome many people do not change or clean the shower liner regularly which is a sanitation issue. Those that do change the shower liner regularly most likely throw them out because they rip them off the hooks and replace them versus washing and this is an environmental issue. The present invention allows for easy attachment and removal of the shower liner and decorative curtain and it provides for the shower liner and decorative curtain to move freely on the rod.

The related art of interest describes patent holders for various shower curtain rings and hook and loop fasteners.

U.K. Patent Application No. 1,162,201 published on Aug. 20, 1969, for Joseph R. Wylde describes hook and loop means for attaching a curtain to an I-beam. The hanging system of the publication is distinguished by its requirement for a rail and does not describe attachment material to shower curtains.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,109,912 issued on May 5, 1992, to Leonard Gary describes a drapery system utilizing an I-beam housing which holds a drapery hook having hook material on one side and loop material on the other side. The drapery system is distinguishable by its requirement for a rail and only one curtain on a drapery system rather than a shower curtain.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,495,628 issued on Mar. 5, 1996, to Kim Logan describes a shower curtain having a selectively raisable lower portion utilizing several horizontal rows of hook or loop patches on a shower curtain and a shower curtain liner. The system is distinguishable for placing the hook and loop patches in horizontal locations for a different purpose of raising the position of the curtains. However, the hook and loop patches are not coupled to a shower hook.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,615,461 issued on Apr. 1, 1997, to Yutaka Tominaga et al. describes a hanging device for a pleated curtain. The hanging device is hooked onto a curtain runner with rollers traversing a C-section curtain rail. The hanging device is distinguishable based on its requirement for a rail and rollers for a drapery system rather than a shower curtain. Tominaga does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,586,595 issued on Dec. 24, 1996, to Toshiaki Takizawa et al. describes a curtain attachment connector comprising a fastener member similar to that of Tominaga et al. except the arrangement of the hook elements. This curtain attachment connector is distinguishable for its requirement for a rail and rollers for a drapery system rather than a shower curtain. Takizawa does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,228,149 issued on Jul. 20, 1993, to Alex J. Phinn, Jr. describes a fastening means and method for a shower curtain employing hook and loop material for fastening only the side edge of the curtain to the wall of the shower stall. The fastening system is distinguished by its use for attaching a side of a shower curtain to a shower wall. Phinn does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,148,580 issued on Sep. 22, 1992, to Dean W. Dyckow describes a shower curtain sealing and fastening arrangement kit. A strip of hook or loop material is attached to one side edge of a shower curtain to mate with another strip of loop or hook material on the shower stall wall. Dyckow does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring

U.S. Pat. No. 5,651,407 issued on Jul. 29, 1997, to Hilda M. Perez describes looped shower curtain fasteners utilizing hook and loop fastening dots to attach to the top edge of a shower curtain. The loops can be adomed with artificial flowers using eyelet fasteners. The fasteners are distinguished by the critical use of the loops. Perez does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring

U.S. Pat. No. 3,196,511 issued on Jul. 27, 1965, to Mildred M. Kintner describes fastening clothes, draperies and curtains with U-shaped band. Hook and loop material patches are utilized for fastening clothes and not shower curtains.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,421,393 issued on Jun. 6, 1995, to Michael Wolfe describes a shower curtain vertical edge stay to attach curtain to the wall and magnets are used to prevent inward flowing of the curtain. Wolfe does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,038,749 issued on Mar. 21, 2000, to Stephanie A. Eberhardt describes a combined shower curtain and liner construction held together by hook and loop strips. The hook and loop combined shower curtain and liner construction is distinguishable by its use of long strips of hook and loop material thus making the liner and curtain more rigid hindering it from opening freely on the rod and preventing a free flow and a natural folding of the current when opening. The hook and loop strip is a single continuous strip across the entire shower curtain. Eberhardt does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 2,320,308 issued on May 25, 1943 to J. Z. Silverman discloses a curtain hook and installation. Silverman does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 2,840,155 issued Apr. 2, 1957 to M. L. Stern discloses a shower curtain assembly a front sheet with a plurality of mutually spaced-apart hanger straps. The hanger straps are carried over and snapped. Stern does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,529,328 issued Sep. 22, 1970 to P.T. Davison discloses a magnetic clothespin. Davison does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,202,059 issued May 13, 1980 to Raymond F. Faragher discloses a reversible shower curtain. The reversible curtain includes two sheet laminate and a curtain header structure including a stiffening strap. Faragher does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,333,187 issued Jun. 8, 1982 to Bob. A. Schuler discloses a shower curtain with an integrated plastic shower curtain with vertical straps to adhere to the side of the shower stall. Schuler does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,101,877 issued Apr. 7, 1993 to Charles J. Subecz et al. discloses a shower curtain ensemble with a plurality of apertures along the top and plurality of plastic hooks covered with fabric. Subecz does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,216,766 issued Jun. 8, 1993 to Randall P. Lang discloses a shower curtain rod attachment with a rotating arm. The arm of the shower rod attachment hooks, suction or clip to the wall and rotates downward. This arrangement is distinguishable by having different attachment means and is for a different purpose. Lang does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,339,884 issued Aug. 23, 1994 to Irving Angerman discloses a shower curtain ring having a flexible body adapted to encircle a curtain rod and close by frictionally interengaging members. The shower curtain ring is distinguishable by having different attachment means. However, Angerman does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring

