Title:
Floor joist hanger
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A floor joist hanger for use with poured concrete walls that allows floor joists to be easily suspended from wall to wall to thereby support a floor, ceiling, or roof of a structure. The floor joist hanger has two parallel and opposing side members that are inserted into vertical slits that have been cut into an insulated form. The floor joist hanger is provided with at least one elongated slit for receiving a strap for securing a floor joist to the floor joist hanger. The floor joist hanger is further provided with a cross-support member extending between the side members. The cross-support member has an upper surface for engaging a bottom surface of a floor joist. The floor joist hanger is anchored to the wall by concrete poured into the insulated form and allowed to cure.



Inventors:
Mccollough, Daniel D. (West Jordan, UT, US)
Application Number:
11/711393
Publication Date:
08/28/2008
Filing Date:
02/27/2007
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04B1/38
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
TRIGGS, ANDREW J
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Clayton Howarth P.C. (SANDY, UT, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. An apparatus for hanging floor joists from a concrete wall constructed using an insulated concrete form, said apparatus comprising: two side members, each of the side members having a rear portion that is configured and dimensioned to be inserted into the insulated concrete form; a cross-support member extending between the side members, the cross-support member having a top surface for engaging a bottom surface of a floor joist; and an elongated slit formed in each of the side members; wherein said elongated slit is configured and adapted to receive a strap.

2. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising a strap adapted to be received into said elongated slits on each of the side members.

3. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein the strap comprises apertures for receiving fasteners.

3. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising a rebar engagement member.



4. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein each of the side members has a substantially rectangular shape.

5. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein at least one of the rear portions of the side members includes at least one aperture for allowing concrete to flow between the side members.

6. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein at least one of the rear portions of the side members includes at least two apertures for allowing concrete to flow between the side members.

7. The apparatus of claim 6, wherein the apertures a circular.

8. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising an aperture for securing a strap to each of the side members with a bolt and nut.

9. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein at least one of the side members comprises a holder for accepting a support for the poured wall.

10. An apparatus for hanging floor joists from a poured wall, said apparatus comprising: two side members, each of the side members having a substantially rectangular shape and being substantially planar; a cross-support member extending between the side members, the cross-support member having a top surface for engaging a floor joist; an elongated slit formed in each of the side members; a joist-holding strap adapted to be received into said elongated slits on each of the side members; and at least two apertures for securing the side members in the poured wall; wherein at least one of the side members comprises a rebar engagement member.

11. The apparatus of claim 10, further comprising at least one aperture formed in a side wall, said aperture being configured and dimensioned for receiving a fastener for secured a strap to one of the sidewalls.

12. A method of securing a floor joist to a poured concrete wall constructed with an insulated concrete form, said method comprising the steps of: inserting a floor joist hanger into the insulated concrete form, said floor joist hanger having two sidewalls and a cross-support member extending between the two sidewalls; inserting a floor joist between the two sidewalls and onto the cross-support member; and using a strap to secure the floor joist to the floor joist hanger.

13. The method of claim 12, further comprising the step of attaching the strap to the floor joist hanger by inserting the strap into a slit in the floor joist hanger.

14. The method of claim 12, further comprising the step of attaching to the strap to the floor joist hanger using a fastener.

15. The method of claim 14, wherein the fastener comprises a bolt.

16. The method of claim 14, further comprising the step of drilling a hole in the floor joist.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

Not Applicable.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not Applicable.

BACKGROUND

1. The Field of the Invention.

The present disclosure relates generally to devices for hanging floor joists from walls and beams and more particularly, but not necessarily entirely, to floor joist hangers for use with concrete walls constructed using single and double insulated concrete forms.

2. Description of Related Art

Various types of insulated concrete forms (“ICFs”) have been used for over 30 years to build concrete walls for structures. One type of ICF comprises a plurality of stacked foam blocks. Each of the foam blocks includes a pair of spaced apart foam walls separated by spacers made of plastic or other materials. The foam blocks are then stacked to form a wall. Once stacked, concrete is then poured into the space between the foam walls. When the concrete cures, the foam walls are left in place on either side of a concrete core.

