Title:
PROVIDING A REMOVABLE ELECTRICAL PUMP IN A COMPLETION SYSTEM
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A tubing string including a tubing and an isolation valve is run into a well, where the tubing string is configured to receive an electrical pump. A first wet connect portion of the tubing string is engaged with a corresponding second wet connect portion that is part of a downhole completion section. A toolstring including the electrical pump is run into an inner bore of the tubing for engagement inside the tubing string. Removal of the toolstring including the electrical pump is enabled without removing the tubing string due to presence of the isolation valve.



Inventors:
Patel, Dinesh R. (Sugar Land, TX, US)
Ross, Donald W. (Houston, TX, US)
Ali, Mohammad Athar (Sugar Land, TX, US)
Application Number:
11/948177
Publication Date:
09/18/2008
Filing Date:
11/30/2007
Assignee:
SCHLUMBERGER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION (Sugar Land, TX, US)
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
166/65.1
International Classes:
E21B19/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
MICHENER, BLAKE E
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
SCHLUMBERGER ROSHARON CAMPUS (Houston, TX, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A method for use in a well, comprising: running into the well a tubing string including a tubing and an isolation valve, wherein the tubing string is configured to receive an electrical pump; engaging a first wet connect portion on the tubing string with a corresponding second wet connect portion that is part of a downhole completion section; running a toolstring including the electrical pump into an inner bore of the tubing for engagement inside the tubing string; and enabling removal of the toolstring including the electrical pump without removing the tubing string due to presence of the isolation valve.

2. The method of claim 1, wherein running the toolstring including the electrical pump comprises running the toolstring including an electrical submersible pump (ESP).

3. The method of claim 1, further comprising running at least one control line that commonly controls the isolation valve and at least another component in the well.

4. The method of claim 1, farther comprising remotely actuating the isolation valve to a closed position for isolating a formation to enable removal of the toolstring including the electrical pump.

5. The method of claim 1, wherein engaging the first wet connect portion with the second wet connect portion comprises engaging a first hydraulic wet connection portion with a second hydraulic wet connect portion.

6. The method of claim 1, wherein engaging the first wet connect portion with the second wet connect portion comprises engaging a first inductive coupler portion with a second inductive coupler portion.

7. The method of claim 1, further comprising engaging a third wet connect portion on the tubing string with a corresponding fourth wet connect portion that is part of the downhole completion section.

8. The method of claim 7, wherein the first wet connect portion and the second wet connect portion form an inductive coupler, and wherein the third wet connect portion and fourth wet connect portion form a hydraulic wet connect mechanism.

9. The method of claim 1, further comprising providing a subsurface safety valve on the tubing string.

10. The method of claim 1, wherein the toolstring comprises a shifting tool, and wherein running the toolstring into the inner bore of the tubing causes the shifting tool to actuate the isolation valve.

11. The method of claim 1, wherein running the toolstring including the electrical pump comprises running the toolstring that includes either a coiled tubing or a jointed tubing attached to the electrical pump.

12. The method of claim 11, further comprising running a pump cable through the coiled tubing or jointed tubing to electrically connect to the electrical pump.

13. The method of claim 12, further comprising providing swellable sealing elements between the pump cable and an inner wall of the one of the coiled tubing and jointed tubing.

14. A completion system for use in a well, comprising: a first completion section having a first portion of a hydraulic wet connect mechanism; a second completion section having a second portion of the hydraulic wet connect mechanism, wherein the first and second portions of the hydraulic wet connect mechanism are engageable when the second completion section is engaged with the first completion section; and an electrical pump coupled to the second completion section.

15. The completion system of claim 14, wherein the electrical pump comprises an electrical submersible pump.

16. The completion system of claim 14, wherein the first completion section further has a first inductive coupler portion, and wherein the second completion section further has a second inductive coupler portion positioned adjacent the first inductive coupler portion.

17. The completion system of claim 14, wherein the first completion section comprises a lateral branch liner that extends from a main wellbore to a lateral branch.