U.S. Pat. No. 7,003,848 issued Feb. 28, 2006 to Stanley Ho discloses a fastening device that can fasten itself to a sheet material and at the same time couples itself to an object. Ho does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,394,168 issued May 28, 2002 to Jayne Zoboski discloses a shower curtain assembly having a first portion hung from hooks and second curtain having fastening means to the first portion. This arrangement is distinguishable for a need to use the header first portion hung from hooks. However, Zoboski does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a single shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,192,965 issued Feb. 27, 2001 to Charles F. Hinds discloses a zippered shower curtain assembly having a valance hung from hooks and second curtain zippered to valance. This arrangement is distinguishable for a need to use the valance hung from hooks. However, Hinds does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a single shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,098,699 issued Aug. 8, 2000 to Samantha Marie Junius discloses an easy curtain having a bead attachment members placed on the curtain attaching a specifically designed telescoping curtain rod. This easy curtain arrangement is distinguishable by the different attachment means and the need to use the specific rod. However, Junius does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a single shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,041,454 issued Mar. 28, 2000 to Sharon Kay Summerford discloses a shower curtain system comprising a curtain and a plurality of coupling straps. However, Summerford does not describe a fastening strip operably coupled to a shower hook. Further, Summerford describes a shower curtain having pile type fasteners attached to both sides of the curtain so that the coupling strap attaches to both sides to create a loop. If the coupling strap does not attach to both sides of the shower curtain via pile type fasteners, then the strap cannot support the curtain. Summerford, does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,894,642 issued Apr. 20, 1999 to Stephanie Eberhardt discloses a hook and loop hanger for a shower curtain and liner having an elongated hanger strip of loop material the same width of the shower rod. The hanger strip is hung from a rod with hooks. Curtain material is hung from the hanger device. This arrangement is distinguishable by the use of the hanger device. The use of such a hanger device would prove to be bulky and stiffening the curtain preventing the flexibility and natural folding of the curtain. Eberhardt does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,308,637 issued Jan. 5, 1982 to Robert D. Kucera discloses a unitary shower curtain hanger interrupted at one point to be deformed and hung on a rod. The hanger closure means is located at the interruption point and closed to form a continuous elongated torus. However, Kucera does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,120,343 issued Oct. 17, 1978 to Eunice D. Wilson discloses a disposable shower curtain which is an inexpensive shower curtain with a plurality of flexible strap members having contact type adhesive capable of rapidly establishing an adhesive bond. However, Wilson does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,010,503 issued Mar. 8, 1977 to Ron Denton discloses a shower curtain fastening device with a hole formed through the flexible strip. The strip is adapted to hand over a curtain rod. A U-shaped material cooperates with the hole creating the fastening means. However, Denton does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,586,375 issued Dec. 24, 1996 to Barbara Copperman et al. discloses a two piece shower curtain hook to hang from a shower curtain rod having a tail permitting the shower curtain to rest thereon and a positioning plate supported on the tail receiving the mounting bracket. This two piece shower curtain hook is distinguishable by its fastening means. However, Copperman does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,367,742 issued Nov. 29, 1994 to Stanley Bindman discloses a click-lock ring for hanging shower curtains designed in the form of a split ring. This ring is distinguishable by its attachment means. However, Bindman does not describe fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,787,954 issued Aug. 4, 1998 to Frederick F. Herrera discloses a shower curtain ring assembly with a male end locking protrusion with a female locking receptacle. This ring is distinguishable by its attachment means. However, Herrera does not describe a fastening strip operatively coupled to a shower hook or a fastening ring.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A shower curtain fastening strip comprises a substrate having first side and second side. A detachable fastening material is affixed on the first and or second side of the substrate. The shower curtain fastening strip is operatively coupled to a single shower hook.

