Title:
RETAINING ASSEMBLY FOR A GLIDING BOARD
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An assembly for retaining a boot on a gliding board, which includes a non-releasable front retaining element and a non-releasable rear retaining element, as well as a mechanism for measuring the forces to which the boot is subjected when it is fixed on the retaining assembly. At least one of the front and rear retaining elements is fixed on a plate actuated with a translational movement, the translational movement being controlled as a function of the values provided by the measuring mechanism. The retaining assembly also includes a release device that includes the measuring mechanism as well as a mechanism for actuating the plate in its translational movement. The measuring mechanism include a front sensor and a rear sensor. The non-releasable front retaining element includes a sole clamp, and the non-releasable rear retaining element includes a step-in heel piece to ensure automatic fitting of the boot.



Inventors:
Merino, Jean-francois (Epagny, FR)
Application Number:
12/032176
Publication Date:
08/21/2008
Filing Date:
02/15/2008
Assignee:
SALOMON S.A. (Metz-Tessy, FR)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63C9/02; A63C9/08
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20080284145Temperature-Compensated Airbag InflatorNovember, 2008Breed
20070251756Automotive Steering SystemNovember, 2007Butschi et al.
20050121867Motorcycle standJune, 2005Brien
20070118260Frequency-weighted vehicle suspension controlMay, 2007Gade
20070144845Wheel suspension for vehicleJune, 2007Saito
20080197606Trailer hitch for automatically allowing a trailer to tilt for facilitating driving a vehicle on and off the trailerAugust, 2008Capuano
20090309344RESTRAINT SYSTEMS FOR USE IN VEHICLES AND METHODS OF RESTRAINTDecember, 2009Van Roosmalen et al.
20090033052Reversible walker assemblyFebruary, 2009Bradshaw et al.
20080197594PIVOTING HANDLEBAR ASSEMBLY CONNECTORAugust, 2008Ling
20020185835SkateboardDecember, 2002Wen
20050236791Steering power assist for 2 or 3 wheel motorcyclesOctober, 2005Carr



Primary Examiner:
WALTERS, JOHN DANIEL
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
GREENBLUM & BERNSTEIN, P.L.C. (RESTON, VA, US)
Claims:
1. An assembly for retaining a boot on a gliding board, said assembly comprising: a non-releasable front retaining element adapted to engage a front of the boot; a non-releasable rear retaining element adapted to engage a rear of the boot; a mechanism for measuring forces to which the boot is subjected when the boot is retained by the retaining assembly; a plate mounted for translational movement, at least one of said front and rear retaining elements being fixed on said plate; said translational movement being controlled as a function of values provided by said measuring mechanism.

2. A retaining assembly according to claim 1, further comprising: a release device that includes said measuring mechanism as well as a mechanism for actuating said plate in said translational movement.

3. A retaining assembly according to claim 2, wherein: said measuring mechanism includes a front sensor and a rear sensor.

4. A retaining assembly according to claim 2, further comprising: a rod having a first end connected to said plate; said actuating mechanism includes an actuating box, said actuating box, in a closed position, retains a second end of said rod and, in an open position, frees said rod to perform a release of the boot.

5. A retaining assembly according to claim 4, wherein: said actuating box includes an electric motor.

6. A retaining assembly according to claim 1, wherein: said non-releasable front retaining element and said non-releasable rear retaining element are constituted by stirrups.

7. A retaining assembly according to claim 1, wherein: said non-releasable front retaining element includes a sole clamp.

8. A retaining assembly according to claim 1, wherein: said non-releasable rear retaining element includes a step-in heel piece to ensure automatic fitting of the boot.

9. A retaining assembly according to claim 7, wherein: said front retaining element comprises vertical pivoting mechanism and an elastic return mechanism to ensure said front retaining element has a certain elastically biased play.

10. An assembly for retaining a boot on a gliding board, said assembly comprising: a non-automatically releasable front retaining element adapted to engage a front of the boot in a closed position and to disengage the front of the boot in an open position; a non-automatically releasable rear retaining element adapted to engage a rear of the boot in a closed position and to disengage the rear of the boot in a closed position; a plate mounted for translational movement, at least one of said front and rear retaining elements being supported on said plate, said translational movement being in a direction spacing apart said front and rear retaining elements and being permitted while said one of said front and rear retaining elements is in said closed position.