18. The completion system of claim 14, wherein the second completion section has a tubing for extending to an earth surface, and an isolation valve attached to the tubing.

19. The completion system of claim 18, wherein the electrical pump is engageable inside the tubing, and wherein the electrical pump is removable from the tubing without removing the second completion section.

20. The completion system of claim 14, wherein the second completion section has at least one flow control valve to control flow between an inner bore of the second completion section and a lateral branch

21. The completion system of claim 20, wherein the second completion section further has a sensor to sense a parameter in a zone associated with the lateral branch.

22. The completion system of claim 14, wherein the second completion section further has at least one flow control valve.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) of U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/894,495, entitled “Method and Apparatus for an Active Integrated Well Construction and Completion System for Maximum Reservoir Contact and Hydrocarbon Recovery,” filed Mar. 13, 2007; and of U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/895,555, entitled, “Method and Apparatus for an Active Integrated Well Construction and Completion System for Maximum Reservoir Contact and Hydrocarbon Recovery,” filed Mar. 30, 2007, both hereby incorporated by reference.

TECHNICAL FIELD

The invention relates generally to running a tubing string including a tubing and an isolation valve into a well, and running a toolstring including an electrical pump for engagement inside the tubing string.

BACKGROUND

A completion system is installed in a well to produce hydrocarbons (or other types of fluids) from reservoir(s) adjacent the well, or to inject fluids into the reservoir(s) through the well. In some wells, it may be desirable to provide an artificial lift mechanism, such as in the form of an electrical submersible pump (ESP). However, to perform workover operations in a well, it may be desirable to remove the ESP, such as to replace or repair the ESP at the earth surface, or to perform another workover operation. Traditionally, to remove an ESP, a tubing string that includes a tubing (e.g., production tubing or injection tubing) would have to be removed with the ESP, which is a time-consuming and costly operation, particularly in remote locations such as subsea wells. Also, conventional completion systems that include ESPs do not provide for flexible communication of hydraulic and/or electrical signals between different sections of the completion systems.

SUMMARY

In general, according to an embodiment, a method for use in a well comprises running into the well a tubing string including a tubing and an isolation valve, where the tubing string is configured to receive an electrical pump. A first wet connect portion in the tubing string is engaged with a corresponding second wet connect portion that is part of a downhole completion section. A toolstring including the electrical pump is run into the inner bore of the tubing for engagement inside the tubing string. Removal of the toolstring including the electrical pump without removing the tubing string is enabled due to presence of the isolation valve.

In general, according to another embodiment, a completion system includes a first completion section having a first portion of a hydraulic wet connect mechanism, and a second completion section having a second portion of the hydraulic wet connect mechanism, where the first and second portions of the hydraulic wet connect mechanism are engageable when the second completion section is engaged with the first completion section. In addition, the completion system includes an electrical pump coupled to the second completion section.

Other or alternative features will become apparent from the following description, from the drawings, and from the claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 illustrates an electrical pump-ready completion system installed in a well, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 2 illustrates the completion system of FIG. 1 with the electrical pump installed, in accordance with an embodiment.

FIGS. 3A-3B illustrate embodiments of providing an electrical pump cable through a coiled tubing, in accordance with an embodiment.

FIG. 4 illustrates an alternative embodiment of an electrical pump-ready completion system.

FIG. 5 illustrates the completion system of FIG. 4 with the electrical pump installed, according to an embodiment.

FIG. 6 illustrates a further embodiment of an electrical pump-ready completion system.

FIG. 7 illustrates yet another embodiment of a completion system with an electrical pump installed.

FIG. 8 illustrates yet a further embodiment of an electrical pump-ready completion system.

FIG. 9 illustrates another embodiment of a completion system with an electrical pump installed.

FIG. 10 illustrates a completion system for use in a multilateral well, where the completion system includes an electrical pump, according to an embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

In the following description, numerous details are set forth to provide an understanding of the present invention. However, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that the present invention may be practiced without these details and that numerous variations or modifications from the described embodiments are possible.