ICFs have several advantages over traditional frame built structures. Structures built using ICFs are far less drafty than frame built structures. In addition, structures built using ICFs have far fewer cold spots, and maintain a noticeably more even temperature. Another advantage to structures built using ICFs is that they are quieter than frame built structures. Further, structures built using ICFs flex less than frame built structures and dampen vibrations. The biggest benefit to structures built using ICFs is the energy savings. Structures built using ICFs cut an estimated 30-40% off the energy used to heat and cool when compared to similarly sized frame built structures due to the high R-value of ICFs.

One drawback to the use of ICFs has been their use in multilevel structures. In particular, multilevel structures may require the use of floor joist hangers attached to ledger boards to hang floor joists for upper levels and ceilings. (A floor joist hanger is a device that allows a floor joist to be suspended between two walls.) Floor joists are parallel framing members installed horizontally to support a floor and/or ceiling loads. Conventional floor joist hangers are designed to be secured with fasteners to a wood wall. This is not generally possible with ICFs, since ICFs are made from foam and filled with concrete and do not readily accept fasteners capable of supporting the load of floor joists. Thus, conventional floor joist hangers typically cannot be secured to concrete walls constructed using ICFs. The most common method of attaching conventional floor joist hangers was to install a ledger board to the wall and then attach the hangers to the ledger board.

Some attempts have been made to develop floor joist hangers for use with ICFs. One such attempt is found in U.S. Pat. No. 7,024,833.

The features and advantages of the disclosure will be set forth in the description which follows, and in part will be apparent from the description, or may be learned by the practice of the disclosure without undue experimentation. The features and advantages of the disclosure may be realized and obtained by means of the instruments and combinations particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The features and advantages of the disclosure will become apparent from a consideration of the subsequent detailed description presented in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an exemplary floor joist hanger according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is top view of the exemplary floor joist hanger illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a partially exploded perspective view of the exemplary floor joist hanger illustrated in FIG. 1 shown mounted in an ICF;

FIG. 4 is an unexploded side view of the illustration of FIG. 3; and

FIG. 5 is another unexploded side view of the illustration of FIG. 3.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

For the purposes of promoting an understanding of the principles in accordance with the disclosure, reference will now be made to the embodiments illustrated in the drawings and specific language will be used to describe the same. It will nevertheless be understood that no limitation of the scope of the disclosure is thereby intended. Any alterations and further modifications of the inventive features illustrated herein, and any additional applications of the principles of the disclosure as illustrated herein, which would normally occur to one skilled in the relevant art and having possession of this disclosure, are to be considered within the scope of the disclosure claimed.

It must be noted that, as used in this specification and the appended claims, the singular forms “a,” “an,” and “the” include plural referents unless the context clearly dictates otherwise. In describing and claiming the present disclosure, the following terminology will be used in accordance with the definitions set out below. As used herein, the terms “comprising,” “including,” “containing,” “characterized by,” and grammatical equivalents thereof are inclusive or open-ended terms that do not exclude additional, unrecited elements or method steps.

Applicant has discovered a floor joist hanger for use in walls constructed using ICFs. Referring now to FIG. 1, there is shown a perspective view of a floor joist hanger 10 pursuant to the present invention. The hanger 10 comprises two opposing sidewalls 12 and 14. The sidewalls 12 and 14 are substantially parallel and define a space between them for receiving a floor joist. Each of the sidewalls 12 and 14 is substantially planar and has a relatively thin construction. The sidewall 12 comprises a top edge 16, a rear edge 18, a bottom edge 20, and a front edge 22. Likewise, the sidewall 14 comprises a top edge 24, a rear edge 26, a bottom edge 28, and a front edge 30.

Extending between the bottom edge 20 of sidewall 12 and the bottom edge 28 of sidewall 14 is a cross-support member 32. A front edge 34 of the cross-support member 32 is co-planar with the front edges 22 and 30 of the sidewalls 12 and 14, respectively. The cross-support member 32 comprises a top surface 36 for engaging a bottom surface of a floor joist.

Each of the sidewalls 12 and 14 comprises a set of small apertures 38 for receiving a fastener, such as nail. The apertures 38 are vertically staggered along the front edges 22 and 30 of the sidewalls 12 and 14, respectively. Each of the sidewalls 12 and 14 comprises a single larger aperture 40. The apertures 40 are configured to receive a larger fastener such as a bolt. The apertures 40 are located near the front edges 22 and 30 of the sidewalls 12 and 14, respectively.