11. A retaining assembly according to claim 10, further comprising: a mechanism for measuring forces to which the boot is subjected when the boot is retained by the retaining assembly; a control box for receiving information from said mechanism for measuring forces; an actuating box for allowing said translational movement of said plate in said direction for spacing apart said front an rear retaining elements while the boot is retained by the retaining assembly only upon receiving predetermined information from said control box.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §119 of French Patent Application No. 07 01162, filed on Feb. 19, 2007, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference thereto in its entirety.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The invention relates to an assembly for retaining a boot on a gliding board, such as a safety binding for a ski boot.

2. Description of Background and Other Information

A retaining assembly of the above-mentioned type is disclosed in the document FR 2 775 613, which includes front and rear retaining elements, neither of which is automatically releasable. Such a device provides optimal safety for small-sized gliding boards. For larger boards as well, there has been a desire to have a retaining device which has automatic safety release means that release the boot as a function of the forces to which the latter is subjected.

For larger boards, the document CH 666624 discloses a non-releasable front retaining element and a non-releasable rear retaining element, of the step-in type, on a plate that is “releasably” mounted on the gliding board. The safety release means are constituted by a “heel element” (Fersenelement) containing a spring. The plate is released during a skiing phase, when the forces to which the plate is subjected generate a sufficient contraction of the spring. Such a device is not entirely satisfactory as the plate remains affixed to the boot when the safety release occurs, and the user, after the safety release, must remove the boot from the front and rear retaining elements. The use of such a device proves complicated and not intuitive. Furthermore, such device does not provide adequate safety. Indeed, because the release occurs against the force of a single spring positioned along an axis that is parallel to the ski, the device cannot adequately react to the forces that are exerted along all directions. Moreover, it is difficult to adapt or modify the release threshold in a device of this type. Generally, there is a possibility of adjusting the pre-stressed state of the spring in order to vary the single release threshold. However, it is impossible to vary a plurality of release thresholds, independently of the other release thresholds, for example in the case in which the lateral release threshold is lower than the vertical release threshold. Finally, such a retaining device only allows the release threshold to be made dependent upon the instantaneous forces to which the boot is subjected. In any event, a release which would be dependent upon the time or duration of the application of such forces is not possible.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides an assembly for retaining a boot on a gliding device, the functioning of which is improved with respect to the prior art devices. In particular, the invention provides a device for safely retaining a boot on a gliding board, which enables simple and intuitive behavior.

In addition, the invention provides an assembly for retaining a boot on a gliding board, which enables safe behavior as it is capable of reacting adequately to the forces, irrespective of the direction in which such forces are exerted.

Further, the invention provides a retaining assembly that enables the principle defining the release threshold to be highly adaptable as a function of the duration of the application of the forces.

In a more particular embodiment, the invention includes an assembly for retaining a boot on a gliding board, which includes a non-releasable front retaining element and a non-releasable rear retaining element, as well as a mechanism for measuring the forces to which the boot is subjected when it is fixed on the retaining assembly, whereby at least one of the front and rear retaining elements is fixed to a plate actuated with a translational movement, and whereby such translational movement is controlled as a function of the values provided by the measuring mechanism. It could also be said that the translational movement of the small plate is released as a function of the values provided by the measuring mechanism. Such release occurs due to an actuating mechanism.

In a particular embodiment, the retaining assembly of the invention includes a release device which includes the measuring mechanism as well as a mechanism for actuating the plate in its translational movement.

The release device of the retaining assembly according to the invention uses a measuring mechanism, such as in the form of strain gages, that make it possible to measure precisely the forces that are transmitted between the boot and the gliding board in all directions. The measured values are processed by an electronic control circuit which takes into account the duration of the application of the forces when making a decision to release. Moreover, the release principle can be adapted and updated depending upon the users or the advanced knowledge of skiing accident injuries.

In a particular embodiment, the measuring mechanism includes a front sensor and a rear sensor.

In a particular embodiment, the retaining assembly according to the invention includes a rod, a first end of which is connected to the plate, and the actuating mechanism includes an actuating box which, when closed, retains a second end of the rod and which, when open, releases the rod to carry out the release.

In a particular embodiment, the actuating box includes an electric motor.

In a particular embodiment, the non-releasable front retaining element and the non-releasable rear retaining element comprise stirrups.

In another embodiment of the invention, the non-releasable front retaining element includes a sole clamp, and the non-releasable rear retaining element includes a step-in ski binding heel piece.