As used here, the terms “above” and “below”; “up” and “down”; “upper” and “lower”; “upwardly” and “downwardly”; and other like terms indicating relative positions above or below a given point or element are used in this description to more clearly describe some embodiments of the invention. However, when applied to equipment and methods for use in wells that are deviated or horizontal, such terms may refer to a left to right, right to left, or diagonal relationship as appropriate.

In accordance with some embodiments, an electrical pump-ready completion system can be installed in a well, where the electrical pump-ready completion system includes a tubing string having a tubing and an isolation valve. The tubing string is capable of receiving a toolstring that includes the electrical pump. After engagement of the toolstring including the electrical pump inside the tubing string, the toolstring including the electrical pump can be subsequently removed without removing the tubing string. This is enabled by presence of the isolation valve that is part of the tubing string. Also, the tubing string has a first wet connect portion for engagement with a second wet connect portion of a downhole completion section. The wet connect portions can be inductive coupler portions (for providing electrical wet connect) and/or hydraulic wet connect portions.

By being able to remove the electrical pump without removing the tubing string, workover operations involving repair or replacement of the electrical pump, or other types of operations in which the electrical pump has to be first removed (such as to enable access of completion equipment past the electrical pump), cost and time savings can be achieved since removing the toolstring with the electrical pump is much easier than removing the entire tubing string.

In one implementation, the electrical pump includes an electrical submersible pump (ESP), which is activated by electrical power. In other implementations, the electrical pump can be any other type of pump that can be activated by electrical power. In the ensuing discussion, reference is made to an ESP. However, it is contemplated that some embodiments of the invention can be applied to other types of electrical pumps.

FIG. 1 illustrates an embodiment of an ESP-ready completion system that is capable of receiving a toolstring including the ESP. The completion system is installed in a well 100, which can be a single-wellbore well or a multilateral well having one or more lateral branches. The well 100 is lined with casing 102.

The completion system includes a lower downhole completion section 104 that has a lateral branch liner 1 14 to connect a lateral branch 112 to the main wellbore. However, in an alternative implementation, the lateral branch 112 can be omitted. The lower completion section 104 is engageable with an indexing casing coupling 117 or other mechanism to set the position and orientation of the lateral branch liner 114.

The lower completion section has portions of both a hydraulic wet connect mechanism and an electrical wet connect mechanism provided on the lateral branch liner 114.

The electrical wet connect mechanism and hydraulic wet connect mechanism are provided to allow for electrical coupling and hydraulic coupling to occur between different sections of the completion system. The electrical wet connect mechanism includes an inductive coupler, made up of a first inductive coupler portion 116 (e.g., female inductive coupler portion) and a second inductive coupler portion 118 (e.g., male inductive coupler portion). The female inductive coupler portion 116 is part of the lower completion section 104 and is attached to the lateral branch liner 114. Also, the female inductive coupler portion 116 is electrically connected to an electrical cable segment 120 that extends from the female inductive coupler portion 116 to equipment in the lateral branch 112.

The male inductive coupler portion 118 is part of a tubing string that includes a larger tubing 140, a length compensation joint 108, and a pipe 110. The male inductive coupler portion 118 is attached to the pipe 110 of the tubing string in the example of FIG. 1. The male inductive coupler portion is connected to an electrical cable segment 122 that extends upwardly through the length compensation joint 108 and a completion packer 106 (also part of the tubing string) to a location further uphole in the well 100. In some implementations, the electrical cable 122 can extend all the way to the earth surface.

In this manner, electrical power and/or signaling communicated over the electrical cable 122 can be provided through the inductive coupler (made up of inductive coupler portions 116 and 118) and over the electrical cable segment 120 to an electrical component in the lateral branch 112 (or alternatively, to an electrical component in the lower portion of the main wellbore).