According to one embodiment, a shower curtain fastener comprises a single or dual sided fastening strip, fastening ring, decorative curtain and shower liner. The decorative curtain and shower liner can be made of plastic or fabric. As used herein, the term curtain refers to both a decorative curtain and shower liner unless otherwise specified.

If an existing decorative curtain is hung on standard shower hooks, then the dual sided fastening strip can be hung on the existing shower hooks and the shower liner can attach easily to the fastening strip. The fastening strip may be made of a pressure sensitive dual interlocking reclosable fastener like hook and loop, mushroom hook and loop, magnetic, snaps or fibrous material. According to one embodiment, the fastening strip may comprise a moldable material that strengthens or protects an opening, like a grommet, membrane or any suitable material.

According to one embodiment, a single or dual sided fastening ring is made of a moldable material with an operatively attachable fastening strip. The fastening ring hangs on a shower rod and the decorative curtain and shower liner attach to the operatively attachable fastening strip. The fastening ring maybe attached to the fastening strip by molding, applying adhesive, heat bonding, ultra sonic welding, bolting, taping, hook and loop, sewing or snapping

The decorative curtain and shower liner have a fastening material attached to the plastic or fabric material. The fastening material may be a hook and loop, mushroom hook and loop, pressure sensitive dual interlocking reclosable hook and loop, magnetic fastener, snap fastener, and adhesive. Attachment of fastening material maybe an adhesive, heat bonding, ultra sonic welding, sewn, taped, hook and loop and/or snapped

The shower curtain fastener allows for an easy attachment and removal of both the decorative curtain and shower liner for cleaning or replacement. Among other advantages, a shower curtain fastener provides a user with options and ease of use. The shower curtain fastener provides the user with a shower liner, which is easy to attach or detach for cleaning or replacement purposes. The shower curtain fastener also provides a decorative curtain that can be easily attached or detached, which can be aesthetically appealing with choices of design, color and use of fabric. Another aspect of the invention is to permit the system user to keep their current aesthetic appeal of their decorative curtain and decorative hooks. The fastening strip provides the option of allowing the user to utilize their existing decorative curtain and decorative shower hooks, while utilizing the shower liner which is easy to attach and detach. Furthermore, the fastening rings with the operatively attachable fastening strip provide the user with additional options of attaching both the shower liner and decorative curtain to the fastening rings, in the event the user does not have existing hooks they are using for aesthetic purposes.

A shower curtain fastener strip is an efficient and effortless way of attaching and detaching a shower curtain liner and or decorative curtain both having a plurality of fastening material attached thereto. The shower liner and decorative curtain attach to a plurality of fastening strips that hang from standard shower hooks or to a plurality of fastening rings that hang from a standard shower rod. The fastening strip and fastening ring both have the complementary fastening material. The shower curtain fastener facilitates the fastening and removal of the shower liner and or decorative curtain providing relief from the dreadful, tiring and at times dangerous task of trying to maneuver the shower liner and decorative curtain on to and off of standard shower hooks for washing or disposal.

These and other aspects of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art after a reading of the following description of the preferred embodiment when considered with the drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is depicting the frontal view of the dual sided fastening strip according to the preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2 is depicting the shower liner with fastening material attached according to the preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 3 is a front view of the dual sided fastening ring with operatively attachable fastening strip according to the preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 4 is a side view of the dual sided fastening ring according to the preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 5 is depicting the decorative curtain with fastening material attached according to the preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 6 is depicting the fastening strip, hung on a standard shower hook according to the preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 7 is depicting the fastening strip, the decorative curtain and shower liner partially attached according to the preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 8 is depicting the fastening ring, the decorative curtain and shower line partially attached according to one embodiment of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

A shower curtain fastening strip 2 comprises a substrate 4 having first side and second side. A detachable fastening material 18 is affixed on the first and or second side of the substrate 4. The shower curtain fastening strip 2 is operatively coupled to a single shower hook 9.