According to a particular embodiment of the boot-retaining assembly according to the invention, the front retaining element includes vertical pivoting mechanism and an elastic return mechanism to ensure that the front retaining element has a certain energized play, or freedom of movement. This energized play improves comfort for the user, “skiability” and performance of the gliding board equipped with the retaining assembly of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

The invention will be better understood from the description that follows, with reference to the attached drawings, in which:

    • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a first embodiment of the invention;
    • FIGS. 2, 3, and 4 are side views of a second embodiment of the invention;
    • FIG. 2a is a partial top view of the embodiment of FIG. 2;
    • FIG. 5 is a side view, similar to FIG. 2, of a third embodiment of the invention.
    • FIG. 5a is a partial top view of the embodiment of FIG. 5;
    • FIG. 6 is a perspective, partial cross-sectional view of the release device according to an embodiment of the invention, when it is in the “closed” position;
    • FIG. 7 is a view, similar to FIG. 6, when the supplemental release device is in the “open” position;
    • FIG. 8 is a perspective, partial cross-sectional view of the supplemental release device according to another embodiment of the invention, when it is in the “closed” position;
    • FIG. 9 is a view, similar to FIG. 8, when the supplemental release device is in the “open” position.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

FIG. 1 shows a gliding apparatus including a gliding board 1 which, in this case, is a ski, an intermediate portion being illustrated, as well as a non-releasable front retaining element 2, a non-releasable rear retaining element 3, and a release device 4.

The front retaining element 2 includes a front stirrup 33, which is made of a steel wire or rod bent at various points to define various sections. These sections include the retaining section 35 that is adapted to come in contact with the boot front end piece, as well as the pivoting sections 36 that are housed in corresponding openings of the front base 37 of the front retaining element 2, so that the front stirrup 33 can rotate around the pivoting sections 36.

The rear retaining element 3 includes a rear stirrup 34, which is also made of a steel wire or rod bent at various points to define various sections. These sections include the actuation section 38, on which a lever 39 is pivotally mounted, as well as the pivoting sections 36 that are housed in corresponding openings of the rear base 40 of the rear retaining element 3.

The lever 39 includes a lower portion called the heel 41, which gets wedged against the rear end piece 62 of the boot 20, and an actuation handle 42.

When the boot is being fixed in the retaining assembly, the user positions his booted foot on the front and rear retaining elements, while slipping the front of the boot beneath the front stirrup 35. Next, grabbing the lever 39 by hand, he positions the heel 41 of the lever 39 on the rear end piece of the boot and pivots the lever 39 against the boot upper. The front retaining element 2 and rear retaining element 3 are referred to as non-releasable because, in order to separate the boot from the retaining elements, it is necessary to maneuver the lever once again in the opposite direction and, regardless of the forces to which the retaining elements are subjected, there is no release, i.e., no automatic opening of the retaining elements.

The rear retaining element 3 is fixed on a plate 43 that can slide in a guide rail 7.

The front retaining element 2 is fixed on a front interface element 5 that is fixed on the ski 1.

The rear retaining element 3 includes a guide rail 7, in which the body of the rear retaining element 3 can slide.

The release device 4 includes an actuating box 8, a control box 9, as well as a front sensor 11 and rear sensor 12 positioned in the front interface element 5 and rear interface element 6, respectively.

The control box 9 includes an electronic circuit and a man/machine interface device with a display.

The actuating box 8 is connected to the body of the rear retaining element by an elongated element 10, such as a bar or a rod, that is capable of being displaced longitudinally while driving the plate 43, which slides in the guide rail 7.

The front 11 and rear 12 sensors constantly measure the forces to which they are subjected, and transmit these values to the control box 9. The processing of these values, as a function of a release principle, results in the electronic circuit of the control box 9 generating a command for actuating the rod 10, which moves the plate 43, and therefore the rear retaining element 3, away from the front retaining element 2, thus releasing the boot.

The forces measured by the front 11 and rear 12 sensors are representative of the forces to which the user's leg and foot are subjected. A simple release principle may be limited to reproducing the functioning of a conventional mechanical safety binding, i.e., a safety binding in which the release is made against the force of a spring. In such a release principle, the command to actuate the rod is issued when the forces measured by the front sensor 11 or rear sensor 12 exceed a particular threshold. The invention is not limited to such a release principle, and any other release principle is applicable within the scope of this invention. For example, release principles in which the duration of the application of the forces or the knee flexion angles are taken into account, are also within the scope of the invention. See, for example, the commonly owned document US 2007/0090626, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference thereto in its entirety.