The hydraulic wet connect mechanism 124 allows for a hydraulic connection to be made in the presence of wellbore fluids between an upper completion section (tubing string) and the lower completion section 104. The hydraulic wet connect mechanism 124 includes a groove 126 that can be run around the circumference of a connection sub 128. Seals 130 and 132 are provided on the two sides of the groove 126 to provide a seal against leakage of hydraulic fluids in the groove 126. The groove 126 allows for hydraulic connection between a hydraulic control line 134 and a hydraulic control line segment 136, which can extend from the hydraulic wet connect mechanism 124 into the lateral branch 112 or into the lower portion of the main wellbore. The hydraulic control line segment 134 extends around the length compensation joint 108 and extends upwardly through the completion packer 106.

The tubing string above the completion packer 106 has the larger tubing 140 (e.g., production tubing or injection tubing). The term “tubing” is intended to refer to any conduit used to carry fluids. The tubing can be generally cylindrical in structure, or alternatively, can have other geometries. The lower end of the tubing 140 is attached to an isolation valve 142, such as a formation isolation valve implemented as a ball valve. In other implementations, other types of isolation valves can be used, such as flapper valves, sliding sleeve valves, and so forth.

The isolation valve 142 can be a mechanical isolation valve that is actuated by a mechanical shifting tool lowered through the inner bore 144 of the tubing 140 for engagement with an actuator mechanism of the isolation valve 142. Alternatively, the isolation valve 142 can be a surface-controlled isolation valve that is controlled by a control line 146 (e.g., an electrical cable, fiber optic cable, hydraulic control line, etc.). In some implementations, the isolation valve 142 can be actuated using both the mechanical shifting tool and the control line.

Instead of using a separate control line 146 to actuate the surface-controlled isolation valve 142, the isolation valve 142 can instead be actuated using a common control line that also controls another component.

When the isolation valve 142 is open, fluid can flow between the inner bore 144 of the tubing 140 and an inner bore 148 of the lower part of the tubing string below the isolation valve 142. On the other hand, when the isolation valve 142 is closed, the tubing inner bore 144 and the inner bore 148 are isolated from each other.

The tubing string of FIG. 1 also includes a surface-controlled safety valve 150. The safety valve 150 is normally open, except during an abnormal event, such an emergency, in which case the safety valve 150 is closed to isolate the portion of the well below the safety valve 150. In the example of FIG. 1, the safety valve 150 is connected to a control line 152 (e.g., electrical cable or hydraulic control line) to control the safety valve 150. The safety valve 150 and the isolation valve 142 together provide two independent mechanical barriers for well control during ESP work over operation.

The completion system depicted in FIG. 1 is an ESP-ready completion system that is able to receive an ESP inside the larger tubing 140. FIG. 2 shows that a toolstring 201 including an ESP 200 has been installed inside the larger tubing 140. The toolstring 201 including the ESP 200 is lowered into the inner bore 144 (FIG. 1) of the larger tubing 140. In the example of FIG. 2, the toolstring 201 that is lowered has a shifting tool 202 for engaging an actuating mechanism of the isolation valve 142. When the shifting tool 202 is lowered into the isolation valve 142, the shifting tool 202 engages the isolation valve 142 to open the isolation valve 142. On the other hand, if it is desired to remove the toolstring including the ESP 200 from the tubing string, then the shifting tool 202 engages the isolation valve 142 to close the isolation valve as the toolstring is removed from the tubing string.

A polished bore receptacle and seal assembly 204 is provided at the isolation valve 142 to allow for sealing engagement of the lower portion of the toolstring 201 in a part of the tubing string. The toolstring 201 also has a smaller tubing 206 (smaller than the larger tubing 140 of the tubing string) that is connected to the ESP 200. The smaller tubing 206 can be a coiled tubing or ajointed tubing. The smaller tubing 206 has an inner bore 208 through which fluid can flow when the ESP 200 is activated.