Referring now to the drawings in general and FIGS. 1-8, it will be understood that the illustrations are for the purpose of describing a preferred embodiment of the invention and are not intended to limit the invention thereto.

The fastening strip 2 shown in FIG. 1 is placed onto a standard shower hook 9 via hole 6 as shown in FIG. 6. The shower liner 12 FIG. 2 attaches to the fastening strip 2 FIG. 1 as shown in FIG. 7. According to one embodiment, the fastening strip 2 FIG. 1 includes a fastening material 18 and a membrane 7, or any suitable moldable material that strengthens or protects the hole 6. According to another embodiment, the fastening strip 2 includes a grommet that strengthens the hole 6. The grommet may be made out of brass, aluminum, plastic, metal or any suitable material. The fastening material 18 in FIG. 1 may be of a pressure sensitive dual interlocking reclosable fastener like hook and loop, mushroom hook and loop, magnetic fastener, snap fastener, adhesive, fibrous material and/or any suitable fastening material. For example dual locking reclosable fasteners, such as those manufactured by 3M, have an array of hooks and loops (such as VELCRO®), or mushroom heads interlocking with one another (3M DUAL LOCK™). The fastening material 18 may be any other suitable type of hook and loop fasteners.

According to one embodiment, FIG. 1 the detachable shower curtain fastening strip 2 comprises a substrate 4 suitable for attachment to a fastening material 18. For example, the fastening strip 2 may have two sides with a fastening material 18, such as a hook and loop fastener. According to one embodiment, two hook and loop components with adhesive on the backside of the respective components are joined together to form the substrate 4 and thus the fastening strip. The adhesive may be already applied to the backside of the hook and loop components or may be applied when joined together. The substrate 4 may then be formed by joining the two fastening materials 18 together. Alternatively, the substrate 4 may be a backing material, plastic, rubber, metal, and/or cloth. The fastening material 18 may then be attached to the substrate 4 in any suitable manner. As stated above, the fastening material 18 may be any of the alternative materials previously stated, or any other suitable material. According to one embodiment, the two sided fastening strip 2 may attach to a shower liner 12 FIG. 2 on one side and to a decorative curtain 5 FIG. 5 on the other side.

According to another embodiment, FIG. 1 the fastening strip 2 may have one fastening side suitable to attach to a shower liner 12 or decorative curtain 5. According to this embodiment, the substrate 4 may be a backing material as described above suitable to attach to the fastening material 18 on one side. For example, a plastic, rubber, metal, fabric such as canvas or any suitable material may be used as the substrate to attach the pressure sensitive dual interlocking reclosable fastener such as, hook and loop, mushroom, hook and loop, magnetic fastener, snap fastener, adhesive, fibrous material and/or any suitable fastening material.

Depending on the type of fastening material 18, complementary fastening materials may be used, such as the hook and loop, or the pressure sensitive dual interlocking material. For example referring to FIG. 1, the fastening strip 2 may have hooks on both sides such that the shower curtain 5 and shower liner 12 have loops. Conversely, the fastening strip 2 may have soft loops on both sides such that the decorative curtain 5 and shower liner 12 have hard hooks. According to yet another alternative embodiment, the fastening strip 2 may have hard hooks on one side and soft loops on the other side. Further, the hard hook fastener material may have a hard tactile feel and the loop fastener material may have a soft tactile feel. Alternatively, the hook fastener material may have a soft tactile feel and the loop fastener material may have a hard tactile feel. For example, the fastening strip 2 may be made of the hard hook or soft loop material, or in any suitable combination. The shower liner 12 FIG. 2 or decorative curtain 5 FIG. 5 may have attached the complementary soft loop or hard hook.