The presence of one sensor at the front and of another at the rear is not a limiting characteristic of the invention. Indeed, it is also possible to have only one sensor.

FIG. 2 shows a side view of another embodiment of the invention. The front retaining element 2 includes a sole clamp 44 that is fixed on a front base 37. The sole clamp 44 includes a projecting portion adapted to take support on the front end piece 61 of the ski boot 20. The front retaining element 2 also includes a support plate 45 that can slide transversely. The sole clamp 44 is fixed on the front base 37 such that it has a certain lateral and vertical play. This double play, or dual freedom of movement, is elastically biased by the use of a spring or a silent-bloc, i.e., a piece made of rubber or of an equivalent material.

FIG. 2a shows a partial top view of a sole-clamp 44, which is fixed on the front base 37 by means of a binding screw 63. The sole-clamp can pivot along the axis of the binding screw, around a central position. This pivoting movement is angularly limited. Along the pivoting movement, the sole-clamp 44 compresses the elastomeric block 64 that is located in a housing provided in the sole-clamp and in contact with the binding screw.

The lateral elasticity serves to absorb impacts laterally and improves comfort of use and skiability by providing a better tolerance of the retaining assembly.

The vertical elasticity serves to enable the front retaining element 2 to adapt to boots whose front end pieces have different heights, as well as to compensate for the occurrence of a possible wedge of snow between the support plate and the bottom of the sole.

Means for adjusting the elasticity in order to improve the performance on snow can be provided.

The rear retaining element 3 includes a step-in heel piece 46. The heel piece 46 is fixed on a plate 43 by means of a straddling element 47, which is itself fixed onto the sides of the plate 43 by screws. Elongated openings 48 are provided in the base 49 of the heel piece 46 so as to enable the device to adapt to various boot lengths.

FIG. 4 shows a longitudinal cross section of the heel piece 46 in the closed position. It includes a lever 39 pivotally mounted on the base 49, about a first axis 50, and a jaw 53 pivotally mounted on the base 49, about a second axis 51. A pedal 52 is pivotally mounted on the jaw 53, about a third axis 54, but only has a very small angle of rotation with respect thereto. Two identical torsional springs 55 are arranged between the pedal 52 and the lever 39, and are symmetrically positioned with respect to the longitudinal axis of the ski. One of these springs 55 is visible in FIG. 4. These springs 55 are constituted by a metallic wire wound around the first axis 50, the first of the ends of which is fixed to the jaw 53, whereas the other is pressed against a lug 56 of the pedal 52.

The springs 55 serve to provide the energy that is necessary for automatically fitting the boot in the ski binding. Indeed, when the user positions his foot, fitted within a ski boot, in the retaining device, he positions the front end of the boot, which bears the front end piece, in the sole clamp 44. Then, with a tilting movement, he positions the rear of the boot 20 in the heel piece 46, which is then in the arrangement shown in FIG. 4. The heel of the boot is positioned on the pedal 52 and exerts pressure thereon. It drives the jaw in its downward rotational movement. The energy accumulated in the springs 55 then has a dual function, viz., accentuating the pivoting movement of the jaw 53, on the one hand, and driving the lever 39 in an upward rotational movement, until a first stop 57 positioned on the lever comes in support against a second stop 58 of the jaw, on the other hand. The boot is then firmly retained between the sole clamp and the heel piece 46. As long as there is a mechanical engagement between the first stop 57 of the lever and the second stop 58 of the jaw, the step-in heel piece cannot be opened, regardless of the forces to which the retaining elements are subjected, i.e., regardless of the forces to which the skier's leg is subjected. To open the step-in heel piece and release the boot, it is necessary to tilt the lever 39 rearward, from the position that it occupies in FIG. 2, so as to mechanically disengage the lever and the jaw.

The safety release is carried out by means of a release device that is similar to the one shown in FIG. 1 and described above, and, therefore, is not described in further detail here.

FIG. 3 shows the embodiment of FIG. 2, after the boot 20 has been released and freed. To carry out the release, the actuating box 8 releases the rod 10, and the rear retaining element 3 can slide rearward. The actuating box 8 includes a rotatable motor, an electromagnet, or any other actuating mechanism. The functioning of the actuating box 8 is further described below. It is important to note that even after the retaining device has released, the step-in heel piece is still in the closed position. The boot was able to be released simply because the distance that separates it from the sole clamp has increased. In order to fit the boot again, the user must actuate the lever 39 to reset the step-in heel piece.