The ESP 200 is activated by an ESP cable 210 that is run along the length of the smaller tubing 206. The ESP cable 210 can be an electrical cable or a fiber optic cable. The cable 210 extends through a packer 212 that is arranged outside the smaller tubing 206. The packer 212 when set engages an inner wall of the larger tubing 140 to provide a seal between the smaller tubing 206 and the larger tubing 140.

With reference to FIGS. 1 and 2, in operation, the lower completion section 104 is first run into the well 100. After the lower completion section 104 has been run into the well, the tubing string is then run into the well, where the tubing string engages the lower completion section as depicted in FIG. 1. The engagement of the tubing string with the lower completion section includes an electrical wet connection and a hydraulic wet connection using the inductive coupler and hydraulic wet connect mechanism discussed above. After the tubing string has been installed, the toolstring 201 including the smaller tubing 206 and ESP 200 is run into the inner bore 144 of the larger tubing 140 for engagement inside the larger tubing 140.

At some later point in time, when it is desired to remove the ESP 200 to perform a workover operation, such as to repair or replace the ESP 200 or to perform some other workover operation with respect to a lower part of the completion system depicted in FIG. 2, the toolstring 201 can be removed from the tubing string. Note that the toolstring 201 including the ESP 200 can be removed without having to remove the tubing string. This is enabled by the presence of the isolation valve 142, which is actuated to a closed position when the toolstring 201 is removed from the tubing string. The closing of the isolation valve 142 can be accomplished using the shifting tool 202, or alternatively, by provision of a remote signal from the earth surface over the control line 146 to the isolation valve 142.

In some embodiments, the control line 146 can be filled with nitrogen or other gas to perform control of the isolation valve. Alternatively, the control line 146 can be filled with a hydraulic fluid. In yet another variation, the control line can be an electrical control line. In yet another embodiment two control lines may be used, one for opening and one for closing.

FIGS. 3A and 3B show alternative implementations of providing the ESP cable 210 to the ESP 200. In the FIGS. 3A-3B implementations, the ESP cable 210 is run through the inner bore of the smaller tubing 206, rather than outside the smaller tubing 206 as depicted in FIG. 2. As depicted in FIG. 3A, several sealing elements 302, 304, and 306 can be provided between the ESP cable 210 and the inner wall of the smaller tubing 206. The sealing elements 302, 304, and 306 can be swellable sealing elements formed of a swellable material, such as swellable rubber. The swellable rubber swells in the presence of a particular chemical, which can be provided inside the smaller tubing 206.

FIG. 3B shows a variation of the FIG. 3A implementation, with the FIG. 3B implementation having openings 308 in the smaller tubing 206 to allow wellbore fluids to enter respective chambers 310 defined by the swellable sealing elements 302, 304, and 306.

FIG. 4 shows an alternative embodiment of an ESP-ready completion system, which has similar components as the completion system of FIG. 1 except a surface-controlled subsurface safety valve 400 in FIG. 4 is a deep set subsurface safety valve 400 that is provided below the isolation valve 142. The subsurface safety valve 400 is controlled by a control line 402, and the isolation valve 142 (if it is a surface-controlled isolation valve) is controlled by the one or more control line 146. The remaining components of the completion system of FIG. 4 are similar to the components depicted in FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 illustrates installment of the toolstring 201 including the ESP 200 inside the tubing string of FIG. 4. The engagement between the toolstring 201 and the tubing string of FIG. 4 is similar to that depicted in FIG. 2.

FIG. 6 shows a further embodiment of an ESP-ready completion system. In the embodiment of FIG. 6, at least control line 608 (e.g., hydraulic control line) is used to control the isolation valve 142 and another component lower in the well. The lower part of the completion system in FIG. 6 (including the length compensation joint 108 and below) is similar to the lower part of the completion system depicted in FIG. 1. In FIG. 6, however, the completion system is divided into three segments: the lower completion section 104, an intermediate completion section 601, and a tubing string. The intermediate completion section 601 has a completion packer 600, a second inductive coupler 602, and a second hydraulic wet connect mechanism 604. The intermediate completion section 601 also has the isolation valve 142, the length compensation joint 108, and the pipe 122. The tubing string of FIG. 6 has a tubing 604 with an inner bore 606 to receive a removable ESP (not shown). The hydraulic control line 608 runs along the outside of the tubing 604, with the hydraulic control line extending through the packer 610 outside the tubing 604. The hydraulic control line 608 extends to the earth surface.