The fastening strip 2 in FIG. 1 may be dual sided, allowing the user the option to keep their existing standard hook 9. The user then has the flexibility to hang the fastening strip 2 unto the existing standard shower hook 9 and attach a decorative curtain 5 FIG. 5 with complementary fastening material 29 FIG. 5 and the shower liner 12 FIG. 2 with complementary fastening material 29 FIG. 2 to the fastening strip 2 FIG. 1.

Referring to FIG. 2, the shower liner 12 can be made of any suitable water repellant material. According to one embodiment, the shower liner 12 has fastening material 29 attached to the horizontal edge of the liner spaced across the width of the shower liner 12. Fastening material 29 may be a pressure sensitive dual interlocking reclosable fastener like hook and loop, mushroom hook and loop, magnetic fastener, snap fastener, adhesive, fibrous material or any suitable fastening material. For example dual locking reclosable fasteners, such as those manufactured by 3M, have an array of hooks and loops (such as VELCRO®), or mushroom hook and loop interlocking with one another (3M™ DUAL LOCK™). Attachment of fastening material may adhesive, heat bonding, ultra sonic welding, sewn, taped, hook and loop or snap.

Referring to FIGS. 3 and 4, according to one embodiment, a fastening ring 10 comprises a ring 11 attached to or molded with a substrate 4. The fastening strip 2 attaches to the substrate 4. The fastening material 18 may then be attached to the substrate in any suitable manner. For example, the fastening strip 2 may be attached by molding, applying adhesive, heat bonding, ultra sonic welding, bolting, taping, hook and loop, sewing or snapping to the substrate 4 that is attached to or molded to the fastening ring 10. Any suitable material may be used as the substrates, as stated above. According to one embodiment, the ring 11 may have a slot (i.e. pronged) that may be snapped onto a rib, or hole or any suitable complementary engagement means formed on an edge of the substrate 4. Any suitable attachment method may be used to attach the ring 11 to the substrate 4 with attached fastening strip 2.

Referring to FIG. 5, the decorative curtain 5 can be made of plastic or fabric or any suitable material. According to one embodiment, the decorative curtain 5 has fastening material 29 attached to the horizontal edge of the curtain spaced across the width of the decorative curtain 5. Fastening material 29 may be a pressure sensitive dual interlocking reclosable fastener like hook and loop, mushroom hook and loop, magnetic fastener, snap fastener, adhesive, fibrous material or any suitable fastening material. For example dual locking reclosable fasteners, such as those manufactured by 3M, have an array of hooks and loops (such as VELCRO®), or mushroom hook and loop interlocking with one another (3M™ DUAL LOCK™). Attachment of fastening material 29 to the shower curtain 5 may be attached adhesive, heat bonding, ultra sonic welding, sewn, taped, hook and loop or snap.

Referring to FIG. 7 the fastening strip 2 FIG. 1 is hung on standard shower hook 9 as shown in FIG. 6 and the standard shower hook 9 is hung a shower rod 34. The shower liner 12 FIG. 2 or decorative curtain 5 FIG. 5 are easily attached to and detached from the fastening strip 2 FIG. 1.

Referring to FIG. 8 the fastening ring 10 FIG. 3 is hung on shower rod 34. The fastening ring 10 FIG. 3 with operatively attachable fastening strip 2 FIG. 1 may be made of plastic and constructed in various colors. The fastening material 18 may be of a pressure sensitive dual interlocking reclosable fastener like hook and loop, mushroom hook and loop, magnetic fastener, snap fastener, adhesive, fibrous material or any suitable fastening material. For example dual locking reclosable fasteners, such as those manufactured by 3M, have an array of hooks and loops (such as VELCRO®), or mushroom heads interlocking (3M™ DUAL LOCK™) with one another. The shower liner 12 FIG. 2 or decorative curtain 5 FIG. 5 are easily attached to and detached from the fastening ring 10 FIG. 3.

Because the shower liner 12 and/or decorative curtain 5 are easily attached and detached, it is easier for the user to clean or replace. Also, if the shower liner 12 and decorative curtain 5 are easier to clean and would reduce potential waste helping the environment. The use of the fastening strip 2 allows the user the flexibility to keep for aesthetic purposes their existing decorative curtain and decorative hooks while still having the ease of attaching and removing the shower liner 12 for cleaning and or replacement. The shower curtain fastener strip 2 and/or fastening ring 10 provides the user with options and ease of use above all other prior art.