Each of the sidewalls 12 and 14 comprises an elongated slit 42 (only one visible in FIG. 1). The elongated slits 42 are vertically oriented. The slits 42 are positioned the same distance from the front edges 22 and 30 as a rear edge 50 of the cross-support member 32. The elongated slits 42 are configured and dimensioned for receiving a strap, such as a nailing strap. The elongated slits 42 are disposed in a front portion of the sidewalls 12 and 14.

Located in a rear portion of each of the sidewalls 12 and 14 are apertures 44. The apertures 44 allow a poured material, such as concrete, to evenly flow between the sidewalls 12 and 14. Further, when the poured material, e.g., concrete, cures, the apertures 44 secure the hanger 10 in the poured material.

The top edges 16 and 24 of the sidewalls 12 and 14 each comprises recesses 46. The recesses 46 are disposed in the rear portion of the top edges 16 and 24. The recesses 46 are each configured and dimensioned for engaging a support structure, such as rebar.

Referring now to FIG. 2, where the same reference numerals indicate the same components, there is shown a top view of the floor joist hanger 10 illustrated in FIG. 1. It will be noted that other than the cross-support member 32, there is no connection between the sidewalls 12 and 14. The sidewalls 12 and 14 are separated by a distance indicated by the double arrows marked with the reference numeral 48. The distance 48 is just wide enough to accommodate the width of a floor joist. The distance 48 can thus be varied to allow the floor joist hanger 10 to receive different sizes of floor joists as needed.

The cross-support member 32 comprises a rear edge 50 and an aperture 52 for receiving a fastener. The distance of the rear edge 50 from the front edge 34 of the cross-support member 32 may be approximately one to four inches, or alternatively about one third the overall length of the hanger 10. It will be appreciated, however, that there is no restriction on this distance.

Referring now to FIG. 3, there is illustrated a partially exploded view of the floor joist hanger 10, an ICF 54, and a floor joist 56. The ICF 54 comprises a front wall 58 and a rear wall 60. The front wall 58 and the rear wall 60 are formed from an insulating material, such as foam. The front wall 58 and the rear wall 60 define a space between each other. The framework 68 holds the front wall 58 and the rear wall 60 in place with respect to each other. A support 66, such as rebar, may be placed in the space between the front wall 58 and the rear wall 60 to strengthen the poured material when it cures. The support 66 may be placed in the recesses 46 to hold the support 66 in place. A poured material, such as concrete, is poured into this space at the appropriate time.

The front wall 58 comprises a front surface 62 having a pair of vertical slits 64 extending completely through the front wall 58. The vertical slits 64 are adapted to receive the rear portion of the sidewalls 12 and 14 of the floor joist hanger 10. The vertical slits 64 may be cut into the front wall 58 by hand or an electric tool. The hanger 10 is inserted by hand or other means into the slits 64 until the rear edge 50 of the cross-support member 32 abuts against the front surface 62 of the front wall 58.

A nailing strap 70 is insertable into the elongated slits 42 in the sidewalls 12 and 14. The nailing strap 70 may include apertures 72. The apertures 72 receive fasteners, such as nails, that are driven into the floor joist 56 as will be described in more detail hereinafter.

A fastener, such a bolt 74 and a nut 76, may be used to attach a strap 78 to the hanger 10. The bolt 74 is inserted into the apertures 40 on the sidewalls 12 and 14. The strap 78 may include apertures 80 and 82. Apertures 80 are large enough to receive bolt 74, while apertures 82 may be used to received fasteners, such as nails.

Referring now to FIG. 4, there is illustrated a side view of the hanger 10 inserted into the ICF 54. Once the concrete has been poured and cured, the floor joist 56 is inserted into the hanger 10 between the sidewalls 12 and 14. The ends of the strap 70 are positioned to lie against the floor joist 56. Fasteners, not shown, such as nails, are inserted into apertures 72 in the strap 70 and are driven into the floor joist 56 either by handheld tool or using an electric tool.