Also, the hydraulic control line 608 is provided to the hydraulic wet connect mechanism 604, which connects the hydraulic control line 608 to a hydraulic control line segment 612 below the hydraulic wet connect mechanism 604. The hydraulic control line segment 612 is hydraulically connected to the isolation valve 142 to control the isolation valve. Moreover, the hydraulic control line segment 612 extends through the length compensation joint 108 to the lower hydraulic wet connect mechanism 124 (which is the same as the hydraulic wet connect mechanism 124 of FIG. 1).

An electrical cable 614 also extends from the earth surface through the packer 610 to the inductive coupler 602. More specifically, the electrical cable 614 extends to a male inductive coupler portion 616 of the inductive coupler 602. A female inductive coupler portion 618 is provided adjacent the male inductive coupler portion 616 to allow coupling of electrical energy between the inductive coupler portions 616 and 618. The inductive coupler 602 is connected to an electrical cable segment 620, which extends through the length compensation joint 108 to the inductive coupler 124 (which is the same as the inductive coupler 124 of FIG. 1).

In the embodiment of FIG. 6, note that the tubing 604 at its lower end is connected to a shifting tool 622, where the shifting toot 622 can be used for actuating the isolation valve 142. Initially the tubing is run without the ESP pump. However, at a later time the tubing string is pulled out of the hole and re-run back in the hole with the ESP pump as shown in FIG. 7 for increasing production.

FIG. 8 shows another embodiment of an ESP-ready completion system, which is divided into three sections: lower completion section 104A, intermediate section 703, and a tubing string. The lower completion section 104A includes a lateral branch liner 700 that extends from the main wellbore to the lateral branch 112. The lateral branch liner 700 extends into the main wellbore to an isolation packer 705. Also provided on the lateral branch liner 700 are an inductive coupler portion 716 (which is part of an inductive coupler 714) and a portion of the hydraulic wet connect mechanism 736. The inductive coupler portion 716, which can be a female inductive coupler portion, is connected to an electrical cable segment 707 that extends into the lateral branch 112. The hydraulic wet connect mechanism 736 is connected to a hydraulic control line 738 that extends to the lateral branch 112.

The intermediate completion section 703 includes a lower pipe 709, and a packer 711 that engages the lateral branch liner 700. The intermediate completion section 703 also has a support structure 713 to which is mounted the isolation valve 142 and a female inductive coupler portion 706 of an inductive coupler 704. The isolation valve 142 is electrically connected to the inductive coupler 704, which further includes a male inductive coupler portion 708 to communicate with the female inductive coupler portion 706.

The inductive coupler 704 is electrically connected by another electrical cable segment 710 to the inductive coupler 714 that includes the female inductive coupler portion 716 and male inductive coupler portion 718.

The male inductive coupler portion 718 of the inductive coupler 714 is electrically connected to an electrical cable segment 722 that extends to a control station 724. The control station 724 includes processing elements, such as a processor (or processors), and other components, to allow for control of various electrical components in the completion system of FIG. 8. The control station 724 can optionally also include sensors, such as temperature and/or pressure sensors.

The control station 724 in turn is connected to an electrical cable 726 that extends through a packer 728 to the earth surface. The packer 728 is arranged on the outside surface of a tubing 730 (part of the tubing string) which extends into a part of the lower completion section. The tubing 730 has a shifting tool 732 at its lower end for actuating the isolation valve 142 mechanically.

FIG. 8 also shows a hydraulic control line 734 (which can extend from the earth surface) that is connected to a hydraulic wet connect mechanism 736 to allow for hydraulic communication between the hydraulic control line 734 and a hydraulic control line segment 738 that extends to the lateral branch 112 or to a lower portion of the main wellbore.