FIG. 5 shows another embodiment of the invention, which is different from the preceding embodiment in that the front retaining element comprises a front stirrup 33. The front stirrup 33 is made of a steel rod or wire bent at various points to define various sections. These sections include the retaining section 35 adapted to come in contact with the front end piece of the boot, as well as the pivoting sections 36 housed in a corresponding opening of the front base 37 of the front retaining element 2, so that the front stirrup 33 can pivot around the pivoting section 36.

The front stirrup 33 further includes flexibility sections 59, which are in contact with the sides of the front base 37.

As can be seen in FIG. 5a, the sides of the front base 37 include ramps 60 positioned on both sides of the normal positions of the flexibility sections 59, which are substantially vertical. Beyond and on this side of this normal position, the flexibility sections 59 can pivot slightly and slide on the ramps 60. The sliding of the flexibility sections 59 on the ramps imposes an elastic deformation of the stirrup. It is this deformation that provides the energy of the return movement of the stirrup to its normal vertical position.

FIGS. 6 and 7 show the actuating box 8 of the actuating mechanism in the “closed” position and in the “open” position, respectively.

The actuating mechanism includes a unit 13 receiving the various components of the actuating box 8. The unit 13 includes a longitudinal housing in which the rod 10 can penetrate. A vertical well receiving a release switch 14 is located at the end of this housing.

The release switch 14 is rotatable. Its upper portion includes a notch 15, and its lower portion includes a first toothed wheel 16.

The actuating mechanism of the release device is comprises a rotatable electric motor 17, the output shaft of which bears a second toothed wheel 18. The electric motor is powered by an electrical battery 19.

A cylindrical pin 21 is fixed at the end of the rod 10. In the closed position, the pin 21 is received in the notch 15 of the release switch 14.

The release device is shown in FIG. 6 in the “closed” position. In this position, the release switch 14 has an angular position, such that the pin 21 cannot escape from the notch 15. In this arrangement, and when the front and rear retaining elements are both in the “engaged” position, the boot is affixed to the gliding board. In fact, in this situation, the boot can be freed only when either or both of the front and rear retaining elements switch from the “engaged” position to the “free” position.

The front sensor 11, rear sensor 12, and actuating box 8 are operably connected to the control box 9. The front 11 and rear 12 sensors continually transmit the stresses to which they are subjected to the control box. The control box 9 processes this information and decides whether to release the boot by opening the release device 4.

As soon as the control box 9 decides that the situation requires releasing the boot, a command is sent to the motor 17, which begins to rotate. The rotation of the second toothed wheel 18 causes the rotation of the first toothed wheel 16, with which it is engaged. The release switch 14 makes a quarter of a turn and becomes in the position shown in FIG. 7, i.e., such that the notch is open in the direction of the rear retaining element 3. In this position, the pin 21 is no longer retained and can escape from the notch 15. The rear retaining element 3 is therefore free to slide rearward under the effect of the forces exerted on the boot, thereby freeing the boot from the retaining assembly and from the ski.

In order to fit the boot again, the user must reset the supplemental release device. To do so, he slides the rear retaining element 3 toward the front retaining element 2. The rod 10 is also moved translationally in the same direction, until the pin 21 becomes housed within the notch 15. At the moment the pin 21 is in the notch 15, the rod actuates a contactor 22 that is laterally positioned. The contactor 22 issues a new command to rotate the electric motor by a quarter of a turn, so that the release switch resumes the position shown in FIG. 6, i.e., the “closed” position.

FIGS. 8 and 9 show an actuating box 8 according to another embodiment of the invention. For reasons of simplicity, only elements that distinguish this embodiment over the first embodiment are described here.

The actuating box 8 includes a unit 13 that receives the various parts, in particular a carrier 23 slidable in a longitudinal direction. A plate 24 is mounted in the carrier and can rotate about a vertically oriented main axis 28. At the base of this plate 24 is located a first toothed wheel 16, not visible in FIGS. 8 and 9, as it is hidden by the plate 24 that has a larger diameter.

An electric motor 17 is also fixed in the carrier 23. It includes, on its vertically oriented output shaft, a second toothed wheel 18 that is engaged with the first toothed wheel 16. The motor is a rotatable actuator of the plate and, as described below, of the release device.