In addition, fasteners may be inserted into apertures 38 and driven into the floor joist 56. It will be noted that the floor joist 56 abuts against the front wall 58 of the ICF 54. It will further be noted that the floor joist 56 is generally not inserted into the hanger 10, until after concrete as been poured into the space between the front wall 58 and the rear wall 60 of the ICF 54. It should also be noted that if the floor joist is of an engineered wood I-beam type, such as BCI or TJI, then along with the installation of the floor joist, a filler board may need to be installed on either side of the web as a web stiffener to provide the proper density for the fastener to be installed in the straps 70 and 78. The stiffener is not required if standard lumber is used for the floor joists, such as a 2×10.

The rebar support 66 is placed into the recess 46 on the hanger 10. The recess 46 holds the support 66 in place while the concrete is being poured into the ICF 54. The embodiment in FIG. 4 may accommodate up to two rebar supports 66 using recesses 46. It will be appreciated that the present invention may accommodate several more supports 66.

It will be further appreciated that the apertures 44 allow concrete poured into the ICF 54 to flow freely around the joist hanger 10. Further, when the concrete cures, the apertures 44 further secure the hanger in the ICF 54.

Referring now to FIG. 5, where the same reference numerals indicate the same components, there is illustrated a side view of the hanger 10 inserted into the ICF 54. The floor joist 56 is inserted into the hanger 10. In lieu of the strap 70, the strap 78 is used to hold the floor joist 56 in place. In particular, the bolt 74 is inserted into one of the apertures 80 in the strap 78. The bolt 74 is then inserted through both apertures 40 in the sidewalls 12 and 14. This may require that a hole of adequate size be drilled into the floor joist 56 at the appropriate location. The nut 76 is then used to secure the bolt 74 in place. Fasteners, such as nails, may then be inserted into apertures 38 and 82 and driven into the floor joist 56 to thereby further secure the floor joist 56 to the hanger 10.

One method for installing floor joist hangers according to the present disclosure comprises the steps of (a) establishing a level line at which the floor joist hangers will be installed; (b) installing a temporary 2×4 ledger board onto the ICFs such that the top surface of the 2×4 is even with the level line; (c) cutting vertical slits from the top surface of the 2×4 to the height of the floor joist hangers; (d) installing the floor joist hangers into the slits in the ICFs such that the bottom of the floor joist hanger sits on the top surface of the 2×4 ledger board; (e) installing screws through apertures, such as aperture 52, in the cross-support members of the floor joist hangers 52 and into the 2×4 ledger board; (f) pouring concrete into the ICFs and allowing it to cure; (g) removing the ledger board; and (h) installing the floor joists into the floor joist hangers. In the above described manner the floor joist hangers will maintain proper alignment while the concrete is being poured into the ICFs and while any concrete vibrator is being used to settle the concrete.

It will be appreciated that the structure and apparatus disclosed herein is merely one example of a means for hanging a floor joist from a concrete wall, and it should be appreciated that any structure, apparatus or system for hanging a floor joist from a concrete wall which performs functions the same as, or equivalent to, those disclosed herein are intended to fall within the scope of a means for hanging a floor joist from a concrete wall, including those structures, apparatus or systems for hanging a floor joist from a concrete wall which are presently known, or which may become available in the future. Anything which functions the same as, or equivalently to, a means for hanging a floor joist from a concrete wall falls within the scope of this element.

Those having ordinary skill in the relevant art will appreciate the advantages provide by the features of the present disclosure. For example, it is a feature of the present disclosure to provide a floor joist hanger improving the securement of a floor joist to a concrete wall structure.

In the foregoing Detailed Description, various features of the present disclosure are grouped together in a single embodiment for the purpose of streamlining the disclosure. This method of disclosure is not to be interpreted as reflecting an intention that the claimed disclosure requires more features than are expressly recited in each claim. Rather, as the following claims reflect, inventive aspects lie in less than all features of a single foregoing disclosed embodiment. Thus, the following claims are hereby incorporated into this Detailed Description of the Disclosure by this reference, with each claim standing on its own as a separate embodiment of the present disclosure.

It is to be understood that the above-described arrangements are only illustrative of the application of the principles of the present disclosure. Numerous modifications and alternative arrangements may be devised by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the present disclosure and the appended claims are intended to cover such modifications and arrangements. Thus, while the present disclosure has been shown in the drawings and described above with particularity and detail, it will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art that numerous modifications, including, but not limited to, variations in size, materials, shape, form, function and manner of operation, assembly and use may be made without departing from the principles and concepts set forth herein.





 
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