The tubing 730 has an inner bore 740 for receiving an ESP, according to some embodiments. The ESP that is engaged inside the inner bore 740 of the tubing 730 has an ESP cable attached to it, where the ESP cable can be run inside the inner bore 740 of the tubing 730.

FIG. 9 shows a variation of the completion system of FIG. 8. In the implementation of FIG. 9, an ESP 742 is installed in the tubing 730. The ESP 742 is electrically connected through a cable segment 744 (which extends through the wall of the tubing 730) to an electrical cable 746. The electrical cable 746 extends to the earth surface. The implementation of the ESP 742 and its electrical connection to an electrical cable is similar to the configuration of FIG. 7.

FIG. 10 shows another embodiment of a completion system in which an ESP 800 is provided. The ESP 800 is provided as part of a smaller tubing 802 that is provided inside a larger tubing 804. A packer 806 isolates the annulus region between the smaller tubing 802 and larger tubing 804. The smaller tubing 802 can be a coiled tubing or jointed tubing.

A lower part of the smaller tubing 802 has a shifting tool 808 for actuating the isolation valve 142 that is attached to the larger tubing 804. The smaller tubing 802, ESP 800, and shifting tool 808 can be considered a toolstring that is engageable inside a tubing string that includes the larger tubing 804 and other components.

The tubing string depicted in FIG. 10 also has attached to it the isolation valve 142 and flow control valves 810 and 812 to control flow in different zones. In the example of FIG. 10, the two zones for which the flow control valves 810 and 812 are provided include respective lateral branches 814 and 816. Thus, the flow control valve 810 controls flow between the inner bore 818 of the tubing string and the lateral branch 814, while the flow control valve 812 controls flow between the inner bore 818 of the tubing string and the lateral branch 816.

The flow control valves 810 and 812 are controlled by a one or more control lines 820, which can be a hydraulic control line. The control line 820 extends through a packer 822 (provided between the tubing string and the casing 102) to the earth surface. Note that the control line 820 may also be used to control the isolation valve 142 or a separate control line is run to control isolation valve.

The hydraulic control line 820 also extends through another packer 824 between the tubing string and the casing 102 to couple to the flow control valve 812. Alternately separate control line(s) may be run for controlling each flow control valve 810 and 812. Moreover, the hydraulic control line 820 extends to a hydraulic wet connect mechanism 826 to allow for hydraulic pressure in the control line 820 to be communicated to flow control valves in the segmented main or mother bore of the well 828 below the hydraulic wet connect mechanism 826.

Note that the hydraulic control line segment 828 can be used to control another flow control valve 830 that is provided in a lower completion section positioned in the lower portion of the main wellbore.

FIG. 10 also shows an electrical cable 832 that extends from the earth surface through the packer 822 to a sensor 834 provided on the tubing string. Measurements collected by the sensor 834 can be communicated over the electrical cable 832 to the earth surface. Examples of the sensor 834 include a temperature sensor, pressure sensor, fluid sensor, flow rate sensor, and so forth.

The electrical cable 832 further extends through the packer 824 to another sensor 836. The sensor 834 is provided to monitor parameters in the zone associated with lateral branch 814, and the sensor 836 is provided to monitor parameters in the zone associated with the lateral branch 816.

The electrical cable 832 continues through another packer 825 to an inductive coupler 838 (which has a male inductive coupler portion 840 and female inductive coupler portion 842). The electrical cable 832 is electrically connected to the male inductive coupler portion 840 which is inductively coupled to the female inductive coupler portion 842 to allow for communication of electrical energy to electrical cable segment 844 (which can be connected to an electrical device in the lower portion of the main wellbore, such as a sensor).

While the invention has been disclosed with respect to a limited number of embodiments, those skilled in the art, having the benefit of this disclosure, will appreciate numerous modifications and variations therefrom. It is intended that the appended claims cover such modifications and variations as fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.