A first connecting rod 25 is fixed in a lower notch 26 provided in the plate 24. The first connecting rod 25 is rotatably mounted, by the first of its ends, about a first vertically oriented secondary axis 27. The second end of the first connecting rod 25 is fixed on the unit. Due to the rotation of the plate 24, the fastening point of the first connecting rod 25 moves about the main axis 28 by a distance equal to double the distance separating the main axis and the first secondary axis 27. This results in the carrier 23 sliding in the unit 13.

The plate also includes an upper notch 29. The first end of a second connecting rod 30 is rotatably mounted about a second secondary axis 31 in the upper notch 29.

The second secondary axis 31 is diametrically opposite the first secondary axis 27 in relation to the main axis.

The second end of the second connecting rod 30 is fixed to the rod 10 (not shown in FIGS. 8, 9), which, as in the preceding embodiment, is connected to the body of the rear retaining element.

The rotation of the plate 24, generated by the motor, causes the displacement of the first end of the second connecting rod by a distance equal to double the distance separating the main axis 28 from the second secondary axis 31.

The mechanism shown in FIG. 8 is in the “closed” position, i.e., when the rear retaining element is against the ski boot. In this position, the main axis 28, the first second axis 27, and the second secondary axis 31 are not precisely aligned. Indeed, the second secondary axis is slightly beyond the unstable position of equilibrium that it would have if these three axes were aligned. Given that the rear retaining element exerts a traction force on the second connecting rod through the rod 10, the plate 24 can remain in the arrangement shown in FIG. 4 only insofar as a stop 32, affixed to the plate, stops the rotation of the plate 24 when the latter is in contact with the second connecting rod 30.

When a release command is issued to the actuating box by the control box, the rotatable actuating mechanism of the release device, i.e., by the motor, rotates the plate 24 sufficiently, so that the plate goes beyond the unstable point of equilibrium constituted by the alignment of the three axes 27, 28, and 31. The plate 24 is then automatically driven rotationally by the traction exerted thereon by the rear retaining element via the rod 10 and the second connecting rod 30. At the end of this rotation, the device is in the configuration shown in FIG. 9, in which the three axes 27, 28, and 31 are aligned.

Due to such a device, the translational travel of the rear retaining element 3 is equal to double the distance separating the main axis from the first secondary axis, to which is added double the distance separating the main axis 28 from the second secondary axis 31.

Other actuating boxes 8 are within the scope of the invention.

The invention is not limited to the several embodiments that have been shown and described hereinabove by way of examples. For example, the supplemental release device can no longer act by translating the rear retaining element, but by causing it to pivot or, also by translating or pivoting the front retaining element. In addition, the supplemental release device can also be made to act on the front retaining device and on the rear retaining device.

LIST OF ELEMENTS

  • 1-gliding board
  • 2-front retaining element
  • 3-rear retaining element
  • 4-release device
  • 5-front interface element
  • 6-rear interface element
  • 7-guide rail
  • 8-actuating box
  • 9-control box
  • 10-rod
  • 11-front sensor
  • 12-rear sensor
  • 13-unit
  • 14-release switch
  • 15-notch
  • 16-first toothed wheel
  • 17-electric motor
  • 18-second toothed wheel
  • 19-electric battery
  • 20-boot
  • 21-pin
  • 22-contactor
  • 23-carrier
  • 24-plate
  • 25-first connecting rod
  • 26-lower notch
  • 27-first secondary axis
  • 28-main axis
  • 29-upper notch
  • 30-second connecting rod
  • 31-second secondary axis
  • 32-stop
  • 33-front stirrup
  • 34-rear stirrup
  • 35-retaining section
  • 36-pivoting section
  • 37-front base
  • 38-actuation section
  • 39-lever
  • 40-rear base
  • 41-heel
  • 42-actuating handle
  • 43-plate
  • 44-sole-clamp
  • 45-sliding support plate
  • 46-heel piece
  • 47-straddling element
  • 48-opening
  • 49-base
  • 50-first axis
  • 51-second axis
  • 52-pedal
  • 53-jaw
  • 54-third axis
  • 55-spring
  • 56-lug
  • 57-jaw stop
  • 58-lever stop
  • 59-flexibility sections
  • 60-ramp
  • 61-front end piece
  • 62-rear end piece
  • 63-binding screw
  • 64-elastomeric block